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OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread - Page 142

post #4231 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airion View Post

Interesting, but interesting because these two models look quite different! Could you explain where/when you pulled the images from?
In either case, there's clearly no need to bend over the panel to connect HDMI cables. Inputs are located on the stand. They're not behind the panel, but below it. It's not literally a media box, but kind of the same idea- just watch your head! biggrin.gif Seriously though watch your head.
Perhaps these things are more above than behind. People aren't going to hang pictures literally behind a 55" display, where they can't see them, leaning over and accidentally putting their body weight on top of the display in the process. I know you didn't mean that, but I think your accident scenario is becoming less likely, and less likely to actually cause damage. Unlike any CRT or LCD display I've ever had (including now) or seen, the AV inputs will be below the display rather than behind it, which eliminates the requirement to reach over/behind it.

Seriously, stop telling me about how unlikely this is OK? It's not unlikely. So long as there is something behind your TV -- anything -- this razor-edge panel will be jutting into the air and will be in your way. In my case, there is a mantle behind the TV and above that wall. I doubt it's a very uncommon layout. In other cases, there'll be a shelf above it. Will this affect everyone? Of course not. That's not the point, never has been.

As for the images, if they are really different backplanes in them (and they seem to be), I'd assume it's just different shows and different stages in the evolution. Whatever was at CES was clearly more prototype. Whatever they showed off last month was more likely a test version of the finished product. That's why we saw things like the shipping box with all the logos and detail on it from the Greek (?) site.
post #4232 of 9446
Still nobody from Europe with the LG to post some serious feedback? Looks like we will just have to wait till they arrive out our local dealers.
post #4233 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by gary cornell View Post

Still nobody from Europe with the LG to post some serious feedback? Looks like we will just have to wait till they arrive out our local dealers.

Don't hold your breath. smile.gif

In all seriousness, though, I suspect if this show up stateside this year, it will be at a few dealers, later in the year. I look forward to spending time with one at a Magnolia or equivalent.
post #4234 of 9446
Not going to name the dealer - i was told Aug., make of it what you will...
post #4235 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by gary cornell View Post

Not going to name the dealer - i was told Aug., make of it what you will...

Let's hope it's true.
post #4236 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Seriously, stop telling me about how unlikely this is OK? It's not unlikely.

Is that a threat?

Seriously, stop telling me how likely this is okay? It's not likely.

What was sauce for the goose is now sauce for the gander (special thanks to Mitt Romney for the quote)! rolleyes.gif Seriously though, I think we'll have to agree to disagree here, but I'm willing to consider that I might well be wrong. We don't know how strong these panels will be, and while I doubt they'll be especially fragile, I don't know, and I'm not afraid to admit it. Neither of us are in a position to speak with authority about the rate of accidents in the future involving an OLED of unknown strength. And yet, you try to.
post #4237 of 9446
Here is a very good 19 second video clip of the LG OLED TV display at SID 2012.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dajVNnkl38s
post #4238 of 9446
It does take 3 LG employees (2 engineers + 1 product manager) to get it out of the box with any kind of confidence though:

lg55em960vunboxing.jpg
post #4239 of 9446
Which proves nothing at all. It is a first generation revolutionary design, so of course they were going to take great care in the handling of it,since they probably did not bring very many of them along for the show. I suspect that as much care is taken by manufacturers in the setting up of similar sized Plasma and LCD displays at exhibitions.


Boeing is using a lot of carbon fiber composite materials in their 787 Passenger Jet.


COMPOSITES IN THE AIRFRAME AND PRIMARY STRUCTURE


http://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/articles/qtr_4_06/article_04_2.html

"The Boeing 787 makes greater use of composite materials in its airframe and primary structure than any previous Boeing commercial airplane. Undertaking the design process without preconceived ideas enabled Boeing engineers to specify the optimum material for specific applications throughout the airframe.

The result is an airframe comprising nearly half carbon fiber reinforced plastic and other composites. This approach offers weight savings on average of 20 percent compared to more conventional aluminum designs."
post #4240 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by ferro View Post

It does take 3 LG employees (2 engineers + 1 product manager) to get it out of the box with any kind of confidence though

biggrin.gif But also, eek.gif

You can imagine their fear. They've got the one prototype in their care and the whole company, including all of their superiors, are depending on them to do the simple task of safely putting up the display. If they were to clumsily damage it, they would be instantly ruining untold amounts of planning, money, and hard work. Those 3 employees hold the entire weight of their company in their hands. Even if it was a brick, I'd be careful too.
post #4241 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenland View Post

Which proves nothing at all.

I'm not trying to prove anything. Just thought it was a new and amusing picture in the context of the last few pages of this thread. smile.gif
post #4242 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by ferro View Post

I'm not trying to prove anything. Just thought it was a new and amusing picture in the context of the last few pages of this thread. smile.gif


Amusing in what sense? You said "it does take". The picture shows one guy just looking on and the other two with hands on the panel. I saw three delivery men doing something similar when the store delivered my plasma set.
post #4243 of 9446
I'd like to see the silver boder replaced with a non glossy black.
post #4244 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenland View Post

Amusing in what sense? You said "it does take". The picture shows one guy just looking on and the other two with hands on the panel. I saw three delivery men doing something similar when the store delivered my plasma set.

Amusing in the sense that the topic of discussion here was the strength of the TV, and the picture shows 3 LG employees taking it out of the box very carefully and awkwardly. The guy looking on also has one hand at the base of the TV.

Again, I'm not trying to prove anything about the strength of the TV. I'm sure it will be fine.
post #4245 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by gary cornell View Post

I'd like to see the silver boder replaced with a non glossy black.


You may be on to something. I took a look at a front on video clip of the unit, and it does tend to glitter and look distracting to the eye. Perhaps it will not be that way in a properly illuminated home setting,
post #4246 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Don't hold your breath. smile.gif
In all seriousness, though, I suspect if this show up stateside this year, it will be at a few dealers, later in the year. I look forward to spending time with one at a Magnolia or equivalent.

In that case the Magnolia management in your region better alert their store staff to watch out for a guy with a Sheldon Cooper personality profile , who will be attempting to bend and break the LG OLED display panel.biggrin.gif
post #4247 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenland View Post

In that case the Magnolia management in your region better alert their store staff to watch out for a guy with a Sheldon Cooper personality profile , who will be attempting to bend and break the LG OLED display panel.biggrin.gif

I have about as much in common with Sheldon Cooper as I do with George Clooney, which is to say not very much.
post #4248 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by ferro View Post

Amusing in the sense that the topic of discussion here was the strength of the TV, and the picture shows 3 LG employees taking it out of the box very carefully and awkwardly. The guy looking on also has one hand at the base of the TV.
Again, I'm not trying to prove anything about the strength of the TV. I'm sure it will be fine.

If the set where truely fragile, 3 guys handling a fragile screen would twist it more then 1 guy.

I'd say this shows it to be pretty strong that 3 guys didn't twist it into pieces as some think it can be.
post #4249 of 9446
The set weighs 15 lbs., but it had 3 people handling it. Clearly, the only logical conclusion is that it's super strong. Yup. rolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gif
post #4250 of 9446
Seoul, South Korea (AP) -- Prosecutors have charged six South Korean employees of an Israeli company with leaking advanced TV display technology from Samsung Mobile Display and
LG Display to their rivals.
The Seoul Central District Prosecutors' Office said Wednesday that the six stole OLED display technology from the display affiliate of Samsung Electronics and LG Display and relayed it to Chinese and Taiwanese panel makers.
Orbotech Ltd., the Israeli company, makes display inspection equipment that it supplies to customers in South Korea, China and Taiwan. Its South Korean unit was also charged.
Orbotech did not respond to requests for comment.
Asian display panel makers are in a highly competitive battle to develop a new generation of ultra-thin TV displays.
The Israeli company wasn't named by prosecutors but Samsung and LG identified it as Orbotech.
post #4251 of 9446
"The set weighs 15 lbs., but it had 3 people handling it. Clearly, the only logical conclusion is that it's super strong. Yup.
rolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gif"


Or the three employees are incredibly weak. You must always keep an open mind for alternative explanations. eek.gif
post #4252 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by taichi4 View Post

"The set weighs 15 lbs., but it had 3 people handling it. Clearly, the only logical conclusion is that it's super strong. Yup.
rolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gifrolleyes.gif"
Or the three employees are incredibly weak. You must always keep an open mind for alternative explanations. eek.gif
The blue pixels are make with Kryptonite.
post #4253 of 9446
Finally got around to profiling my Sony PVM-2541 OLED display with an i1 Pro Display 3 and dispcalGUI. The following image shows that the display has a wider gamut than Rec. 709.
441

Its gamut is close to that of Adobe RGB:
441

As a comparison, the new Macbook Pro Retina Display doesn't quite cover the full Adobe RGB gamut:
441

Since the Samsung LG technology is closer to Sony's, it'll be interesting to see how that compares to LG's WOLED Samsung's gamut. [edited]

--wilson
Edited by wjchan - 7/1/12 at 6:54pm
post #4254 of 9446
Are those uncalibrated results? I assume that calibrated results would look much different.
post #4255 of 9446
Sony's super top emission tech is a little bit like LG's but without the W.
Quote:
Originally Posted by wjchan View Post

Finally got around to profiling my Sony PVM-2541 OLED display with an i1 Pro Display 3 and dispcalGUI. The following image shows that the display has a wider gamut than Rec. 709.
441
Its gamut is close to that of Adobe RGB:
441
As a comparison, the new Macbook Pro Retina Display doesn't quite cover the full Adobe RGB gamut:
441
Since the Samsung technology is closer to Sony's, it'll be interesting to see how that compares to LG's WOLED gamut.
--wilson
post #4256 of 9446
'The blue pixels are make with Kryptonite.'

That could be another reasonable explanation, except for the fact that kryptonite was banned in displays by the Indo-Chinese Pact of 1907.
Edited by taichi4 - 7/1/12 at 8:01pm
post #4257 of 9446
You're right. The Sony technology, which uses color filters to obtain red, green and blue, is closer to LG's. The graphs are from uncalibrated displays; I was only profiling the Sony monitor.
post #4258 of 9446
Quote:
Originally Posted by hoope11 View Post

You are wrong about this. The strength and toughness of carbon fiber composites varies greatly. The orientation of the fibers and the polymers used significantly affect the properties of the material. It's true that parts of a racecar's carbon fiber monocoque are designed to shatter in a crash, but the shell surrounding the driver is constructed to be totally rigid.
It is absolutely possible to create a carbon composite backplane that would resist bending in the arms of a person.
I don't know anything about the construction of this specific TV, but I would expect the engineers to choose a material with sufficient rigidty.

Actually this is wrong too.

The reason carbon fiber works well in these cars is that it forms a sort of cage around the driver, this cage has form and structure to make it strong. It is much like when sheet metal is folded with flanges it is strong but when in flat sheet form it is flimsy. It is also why you see ribbing formed into large spans of sheet metal, it needs some kind of cross section to stiffen it up. Take a flat sheet of paper stand it on edge then try to put something on it, it will collapse. Take that same sheet and roll it into a tube now you could put a book on it and it will hold up.

On the back of a TV a flat carbon sheet will have no form/cross section to it and will not withstand torsional force very well at all. The thin carbon fiber sheet would flex allot, it wouldn't break, but the glass display panel will. If you formed ribbing into the CF then it would be better, but then it wouldn't be thin anymore and defeat the whole purpose.

I tend to agree with those that say thin on TVs is a gimmick. I would rather have a little thicker set and have it be be more robust. I don't sit there looking at a TV from the side to admire it's thinness, I look at it from the front to admire the picture smile.gif
Edited by DaveC19 - 7/1/12 at 8:38pm
post #4259 of 9446
From: The OLED-Info newsletter (July 2012)

OLED TVs in 2012
Samsung and LG already announced plans to start selling OLED TVs in 2012, but it seems that no one really knows how much they hope to sell in 2012. The actual question seems to be the capacity: how many panels will the two companies be able to produce until the year's end?

According to Digitimes, Samsung's internal target is to produce 200,000 panels in 2012 (in their 5.5-Gen fab). LGD will only be able to produce 50,000 panels.

DisplaySearch are much less optimistic. They estimate that both companies together will only be able to produce 20,000 panels as they still haven't overcome all the technical challenges.
post #4260 of 9446
Two great models to look out for -

1)Samsung ES9500 OLED TV - It is definitely going to be thin, but will live up to its picture quality promise?

The SONYXEL-1 suffered from color accuracy issues, but they describe their new "55 incher as a masterpiece of accurate color reproduction and maximized performance - So maybe they did solve their problems?
Samsung told CNET that the ES9500 TV has a 0.3-inch depth, which is about a third as thin as the skinniest LED TVs, but still nearly doubles that of the LG's 0.157-inch (4mm) depth.
for more info - http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/samsung-es9500-oled-tv/4505-6482_7-35117948.html?tag=contentBody;cocoTable for more information.

2) LG 55EM9600 - a forthcoming OLED that promises amazing picture quality, but will be priced for serious enthusiasts only. The LG 55EM9600 won CNET's highest honor at the Consumer Electronics Show in January with the promise of revolutionary picture quality in an incredibly slim design. Although LG holds more promise for its picture quality, its astronomical price might deter it from mainstream success. Time will have to tell.

Either way both products show potential for revolutionizing the Tv industry.

For more info :http://reviews.cnet.com/flat-panel-tvs/lg-55em9600/4505-6482_7-35117947.html?tag=contentBody;cocoTable
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