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Anthem D2/D2v/AVM50/AVM50v/ARC1 tweaking guide - Page 1380

post #41371 of 42717
Right ok. How does one use the grounding screw on the D2v? I guess it could be the Krell as it's in it's own wall plate not wired with the rest of the components which is why I bought the Thor CM90 module to eliminate/reduce any interference. As you mentioned this issue can take awhile to resolve so I will keep on trying but for now the buzzing is gone.

For interest sake here is the XLR configuration explained in the Krell manual:

The XLR pin configuration is described below:
Pin 1 Shield (ground)
Pin 2 Non-inverting (hot) (0°)
Pin 3 Inverting (cold) (180°)


I have sent the cable maker (Clink Cables) an e-mail asking if he made my cable to suit being used with the Krell. His workmanship is excellent and have been dealing with him for awhile now.
Edited by SimonNo10 - 8/17/13 at 1:16am
post #41372 of 42717
Sounds like exactly what the other poster has stated. You have a ground loop.
Obtain a digital voltmeter and test between your devices for an AC voltage reading above the ground potential. I would suspect one of your isolating AC devices is the culprit. Especially since you say you could hear the buzz slowly dying off as if a capacitor was slowly charging and assuming the AC voltage.
A process of elimination usually works out the best. I would probably try using unfiltered AC direct form your AC entrance panel/board as a first try. This would be a good starting point.
post #41373 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by thestewman View Post

Sounds like exactly what the other poster has stated. You have a ground loop.
Obtain a digital voltmeter and test between your devices for an AC voltage reading above the ground potential. I would suspect one of your isolating AC devices is the culprit. Especially since you say you could hear the buzz slowly dying off as if a capacitor was slowly charging and assuming the AC voltage.
A process of elimination usually works out the best. I would probably try using unfiltered AC direct form your AC entrance panel/board as a first try. This would be a good starting point.

Thanks for the advice. Yep this issue is really bothering me now as the buzzing has returned this morning after it went away last night but turned on just the amp and buzzing is there. Went to my local Bunnings and they didn't have a Multi Meter or Voltmeter but I know Dick Smith sell them but now I'm just thinking of getting my sparky to come over as he did the electric job and installed the new Meter box and put in the Thor CM-90 into the wall plate for the Krell. Otherwise I will wait until I receive the email for the Hum X device and see if that can rectify the issue and will be cheaper than getting an electrician over.

Can't believe this started with just installing the Antimode and removing and connecting a few XLR's. Makes no sense as the system has performed perfectly for over a year with no buzzing at all.
post #41374 of 42717
^ If you have a Ground Loop, it is actually quite common for the addition of a new device into the system to reveal it. That's simply because the new device completes a missing link in the Ground Loop path so that the garbage current can flow.

A Ground Loop is garbage current that flows between the devices in your setup along the shields of the cables that connect them, looking for a path back to ground so current can flow. The devices in that path don't even have to be ON -- they just have to be connected. You can stop the effect of the Ground Loop by breaking the circuit path in various ways, but that's just a stopgap measure, as the real cause of the problem still exists -- constantly seeking a DIFFERENT path to ground so garbage current can flow again. The REAL fix for a Ground Loop is to find the source of the garbage in the first place.

That can be a daunting task as you have to strip out connections and then reconnect devices in various, minimal combinations until you isolate the source.

Fortunately, the two most common sources for Ground Loop garbage are easy to identify.

The single most common source these days is garbage that comes into your system on the cable shield of a cable or satellite TV feed wire. Proving that's the culprit is easy. Just disconnect that feed wire where it comes out of the wall. If the hum/buzz goes away, then that's the culprit. Fix this by fixing the grounding where that feed line ENTERS your house.

The next most common source is due to having more than one power circuit feeding your set of equipment. If the power circuits are at different "ground potential" then Ground Loop current will flow between them. The power that comes into your house is "3 phase" power. Simply put, that means there are two different ways each circuit breaker can be attached to the incoming power. And breakers attached to the opposite rails will often have different ground potential. The way the typical circuit breaker box is laid out, breakers in the box directly above or below each other attach to the opposite rails. And if the electrician adding extra circuits to your home theater was not aware that your equipment cared about having everything at the same ground potential, you can see it would be quite easy for him to install the new breaker(s) on opposite rails. The fix is easy. Get him back in there and have him reposition the breakers in the breaker box.

To test whether THIS is the cause you need to temporarily power your equipment from the SAME wall power circuit. It helps if you can trim things down to the minimum number of devices that need to be plugged in (and connected to each other) to exhibit the problem. Even so, you may need to power things up one at at time to keep from popping the breaker -- particularly due to the draw of the power amps which should be turned on first.

If neither of those is the culprit, then a third possibility is that you have a faulty device in your theater which is presenting voltage on its chassis ground. There's no easy way to find the culprit -- you have to try connection combos in a logical manner. A device which is doing this needs to be repaired. It should not be allowing voltage to leak to its chassis.

Again, the NEW device you added which caused the problem to appear may not be the source AT ALL. It simply adds a critical additional connection combo which finally allows the garbage current from the REAL source to flow to ground.
--Bob
post #41375 of 42717
Thank you Bob for your post was very helpful and hope with that information on hand now I can get rid of this problem. I just can't understand with all that I have implemented and the money spent to prevent this type of thing happening, it's happening with just a simple thing as adding an Antimode into the chain and removing it. I wish now I never borrowed it for testing.

Just so your information I don't have cable or satellite tv, my system couldn't be more simple- Bluray player, Anthem,Projector and Amp all using XLR which is supposed to reduce interference than using RCA's pus the above mentioned electrical devices which again are supposed to eliminate these sort of things which leads me to believe it's either the Krell or the Anthem and my money is on the Anthem going by the endless issues I've had with these units.

So as I asked above is there something I can do with the grounding screw that's on the back of the D2v as mentioned by Macca? Also I can't use the same wall outlet with the Krell as it uses a 15amp plug as opposed to a 10amp which is why I have a 15amp wall plate and why I bought the Thor CM-90 filter module just for that plate. The Oppo and Anthem are plugged into the same wall outlet via the Throughbred board which on the main power board outside has this installed on that circuit:

http://www.rkcable.com.au/Clipsal970MF20.htm

Ok turned system on after getting home and buzzing is there. So with everything off except the Krell I pulled out the HDMI from the Oppo to the audio 1 on the anthem and buzzing stops. I put back in the HDMI into the Oppo buzzing starts and then I removed the power plug from the Oppo (unit is off and wall point is off) and buzzing stops. Put back in the power plug into the Oppo buzzing starts and I tried 2 other wall outlets and the buzzing remains.

Also turned on Anthem and Krell amp took out Right Front XLR from Anthem and if I hold the XLR with fingers on the end and touch the Oppo chassis the buzzing stops. If I touch the Krell while holding XLR the buzzing stops. Just turned off Krell removed the XLR's from amp turned on the rest of the system then connected XLR's back into the Krell turned it on and the buzzing is gone. I've done this before and it only lasts a short while but it's gone while I'm using the system but it will most likely come back when I turn on the amp only tomorrow morning.

Forgot to mention that the 2 Submersives are not currently connected as I've sent the amps off for a credit and upgrading to the HP+ amps for both, so after what you said Macca about your Cats I wonder if the Submersives were completing the ground of my system. Now that there out and the buzzing has come back seems too much of a coincidence.
Edited by SimonNo10 - 8/18/13 at 5:28am
post #41376 of 42717
i went through the entire exercise with my system
start at the amp with nothing connected and start working your way back 1 connection at a time
it may be a longer process if the buzzing doesn't start immediately (that is weird!)
note: the xlr connectors are for removing hum induced in the wire run, not for ground loops
as stated make sure for this test that all equipment is plugged into the same outlet
don't assume that there is just 1 problem
each ground loop found (if more than 1) might require a different solution

mark

i had a ground loop because of the cable connection, grounding the input to the house did not fix it (it should have) - a ground isolator on the incoming cable did
later i found that i had hot & neutral reversed on the outlet to the system, which was why grounding the cable didn't work
as Bob stated, find the source of the problem & correct it, rather than trying to fix the symptom in front of you
post #41377 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

For interest sake here is the XLR configuration explained in the Krell manual:

The XLR pin configuration is described below:
Pin 1 Shield (ground)
Pin 2 Non-inverting (hot) (0°)
Pin 3 Inverting (cold) (180°)


I have sent the cable maker (Clink Cables) an e-mail asking if he made my cable to suit being used with the Krell. His workmanship is excellent and have been dealing with him for awhile now.

In case he asks, that matches the XLR pin configuration of the Anthem (p.88 of the user manual).
post #41378 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

So as I asked above is there something I can do with the grounding screw that's on the back of the D2v as mentioned by Macca? Also I can't use the same wall outlet with the Krell as it uses a 15amp plug as opposed to a 10amp which is why I have a 15amp wall plate and why I bought the Thor CM-90 filter module just for that plate. The Oppo and Anthem are plugged into the same wall outlet via the Throughbred board which on the main power board outside has this installed on that circuit:

http://www.rkcable.com.au/Clipsal970MF20.htm

Ok turned system on after getting home and buzzing is there. So with everything off except the Krell I pulled out the HDMI from the Oppo to the audio 1 on the anthem and buzzing stops. I put back in the HDMI into the Oppo buzzing starts and then I removed the power plug from the Oppo (unit is off and wall point is off) and buzzing stops. Put back in the power plug into the Oppo buzzing starts and I tried 2 other wall outlets and the buzzing remains.

Also turned on Anthem and Krell amp took out Right Front XLR from Anthem and if I hold the XLR with fingers on the end and touch the Oppo chassis the buzzing stops. If I touch the Krell while holding XLR the buzzing stops. Just turned off Krell removed the XLR's from amp turned on the rest of the system then connected XLR's back into the Krell turned it on and the buzzing is gone. I've done this before and it only lasts a short while but it's gone while I'm using the system but it will most likely come back when I turn on the amp only tomorrow morning.

Forgot to mention that the 2 Submersives are not currently connected as I've sent the amps off for a credit and upgrading to the HP+ amps for both, so after what you said Macca about your Cats I wonder if the Submersives were completing the ground of my system. Now that there out and the buzzing has come back seems too much of a coincidence.

Right, makes sense. As someone already mentioned the Anthem is being grounded via interconnects to other components (XLR pin 1 to Krell and HDMI to Oppo) which are on different AC circuits. The problem is probably what Bob said about the Krell circuit and Oppo circuit being at different ground potentials. Breaking connection to either one is stopping the ground loop. If adding the subs to the system stops the buzzing there is a good chance that connecting the Anthem ground terminal to another chassis on that circuit (Oppo) will also stop the symptom. You might want to check with Anthem Tech Support on how to hook it up, if there's not enough info in the user manual. However the real solution is to have the electrician correct the AC circuit(s).
post #41379 of 42717
The Ground screw on the Anthem chassis is for attaching the ground wire from a turntable phono amp (very low voltage; needs extra care to assure ground is matched with that of the preamp). It won't help with your ground loop problem. Indeed, what is letting the garbage current flow is that you have so MANY ground connections between your devices over the cable shields of the interconnect cables.

That separate wall power for the amp is a likely culprit.

Attaching MORE devices to reduce the hum simply means you've created an alternate path for the garbage to flow which isn't being picked up by the audio circuits. It is NOT a fix. The fix is to find and eliminate the source of the garbage.

Ground Loop garbage current flow can have other effects as well such as video interference (looks like horizontal lines that scroll slowly upward). Now that you know you have a Ground Loop problem, fixing the source should be your goal, not just a bandaid solution like using a two prong cheater plug on the OPPO's three prong power cord. (Which, given your latest discovery, would likely also appear to "fix" the hum.)
--Bob
Edited by Bob Pariseau - 8/18/13 at 9:15am
post #41380 of 42717
I got my new mic from Anthem the Thursday. On Wednesday I decided to try to get rid the 40hz dip in my subs. Using 'quick measure' I did some some tweaking with positioning the subs and setting phase in the subs. I got the best QM reading by setting one sub's phase to 150* and leaving the other at 0*. The subs are both on the front wall facing into the room away from the corners, and fairly equidistant from the MLP. I wouldn't have thought changing the phase, especially to 150*, would make a positive difference, bit it seemed to. Any thoughts on this from you guys would be appreciated.
I then decided to do a new ARC run with the old mic so that I could compare it to the ARC run I did on Thursday after I got my new mic.
The first 3 images are the music charts and targets for the run with the old mic.




These next 2 pictures are the music chart and targets using the new mic.



Please notice a couple things.
First the huge dip at 11khz with the old mic is gone! biggrin.gif
There seems to be a bigger dip at 1-2khz with the new mic. I don't know why, unless its really there, and the old mic wasn't picking it up. ARC seems to be taking care of it.

Next, please notice the difference in the room gain for movie and music in the run with the new mic. The uploaded speaker levels were also different for movie sub (-0.5) and music sub (-1.5) in the Anthem setup menu.
In the run with the old mic I used Bob's method of making a 'same as movie' run and changing the speaker configuration by 'n'-ing out the unused speakers for music. The room gain is the same in with Bob's method, and the uploaded speaker levels were the same for movie and music subs.

Now ,since I made two separate runs for the ARC run with the new mic --one for a 5.1/movie setup and a 2.1/music setup-- I can't guarantee that I positioned in exactly the same spots for the 5 different mic positions in each run, but I did my best to make them as close to the same positions as humanly possible.
The lower room gain for music and the reduced speaker level uploaded for the music sub are consistent with the many ARC runs I have made using separate movie/music runs. The room gain is always lower, usually 0.5db to 1.0db less. The music speaker level for the sub is consistently lower also, usually around 1.0db less.

In all the ARC runs I have done over the years (I'd guess at least 30 runs) I have always had these same findings--lower room gain and sub speaker level for music. I'm pretty sure if it were due to mic positioning that some time the movie/music room gain and sub speaker levels would have been reversed, with the music settings being higher than the movie's. But this has never happened.

Has anyone else had these findings when doing separate ARC runs for movie and music ?? Would anyone who uses different speaker setups for movies and music be willing to do separate movie/music runs the next time you run ARC and post your findings. It might not prove that there are different algorithms for movie and music in ARC, but there has to be some reason for the differences when doing separate runs.

Tom
post #41381 of 42717
I believe your Movie/Music differences are simply due to the different speaker count. ARC adjusts the volume trims to reduce the dips it has to fill (it being better to attenuate peaks). With higher Room Gain there are deeper dips. Meanwhile the Room Gain measurement has to account for the data from more speakers for your Movie.

I bet if you enabled all the speakers for Music but still did two passes, you'd get close to identical Movie and Music results.

And if you cut the number of speakers in Movie and Measured only those, you'd get a result that matches your Music.

I.E., this all seems to be "normal" to me.
--Bob
post #41382 of 42717
^
Your probably right, but why is there not a difference in room gain when you 'n' out speakers? Isn't ARC only using the active speakers to make the calculation? Why wouldn't that lower the room gain?
And why is the music sub speaker level always lower than the movie sub when doing a separate run for music? It seems that ARC is purposely lowering the bass level for music when a separate run is made. Its as if the developers of ARC prefer more bass for movies than for music.

I guess it really doesn't matter as long as it sounds good, and it does. Great actually. I might be deluding myself, but I do think I get a slightly better results making separate runs, and the time involved doing a 2.1 ARC run is negligible.

I guess to prove that there is a difference in ARC between movie and music I would have to make separate runs, but both with the same number of speakers, and see if there is a difference in room gain and uploaded sub speaker level, like you said. Maybe next time.

In the meantime I'll just enjoy.biggrin.gif

Tom
post #41383 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by tngiloy View Post

^
Your probably right, but why is there not a difference in room gain when you 'n' out speakers? Isn't ARC only using the active speakers to make the calculation? Why wouldn't that lower the room gain?
And why is the music sub speaker level always lower than the movie sub when doing a separate run for music? It seems that ARC is purposely lowering the bass level for music when a separate run is made. Its as if the developers of ARC prefer more bass for movies than for music.

I guess it really doesn't matter as long as it sounds good, and it does. Great actually. I might be deluding myself, but I do think I get a slightly better results making separate runs, and the time involved doing a 2.1 ARC run is negligible.

I guess to prove that there is a difference in ARC between movie and music I would have to make separate runs, but both with the same number of speakers, and see if there is a difference in room gain and uploaded sub speaker level, like you said. Maybe next time.

In the meantime I'll just enjoy.biggrin.gif

Tom

This may be the answer Tom

All Dolby Digital and DTS consumers and professionals 5.1 processors automatically add 10 dB to the LFE channel to restore the level balance between the main channels and the LFE channel as was originally heard in the studio.

http://www.genelec.com/faq/multichannel/102-in-a-dolby-digital-or-dts-51-system-should-subwoofer-level-be-aligned-up-or-down-by-10-db/
post #41384 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by tngiloy View Post

^
Your probably right, but why is there not a difference in room gain when you 'n' out speakers? Isn't ARC only using the active speakers to make the calculation? Why wouldn't that lower the room gain?
And why is the music sub speaker level always lower than the movie sub when doing a separate run for music? It seems that ARC is purposely lowering the bass level for music when a separate run is made. Its as if the developers of ARC prefer more bass for movies than for music.

I guess it really doesn't matter as long as it sounds good, and it does. Great actually. I might be deluding myself, but I do think I get a slightly better results making separate runs, and the time involved doing a 2.1 ARC run is negligible.

I guess to prove that there is a difference in ARC between movie and music I would have to make separate runs, but both with the same number of speakers, and see if there is a difference in room gain and uploaded sub speaker level, like you said. Maybe next time.

In the meantime I'll just enjoy.biggrin.gif

Tom

Because the Targets are built from the Measured data in the preliminary analysis. When you "n" out the speakers that's not redone. The only way Room Gain changes at that point is if you change it Manually.

Next time you do a Measurement pass, reverse Movie and Music. I.e., less speakers in Movie and more in Music. I think you'll find that the differences you've found reverse as well.
--Bob
post #41385 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by thestewman View Post

Check these items

That you Did Not set your sub as Super

That you Did Not set your other speakers to Large as this adds low frequency sound from other channels to the sub

That you Did Not select 2 subs in your setup

That you are using C weighted and slow response in your SPL meter

That you Did zero the SPL before starting


Then you need to exactly perform these steps, without skipping any, these guidelines, that I changed a little for clarity and updating,that were written originally by Bob P

Prior to running the ARC measurements, there is another step to do to get the test tone volumes correct:

Using your trusty Radio Shack SPL meter (on Slow Response and C weighting), go into Setup / Speaker Calibration.

Set the volume trim for the Front Left speaker and for the subwoofer both to 0dB.

Then set Noise sequence to Manual in the first line and scroll down to the TEST LEVEL line.
Adjust the Test level until your Front Left speaker is producing roughly 75dB as measured at your dead center listening position (ARC mic position #1 -- SPL meter pointing straight up).

Leave the volume trim setting for the Front Left speaker at 0dB, only adjust the Test Level line.

ETA: CAUTION -- Due to an apparent bug, the test tone volume produced by theTest Level line is affected by the volume set in the Left Front speaker line.
So do it as stated above: Set the Left Front line to 0dB and THEN adjust the Test Level line.]

Now scroll to the Subwoofer line.

Leave that line at 0dB

Adjust the volume knob on your subwoofer until it measures roughly 75dB at the same listening position.
There is no need to be super precise in these adjustment -- a ball park setting is sufficient.

ARC will use the Test Level settings you have just made to set the volume for its own test sweep tones.
The adjustment you have just made to your subwoofer's volume knob insures that it, too, will be level adjusted properly to match.

If you happen to have any other speakers with internally powered amps (i.e., with a volume control on them) do the same for them.

Back out of the Setup menu. Run the ARC application."

Let us know how it works out after you do this Test Level setup for ARC

Stew


Just wanted to tell you thanks. I tried this and ran ARC again and finally my sub has woken up!! Watched The Dark Knight Rises, which is one of the best sounding movies I`ve ever heard, and it sounded phenomenal. Best my system has sounded!! Thanks man.
post #41386 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Because the Targets are built from the Measured data in the preliminary analysis. When you "n" out the speakers that's not redone. The only way Room Gain changes at that point is if you change it Manually.

Next time you do a Measurement pass, reverse Movie and Music. I.e., less speakers in Movie and more in Music. I think you'll find that the differences you've found reverse as well.
--Bob

The more I thought about it the more I'm sure you're right. The findings would be reversed if using 2.1 for movie and 5.1 for music. Movie and Music are just A and B, or Fred and Ethel.

But the more I thought about it the more I think doing a separate movie and music ARC runs (if you use different speaker setups for movie and music) should be the suggested procedure. If there is measurable difference between a 5.1 and 2.1, or between 7.1 and 2.0 for that matter, then a separate run would seem to be advisable.
Doing the 'n' thing to remove speakers is easier, but if it not as accurate and does not get as accurate a ARC correction, then I'll continue to do separate movie/music runs. It takes just 50% more time to sweep 3 speakers at 5 positions after the original ARC 5.1 sweeps at 5 positions.

Tom
post #41387 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by tngiloy View Post

The more I thought about it the more I'm sure you're right. The findings would be reversed if using 2.1 for movie and 5.1 for music. Movie and Music are just A and B, or Fred and Ethel.

But the more I thought about it the more I think doing a separate movie and music ARC runs (if you use different speaker setups for movie and music) should be the suggested procedure. If there is measurable difference between a 5.1 and 2.1, or between 7.1 and 2.0 for that matter, then a separate run would seem to be advisable.
Doing the 'n' thing to remove speakers is easier, but if it not as accurate and does not get as accurate a ARC correction, then I'll continue to do separate movie/music runs. It takes just 50% more time to sweep 3 speakers at 5 positions after the original ARC 5.1 sweeps at 5 positions.

Tom

+1
post #41388 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by tngiloy View Post

The more I thought about it the more I'm sure you're right. The findings would be reversed if using 2.1 for movie and 5.1 for music. Movie and Music are just A and B, or Fred and Ethel.

But the more I thought about it the more I think doing a separate movie and music ARC runs (if you use different speaker setups for movie and music) should be the suggested procedure. If there is measurable difference between a 5.1 and 2.1, or between 7.1 and 2.0 for that matter, then a separate run would seem to be advisable.
Doing the 'n' thing to remove speakers is easier, but if it not as accurate and does not get as accurate a ARC correction, then I'll continue to do separate movie/music runs. It takes just 50% more time to sweep 3 speakers at 5 positions after the original ARC 5.1 sweeps at 5 positions.

Tom

Hi

I have found this also and always run the 2.1 music run for the difference in room gain and volumes. If you would like to be more accurate, I would suggest that you run the 10 point measurement positions, the more data the better when it comes to arc.

Regards
post #41389 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by AVfile View Post

In case he asks, that matches the XLR pin configuration of the Anthem (p.88 of the user manual).

Thanks for that. No real progress on the issue but once again the issue goes away if I unplug the XLR's from the Krell turn it off then on and it's gone but leave it overnight in standby with the rest of the equipment and it's back the next morning. I have sent text messages to my electrician asking for him to come over but nothing set as yet. The cable guy got back to me and has suggested like others to get a Multimeter and test the cables and explained how to do it.

Thanks again for all the assist and suggestions so far really appreciate it guys.
post #41390 of 42717
Cool.

I thought Nick @ Anthem said the ground screw could be used to effectively make it into a 3-pronged device, not just for a turntable.
post #41391 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

Thanks for that. No real progress on the issue but once again the issue goes away if I unplug the XLR's from the Krell turn it off then on and it's gone but leave it overnight in standby with the rest of the equipment and it's back the next morning. I have sent text messages to my electrician asking for him to come over but nothing set as yet. The cable guy got back to me and has suggested like others to get a Multimeter and test the cables and explained how to do it.

Thanks again for all the assist and suggestions so far really appreciate it guys.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AVfile View Post

Cool.

I thought Nick @ Anthem said the ground screw could be used to effectively make it into a 3-pronged device, not just for a turntable.

AVfile

Absolutely correct


Simon10

What you described above with touching the terminal or end of the disconnected XLR with your finger confirms what we have attempted to explain.
You essentially are grounding the end of the disconnected wire.

I recall someone else in Australia or New Zealand months ago on a different forum with the same devices,The Thor CM-90 and Hum X devices and having a hum problem.
Those must be popular with the electrical trades people..

As a first step you might try this. Connect one end of a wire #16 or #18 to the grounding screw of the D2v. Turn on all your other devices. Take the free end of thr wire and momentarily touch an unpainted bare metal area of your other units and see if the hum disappears. .

A next step would be to bypass the Thor CM-90 and Hum X devices completely as a test if the hum is corrected.
post #41392 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by thestewman View Post


AVfile

Absolutely correct


Simon10

What you described above with touching the terminal or end of the disconnected XLR with your finger confirms what we have attempted to explain.
You essentially are grounding the end of the disconnected wire.

I recall someone else in Australia or New Zealand months ago on a different forum with the same devices,The Thor CM-90 and Hum X devices and having a hum problem.
Those must be popular with the electrical trades people..

As a first step you might try this. Connect one end of a wire #16 or #18 to the grounding screw of the D2v. Turn on all your other devices. Take the free end of thr wire and momentarily touch an unpainted bare metal area of your other units and see if the hum disappears. .

A next step would be to bypass the Thor CM-90 and Hum X devices completely as a test if the hum is corrected.

Thanks for that. I'm not running a Hum X as the place got back to me saying there not sold here in Australia (the single plug version). I can't bypass the CM-90 as it's hard wired behind the wall plate and requires an electrician to install/uninstall. I'm assuming with the #16/#18 your referring to the gauge of the wire?
post #41393 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

Thanks for that. I'm not running a Hum X as the place got back to me saying there not sold here in Australia (the single plug version). I can't bypass the CM-90 as it's hard wired behind the wall plate and requires an electrician to install/uninstall. I'm assuming with the #16/#18 your referring to the gauge of the wire?

Yes, the gauge of the wire. It does not have to be a heavy gauge.

It would also be a another good test if you could plug all your devices into an AC outlet without the CM-90.
Not that the CM-90 is the cause but to get all the devices on one electric run as a test.
Maybe secure a heavy extension cord with a multi adapter to use temporarily.
The electrician may have wired the CM-90 to an opposite phase or inverted the pos/neutral.
I am not familiar with European 3 phase wiring.
post #41394 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by thestewman View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by thestewman View Post

And I find that is the problem.
So many Anthem owners voice complaints about a complicated audio video device and Anthem stonewalls most of them.
I have experienced several audio problems and some other defects and Anthem has never handled the tech service in a positive way.
Why are we as owners allowing this to occur ? If there was enough negative comments on this forum and on Facebook maybe Anthem would take a different stance.
The Anthem units are excellent complicated devices with some inherent defects that Anthem refuses or does does not want to address and when they take that stance we let them.
The normal Anthem response if you persist on addressing an issue that is not affecting a large number of users. Anthem will refuse to respond.

I encourage anyone with a defect to keep pressing them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Picasso Moon View Post

These are almost the identical problems I had with my D2v. The setup menu would almost always work after the unit it started up but after using the unit a while the menu will no longer display and the only way you could get it back was to restart. Also, after viewing my Roku 3 for a period of time when switching to my Tivo DVR hooked up via component there was no video display but the audio was fine. This would happen 100% of the time after viewing a 45 minute program on the Roku. Again, the only way I could ever get the video back for the Tivo was the restart the D2v.

So at least take a little comfort in knowing you aren't the only one who's had these issues.

Again I state. Don't let them off the hook this is unaceptable

And to make things more frustrating, if the setup menu screen decides to come back on and you exit THEN I get the dreaded 'Pink screen of Death'. My Plasma setup in RGB mode in the Anthem and Plasma control menu shows pink video! This shows up so far on my cable box input.

 

I have to force an HDMI handshake by toggling to another HDMI input and back and then it clears to normal video... Like others have said, I've communicated with Anthem on this issue and was never resolved as they couldn't duplicate it themselves( I guess). I gave up as well.

 

Sort of like if the only doctor/specialist in the country tells you there's nothing more he can do for your terminal illness ....

post #41395 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by thestewman View Post

Yes, the gauge of the wire. It does not have to be a heavy gauge.

It would also be a another good test if you could plug all your devices into an AC outlet without the CM-90.
Not that the CM-90 is the cause but to get all the devices on one electric run as a test.
Maybe secure a heavy extension cord with a multi adapter to use temporarily.
The electrician may have wired the CM-90 to an opposite phase or inverted the pos/neutral.
I am not familiar with European 3 phase wiring.

The Krell uses a 15amp wall outlet not 10amp which is standard for everything else that's why I can't run everything into one point for testing. My electrician is coming over next Tuesday at the earliest as his booked up until then and he is going to check the CM-90 he installed ( his apprentice did it) while he stood at the metre box and was testing the circuit, but that was in 2011 and before I got the whole meter box replaced by him with a new power line cable running from the street (from 30amps to 60amps). I was able to borrow a multimeter from my friend so I can start testing the wall outlets and the XLR cables.
Edited by SimonNo10 - 8/20/13 at 3:07pm
post #41396 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

The Krell uses a 15amp wall outlet not 10amp which is standard for everything else that's why I can't run everything into one point for testing. My electrician is coming over next Tuesday at the earliest as his booked up until then and he is going to check the CM-90 he installed ( his apprentice did it) while he stood at the metre box and was testing the circuit, but that was in 2011 and before I got the whole meter box replaced by him with a new power line cable running from the street (from 30amps to 60amps). I was able to borrow a multimeter from my friend so I can start testing the wall outlets and the XLR cables.

Did I read earlier that you only get this this buzz from 1 front speaker? In my experience with ground loop hum, it always occurs in both, not just 1 channel.
post #41397 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

The Krell uses a 15amp wall outlet not 10amp which is standard for everything else that's why I can't run everything into one point for testing. My electrician is coming over next Tuesday at the earliest as his booked up until then and he is going to check the CM-90 he installed ( his apprentice did it) while he stood at the metre box and was testing the circuit, but that was in 2011 and before I got the whole meter box replaced by him with a new power line cable running from the street (from 30amps to 60amps). I was able to borrow a multimeter from my friend so I can start testing the wall outlets and the XLR cables.

It is not the wall outlets you check other than having the electrician check for reversed phasing . Check each audio and video device from a bare metal spot on the device to ground and watch for a voltage reading. Check also between the devices.
post #41398 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by jo5507 View Post

Did I read earlier that you only get this this buzz from 1 front speaker? In my experience with ground loop hum, it always occurs in both, not just 1 channel.

No just the front right speaker only.
post #41399 of 42717
I think I've made a break through with the buzzing issue. I connected some wire to the grounding screw on the D2v and touched the positive speaker banana plug of the front right speaker on the Krell and the buzzing stopped straightaway. What does this mean? Is there an issue with that input on the power amp?

This was after touching the Oppo and nothing but as soon as I touched the speaker cable banana plug end of the front right speaker positive end (red) connected into the Krell it went away instantly.
post #41400 of 42717
Quote:
Originally Posted by SimonNo10 View Post

I think I've made a break through with the buzzing issue. I connected some wire to the grounding screw on the D2v and touched the positive speaker banana plug of the front right speaker on the Krell and the buzzing stopped straightaway. What does this mean? Is there an issue with that input on the power amp?

This was after touching the Oppo and nothing but as soon as I touched the speaker cable banana plug end of the front right speaker positive end (red) connected into the Krell it went away instantly.
Um, that's not a good idea......assuming the XLR's are still connected its likely the anthem chassis is grounding through the XLR's to the Krell's(and others) ground. So basically you just short circuited the Krell's right front speaker output......ie speaker output positive to ground(the negative speaker output is usually connected to ground internally).

Please don't go touching that grounded wire to any live positive terminals. The point of the exercise was to touch the chassis of other equipment.

Cheers
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