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Anthem D2/D2v/AVM50/AVM50v/ARC1 tweaking guide - Page 108

post #3211 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

I'd be more surprised if you said that you thought the Toshiba solution was better than what the Anthem could do with input from an Oppo 970.

Anyway that's my story and I'm sticking to it.
--Bob

I don't know about any Oppo.

I don't have one.
post #3212 of 42686
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Well if it is that noticeable, I'd say there is something wrong with the DVI input on the Ruby. I could think of a number of things the Ruby might be doing to screw up here, but this is the first I'd heard anyone had image quality issues with the Ruby's DVI input.

Sadly Bob, William Phelps himself did confirmed the fact that the DVI connection on the Ruby was less sharp then the HDMI connection. So you have to pick your poison. Less sharp but judder-free over DVI, or more sharp but at 1080p60 over HDMI. Pearl owners can have the best of both worlds.

But! We are really splitting hair in 4 here. The difference insharpness is really small between the DVI and HDMI connection on the Ruby, almost insignificant. I'm sure alot of people wouldn't notice it if we didn't told them there was a difference between the 2 inputs.

But AVSers are more picky (has we can clearly see in this thread! ), and some will be bothered by the smallest thing. Alot of people on AVS are using the Ruby at 1080p48 over the DVI connection with external scalers and are really happy with the results, and are not bothered at all by the "less sharp" picture.

And we can also agree that alot of people are used to judder (we were raised looking at it every day on TV...) and don't even realized what it is until they see the other way around. And even then, some are more annoyed by judder then others, who don't see the "big" difference at all...
post #3213 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by LEVESQUE View Post

Sadly Bob, William Phelps himself did confirmed the fact that the DVI connection on the Ruby was less sharp then the HDMI connection. So you have to pick your poison. Less sharp but judder-free over DVI, or more sharp but at 1080p60 over HDMI. Pearl owners can have the best of both worlds.

But! We are really splitting hair in 4 here. The difference insharpness is really small between the DVI and HDMI connection on the Ruby, almost insignificant. I'm sure alot of people wouldn't notice it if we didn't told them there was a difference between the 2 inputs.

Any idea what they screwed up on the DVI side? This is really odd. If I wanted to set out to do this on purpose I'm not sure I'd find a way.
--Bob
post #3214 of 42686
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Any idea what they screwed up on the DVI side? This is really odd. If I wanted to set out to do this on purpose I'm not sure I'd find a way.
--Bob

I know and I totally agree. But who am I to argue with William Phelps? William is a reference.
post #3215 of 42686
Can the AVM50 be uses for Constant Height Application? I have a Mitsu hc5000 and the AVM50. Can this combo work?
post #3216 of 42686
DVI so RGB. That's what saved me from the "Green screen of terror" first time out around the block.
post #3217 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by LEVESQUE View Post

The difference insharpness is really small between the DVI and HDMI connection on the Ruby, almost insignificant. I'm sure alot of people wouldn't notice it if we didn't told them there was a difference between the 2 inputs.

In my theater it was like going back to my CRT displays at 1080i.

I would not call that insignificant.
post #3218 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by abc999 View Post

Can the AVM50 be uses for Constant Height Application? I have a Mitsu hc5000 and the AVM50. Can this combo work?

I haven't looked into that. What do you need the AVM-50 to do to support this?
--Bob
post #3219 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by LEVESQUE View Post

.

Alain -- Did you pick up your Pioneer Yet?
post #3220 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Can you describe the difference?

As I understand it you are saying 4:4:4 is better than 4:2:2 with your display. Remind me, what's your display? Do you happen to know if it is spec'ed to accept 10 bit or 12 bit samples via HDMI 4:2:2? If it only accepts 8 bit samples, then 4:4:4 is surely the way to go.
--Bob


I have a Panasonic PT-AE900U, the colors are slightly more defined and the blacks are marginally blacker. For instance, there is a scene in Flyying Dagger when the blind girl is dancing in a room while the cheif is throwing beans at her the colors of that room are richer and more vibrant. Not sure if it accepts 8,10 or 12, I ll have to research it some.
post #3221 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

....The video side of the D2 has one acknowledged weakness. Its noise reduction is not quite as powerful as the best such solutions out there. This is relevant if you watch a lot of crappy TV signals -- weak off air broadcasts for example. It is not an issue for video of normal to good quality such as is typically found on discs. Lest you get too concerned at this, I should point out that most people use their D2 with video noise reduction turned off anyway (which is also the factory default setting), i.e., they don't need it at all, much less need a more powerful version of it.

--Bob

Noise reduction can be an important feature. It's an especially important feature if it can reduce noise ... without softening the picture. I know that ability is limited to a very few processors. Video noise can greatly affect my enjoyment of a film or a program. This is one of my concerns with owning a larger display. The larger the display the more obvious the artifacts.

My experience is that there are compression artifacts from limited bandwidth, which is most noticeable in Cable or Satellite broadcasts, and there are deinterlacing artifacts which result from poor deinterlacing in DVD players, satellite and cable STBs.

Mosquito noise and Blocking artifacts (macroblocking) are the result.

When you say that the D2 has a weakness in "noise reduction", I'm assuming you mean "noise" that results from limited bandwidth (compression artifacts) and not noise that results from poor deinterlacing. My understanding is that the D2 uses motion adaptive deinterlacing which eliminates deinterlacing artifacts.

I significantly upgraded my system about 4 years ago, except that I keep an inferior progressive scan JVC DVD player. As my viewing became more critical, I noticed artifacts (noise) when watching certain DVDs. In "Monsters INC." I noticed noise around the hinges of a bathroom door and at the edges of the monsters fur. I replaced the JVC with the Pioneer 59 avi and immediately noticed that almost all the noise disappeared.

I'm guessing this was a result of the better deinterlacer in the Pioneer. I'm also guessing that the D2 will eliminate this kind of noise in a 480i signal sent over HDMI by the OPPO through the D2 to any display.

I'm also guessing, from what you said, that the D2 is no "Mosquito" when it comes to eliminating compression artifacts. So I shouldn't expect *video noise* from over-compressed satellite, cable or OTA signals to be eliminated ... or even reduced? ... by the D2?

If I want that, I would also need to buy a "Mosquito"? Thanks.
post #3222 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOBE View Post

Noise reduction can be an important feature. It's an especially important feature if it can reduce noise ... without softening the picture. I know that ability is limited to a very few processors. Video noise can greatly affect my enjoyment of a film or a program. This is one of my concerns with owning a larger display. The larger the display the more obvious the artifacts.

My experience is that there are compression artifacts from limited bandwidth, which is most noticeable in Cable or Satellite broadcasts, and there are deinterlacing artifacts which result from poor deinterlacing in DVD players, satellite and cable STBs.

Mosquito noise and Blocking artifacts (macroblocking) are the result.

When you say that the D2 has a weakness in "noise reduction", I'm assuming you mean "noise" that results from limited bandwidth (compression artifacts) and not noise that results from poor deinterlacing. My understanding is that the D2 uses motion adaptive deinterlacing which eliminates deinterlacing artifacts.

I significantly upgraded my system about 4 years ago, except that I keep an inferior progressive scan JVC DVD player. As my viewing became more critical, I noticed artifacts (noise) when watching certain DVDs. In "Monsters INC." I noticed noise around the hinges of a bathroom door and at the edges of the monsters fur. I replaced the JVC with the Pioneer 59 avi and immediately noticed that almost all the noise disappeared.

I'm guessing this was a result of the better deinterlacer in the Pioneer. I'm also guessing that the D2 will eliminate this kind of noise in a 480i signal sent over HDMI by the OPPO through the D2 to any display.

I'm also guessing, from what you said, that the D2 is no "Mosquito" when it comes to eliminating compression artifacts. So I shouldn't expect *video noise* from over-compressed satellite, cable or OTA signals to be eliminated ... or even reduced? ... by the D2?

If I want that, I would also need to buy a "Mosquito"? Thanks.

The noise reduction I'm talking about is typical analog TV broadcast noise. See the HQV test disc for more info. The Realta stuff is the champ at reducing this right now. The D2's Gennum stuff tackles it about half as well.

If your TV provider is treating you to a lot of compression noise (think DirecTV) the Mosquito would be well worth looking into. It fills a very special niche.

You won't have any de-interlacing artifacts to worry about if you let the D2 do all your de-interlacing.
--Bob
post #3223 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

I haven't looked into that. What do you need the AVM-50 to do to support this?
--Bob

I think it is called horizontal stretch wherein a 2.35 movie will fill the whole 16:9 area of the display device LCD (in my case) making the image taller. Then using an anamorphic lens in front of the display's lens assembly stretching it back horizontally to correct the the image. Those with this setup claims that it increases brightness by 20% and maybe around 30% in resolution since you use the whole 1080x1920 pixel area of the device.

This is what I understand, I might be wrong.

Alvin
post #3224 of 42686
If I were to purchase a new display for use with my AVM50, what do you folks recommend? I am looking for 55" to 60" panel or rear projection capable of 1080p. I've been considering Panasonics plasma or Sony's SXRD.

Thanks,
post #3225 of 42686
Thread Starter 
DOBE.

You can always buy the Algolith Flea if you want powerful noise reduction. But with DVDs, HD-DVDs and Blu-rays, you don't want to use NR. But with satellite or cable, then NR can be useful.

drhankz

When I said "insignificant", it was for Joe-6-pack out there. AVSers are really picky and more concerned with PQ, so alot of us are bothered by that phenomena, like you and me.

And yes I got my new Pio yesterday, but I'm not home for 4 days, so I will not be able to play with it until wednesday.
post #3226 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by LEVESQUE View Post

drhankz

When I said "insignificant", it was for Joe-6-pack out there. AVSers are really picky and more concerned with PQ, so alot of us are bothered by that phenomena, like you and me.

And yes I got my new Pio yesterday, but I'm not home for 4 days, so I will not be able to play with it until wednesday.

Thanks for the Complement Alain.

Oh Dear 4 DAYS? The suspense must be killing you.

I'm very happy I WAITED for the Pioneer!

See you in Las Vegas [GRIN]! I'm leaving Friday!
post #3227 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

I haven't looked into that. What do you need the AVM-50 to do to support this? (2:35 Constant Height Screen)
--Bob

Here is a link to the best place on this forum that explains it, with many links to other good places. I am planning to do this as well.

2:35 Constant Height FAQ's

Simply put, if your DVD player or your projector will not do the "vertical stretch" or zoom (or whatever your device calls it), then you need a scaler to do it for you.
post #3228 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

The noise reduction I'm talking about is typical analog TV broadcast noise. See the HQV test disc for more info. The Realta stuff is the champ at reducing this right now. The D2's Gennum stuff tackles it about half as well.

If your TV provider is treating you to a lot of compression noise (think DirecTV) the Mosquito would be well worth looking into. It fills a very special niche.

You won't have any de-interlacing artifacts to worry about if you let the D2 do all your de-interlacing.
--Bob

Good guess. Yes I have Direct TV. Although at least they are all digital. Where I live Comcast cable is still mostly analog, although they are in the process of converting. Cable also has compression artifacts.

D* is slowly converting to MPEG 4 compression. I don't know if this will increase or decrease the compression artifacts. I watch as many programs as I can OTA, which greatly reduces the compression artifacts.

I was hoping the D2 would help to eliminate the compression artifacts

Quote:
Originally Posted by LEVESQUE View Post

DOBE.

You can always buy the Algolith Flea if you want powerful noise reduction. But with DVDs, HD-DVDs and Blu-rays, you don't want to use NR. But with satellite or cable, then NR can be useful.

Yeah the Flea is cute. it looks like a little R2D2.
post #3229 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemark81 View Post

If I were to purchase a new display for use with my AVM50, what do you folks recommend? I am looking for 55" to 60" panel or rear projection capable of 1080p. I've been considering Panasonics plasma or Sony's SXRD.

Thanks,

The choice for me was always between the 70" SXRD and the 65" Panasonic plasma. I decided to go with the Pannny because I'm sensitive to the Silk Screen Effect (SSE) and the picture still looks projected and a little soft (by comparison) ... although much less than with RPTVs of the past. I like the close to virtual reality look of a plasma, but that's me.

I think these guys will probably tell you that the AVM50/D2 will work equally well with either display.
post #3230 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlbrand View Post

Here is a link to the best place on this forum that explains it, with many links to other good places. I am planning to do this as well.

2:35 Constant Height FAQ's

Simply put, if your DVD player or your projector will not do the "vertical stretch" or zoom (or whatever your device calls it), then you need a scaler to do it for you.

OK, well I'm not really sure I have a handle on this yet, but I *THINK* what you want to do here can be handled with the "Crop Input" function in the Anthem's Video Source Adjust menu.

This function has two built-in styles of cropping, but also provides for the user to enter a completely custom cropping. I believe if you simply crop the content to 2.35:1 the scaler will do the rest. However you may also need to manually set the horizontal and vertical sizing using the "No Scale" function of the "Scale Output" function in that same menu.

This is all just a guess. Someone who actually has such a setup is going to have to dig into this for us.

I do note, however, that the referenced links state that all Gennum based processors can do this.
--Bob
post #3231 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOBE View Post

The choice for me was always between the 70" SXRD and the 65" Panasonic plasma. I decided to go with the Pannny because I'm sensitive to the Silk Screen Effect (SSE) and the picture still looks projected and a little soft (by comparison) ... although much less than with RPTVs of the past. I like the close to virtual reality look of a plasma, but that's me.

I think these guys will probably tell you that the AVM50/D2 will work equally well with either display.

Sure, it will work fine with either display.

Personally I prefer flat panels. I hate worrying about whether my projection geometry is still perfect just because I've moved the cabinet.

Right now I'm most intrigued by the Pioneer Elite FHD-1, but that's smaller than requested. However I'm not actually in the market for a new display at the moment so I really haven't dug into this stuff that much.

I suspect my next display will be a flat panel with a native resolution of 1920x1080p, a refresh rate of 120Hz, and the ability to accept /24Hz, /48Hz, and /60Hz at that resolution over HDMI V1.1 (or higher but still compatible with V1.1) and "do the right thing" with it using at least 12 bit internal processsing and with exceptional black levels. If you find one, let me know. (grin!)

Meanwhile I also want an HD-DVD or Blue Ray player that's as good as the Oppo 970 for legacy formats. And world peace. And a pony....
--Bob
post #3232 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

....I suspect my next display will be a flat panel with a native resolution of 1920x1080p, a refresh rate of 120Hz, and the ability to accept /24Hz, /48Hz, and /60Hz at that resolution over HDMI V1.1 (or higher but still compatible with V1.1) and "do the right thing" with it using at least 12 bit internal processsing and with exceptional black levels. If you find one, let me know. (grin!)

Meanwhile I also want an HD-DVD or Blue Ray player that's as good as the Oppo 970 for legacy formats. And world peace. And a pony....
--Bob

If I were a betting man, I would put my money on you getting the pony first.
post #3233 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by LEVESQUE View Post

DOBE.

You can always buy the Algolith Flea if you want powerful noise reduction. But with DVDs, HD-DVDs and Blu-rays, you don't want to use NR. But with satellite or cable, then NR can be useful.

Understand that there is no free lunch with any of this noise reduction stuff. The damage has already been done to the image and all you can do is try to conceal it.

My current cable provider produces a surprisingly clean digital signal. Way better than DirecTV with their infamous "HD Lite" and their silly over-compression of SD channels. But you will still get SD content at times where the colors are washed out or the black levels are wrong. This is not so much noise as just mishandling and "generation loss" from too many copying stages. I don't try to fiddle with stuff to conceal that. If I like the program, I ignore it. Otherwise I change the channel.

I calibrate my setup for high quality content. That means that artifacts in poor quality content are actually more noticeable. So I curse TNT or whoever is broadcasting this crap and let the anticipation build for when I switch to a channel that takes more care.
--Bob
post #3234 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOBE View Post

D* is slowly converting to MPEG 4 compression. I don't know if this will increase or decrease the compression artifacts. I watch as many programs as I can OTA, which greatly reduces the compression artifacts. .

DirecTV's problem is lack of satellite capacity. The push to provide local station rebroadcast into local markets -- particularly HD locals -- to compete with cable really clobbered them. They can't launch the satellites fast enough.

So they "bit starve" HD (you don't really get 1080i or 720p into your receiver -- it's just scaled up to that by the crappy scaler in the satellite box before it's sent out towards your TV) and they "over compress" SD. When football season is on, and they have to free up even more HD capacity for sports package broadcasts, they even over compress HD. And whenever any satellite develops a problem, they shuffle things around and over compress even more. The worst DirecTV signals are really godawful.

But there's nothing fundamentally wrong with the technology. The BEST DirecTV signals are *PERFECT*. They really can send off air quality HD if they want to and the receivers all know to do the right thing with it. Remember that off air HD is also MPEG compressed. It's just that these days DirecTV never lets the signal get that good.

So they are trying to launch more satellites, and they are trying to switch from MPEG2 compression to MPEG4 compression. MPEG4 compression is a more clever algorithm that is capable of producing the same quality in a signal that consumes less bandwidth. With MPEG4 they can fit more stuff OR better quality into their limited satellites. Unfortunately the demand for more local channels will exceed their ability to launch new satellites for some time EVEN WITH MPEG4. So they are still going to be limited in the number of channels they can carry and the quality with which they can carry them.

As they launch more satellites, the combo of more satellite capacity and the extra efficiency of MPEG4 compression should result in more channels at higher quality. But the emphasis will be on more channels (channels you won't be able to receive) until they cover ALL the local markets with local into local service. So if your local market is already served this way, you are not likely to see any significant improvement in DirecTV channel-count or quality for a couple more years.

I suggest you lean on Comcast to improve their service faster.
--Bob
post #3235 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

....So they "bit starve" HD (you don't really get 1080i or 720p into your receiver -- it's just scaled up to that by the crappy scaler in the satellite box before it's sent out towards your TV) and they "over compress" SD....

But there's nothing fundamentally wrong with the technology. The BEST DirecTV signals are *PERFECT*. They really can send off air quality HD if they want to and the receivers all know to do the right thing with it. Remember that off air HD is also MPEG compressed. It's just that these days DirecTV never lets the signal get that good....

As they launch more satellites, the combo of more satellite capacity and the extra efficiency of MPEG4 compression should result in more channels at higher quality. But the emphasis will be on more channels (channels you won't be able to receive) until they cover ALL the local markets with local into local service. So if your local market is already served this way, you are not likely to see any significant improvement in DirecTV channel-count or quality for a couple more years.

I suggest you lean on Comcast to improve their service faster.
--Bob

At the moment, I don't use D*'s STB. I have a Sony HD 300 STB ($800 when purcahsed) paired with the 50" Fujitsu. The HD and SD quality is fairly good.

I'm hoping that sending all channels at native resolution out of the HD300 and into the D2 will improve the PQ even more. I'm sure it won't make it worse.

My current plan is buy the HR20, which is D*'s. I hope it's not "crappy". I was going to buy the S3 TIVO, but Comcast in Sacramento (also known as Comcrap on the boards) is way behind the curve.

As I said, it's still mostly SD and they only offer about 5 channels in HD, besides the premiums.

I'm thinking that although the $800 S3 Tivo probably has a better scaler, if I'm sending a native signal into the D2, the extra money put into the S3 scaler/processor (Vs the HR20) will be wasted. No?

My understanding is cable has its own terrestrial limited bandwidth problems. Also D* claims that they will be offering 20 new HD (MPEG4) channels by this time next year. Do I believe them? If they're offered will they be HD lite?

All I know is that with a larger display 65" Vs 50", I will see the difference for better or worse. That's one of the reasons for the D2.
post #3236 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOBE View Post

At the moment, I don't use D*'s STB. I have a Sony HD 300 STB ($800 when purcahsed) paired with the 50" Fujitsu. The HD and SD quality is fairly good.

I'm hoping that sending all channels at native resolution out of the HD300 and into the D2 will improve the PQ even more. I'm sure it won't make it worse.

My current plan is buy the HR20, which is D*'s. I hope it's not "crappy". I was going to buy the S3 TIVO, but Comcast in Sacramento (also known as Comcrap on the boards) is way behind the curve.

As I said, it's still mostly SD and they only offer about 5 channels in HD, besides the premiums.

I'm thinking that although the $800 S3 Tivo probably has a better scaler, if I'm sending a native signal into the D2, the extra money put into the S3 scaler/processor (Vs the HR20) will be wasted. No?

My understanding is cable has its own terrestrial limited bandwidth problems. Also D* claims that they will be offering 20 new HD (MPEG4) channels by this time next year. Do I believe them? If they're offered will they be HD lite?

All I know is that with a larger display 65" Vs 50", I will see the difference for better or worse. That's one of the reasons for the D2.

OK a lot of stuff here. First of all I doubt you'll get 20 new national HD feeds from DirecTV because there aren't that many. Some will be premium channels. Some channels will be local rebroadcast. Some will be sports packagaes. Some will be the same channel in East and West coast versions and you'll only be allowed to actually watch one or the other. DirecTV uses "new math" in counting its channels. Mind you the cable guys do the same thing. My cable service offers the same HD channel on 2 different channel numbers and counts it as two channels.

Second, they will most likely either be HD-lite or delayed in showing up. DirecTV still has to launch some more birds. What's happening right now is that they are pushing MPEG4 fast, and that is freeing up some capacity on the existing birds.

Third you *CAN'T* feed a native HD-lite signal to the D2 because the DirecTV receiver doesn't make it available to you. So if a given, bit-starved, 1080i HD-lite channel actually comes in to your receiver at 1280x960i equivalent bandwidth, the satellite receiver will "scale" that up to 1920x1080i (i.e., reconstitute the "original" signal) before you can get your hands on it. So the quality of that proccess in the receiver becomes an issue. Although this is not precisely what happens with bit-starved signals, the best way to think of it is that the receiver de-interlaces, scales and re-interlaces. Yuck.

Now that said, the H20 is your best bet for DirecTV (as I understand it). The S3 plus a simpler satellite receiver will not gain you anything. The simpler receiver will still have to handle the HD-lite stuff before the S3 can get anything.

Set the H20 to "native" resolution output. This will be a big win for SD because you will get a true 480i signal (they don't bit starve SD since there aint enough bits to starve) and the D2's de-interlacing and scaling will take it from there. For HD you will get the HD-lite scaled up to the "original" 720p or 1080i by the H20 -- there's no way around that -- and the D2 will take it from there. This will be a win vs. setting the H20 to always send out either fixed 720p or 1080i no matter what you are watching.

Now for SD you will still see macro-blocking due to the over-compression DirecTV foists on you. This is not equally bad on all channels -- DirecTV tries to pick its enemies. It is worst on channels with lots of commercials and on local SD stations rebroadcast by DirecTV to you. You will also see it on animation channels due to large blocks of solid color that just show it up more. Some SD channels actually come through quite well in this regard. Unfortunately it does vary as D* needs to shuffle things around from time to time. The Friday and Saturday before football Sundays will see more damaged SD for example as that's when they re-jigger the transponders to carry the various football HD feeds.

For HD you will primarily see artifacts in areas of rapid motion. This is a combination of bit-starving and then re-scaling in the receiver and also some over-compression. Again this varies between channels and from time to time. Mark Cuban at HD-NET has a running battle with D* about what they do to his signal.

Now I don't want to make this sound too grim. You will see BETTER stuff through the D2 than you are getting now. SD will gain a lot. Although on channels with bad over compression that may just make the compression artifacts more noticeable, the good SD channels will definitely show improvement. In addition, the color space issues between SD and HD will be taken care of automatically by the D2. HD will be improved due to feeding both 720p and 1080i to the D2. The D2 will also enable you to better calibrate the levels for your HD feed. The result CAN BE very very good. But two days later you may find the same channel has been given the D* "touch". Record the same HD program on the same HD channel on different days on your H20 and you may very well see different quality when you compare them. And that's entirely due to what D* does to the signal since the H20 is merely recording the exact bitstream coming down from the bird.

-----------------------------------------------------------------

Cable providers that are still using mixed analog and digital systems often over-compress the digital channels to cram more digital channels into limited bandwidth.

Cable providers that have finally managed to eliminate their analog stuff don't have that problem (more or less) and the resulting digital signals can be excellent. For Comcast that means when they start offering the Motorola 3412 HD-DVR instead of the 6412 HD-DVR. The newer 3412 is digital-only while the 6412 is mixed analog and digital.

Have you considered moving? (grin!)

==============================================

I should add that even cable companies that over-compress the bulk of their digital SD channels typically have very good HD channels since that's their main point of competition.
--Bob
post #3237 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by rudolpht View Post

Incidentally pretty jazzed by the PS3 as a Blu-Ray player, and working out the IR remote programming now, ie using a PS2 IR receiver/remote off a USB->PS2 adapter. I was thinking of going the Pio Blu-Ray route and could dump the 59AVi in the process to free up an HDMI port, but for about a third of the cost (595 vs 1500 +tax and/or shipping) and the fact that I like my old 59 and can keep it set up consistently for SD & most music, I'll slum it with the PS3

I hate quoting my own verboseness, but here's a helpful link for folks trying to get a PS3 better integrated into your setup. The picture is simply stunning 1080p.

Remote Central PS3 Instruction

Now PLEASE Anthem add in the PCM 7.1 capability.
post #3238 of 42686
OK, I have been experiencing a great deal of audio glitches on the Anthem lately in switching between sources that use HDMI audio. It effectively dies (silences requiring sometimes at least one and sometimes two power cycles and minutes of family frustration.

Is there anything that can be done to "initialize" a PCM stream between devices????

Bob? Anyone?
post #3239 of 42686
rudolpht,
I can't recall anyone else reporting an HDMI audio problem like this here. Is this new? What audio sources are you switching between? Are you saying you get good HDMI video but the audio fails? Is this just upon switching inputs or does it happen in the middle of watching something?
--Bob
post #3240 of 42686
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

rudolpht,
I can't recall anyone else reporting an HDMI audio problem like this here. Is this new? What audio sources are you switching between? Are you saying you get good HDMI video but the audio fails? Is this just upon switching inputs or does it happen in the middle of watching something?
--Bob

Video typically remains fine, just the audio goes away. Switching between PS3, HD Tivo, and/or HD Moto DVR loses HDMI audio. Sometimes even within a device (but it's probably me not noticing the transition, from HD Tivo menu to live video. (The only resolution change is typically 720p Tivo menus to or from 1080i or 480i video, but it happens going from 1080i to 1080i also).

Thanks & HNY,
Tim
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