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DIY Shuffleboard

post #1 of 73
Thread Starter 
I recently finished building a 12' shuffleboard table for my basement bar. I didn't take a lot of pictures while I was building it because I really didn't think it would come out that good. But it came out pretty good after all, and most importantly it plays very well.
I put as much detail as I could remember into the description. It was pretty easy to build and its been a big hit with my friends. So if you've ever thought about building one, hopefully this helps:

http://www.davesspot.com/shuffleboard.htm
post #2 of 73
thats really great, Im almost done my theater soooooooo I think this will be the next project. I have one question for you, what is the depth of the cradle on the idside????? and about how far down in the cradle does your actual playing surface sit??? Do you have to use those levelers?????????
are they really necessary?????????
post #3 of 73
Thread Starter 
The crade is about 5 1/2" from the floor of it to the top of the trim. The bolts the rails sit on are 2 1/2" long. The top of the playing surface is about 3" off the floor of the cradle. So the top of the playing surface is about 2 1/2" from the top of the cradle.

You need some way to level it. If the table is not level by even a very small amount, you will know it when you're playing. A level playing surface is absolutely the most important part of the table. Using leveling feet on the leg is the conventional way to do it. But I couldn't find any that were big enough. Usually they are small and made for a table or something with skinny legs. But either technique should work.
post #4 of 73
where did you get the levelers?
post #5 of 73
And where did you get the pucks or whatever they're called? Do you use sand for the top or something else? I'm feeling a project coming on....
post #6 of 73
I have one more sanding and a spray coat of poly and Im done, i think its gonna turn out really well, id love to show you guys some pics but i have no idea how to post them
post #7 of 73
I'm going to bring this back from the dead because I'd love to see how these have turned out for those who built them.
post #8 of 73
I honestly cant believe that people would spend 3-4 grand on a board , I made mine fr way under 300. Everyone who sees it thinks its store bought, until they see the trim work (im horrible with a mitre saw)
But now i can use the money i had budgeted for a shuffle board and go upgrade my audio
post #9 of 73
I saw one today at Costco for $249. Didn't look too closely, and I'm guessing you get what you pay for, but you never know..
post #10 of 73
I think this is a great idea and am definitely considering building one. I'd like to make the top out of mdf but was wondering if it would be better to cut the mdf in strips and laminate them side to side like a butcher block. Then stagger the strips so you don't have 1 big seam in the middle of the bed (will get sagging over time I would imagine). Any ideas?
post #11 of 73
The reason for lamination is to reverse the ntural tendency of wood to warp/twist. As MDF is exceptionally stable, I would see no reason to do that. Putting support underneath where necessary would seem a better idea and a lot less work than trying to laminate dozens of MDF strips.

Other thoughts? This project is still on my list to do someday!
post #12 of 73
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Icedtea515 View Post

I think this is a great idea and am definitely considering building one. I'd like to make the top out of mdf but was wondering if it would be better to cut the mdf in strips and laminate them side to side like a butcher block. Then stagger the strips so you don't have 1 big seam in the middle of the bed (will get sagging over time I would imagine). Any ideas?

That's exactly what I did for my first attempt at the playing surface except I used particle board cut into 1.5" strips. I thought I could keep 1 side flat by keeping that side on the floor while i laminated the pieces together. But I was horribly wrong and it was far from perfect. Without a planer there wasn't much I could do. I tried using joint compound to level it all out, then I glued faux maple hardi-board on top. It looked pretty good. But it was like playing on top of a pipe. Not much fun. It was a ton of work and produced a trash can full of dust. I eventually cut it up, thew it out, and went back to the drawing board.
Here is a pic.

Don't worry about sagging at the seam. As long as its properly supported underneath it will be fine. Modern glues are incredibly strong.
post #13 of 73
dfc106, i was wondering how your table plays compared to the expensive tables, like the ones you play with at bars.
post #14 of 73
Thread Starter 
The speed and feel is about the same, aside from the smaller scale. That's controlled by the powder wax, though. It can be as slow or fast as you like. I use Sun Glo speed 5. That seems to be perfect for the size.

Other than that the only difference is that most 'real' tables are slightly concave. So if you slide a puck down the side it will go slightly towards the center. This is adjustable by the climatic adjusters. I don't know why this is desirable. But I prefer it flat anyway.
post #15 of 73
Looks great!
post #16 of 73
I am probably going to tackle this project after Christmas. There are 2 changes I am considering:

1) I may try a wood veneer on top of the MDF (maple), there is a 2'x8' veneer that seems like it would work. From what I read MDF is a great substrate for Veneer.

2) Maybe try to make the bolts adjustable from under the table. How often do you find your self having to make adjustments?

Looks great!
Matt
post #17 of 73
I am building an 8 foot table...how did you decide how big to make the number spaces and what size pucks are you using?
post #18 of 73
Quote:


1) I may try a wood veneer on top of the MDF (maple), there is a 2'x8' veneer that seems like it would work. From what I read MDF is a great substrate for Veneer.

Yes, but the maple veneer is incredibly thin. You may want to look for some thicker veneer so it doesn't wear through. Use paper-backed veneer (so the glue doesn't leak through). Also, use a good contact cement (oil based, NOT water based).
post #19 of 73
I am just completing my 9' shuffleboard project now. The craddle is made from 3/4" MDF and the frame is solid oak slotted to receive the 107" MDF platform, the legs are made from 2x4 pine covered with maple plywood and solid oak sides. The playing surface is 8' long x 15" wide select pine covered with a two part epoxy about 1/8" thick. The platform has a cross support underneath every 12", the legs bolt thru the MDF top and the table is extremely solid (and HEAVY) about 225LBS! The finished table is 108" Long x 25" wide and the playing surface will be about 31" from the floor. I have posted 3 pics and will post more when I am finished.
LL
LL
LL
post #20 of 73
Is this ripped pine, jointed together for the top? How did you get it flat and smooth?
post #21 of 73
aaa
post #22 of 73
The playing surface is made up from 20- 1"x 2"x 8' "select pine" boards I purchased from Home Depot, glued together as carefully as possible and then planed and sanded smooth. I coated it with envirotex lite 2 part pour on poly and it is baby butt smooth and flat! It was a lot of work to make the playing surface this way and worth every bit of the effort!
post #23 of 73
I've done a lot of handy work, but most of it didn't involve a lot of detail like this project would, although I'm fairly confident I could do it. I was thinking of doing something a little different than anyone else has. I was wondering what those who have done the project think as well as any expert woodworkers.

Here is what I got.

What I was thinking about doing for the playing surface was having a mdf base (probably 1/2") and then laying 1" x 2" x 8' choice pine on the top, using the 1" side to add to the thickness and using the 2" side for the width across the table. The 8' would obviously be for the length. I was thinking that doing it this way, the mdf base, if set up right, would provide a flat square base to start laying the pine on. The pine would make the surface more rigid as well as having the traditional shuffleboard look. Any thoughts?
post #24 of 73
Well I'm starting a new project the Shuffleboard table! Please send me your ideas for the playing surface!
post #25 of 73
I think I am going to take on this project also, what do you think about using the described mdf then attaching 2.5 inch hardwood flooring from the bottom as the plaing surface? Put some thick layers of poly over the flooring to seal it as well as fill in any seams. Would this be too affected by humidity?
post #26 of 73
Has anyone tried using plexiglass as a surface...?
post #27 of 73
sorry for the late posting I have been real busy!
update to my shuffleboard project:
I found that building a "dam" for the resin to "level" in was a mistake, it created a ridge that i had to sand to remove. It was like having a "bumper" to keep the pucks on the table. Lesson learned. I have since remodeled my messy garage and finally built a complete woodshop (Ka ching $$$) and have now embarked on building custom shuffleboard tables. I have refined all my processes and documented all my designs (being a retired mechanical engineer thats what we do!) so now i am off and running building my first production shuffleboard table. I will post pics of it as soon as I am able. in the mean time here are a couple of my final prototype table which plays great and has stayed consistant and level since i finished it in January.

As far as using anything other than hardwood laminated together for a playing surface, I personally would rather spend the extra money and time and make it to last and be consistant than to save time and money and end up with a less than good playing surface. I built my first surface using 1x2 home depot select pine figuring i would toss it after refining the processes needed but it is still true and straight because I used 12 pipe clamps to glue it up on a level surface and then planed it smooth and then on a VERY level surface covered it with envirotex 2 part poly resin and I have climate adjustment on the cradle to keep it that way.
LL
LL
LL
post #28 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by mercert View Post

sorry for the late posting I have been real busy!
update to my shuffleboard project:
I found that building a "dam" for the resin to "level" in was a mistake, it created a ridge that i had to sand to remove. It was like having a "bumper" to keep the pucks on the table. Lesson learned. I have since remodeled my messy garage and finally built a complete woodshop (Ka ching $$$) and have now embarked on building custom shuffleboard tables. I have refined all my processes and documented all my designs (being a retired mechanical engineer thats what we do!) so now i am off and running building my first production shuffleboard table. I will post pics of it as soon as I am able. in the mean time here are a couple of my final prototype table which plays great and has stayed consistant and level since i finished it in January.

As far as using anything other than hardwood laminated together for a playing surface, I personally would rather spend the extra money and time and make it to last and be consistant than to save time and money and end up with a less than good playing surface. I built my first surface using 1x2 home depot select pine figuring i would toss it after refining the processes needed but it is still true and straight because I used 12 pipe clamps to glue it up on a level surface and then planed it smooth and then on a VERY level surface covered it with envirotex 2 part poly resin and I have climate adjustment on the cradle to keep it that way.

that's really a great job!
post #29 of 73
Here is what I have. Its a homemade board. Playing surface is 11' x 2' of solid maple 3" thick. Yes, it is heavy! The cabinet is oak. I painted the curling rings myself as we are avid curlers and this setup also plays the standard shuffle game using the lines on the board. Felt covered bumpers were added using rubber from an old pool table. It turned out quite nice and plays great.



post #30 of 73
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slew View Post

Here is what I have. Its a homemade board. Playing surface is 11' x 2' of solid maple 3" thick.

What a great looking table! Thanks for the pics...

Can you tell us more about your surcace? I was thinking of the "dam" method but am concerned about mercert's "ridge".

What did you end up coating yours with? How did you apply it?
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