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LCD TVs: Market Price Stats Thread - Page 2

post #31 of 47
Companies like Westinghouse and Vizio have 52 inch models that have just recently hit the market. They will drive down prices big time, just like they did when they entered the 37,42 and 46 inch markets. Give it another few months when these and other brands start saturating the stores. That should be around the Christmas rush. By then some retailers will be selling these as loss leaders. The so called premium brands will have to follow suit. Should be fun
post #32 of 47
-From TWICE [This Week in Consumer Electronics], reported by Greg Tarr

10/22/07 - Analysts See Black Friday Flat-Panel TV Repeat

New York
Key analysts tracking the consumer television industry said that the notorious holiday promotional period known as Black Friday will again draw aggressive pricing activity this year, although some of that will be directed at different screen sizes, display technologies and a broader selection of brands than in 2006.

Hot segments to watch, they said, will be both LCD and plasma flat-panel models, in both 720p and 1080p resolution levels.

The hardest-hit segment will be rear-projection sets, which will have to contend with door-buster specials from big-screen plasma sets.

Most of the analysts queried by TWICE say they believe that plasma TVs in the 42-inch and 50-inch screen sizes will see the wildest ride, and some predict that heavy holiday promotions in the 50-inch 1080p plasma segment will go on to help the display technology fend off LCD TV advances in the larger screen sizes next year.

Black Friday 2006 signified a passing of the torch from plasma to LCD at 42-inch, said Sang Tang, HDTV research analyst with Current Analysis West, an NPD Group company. This year, expect plasma to turn the tables on LCD. Plasma will be very aggressive at 50-inches and will maintain a foothold on the high-end market. In other words, there won't be a flat-panel shakeout this year. LCD maintains its mass consumer appeal, while plasma takes the high-end market.

We expect to see healthy price reductions in plasma TVs from Q3 to Q4 as well as in 1080p LCD, as that is where supply is plentiful, and in the case of 1080p LCD and plasma, where margins are high, said Ross Young, president of DisplaySearch, a market research firm that is part of The NPD Group. We may also see some brands end the life of their 720p TVs and exclusively focus on 1080p, which could lead to some larger-than-usual [average selling price] declines in 720p.

Riddhi Patel, iSuppli TV systems principal analyst, said, The price war will be intense specifically at 40- to 42-inch levels. The competition will be not only between LCD and plasma but also between 40- and 42-inch LCD. Currently 42-inch LCDs are lower priced than the 40-inch LCDs. This is mainly because of the brand mix at each of these sizes.

Tamaryn Pratt, Quixel Research principal, said to expect significant price compression in 50-inch plasma (720p) on Black Friday.

For the top-tier brands we'll see that prices will fall to $1,299 to $1,399, minimally for Black Friday and regularly over the holidays at $1,599 to $1,699 depending on the feature set. Wider availability of larger-sized 40-inch-plus LCD TV is creating the majority of this price pressure, said Pratt.

She added that in 42-inch 720 plasma TVs a few manufacturers should pull out $799 or below specials, with top-tier prices for the category running around $999-$1,099 in the holiday season.

But huge volumes will be done in the 40- to 42-inch LCD TV segment, she said, where 1080p will be an important factor.

We can expect opening brands at $999 to $1,099 at 40- to 42-inch 1080p, all the way to $1,399 to $1,499 for opening 1080p at the same screen size, she forecasted.

DisplaySearch's Young also saw $799 for a 42-inch HD plasma TV with double-digit channel (brand and retailer) margins and $1,099 for a 50-inch HD plasma with single digit margins, as difference makers this year.

Riddhi Patel, iSuppli TV systems principal analyst, said to look for 42-inch LCD TVs at $999, 37-inch LCD TVs at $699, and 50-inch 720p plasmas at $1,199, all at 720p levels, as big holiday movers.

As for which brands to watch for the heaviest activity this year, Patel said heavy price promotions will again come from all manufacturer levels both first tier (premium) and value second- and third-tier brands.

At the low end, Black Friday door-busters are likely to come from the usual suspects Vizio, Westinghouse, Olevia, she said. At the high end, she looks for Sony, Samsung and others to compete.

DisplaySearch's Young said he expects at least some of the price-slashing activity to come from the manufacturers that control panel supplies Sony, Samsung, Sharp and Panasonic. LGE also has ample internal LCD and plasma capacity and can make some major moves, he said. Syntax, Westinghouse and Polaroid were very aggressive last year and are already at low prices, so I would expect them to be involved as well. In addition, with Vizio able to pass along savings from lower [warehouse] club channel margins to the consumer due to lack of channel conflicts, they should maintain very aggressive prices.

Pratt of Quixel said she has her eye this year on Sharp, which is going to continue its full court press in the 52-inch LCD-TV space. They have factory capacity behind them and this is the time for them to take advantage of it while the other brands catch up.

Samsung and Sony will also be significant in the 40- to 42- and 46 inch segments, Pratt added. Let's not forget Vizio they have the wall of orange at Costco as well as ad spots on ESPN, so expect them to be highly impactful again this year in both LCD TV and [plasma].

At the top, Panasonic and Samsung will continue to lord over the PDP category in sheer volume. Pioneer's new Kuro line also seems to be generating momentum, she observed.

Current Analysis West's Tang is picking Vizio, Westinghouse and Syntax to be the pace setters in opening price point LCD, while Panasonic will be very aggressive on the plasma side.

Toshiba will be somewhat of a wild card this year, he added. Since leaving the plasma market, Toshiba has been very price aggressive with their LCDs, and I expect them to continue this push into the holiday season.

As for the impact on rear projection microdisplay (MD) TV, which saw some Black Friday activity in 2006, the industry watchers said to watch out.

DisplaySearch's Young said: With 40-inch-plus flat-panel TV prices falling the fastest, MD RPTVs will need to discount at similar rates to keep up.

Pratt at Quixel warned, The aggressive plasma TV pricing activity will cause a ripple effect that could impact the microdisplay [rear-projection] TV category not pretty.

Tang at Current Analysis West said, LCD's screen size growth and price competitiveness have forced rear-projection TV and plasma to a more niche, high-end focus. In the high end market, 1080p was the value proposition RPTV offered over plasma.

With plasma increasing its focus on 1080p 50-inch-plus sets, and offering competitive prices with them, rear-projection TV will be significantly marginalized in the high-end market. Any performance-related or screen size reservations are easily offset by its 1080p, thin form factor appeal.

Tang said rear projection's salvation could come from a shift in focus to one that stresses sub-$1,000 price points. Either it does that, or it continues to try to compete against plasma in the high-end market, which, with its increased focus on 1080p, makes for a very difficult situation.


© 2007, Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All Rights Reserved.
post #33 of 47
I wasn't paying a lot attention of HDTV's last year during black friday but it seemed like the deals were on low end models (visio's, olevia's, etc) or mid range models (low end panasonics, samsungs, etc.)

That article seems to think all models will have prices slashed around black friday. I'm wondering what kind of "aggressive" pricing we'll see on models like XBR4's or Kuro's, if it even worth waiting a month.
post #34 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Warder45 View Post

I wasn't paying a lot attention of HDTV's last year during black friday but it seemed like the deals were on low end models (visio's, olevia's, etc) or mid range models (low end panasonics, samsungs, etc.)

That article seems to think all models will have prices slashed around black friday. I'm wondering what kind of "aggressive" pricing we'll see on models like XBR4's or Kuro's, if it even worth waiting a month.

I think on this sort of thing its worth waiting as long you possibly can.
post #35 of 47
I have been watching the prices on the new Toshiba and LG 52" lcds. I hope the 120htz are going for around $2200 by Christmass. Both have awesome pictures. They have fallen like a rock over the last few weeks.
post #36 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebduda View Post

I have been watching the prices on the new Toshiba and LG 52" lcds. I hope the 120htz are going for around $2200 by Christmass. Both have awesome pictures. They have fallen like a rock over the last few weeks.

I do not know what your viewing situation is like but I've noticed both on LG and Toshiba that the viewing angle is severely limited compared with Samsung and Sony LCD's and is also pretty bad compared with plasma's. Just FYI.
post #37 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by 6SpeedTA95 View Post

I do not know what your viewing situation is like but I've noticed both on LG and Toshiba that the viewing angle is severely limited compared with Samsung and Sony LCD's and is also pretty bad compared with plasma's. Just FYI.

I viewed them at the local BB. They were all hanging on the wall. I didn't notice any problem with viewing angles at all. One think I noticed with the Samsungs is the glare. It's a great picture but the glossy screen will just not cut it for me. Glare is a big issue for me since it will be going in a room with a lot of windows. In fact if you compare the Sony's to Toshiba, LG, Sharp they have a little more glare but nothing compared to Samsung. It was easy to compare the sets with the big Mercury vapor lights hanging overhead.
post #38 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by ebduda View Post

I viewed them at the local BB. They were all hanging on the wall. I didn't notice any problem with viewing angles at all. One think I noticed with the Samsungs is the glare. It's a great picture but the glossy screen will just not cut it for me. Glare is a big issue for me since it will be going in a room with a lot of windows. In fact if you compare the Sony's to Toshiba, LG, Sharp they have a little more glare but nothing compared to Samsung. It was easy to compare the sets with the big Mercury vapor lights hanging overhead.

Samsung has more than one model FYI.
post #39 of 47
Anything new in the 52" up has the glossy screen. BTW the new Olevia 52" can be bought at Target's web site for 2400. Alright more competition.
post #40 of 47
Westinghouse TX-52F480S hitting the online stores. This 52" will also help drive down prices. Westinghouse is usually very aggressive.
post #41 of 47
Thread Starter 
Thread Update (links go to original articles; see the end of my previous post for archived stories):

19 November 2007: LCD TV Q3 sales up 48 pct, plasma down 19 pct-study
post #42 of 47
Thread Starter 
Worldwide LCD panel shipments jump 41% in 2007, says Displaybank
23 January 2008

Shipments of large-size TFT LCD panels jumped by 41% from 2006 to 393.47 million units in 2007, and shipment area also soared by 57.4% to 5,276 million square meters (msqm), according to Displaybank.

Revenues also reached US$71.7 billion, up 35.7% from the previous year, buoyed by strong demand for large size panels and an increase in shipments. On the other hand, the average selling size (ASS) was 20.88-inches, breaking the 20-inch range for the first time, and this clearly highlights the migration toward large sizes in the TFT-LCD panel market.

Looking at market share by company in terms of shipment units, Taiwan-based AU Optronics (AUO) was the number one capturing a 20.5% share, maintaining its top position ahead of Samsung Electronics by canvas, while Samsung Electronics and LG.Philips LCD followed the leading player with a 20.3% share each. Taiwan's Chi Mei Optoelectronics (CMO) ranked fourth with a 12.7% share.

In terms of revenues, Samsung Electronics maintained its leading position following last year with a 22.9% share, followed by LG.Philips LCD at 20.9% in second place, and AU Optronics at 19.4%.

By application, shipments of monitor panels grew 35% on year to 184.16 million units, led by 19-inch and 22-inch widescreen models. Notebook panel shipments totaled 113.26 million units, surging 46% from the previous year, while LCD TV application shipments jumped by 53% on-year to 83.70 million units.
post #43 of 47
Thread Starter 
US market: Big screen 1080p LCD TVs were the big story in 2007, says Quixel Research
12 February 2008

Last year was the year that large screen LCD TVs took a giant leap forward in both units and revenues, according to Quixel Research. Sales for the 40- to 44-inch LCD TV segment saw sales increase almost 300% from 2006 to 2007, while the 45- to 49-inch LCD TV segment increased almost 400% for the same time period.

The 32-inch screen size will not be the sweet spot in the marketplace for much longer, Tamaryn Pratt, Quixel Research's Principal stated. As February capacity continues to increase, LCD TV unit sales of the 40-and 42-inch models will soon outpace 32-inch sales. In 2007, the combined unit sales of the 40- to 47-inch models already topped the 32-inch segment in unit sales, he added. This was great news for large screen manufacturers; because 1080p is so dominant in the screen sizes above 40-inch and value for the combined 40- to 47-inch models more than doubled the value for the 32-inch segment for the year, he stated. Full HD sales escalated swiftly in the fourth quarter when LCD TVs larger than 40-inches were three times as likely to be 1080p.

Overall unit sales for the LCD TV category were up 74% from 2006 to 2007 and up 39% from the third quarter to fourth quarter of 2007. In value, the LC D TV category generated US$19.9 billion in revenues for 2007 or up 74% compared to 2006 results of US$11 billion.

The total value of the Advanced TV market in the USA was worth almost US$28.7 billion in revenues in 2007 and US$9.6 billion in the fourth quarter of 2007. The LCD TV segment represented almost 70% of that market in 2007. Quixel Research's projections for the USA LCD TV market show the category close to tripling in volume by 2010.
post #44 of 47
Thread Starter 
Report puts Sony LCD TVs as top brand with Samsung a close second
20 February 2008




DisplaySearch released a report this week that shows for the first time ever LCD TV shipments outpacing CRT TVs worldwide in Q4 2007. According to the report, global TV shipments grew 21% quarter to quarter and 5% year to year. The total number of TVs shipped was nearly 200 million units worldwide.

2007 was the first year where TV revenues exceeded $100 billion with Q4 2007 revenues alone counting for $32.9 billion of that number. DisplaySearch says that LCD unit share grew worldwide, but the strongest growth in LCD unit share was seen in Europe. Developing nations showed the greatest increase in LCD unit share with Latin America, Asia Pacific, Middle East, and Africa rising a combined 106% year over year.

CRT TV shipments fell from 77% of global TV shipments in Q1 2006 to 46% of global shipments in Q4 2007. LCD made impressive gains against rear projection TVs and Plasma TVs as well.

LCD TV share increased from 44% to 65% year over year while plasma dropped from 40% to 31% and rear projection TV dropped from 16% to 3%. That massive drop in rear projection was no doubt helped by Sony pulling out of the rear projection market in 2007.

DisplaySearch says that Sony was the number one brand of LCD TV in Q4 2007 with 19.5% of the market. Samsung followed in a very close second place with 19.3% of the LCD TV market. Philips was a distant third with 10.1% of the LCD market with Sharp sitting at the same 10.1% share. The fifth place company was LG with 7.7% of the market.
post #45 of 47
As long as Sony and Samsung are #1 and #2, prices are not going to drop very much.
post #46 of 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike999 View Post

As long as Sony and Samsung are #1 and #2, prices are not going to drop very much.

I'm wondering. The numbers are the North American sales figures. And Vizio (which is a closed 3rd) hasn't start selling in Canada yet... hm...
post #47 of 47
Thread Starter 
More Evidence L.C.D. TV Prices Will Drop Soon
21 August 2008

In his now-famous letter to early buyers of last year's first generation iPhone, Steven P. Jobs, the chief executive of Apple, told customers who were angry that its price was lowered by $200 just a few months after launch, that price drops in technology were a given. This is life in the technology lane, he said in an open letter to consumers. If you always wait for the next price cut or to buy the new improved model, you'll never buy any technology product because there is always something better and less expensive on the horizon.

That may be true in the computer world, where price drops happen at best a few times per year. But when it comes to L.C.D. and plasma television pricing, you usually don't have long to wait if you want to save a few dollars.
So for those would-be TV buyers for whom price is a major consideration-which seems to be most people these days-you might want to hold on for a few more months before you pull out your credit card.

Around the October time frame, L.C.D. TVs will see a substantial price drop, just in time for holiday buying. That's the prediction of Andrew Abrams, executive director and senior analyst at Avian Securities, a New York based brokerage and information technology research firm.

The reason is twofold: wholesale prices for the L.C.D. panels themselves have been dropping, and excess inventory is forcing prices down as companies try to get rid of their finished products so they can move in new models.
Which begs the question, why is it so hard for companies to figure out how much product they actually need and manufacture accordingly? I've thought about this for five years, and I don't know, Mr. Abrams said.

One problem might be irrational exuberance. Electronics retailers seem convinced that big events-especially sports-will finally motivate buyers to get off their duff and run into a store to get that 65-inch flat panel TV that they've been lusting after (witness the newspaper ads for big screen TVs before major sports events like the Super Bowl or the Olympics).
But it doesn't always happen that way. After the 2006 World Cup, many HDTV sets were sent back to the manufacturers after they couldn't be sold, Mr. Abrams said.

While it's too early to say how this week's Olympics has influenced TV sales in the United States, it doesn't look to have done much for the home country. A separate note from iSuppli, a company that tracks the world-wide panel market, says that an increase in L.C.D. sales in China, once expected because of the Olympics, fell short of expectations.

Lower than expected demand is contributing to lower panel prices, with dramatic declines in the past few months. For example, the price of a 37-inch panel was $446 in January, according to Mr. Abrams, but will only be $372 in August.

Those drops do not translate into a dollar-for-dollar drop at retail, as the panel price is only one part of the pricing equation. In fact, it's possible that prices won't drop at all, if retailers decide to charge the same to increase their profit margins.

But that strategy is always tricky; if one retailer decides to gain a sales advantage and drops its price, other companies often must follow suit. Which may make it worthwhile to keep on watching that old tube TV for a few more months.
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