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OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread - Page 185

post #5521 of 9450
I wouldn't exactly call this news, but some might be interested...

Samsung OLED TV gets UL certification

Source: http://sammyhub.com/2013/03/19/samsung-oled-tv-gets-ul-certification/


Samsung has announced that its OLED TV has gained a certification from Underwriters Laboratories. Samsung boasts that its 55-inch OLED TV is the first OLED TV to receive any certification for the picture quality and went through a series of tests, which the lab calls Emotional Image Quality Evaluation.

The tests include assessments on brightness, colour and uniformity and uses 3D colour space to accurately measure the depth of colour and contrast ratio.

Samsung’s S9 UHD TV also got certified by Underwriters Laboratories earlier this month.

Samsung is expected to start selling the OLED TV later this year.
post #5522 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

So your argument is that OLED hype will continue because OLED, which was already in a bunch of phones, is going to be in a bunch of phones...
This is even less persuasive.
Your other argument -- that had Samsung abandoned OLED for phones (something that didn't seem to have any chance of happening anyway) -- OLED would be dead is not one many people in the industry were taking seriously.
I don't see any relationship between the continued success of OLED in mobile phones and the growth of OLED TVs. And -- if anything -- a year after the OLED TVs were first announced, I'm less certain that OLEDs are going to have 100% market share in smartphones. I'm not saying they won't, just that I was certain they would a year ago and now I don't really know.

You seem to think OLED TV and OLED mobile are totally different. They are not, technology core is the same. Having 50 mln OLED displays sold is indirectly boosting chances for OLED TV. There is huge difference between technology which is promising but has no volumes and technology which has some real segment selling well. But overall, it seems OLED will not dent LCD hegemony in any significant way.
post #5523 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by irkuck View Post

You seem to think OLED TV and OLED mobile are totally different.

No, I don't. But the manufacturing of them is completely different.
Quote:
They are not, technology core is the same.

Even this is disputable. Samsung's AMOLED mobile displays have very, very little in common with LG's RGBW OLED TVs (which apparently will soon be the technological twins of Samsung's TVs... perhaps by next year). The backplanes are different, the front color filters are different, the middle "layer" is manufactured entirely differently.
Quote:
Having 50 mln OLED displays sold is indirectly boosting chances for OLED TV.

This is quite frankly nonsense. They made 35 million or so last year. Did that "indirectly boost the chances of OLED TV" too? It neither harmed nor helped.
Quote:
There is huge difference between technology which is promising but has no volumes and technology which has some real segment selling well.

AMOLED on mobiles has been selling well since at least 2011. It's actual growth curve in 2013 vs. 2012 will be quiet minimal. You want your meme, fine, you can have it. I don't see how this is even slightly important, but I will simply conceded that it's slightly important.
Quote:
But overall, it seems OLED will not dent LCD hegemony in any significant way.

As I said last year, the chances of OLED becoming even half of the total display industry by decade's end seemed minimal. I was mocked. They seem far more minimal now given that if we are forecasting today, we'd go:

Smartphones: perhaps 100% OLED, perhaps 50% (depending on what happens with IGZO LCD costs)
Tablets: probably less than 50% OLED, see above
Laptops: probably less than 20% OLED
Desktop monitors: probably less than 5% OLED
TVs: almost certainly less than 25% of units sold
post #5524 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by irkuck View Post

You seem to think OLED TV and OLED mobile are totally different.

No, I don't. But the manufacturing of them is completely different.
Quote:
They are not, technology core is the same.

Even this is disputable. Samsung's AMOLED mobile displays have very, very little in common with LG's RGBW OLED TVs (which apparently will soon be the technological twins of Samsung's TVs... perhaps by next year). The backplanes are different, the front color filters are different, the middle "layer" is manufactured entirely differently.
Quote:
Having 50 mln OLED displays sold is indirectly boosting chances for OLED TV.

This is quite frankly nonsense. They made 35 million or so last year. Did that "indirectly boost the chances of OLED TV" too? It neither harmed nor helped.
Quote:
There is huge difference between technology which is promising but has no volumes and technology which has some real segment selling well.

AMOLED on mobiles has been selling well since at least 2011. It's actual growth curve in 2013 vs. 2012 will be quiet minimal. You want your meme, fine, you can have it. I don't see how this is even slightly important, but I will simply conceded that it's slightly important.
Quote:
But overall, it seems OLED will not dent LCD hegemony in any significant way.

As I said last year, the chances of OLED becoming even half of the total display industry by decade's end seemed minimal. I was mocked. They seem far more minimal now given that if we are forecasting today, we'd go:

Smartphones: perhaps 100% OLED, perhaps 50% (depending on what happens with IGZO LCD costs)
Tablets: probably less than 50% OLED, see above
Laptops: probably less than 20% OLED
Desktop monitors: probably less than 5% OLED
TVs: almost certainly less than 25% of units sold

Decades end is almost 7 years away. That's disheartening to think that might result in OLED penetration of less than 25% in the TV market.
post #5525 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Decades end is almost 7 years away. That's disheartening to think that might result in OLED penetration of less than 25% in the TV market.

Reality is sometimes cruel.
post #5526 of 9450
Do quantum dot displays pose challenges for OLED?

Source: Digitimes

As OLED has been consistently facing mass production issues for applications on large-size displays such as TV panels, and is expected to have high production costs for at least a few more years as industry observers have predicted, display developers have been looking for alternative solutions to providing high contrast and more energy-efficient products to their TV and possibly even tablet, smartphone and notebook customers. One of those solutions is quantum dot display technology.

Quantum dots (QD) or semiconductor nanocrystals are a form of light emitting technology and consist of nano-scale crystals that can provide an alternative for applications such as display technology. This display technology differs from CRTs and LCDs, but it is similar to OLED displays, in that light is supplied on demand, which enables new, more efficient displays and allows for mobile devices with longer battery lives, according to recent reports from New Scientist.

QD displays also consume lower power and have richer color than conventional OLED, claim some analysts. The analysts also state that the white light produced by quantum dots has high brightness and excellent color reproduction, raising its potential to replace the backlight unit (BLU) using the LED to form the "QLED."

But has the technology proved itself in actuality? As of early 2013, Sony used QDs to improve the color of some of its high-end Bravia TVs, shown at CES 2013. The analysts who viewed the TV claimed the range of colors it could display was increased by about 50% compared to LCD TVs. Judging by the photos circulating online it seems this claim is legit.

The technology being used in the Sony TV sets is said to come from Nanosys, which recently announced that it is working with 3M to commercialize a QD film that could be integrated into the back of today's LCD panels. Sources at the company have also said the film could cut the display's power consumption by half and enable LCDs to generate 50% more colors within the range set by the National Television System Committee, added the analysts.

Additionally, according to IEEE Spectrum Technology, QD Vision is also working on a QD LED display that reportedly works exactly like an OLED display but at a lower cost. OLED displays contain a thin layer of light-emitting organic semiconductor sandwiched between two electrodes, but QD Vision reportedly replaces the organic material with QDs, said analysts who have connections to the technology creators.

Despite the technology starting to pop up in the market, Digitimes Research has found that no makers of the QD technology have plans to mass produce it in the short term and may need at least another 3-5 years. Samsung Display is also not expected to take priority of the technology and instead will continue development of its OLED research, added Digitimes Research.

OLED is gaining a lot of hype in the market, as it should considering the picture quality it provides. However, despite recent large investments into OLED either through Samsung Display or LG Display, there still has been only little progress in terms of using the technology for large-size applications. A large reason for this is that manufacturing OLED displays typically requires depositing organic molecules on the substrate using expensive evaporation techniques, hence the high costs and complicated production process. The analysts also stated the two companies may need another three years at least to bring down costs so that OLED TVs may be affordable for consumers, which if true, means that TV vendors could be battling for OLED displays as well as quantum dot display technology in the future.

In the meantime, one thing seems for sure - Samsung and LG are still likely to use OLED, as they have made huge investments in the technology, so it is likely that Japan-based TV vendors who are looking for a new high-end technology for use in their TV products might want to consider investing in the technology perhaps with Sharp, as their Korea-based rivals have their OLED technology niche while China-based TV vendors are largely aiming to get Ultra HD TV panels from Taiwan-based panel makers.
Edited by Rich Peterson - 3/20/13 at 8:14pm
post #5527 of 9450
Samsung Gives Products Wall Street Send-Off

Source: Twice magazine

New York — As supermodel Kate Upton, quarterback Eli Manning and hip-hop artist Flo Rida looked on, Samsung Electronics America executive VP Joe Stinziano gave a formal send-off to his company’s 2013 TV and A/V model lines in the heart of Wall Street on Wednesday.
...

The company said it will also offer its first 55-inch 1080p OLED TV “in the second half of the year,” at a price to be announced, the company said.
post #5528 of 9450
So let me react to this news.....

1) Digitimes has maybe the worst reports in tech journalism. And it's a bloody shame. OK, that said, it seems like a QD layer could make a really, really good RGBW-style display a la LG's OLED. This would perhaps allow for much easier manufacturing (solving the problem of making pixels), assuming quantum-dot technology is adaptable to this kind of use. If I were someone not named Samsung or LG, I'd probably be looking at this hardcore. Whiter light with lower power consumption based on fewer layers? Mate that with an IGZO backplane and color filters and bam....

2) Kate Upton, Eli Manning and... Flo-rida? A SuperBowl champ... A supermodel... And a super hack.
post #5529 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

No, I don't. But the manufacturing of them is completely different.

One big variable in the manufacturing is whether Samsung sticks with LTPS. As of right now, I think that they are planning on a LTPS fab paired WRGB for their first commercial Gen 8 facility. They may also see some benefit from their experience with vapor deposition of the materials. I assume that while removing the shadow mask makes everything simpler that there is still some learning curve to depositing a precise amount of materials at an even depth across a Gen 8 sized substrate.

I'd also add that they should benefit from their continued R&D into OLED materials. While the emitter layers may not be identical, they should be fairly similar and there are a variety of other layers which will benefit from any improvements that Samsung makes to their handset line.

Let me put it this way, I'd be far more skeptical of any other company trying to catch LG using WRGB. The fact that Samsung has manufactured hundreds of millions of OLED's should give them at least some advantage over a company like AUO trying to copy LG.
post #5530 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by slacker711 View Post

Let me put it this way, I'd be far more skeptical of any other company trying to catch LG using WRGB. The fact that Samsung has manufactured hundreds of millions of OLED's should give them at least some advantage over a company like AUO trying to copy LG.


Take 10 steps back. Both sides of this argument might be talking past each other. Might.

There are three disparate notions going on that apply to both arenas:
  • The marketing impact upon the public. As the public starts seeing OLED on more and more phones (will they?), it stands to reason that the term becomes more commonly recognized as "the next latest and greatest" than if it were confined to TVs. Whatever impact that has is up for grabs. Doubt it means anything at all for TV sales.
  • Regardless of whether or not one manufacturing technique in any way applies to the other, the technological achievements in the small (the actual OLED elements) might be important for both small and large displays. In particular there's uneven wearing, and the IR/BI boogeyman again (to some). Phones don't have the display on for long, but there are game consoles that do.
  • That said, it absolutely makes no sense to me to place any faith at all that the manufacturing achievements of one have any impact on the other.

I'm the very last one to get away with pretending to take the high-road on anything here (yes, my track record is terrible), but it seems to me that both points are not completely at war with each other, which would indicate that it's a pretty good time to wind down this particular off-ramp.

For me only---my final 2¢ on it: I personally like knowing what Samsung did with the OLED sub-pixels of their small displays, but that's probably about it.
post #5531 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

So let me react to this news.....

1) Digitimes has maybe the worst reports in tech journalism. And it's a bloody shame. OK, that said, it seems like a QD layer could make a really, really good RGBW-style display a la LG's OLED. This would perhaps allow for much easier manufacturing (solving the problem of making pixels), assuming quantum-dot technology is adaptable to this kind of use. If I were someone not named Samsung or LG, I'd probably be looking at this hardcore. Whiter light with lower power consumption based on fewer layers? Mate that with an IGZO backplane and color filters and bam....

Are QD amenable to the utopian roll-to-roll printing?
post #5532 of 9450
LG Tells Samsung: Show Me The Money.


http://english.yonhapnews.co.kr/news/2013/03/21/5/0200000000AEN20130321008500320F.HTML

"LG Electronics asks Samsung to pay for patents
SEOUL, March 21 (Yonhap) - LG Electronics Inc. on Thursday accused Samsung Display Co. and Samsung Electronics Co. of illegally using its technology and demanded the two companies pay for the patents, the latest development in the Samsung-LG display feud. Samsung Display and LG Display Co., the world's two biggest display makers, have been embroiled in a patent tussle over organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and liquid crystal display (LCD) technologies that later expanded to their TV-making affiliates Samsung Electronics and LG Electronics. In a statement, LG Electronics said it is "doubtful" about Samsung Display's decision to drop a patent suit against the company and said it will carefully consider the suggestion LG Electronics also called for compensation for the use of its patent technologies, adding it is ready to hold talks on the payment issue. The move marks a twist in the display feud between the two tech giants that seemed to be heading toward a peaceful end. After filing requests for a sales ban on each other's products and use of certain technologies, the two companies recently agreed to make a compromise in a meeting organized by the commerce ministry. In February , Samsung Display dropped an injunction aimed to block LG Display from using its OLED technology."
post #5533 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

No, I don't. But the manufacturing of them is completely different.
Even this is disputable. Samsung's AMOLED mobile displays have very, very little in common with LG's RGBW OLED TVs (which apparently will soon be the technological twins of Samsung's TVs... perhaps by next year). The backplanes are different, the front color filters are different, the middle "layer" is manufactured entirely differently. d

Heh, so where are the LG's mobile RGBW OLEDs? LG RGBW is exactly what I'm saying: very promising tech aiming to sell 100 TVs for 12000$. Samsung at least has tens of millions sold already.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

This is quite frankly nonsense. They made 35 million or so last year. Did that "indirectly boost the chances of OLED TV" too? It neither harmed nor helped.
AMOLED on mobiles has been selling well since at least 2011. It's actual growth curve in 2013 vs. 2012 will be quiet minimal. You want your meme, fine, you can have it. I don't see how this is even slightly important, but I will simply conceded that it's slightly important.

You are grossly wrong. Without real sales these companies could be on the cliff to decide if it is worth struggling with the tech which is eternally promising. Why the Galaxy 4 OLED is significant? It is since the LCD raised the bar significantly this year by jumping to full HD mobile. OLED had to be there or it would be obsolete. Fact that OLED did it means it is still in the game. This is bit similar to the 4K vs. 2K in TV. OLED must be able to be in the 4K segment, otherwise it risks being obsolete.

Regarding the mobile vs. TV OLEDs I presume the organic LED material is same in both. Both TV and mobile are 2K now. Difficulty in the mobile OLED is high density of subpixels. Difficulty in TV are subpixel sizes and resulting uniformity problems. These are different problems indeed.
post #5534 of 9450
can we expect to see oled displays on tablets soon? would that be a samsung mobile based oled display or an rgbw type?
post #5535 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr. wally View Post

can we expect to see oled displays on tablets soon? would that be a samsung mobile based oled display or an rgbw type?

I have read some rumors that Samsung might start gearing up for tablets later this year and into 2014. I think the question is more economic than technical. As of right now, the iPad absolutely dominates the high-end of the tablet market where an OLED tablet would need to sell. Most of the non-Apple tablets have had to compete on price and that wont work for an 7+" OLED right now.
post #5536 of 9450
post #5537 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by slacker711 View Post

One big variable in the manufacturing is whether Samsung sticks with LTPS. As of right now, I think that they are planning on a LTPS fab paired WRGB for their first commercial Gen 8 facility. They may also see some benefit from their experience with vapor deposition of the materials. I assume that while removing the shadow mask makes everything simpler that there is still some learning curve to depositing a precise amount of materials at an even depth across a Gen 8 sized substrate.

I presume you are correct about even deposition across a Gen 8 substrate. LG must be struggling even on their current production with this. It can't be all the IGZO problem.
Quote:
I'd also add that they should benefit from their continued R&D into OLED materials. While the emitter layers may not be identical, they should be fairly similar and there are a variety of other layers which will benefit from any improvements that Samsung makes to their handset line.

There might be materials benefits, but you make very different choices for RGB and RGBW.
Quote:
Let me put it this way, I'd be far more skeptical of any other company trying to catch LG using WRGB. The fact that Samsung has manufactured hundreds of millions of OLED's should give them at least some advantage over a company like AUO trying to copy LG.

Seems like AUO is going down the path of trying to invent "printable" RGB on the very, very thin dimes of Sony and Panasonic. There are so many reasons why I don't see this happening quickly -- if at all.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Take 10 steps back. Both sides of this argument might be talking past each other. Might.

Slacker and I are not talking past each other, for what it's worth.
Quote:
For me only---my final 2¢ on it: I personally like knowing what Samsung did with the OLED sub-pixels of their small displays, but that's probably about it.

I think that's cool too. Of course it has zero implications for an RGBW TV.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

Are QD amenable to the utopian roll-to-roll printing?

Umm, maybe? No one can say since nothing has ever been really made with quantum dots. I'm not exactly sure how the QD LEDs Sony is using are being made either, but I suspect they are being fabbed on wafers, so that's not really telling us much.
Quote:
Originally Posted by irkuck View Post

Heh, so where are the LG's mobile RGBW OLEDs? LG RGBW is exactly what I'm saying: very promising tech aiming to sell 100 TVs for 12000$. Samsung at least has tens of millions sold already.

Keep repeating it like a parrot. I'll mail you a box of crackers.
Quote:
You are grossly wrong.

Well then at least I'm in really good company.
Quote:
Without real sales these companies could be on the cliff to decide if it is worth struggling with the tech which is eternally promising. Why the Galaxy 4 OLED is significant? It is since the LCD raised the bar significantly this year by jumping to full HD mobile. OLED had to be there or it would be obsolete. Fact that OLED did it means it is still in the game. This is bit similar to the 4K vs. 2K in TV. OLED must be able to be in the 4K segment, otherwise it risks being obsolete.

If Samsung had not gone full HD and had simply said, "The Galaxy S4 has an even better, even brighter screen this year" and offered the same resolution as last year, I'm quite confident they would still not be losing any sales they would otherwise have had to HTC, Moto, LG... I know all you tech fanboys think your desire for specs and this and that add up to a meaningful percentage of the market. But you don't.
Quote:
Regarding the mobile vs. TV OLEDs I presume the organic LED material is same in both.

Actually, no. In RGBW, the materials are not identical to the RGB material. Similar, but not identical. You use a more forgiving blue since you never emit a true blue to the end user.
Quote:
Both TV and mobile are 2K now. Difficulty in the mobile OLED is high density of subpixels. Difficulty in TV are subpixel sizes and resulting uniformity problems. These are different problems indeed.

Again, no. In TV with RGBW, you don't have any OLED pixels, subpixels, etc. You do have the potential for uniformity issues on the OLED layer. But they are not based on pixels.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr. wally View Post

can we expect to see oled displays on tablets soon? would that be a samsung mobile based oled display or an rgbw type?

So Samsung has been selling a really pricey ~7" tablet with OLED for a while. No one buys it. It costs too much. The same problem is going to exist until they can reach price parity with LCD tablets of same size (at least premium tablets like iPads and whatever Windows premium tablets catch on going forward). And this is the OLED chicken-and-egg writ large. In TVs, we are watching mfrs. try to push down the learning curve to get costs lower by selling tiny numbers of super expensive TVs in a world where no one really buys super expensive TVs anymore. And that's going to be a struggle.

In tablets, it's worse.

Samsung can make tablet OLEDs happen by basically investing in the capacity to do it and then deciding to price the tablets at parity with other tablets. They will lose money doing this -- for a while -- but eventually they might hit a cost per display that makes sense. Of course, the window is tight. LCD is still getting cheaper and if we are still to believe that eventually IGZO gets cheaper than LTPS and even a-Si, then not betting on that for backplanes makes the problem worse. Why? Because look out 2 years to next-gen tablet screens based on IGZO with next-gen LED backlights that are 2x more efficient and perhaps even using something like quantum dots for better color and even better efficiency. The basic cell / LC piece is ridiculously cheap from a decade of doing this on a fully amortized plant...

OLED is catching a moving target that is actually an improving, moving target.

In a world where Samsung and Apple were still frenemies instead of outright foes, I think this transition might already be underway. As things stand, however, it's going to be very challenging to make it happen. Of course, a lot depends on whether Apple (or someone like it) drives the LCD industry to make all this real. Maybe Apple already is (they are spending $10 billion on cap ex this year, nearly as much as Intel), but we don't know because they play the cards close to the vest.
post #5538 of 9450
well the samsung tablet with the amoled displayy is either not widely available or no one is touting its oled screen.

either way oled dispalys are not a factor in the tablet market
post #5539 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr. wally View Post

well the samsung tablet with the amoled displayy is either not widely available or no one is touting its oled screen.

either way oled dispalys are not a factor in the tablet market

It's not widely available and it's much more expensive than the LCD verison of the small Galaxy Tab.
post #5540 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

If Samsung had not gone full HD and had simply said, "The Galaxy S4 has an even better, even brighter screen this year" and offered the same resolution as last year, I'm quite confident they would still not be losing any sales they would otherwise have had to HTC, Moto, LG... I know all you tech fanboys think your desire for specs and this and that add up to a meaningful percentage of the market. But you don't.

Oh no, I was not aware your sense of the market is so low. We are talking about flagships, top-end tech. They must have latest and best specs, people look after other features like convenience of use only after the specs are there. This year displays specs are full HD displays, it would be huge damage for Samsung if S4 had no full HD, OLED is there to imply it is outsmarting competition. Same reason is for eight core processor in S4 in some markets and 13 megapixel camera. This makes interesting question of what is next when the display res is at the end of the road? There are rumors already that next LG flagship will have 4K video camera recording - one more reason to buy 4K TV biggrin.gif.
post #5541 of 9450
Irkuck, your view of the market is quite frankly mistaken. I know a lot of folks who sell mobile for a living and I assure you that while the young boys ask about resolution and care about specs, 90% of buyers do not.

And really, I feel like at this point you are just trolling me and I'm taking the bait. So I'll try to stop.
post #5542 of 9450
Not knowing any marketing statistics, I'll guess men go for specs and women go for what feels right. Women are theoretically half the consumer market but don't men buy the tech stuff (usually). And in the end, don't both of them have to get past that persuasive sales tech guy spouting numbers.

Then again people buy ultra flat panels with reduced image quality, so specs obviously aren't everything.
Edited by borf - 3/22/13 at 3:57pm
post #5543 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Irkuck, your view of the market is quite frankly mistaken. I know a lot of folks who sell mobile for a living and I assure you that while the young boys ask about resolution and care about specs, 90% of buyers do not.

And really, I feel like at this point you are just trolling me and I'm taking the bait. So I'll try to stop.

History has proven you correct. Seriously, how many people outside these types of forums have a clue as to how their current(let alone the latest n greatest) gear works?
post #5544 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Irkuck, your view of the market is quite frankly mistaken. I know a lot of folks who sell mobile for a living and I assure you that while the young boys ask about resolution and care about specs, 90% of buyers do not.
And really, I feel like at this point you are just trolling me and I'm taking the bait. So I'll try to stop.

For the forum record, this shows plain and simple you have no idea of the market. True, the flagship segment is a smaller part of the market but its overall volumes are staggering. Say, Samsung will sell 50 mln S4 this year, this is minuscule part of over billion phones sold. But 50 mln 2K OLED displays sold in a very profitable and expensive product is a volume which keeps OLED still on the table. And in the flagship segment specs are everything. Some buyers may not understand what 2K or 8-core means but they definitely go for the higher numbers biggrin.gif. Otherwise there would not be such extreme darwinian evolution which brought full HD to mobile and is pushing towards 4K video recording.

Regarding the LG RGBW, it surely has (theoretical) advantage over AMOLED. But it is highly suspicious LG is not pushing it into mobiles where there are volumes and profits. There must significant obstacles against this, most likely technological.
post #5545 of 9450
As usual, you draw totally unsupportable conclusions and simply state them as fact. Enjoy.
post #5546 of 9450
Would it not be possible to keep comments on this Thread to the subject of OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread? There is so much chatter about mobiles and tablets it is difficult sifting information about OLED TVs from the chaff. rolleyes.gif
post #5547 of 9450
Good luck with that. Threads tend to meander, it's just the way it is on forums. Especially when there isn't a ton of new developments, news, etc., to discuss.
post #5548 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by mypretty1 View Post

Would it not be possible to keep comments on this Thread to the subject of OLED TVs: Technology Advancements Thread? There is so much chatter about mobiles and tablets it is difficult sifting information about OLED TVs from the chaff. rolleyes.gif

Not much to tell about OLED TVs for now. TVs may arrive on the back of mobile OLEDs biggrin.gif.
post #5549 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by irkuck View Post

Not much to tell about OLED TVs for now. TVs may arrive on the back of mobile OLEDs biggrin.gif.

So you keep hijacking the thread and taking it off topic, because you think it is funny to do so? It is not.

The news flow about OLED TV developements is not enhanced by your flooding of the thread with all that blather about phone panels. Feel free to start a thread dedicated to that topic, but kindly stop misusing this one. Thank you.
post #5550 of 9450
Quote:
Originally Posted by greenland View Post

So you keep hijacking the thread and taking it off topic, because you think it is funny to do so? It is not.

The news flow about OLED TV developements is not enhanced by your flooding of the thread with all that blather about phone panels. Feel free to start a thread dedicated to that topic, but kindly stop misusing this one. Thank you.

+1 wink.gif
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