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Cinema Magnifique - a work in progress - Page 2

post #31 of 156
Thread Starter 
Well, I got quite a bit done this weekend, but no pictures because the camera batteries need recharging I hung the black carpet on the bottom half of two of the three walls. I gotta dig out my stud finder, as the studs in this room are all original to the house, and warped beyond belief. I found enough of them to put the chair rail up over the carpet and baseboards below. Making returns for the chair rail to butt against the door frames was a new experience. I cut the returns a bit longer than necessary, glued and nailed them in place, then used a coping saw to remove most of the excess. Finally, I used the belt sander to get them just right. What took some time was mitering the baseboard around the air conditioning duct. I ripped an inch off the bottom of some baseboard, miter cut it at 45 degrees to go up the sides of the duct, and miter cut another piece to go over the top. I applied glue and nails to the side pieces, then weighted them down on the table saw for the night. I'll get pictures tomorrow evening, after the batteries are recharged.

Oh, and we got broadsided by an idiot Saturday evening driving to dinner. He lost control coming up an exit ramp off the Interstate, jumped the curb, plowed through the grass, went over another curb, across two lanes, then over the median curb where he hit me just behind the driver's side door. It spun me around and over the median into oncoming traffic. Fortunately for us, they had time to stop and not hit us. The accident trashed the door and rear quarter panel, ripped the rear bumper off the car, and broke the rear wheel off the axle. I got a bump on the head and the wife was fine, but it looks like our BMW Z3 convertible is a total loss.
post #32 of 156
Wow!! Glad to hear you're okay. Bummer about your car.

Mike
post #33 of 156
Thread Starter 
I think all the energy I expended Sunday in the HT room was delayed frustration after the accident. I don't recommend it to anyone as a motivational tool, by the way.
post #34 of 156
Thread Starter 
Here's a view of the middle of the rear wall. It's the first wall section that's almost completed. It still needs trim molding to cover the carpet edges against the door casing, quarter-round shoe molding at the floor, and paint on the faces of both white doors. The door on the left is the bathroom (not even decorated yet, that's a completely different project.) The door on the right is the entrance to the room.

Did I mention it's going to be kind of dark when the lights are down?

post #35 of 156
What type of black carpet are you using around the bottom of the walls? You going to add any acoustic treatment to the room as well?
post #36 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonybradley View Post

What type of black carpet are you using around the bottom of the walls?

Rats!! I just knew someone was going to ask me that question. I originally planned to use charcoal black fabric below the chair rails. I figured I'd have to paint the sheet rock black first, so nothing would show through the fabric. Then while shopping at Lowe's several weeks ago, I was walking by the huge rolls of carpet they have on the back wall of the store. It's a general-purpose "marine" carpet of the sort you put in boats. It's really BLACK and comes in a six-foot width which worked out well for my three-foot high chair rails. When cut down the middle, I get two usable strips of carpet. It's also about seven dollars a square yard. Had I bought fabric, it would have been higher priced and only four feet wide. And this carpet has a rubber backing on it which works better sound-wise than plain fabric would have.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tonybradley View Post

You going to add any acoustic treatment to the room as well?

If you look back on page one of this thread where Brian Pape first commented, I admitted I wasn't doing any full-gonzo room treatments for acoustics. I know it's heresy to many, but I had had enough of construction and renovation for over eight months and I didn't feel like tearing out all the sheetrock they installed, primed, and painted. Plus, the WAF would have sunk drastically. I plan to build a couple of superchunk bass traps for the back corners when the room is complete. I'm constructing decorative wall frames with fabric over polyester batting to soften the reflections a bit. Finally, I'll be building a small stage and proscenium in the front of the room, where the wall will be completely covered in Linacoustic from floor to ceiling. Far from perfect, but more than good enough for just the wife and me.
post #37 of 156
Thread Starter 
A co-worker is planning to build out the bonus room in his house for a home theatre in a few months, and commented on the red faux finish with the gold inclusions. He mentioned how he'd like to paint his ceiling with a dark blue faux finish and possibly include the gold flecks. If you consider it, any strong primary color (red, blue, green) could work very well in this situation for the walls.
post #38 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by VorlonFog View Post

Here's a view of the middle of the rear wall. It's the first wall section that's almost completed. It still needs trim molding to cover the carpet edges against the door casing, quarter-round shoe molding at the floor, and paint on the faces of both white doors. The door on the left is the bathroom (not even decorated yet, that's a completely different project.) The door on the right is the entrance to the room.

Did I mention it's going to be kind of dark when the lights are down?


I love that paint job, Vorlon. Do you think that am amatuer could do that faux leather look? I think I'd like to do it with blue/black instead of red/black. Do you know of any online tutorials for doing this type of thing?
post #39 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by gremmy View Post

I love that paint job, Vorlon. Do you think that am amateur could do that faux leather look? I think I'd like to do it with blue/black instead of red/black. Do you know of any online tutorials for doing this type of thing?

I definitely think anyone could do it. I paid someone to do mine so I could get it done in just two or three days, instead of a whole week or more it would take by myself. (I'm neither very patient nor very artistic ) The Ralph Lauren section at HomeDepot has several free color glossy brochures describing the techniques they recommend for all of their faux finishes. Ralph Lauren has an absolutely wonderful color selection - so take their color chip to any other paint store that has a color match system (most do) and they'll mix you that color for a much better price I know there are several different web pages describing faux methods, but it boils down to three different techniques : basecoat with decorative glaze worked into/over it, basecoat with glaze applied over and then partially removed, and basecoat with glaze partially applied.

No matter which method you use, the only part you can do quickly and in one step is apply the base color to the entire room. Anytime you're working with decorative glazes, you need to work in smaller areas at a time. The glaze has ingredients to lengthen the drying time, but misting it with water extends this even longer. I've seen pretty much the same patterns for applying the glaze on many different websites. They shape the smaller areas so that you have time to work it well, and so the edges of each area blend well into the next area. This Benjamin Moore page is similar to how the painter did my walls: copper patina finish

I performed a Google web search for "faux finish techniques" and this is the first site to come up It's an about.com site that references other websites, but gives you a good starting point. Good luck if you tackle this yourself and always remember it's just paint. You can always paint over it with something different if you don't like how it turns out.
post #40 of 156
Great job on the painting. It looks very elegant. I wish I had done that in my theater.
post #41 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phisch View Post

Great job on the painting. It looks very elegant. I wish I had done that in my theater.

I wish I had had the time and patience to have double-drywalled the room with GreenGlue between the layers.
post #42 of 156
Thread Starter 
Monday was spent dealing with the wrecker, the insurance agent, the body shop, and the car rental places. Needless to say, absolutely nothing got done in the room that day. I went back to work Tuesday and really wished I'd stayed home instead. I argued with local police over the phone Thursday about the gross inaccuracies in their accident report and met with them face-to-face Friday afternoon. Thursday on the phone they refused to update or revise their report. Friday, after seeing the photos I took of the accident site with my cell phone, they issued an addendum to the original report. The adendum raised their estimate of the other driver's speed 10 MPH and now accurately represents his path jumping two curbs, crossing two lanes of traffic, and jumping a median divider before striking my car. A small victory, but an important one.

In the room this week I finally hung carpet on the remaining wall and found out I was about two inches short. Fortunately I have a smaller piece remaining and can mate them together in the back corner behind the door. A piece of trim molding will go in the corner to hide the seam. I was missing one corner block for the chair rail and had one extra for the baseboards, so I swung by Lowes for the missing block and some trim molding. They got three coats of stain Thursday night and their first coat of varnish Friday night. I spent two hours Wednesday night just cleaning up the room after last weekend's baseboard and chair rail extravaganza. This weekend I'll finish up the chair rail and baseboards on the last wall and install the trim molding. Then I can think about lining the front wall with Linacoustic and building a stage. Oh boy oh boy oh boy

CORRECTION: After returning from dinner, the note from BellSouth explained how they repaired our phone connection - they completely replaced the box outside that got struck by lightning last night. I tell ya, I don't get no respect.
post #43 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by VorlonFog View Post

I wish I had had the time and patience to have double-drywalled the room with GreenGlue between the layers.

We should all make a list of the things we wish we had done but skipped because we didn't want to spend the time on it. I can think of a few myself ...

Mike
post #44 of 156
Quote:


Rats!! I just knew someone was going to ask me that question. I originally planned to use charcoal black fabric below the chair rails. I figured I'd have to paint the sheet rock black first, so nothing would show through the fabric. Then while shopping at Lowe's several weeks ago, I was walking by the huge rolls of carpet they have on the back wall of the store. It's a general-purpose "marine" carpet of the sort you put in boats. It's really BLACK and comes in a six-foot width which worked out well for my three-foot high chair rails. When cut down the middle, I get two usable strips of carpet. It's also about seven dollars a square yard. Had I bought fabric, it would have been higher priced and only four feet wide. And this carpet has a rubber backing on it which works better sound-wise than plain fabric would have.

How did you secure the carpet to the walls? Is it wrapped around the outside corners, or cut to fit? How did you do the iside corners?
post #45 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by phisch View Post

How did you secure the carpet to the walls? Is it wrapped around the outside corners, or cut to fit? How did you do the inside corners?

phisch:
The backing on this marine carpet is thin and flexible. I used 9/16" staples to hold it at the top and bottom before installing the chair rail and baseboards. The speaker and electrical boxes help secure it too. I stapled around these boxes before using Carlon box extenders to install the outlet covers. I wrapped the carpet around the one outside corner with no problems and tacked it vertically at the inside corners with staples every six inches. The nap is just high enough to cover the staples and so they're not visible. In the one back inside corner where I had to join two pieces, I originally thought I'd have to put trim molding to cover the join. Nope, it's good as is.
post #46 of 156
Do you have pictures?

Mike
post #47 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by accts4mjs View Post

Do you have pictures?

Stapling the carpet up and installing the chair rails and baseboards? Nope. My wife isn't much of a helper or a photographer. Our two little Yorkshire Terrors can't hold a hammer or the camera, either.

I did post a picture of the rear wall back on 8/7 though. I was pleasantly surprised how well the inexpensive carpet absorbed the flash.
post #48 of 156
Oh wow!! Yeah, I remember that photo. I didn't realize that was carpet at the bottom. VERY NICE!

Mike
post #49 of 156
Thread Starter 
Your work ain't too shabby, either!
post #50 of 156
Thread Starter 
... with internet, as opposed to at home without (lightning struck the telephone box on our house Thursday evening and the cable box is right beside it.)

I finished the remaining side wall Saturday and came up two feet short on baseboard for the back corner because I went up and over the two baseboard HVAC ducts with the molding. Each duct has two six-inch high sides, explaining the two-foot shortage. Lowe's is a block from our favorite Chinese restaurant, so after dinner Saturday night I got one more baseboard and some oak quarter-round shoe molding to finish things. I put three coats of stain on last night, but quit before 9pm. They'll get their first coat of varnish today as well as the egg-and-dart molding for the wall frames. I stained it weeks ago but never started varnish because the painter was coming in to do the walls and I didn't need it to finish out the room. As long as I'm going to varnish, I might as well do all of it.

For just a few hours yesterday I had picked up all the sawdust, emptied the garbage can, cleaned and sorted the tools, and swept the floor. Even the drop cloth beneath the sawhorses got shook out in the back yard. I probably won't start cutting and nailing anything again until Wednesday or Thursday of this week. Hopefully I'll have net access at home again by that time. Only Time-Warner knows for sure.
post #51 of 156
It is nice to cleanup once in a while. I surprised my wife by cleaning up her half of the garage, washing her car, and parking it in there for her It's the little things that keep us from going insane, right?

Mike
post #52 of 156
Thread Starter 
We received the Horchow catalog intended for one of our neighbors in our mail last night. This beautiful sconce was on page 4 of the catalog which led me to check their website for others. They have several pages of ornate, detailed, and absolutely beautiful sconces available.

Enjoy, and I hope you find something you like!
post #53 of 156
Keith,

I've been watching your thread from the beginning. I love that faux finish. I need to keep my wife away from your HT pics because I know she would want it in our room. I'm trying to devote as little time as possible to changes (you know I've had a bunch along the way)

Looks like you are more on track than me. Stay there so you can get it done on time! Keep up the great work!
post #54 of 156
Looking good, Keith!! Great faux finish.
post #55 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by swithey View Post

I've been watching your thread from the beginning. I love that faux finish. I need to keep my wife away from your HT pics because I know she would want it in our room. I'm trying to devote as little time as possible to changes (you know I've had a bunch along the way)

Looks like you are more on track than me. Stay there so you can get it done on time! Keep up the great work!

Steve: Thank you !! If I'm anywhere near on track, it's only because: (a) I'm not going super-tweaky with acoustic treatments (yet) and (b) I've been watching guys like you, Ronnie, Ruben, Bud, and everyone else do it extremely well. The examples, pictures, and explanations you all provide and share are just as valuable to someone with a small room and modest budget as they are to huge rooms with healthy budgets.

Thanks again, it means a lot to me.
post #56 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eddie Horton View Post

Looking good, Keith!! Great faux finish.

My wife was skeptical (at first) but her WAF has multiplied many times over since the painter spattered on the gold and I finished the carpet, chair rails and baseboards on the lower walls. Once all that was done, she was absolutely eager for me to build the stage. I couldn't ask for a better reason to get started on it.
post #57 of 156
Thread Starter 
My friend and co-worker Craig helped me get lumber home from HomeDepot after work today: 2x12s, 2x6s, 7/16 OSB, LiquidNails, SillSeal, and deck screws. He also gave me the 30-pound roofing felt left over from the bathroom remodel he's finishing up. After juggling cars in the driveway and taking the garbage to the street, I started cutting. My room is roughly 12 feet wide, but I needed to trim a bit off the 12-foot boards to build the frame. Because the room is only 12 feet deep, my stage will only be about two-and-a-half feet from front to back. That should allow plenty of depth to hide my subwoofer and front channel speakers behind black fabric panels. I spaced the supports at 24 inches just to keep things easy and placed SillSeal beneath the frame to protect the hardwood floors. This weekend I plan on building out the front curves and attaching them to this frame.

I can't post this picture without first expressing my HUGE THANKS to Ronnie Jackson and Ruben/SandmanX for their incredibly well-documented stage build-outs. Without their superb examples, I'd still be scratching my head over what to do next.

post #58 of 156
Thread Starter 
Yeesh! I started early and worked all day drawing and then framing all the curves for the front of the stage. I cut strips of masonite/hardboard to make the curves and applied them to the frames using LiquidNails and deck screws. After that I framed the left and right steps and attached hardboard to them, too. Finally, I stained several 2'x4' panels of 1/4-inch oak-faced plywood that will get applied over the hardboard curves when everything is assembled. I'm too darned tired and the room's a mess, so pictures will just have to wait until Sunday afternoon.
post #59 of 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by VorlonFog View Post

I'm too darned tired and the room's a mess, so pictures will just have to wait

LOL!

Now there's a feeling I'm VERY familiar with

(Still, I can't wait to see the pictures though -- if you're that tired then it means they'll be worth seeing.)

Mike
post #60 of 156
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by accts4mjs View Post

LOL!

Now there's a feeling I'm VERY familiar with

(Still, I can't wait to see the pictures though -- if you're that tired then it means they'll be worth seeing.)

Mike: I'm not so sure about that. I loaned my compressor to my buddy Craig so he could finish up his bathroom remodel after his compressor went belly-up last week. I don't have a framing nailer (Craig does) so I was swinging the hammer at 16p nails all day. The two center supports in the main curve wound up with a gap between them at the front (where they should have been perfectly sistered together.) I think I'll just center one of the oak quarter-inch plywood panels over that gap to cover it.

My camera's been charging and the stained oak ply panels have been drying on top of the stage frame all night. After we head out for Sunday breakfast, I'll get the pictures taken and posted. I can't start mowing the lawn until after noon at the earliest, anyway.
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