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Owners ONLY thread - >>>KDS-A2000's<<< - Settings/Tweaks - Page 24

post #691 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by JD23 View Post

I think the I have figured out how to reduce the time needed for my green/pink haze to disappear after start up. Previously, it took approximately 30 min. After turning off power saving, I have now cut the time needed in half. The lamp should heat up faster on the normal power setting and allow the set to reach its steady state temperature more quickly.

That is interesting. I also notice that my pinkish haze is less noticeable with iris on auto settings, and the closer you set the iris to MIN the more the haze can be seen. So maybe the brighter lamp setting hides the issue as well. Set # 2 is somewhat better than # 1, but it still has a pinkish area that runs across the top and down the right side. It is very faint and 95% of people would probably not notice it. I think I will just keep this one, and down the road if it gets worse I will contact Sony for OB replacement. I am buying the Sony warranty for sure!
post #692 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Googer View Post

I'm not the one that created those test patterns so I'm not positive how they were created. Chances are it's detailed in this thread (the OP of that thread, dr1394, is the author of these patterns) but I'm currently feeling too lazy to read it all. BTW, for these already-authored patterns, you can always use VLC to play them if nothing else.

They are authored directly in 4:2:2 YCbCr. This allows for precise levels and positioning. The "workflow" is as follows:

1) Write a C program that generates the pattern.

2) Transfer the YCbCr file(s) to a DVS uncompressed file server with HD-SDI output.

3) Encode the HD-SDI with a real-time hardware HD MPEG-2 encoder.

4) Post the encoded Transport Stream on the website.

Here's an example of the C code for a crosshatch pattern:
Code:
/*
Crosshatch pattern generator
*/

#include 
#include 
#include 
#include 

#define TRUE            1
#define FALSE           0

unsigned        char    block[16][16];
unsigned        char    buffer422[1920 * 1088 * 2];

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        FILE    *fpout;
        int     x, y, index = 0;
        unsigned int    horz = 720;
        unsigned int    vert = 480;     /* 576 for PAL */
        unsigned int    rows = 24;
        unsigned int    columns = 24;
        double  xf, yf;

        if (argc != 2) {
                fprintf(stderr, "usage: pat\
");
                exit(-1);
        }

        /*--- open binary file (for parsing) ---*/
        fpout = fopen(argv[1], "wb");
        if (fpout == 0) {
                fprintf(stderr, "Cannot open output file 
post #693 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr1394 View Post

They are authored directly in 4:2:2 YCbCr. This allows for precise levels and positioning. The "workflow" is as follows:

1) Write a C program that generates the pattern.

2) Transfer the YCbCr file(s) to a DVS uncompressed file server with HD-SDI output.

3) Encode the HD-SDI with a real-time hardware HD MPEG-2 encoder.

4) Post the encoded Transport Stream on the website.


.
.
.

Ron

Very interesting and I definitely like the idea of programmatically generating the patterns, but the final .ts output certainly isn't within the realm of feasibility for most people that don't have a device with HD-SDI output or the MPEG-2 encoder on-hand, at least not using that method. I've considered writing a program or programs in the past to generate test patterns on-the-fly for people that use PC's on their setups but still haven't bothered to get around to it...
post #694 of 3250
Can someone please direct me to the CNET test patterns? I've generated my own, but I'd like to see what others are talking about. Thanks in advance.
post #695 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Googer View Post

The green haze you describe does sound more like a white balance issue to me, but I am surprised you would have to make such large adjustments in an attempt to correct it. Also, if it's only affecting darker scenes, you should only have to lower the bias and you can leave the gain alone. I will say that you can, however, check to see if this is a grayscale problem or a color decoder problem with a grayscale test pattern such as this one. If all of the bars appear to be the same 'color' gray to you, then this is either a color decoder problem or even (gasp! ) the source itself. If you really want to play with the color decoder in the service menu, I mentioned which settings those were in my current settings post (though admittedly I didn't really describe how to use them ).

Googer:

The grayscale test pattern you linked looked great. It was a very consistant in tone and caused me to adjust my brightness and contrast a little (at first the two dark bars to the left looked the same now the left most is absolutely black and the next one is just really dark while the right most is pretty close to white).

I took your advice and went to the PANEL settings to adjust the green bias (having set it and green gain back to zero in the menu white balance). I had to pull it down from the 128 it was defaulted at to 118, but, now it looks great. I tried several source segments that had really exhibited the problem before and they look fine. I tried a few other things to make sure I hadn't fixed bad images only to mess up good ones and was satisfied with the results.

Enough so, I called and cancelled the service tech I had scheduled to come tomorrow.

Thanks.
post #696 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr1394 View Post

They are authored directly in 4:2:2 YCbCr. This allows for precise levels and positioning. The "workflow" is as follows:

1) Write a C program that generates the pattern.

...
Ron

Impressive, but I was hoping for a simpler solution to take static images (.jpg, .bmp, etc) and 'fool' a video player to display them on the video overlay.

Googer suggested VLC, which I have, but, I don't think it will display these kind of images. I've no problem once it's in .ts, .mpg, or other video formats...

Edit: Well I just figured out one easy way to do it!

Fire up Windows Media Encoder, drop your image on it and tell it to start encoding (loop at end). The image is displayed on the video overlay.
post #697 of 3250
Googer:

I have a couple of questions:
1) By adjusting the green bias down to get rid of the green haze how much would that affect your greyscale readings based on your settings?

2) I tried Lovingdvd's settings that have the power saving off. I liked them, but the blacks weren't as black. Would you always recommend keeping power saving on to achieve blacker blacks even though you loose some "punch" in the picture?
post #698 of 3250
Googer-

1) Will your settings in the service menu under COLOR DECODER decrease the red push (~20-25% on my set) on my set? Also, will the setting apply (generally) equally across the various inputs (i.e. component and HDMI, for example)?

2) I notice that you only changed YFLR for 1080i. If I send 720P from set top box (to prevent extra processing steps that would be required for 720P sources like ESPN HD) to the TV, is there any change that should be made to YFLR for 720P?

3) Will the overscan settings decrease overscan (perhaps a stupid question)? My set currently is about 2.5-3% overscan.

4) Even fully using the menu controls for pic position, the picture needs to be moved down another inch. Can this be done in the service menu? How? Before or after adjusting overscan?

I'm slowly, but surely getting my picture dialed in with the help of you and this great thread. -
Much Thanks.
post #699 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyv View Post

Googer:

The grayscale test pattern you linked looked great. It was a very consistant in tone and caused me to adjust my brightness and contrast a little (at first the two dark bars to the left looked the same now the left most is absolutely black and the next one is just really dark while the right most is pretty close to white).

I took your advice and went to the PANEL settings to adjust the green bias (having set it and green gain back to zero in the menu white balance). I had to pull it down from the 128 it was defaulted at to 118, but, now it looks great. I tried several source segments that had really exhibited the problem before and they look fine. I tried a few other things to make sure I hadn't fixed bad images only to mess up good ones and was satisfied with the results.

Enough so, I called and cancelled the service tech I had scheduled to come tomorrow.

Thanks.

Good to hear you're happy with the results with just eye-balling it. Who knows for sure if it's more or less accurate than where it was without the equipment to actually measure it, but I'd guess it's probably closer overall (or it could actually be further from tracking at D65 but probably tracks more consistently now - and I personally find inaccurate but flat grayscale tracking less objectionable than varying but technically relatively close grayscale tracking, as may be your case as well).

You're in effect doing a more controlled form of the 'steaming rat' calibration, which I personally don't think people should rely on (because it relies too much on knowing what something is supposed to look like). Since you're doing it with test patterns, at least you know that colors aren't intentionally off as an artistic choice by the director or somesuch. As an example of this, one should never try to calibrate their TV using The Matrix because most of the movie (i.e., everything that occurs in The Matrix) intentionally has the color balance thrown way off as a 'subtle' reminder that it's not the real world.
post #700 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by pwiss View Post

Googer:

I have a couple of questions:
1) By adjusting the green bias down to get rid of the green haze how much would that affect your greyscale readings based on your settings?

At lower levels, quite a bit. I just know that the grayscale settings I posted give a pretty flat D65 grayscale on my coworker's set. Also understand that this isn't meant for any green blob issues; this is strictly for adjusting any green haze / tint that you may notice across the entire screen at low light levels.

Quote:


2) I tried Lovingdvd's settings that have the power saving off. I liked them, but the blacks weren't as black. Would you always recommend keeping power saving on to achieve blacker blacks even though you loose some "punch" in the picture?

I like power saving on myself because I find the set plenty bright even with it on and it does help black levels. Further, it will likely also increase the bulb's life since it should be burning it at a slightly lower wattage than with power saving off. There really shouldn't be much difference in the 'punch' of the image with on vs. off except for the overall brightness being different (and the color balance likely being slightly different between the two, though that's easy enough to account for during calibration). Because it most likely does affect calibration, I'd say to choose whichever one you prefer and just leave it there.
post #701 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Randomcreek View Post

Googer-

1) Will your settings in the service menu under COLOR DECODER decrease the red push (~20-25% on my set) on my set? Also, will the setting apply (generally) equally across the various inputs (i.e. component and HDMI, for example)?

They'll reduce it some but if it's that strong it would need to be reduced some more. I'd be surprised if the red push is really that high though - it was more on the order of 5% on my coworker's set and I've found in the past on other TV's that the color decoder variance from set to set across the same model is relatively small. The color decoder settings should apply across both component and HDMI, though something I didn't check yet on my coworker's set is if it has multiple memories for the two different color spaces (ITU-601 and ITU-709. It really should though because the SD and HD color spaces aren't the same.

Quote:


2) I notice that you only changed YFLR for 1080i. If I send 720P from set top box (to prevent extra processing steps that would be required for 720P sources like ESPN HD) to the TV, is there any change that should be made to YFLR for 720P?

From what I saw, no. The only resolution where I noticed the LPF rearing its ugly head was 1080i. umr said it was also affecting 720p but I checked and rechecked this carefully when I was tackling the LPF issue on my coworker's set.

Quote:


3) Will the overscan settings decrease overscan (perhaps a stupid question)? My set currently is about 2.5-3% overscan.

Yes they can actually be reduced enough you'd actually be slightly underscanned. That said, I really recommend leaving the overscan settings alone, even for 480i, 480p, and 720p (and I'd already made it clear in the past before I'd even found overscan settings that no one should even think of touching them for 1080i or 1080p). The reason I believe they should be left alone even for the lower resolutions is because lots of moire was appearing in test patterns when it was changed from the default (whether I decreased or even increased (!) it).

Quote:


4) Even fully using the menu controls for pic position, the picture needs to be moved down another inch. Can this be done in the service menu? How? Before or after adjusting overscan?

Unlike the overscan, I say go ahead and play with the centering all you like in the service menu (though I found my coworker's set didn't need any adjustments). If you really want to play with overscan though, you could do this in either order though I'd say center first with how the overscan settings were working. I don't have my notes in front of me that said exactly which part of the service menu was for making positioning changes, but it was somewhere right where the overscan settings that I'd found are (i.e., somewhere in the WEM SERVICE 067-070 block that I'd previously mentioned).

Quote:


I'm slowly, but surely getting my picture dialed in with the help of you and this great thread. -
Much Thanks.

You're welcome.
post #702 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Googer View Post

Good to hear you're happy with the results with just eye-balling it.

You're in effect doing a more controlled form of the 'steaming rat' calibration.

Another interesting link - thanks again. I'm sure I'd never have tried 'Steaming Rat' if not for your guidance. I probably should get a calibration disk, but, it would still only be as good as my aging eyeballs since I am unlikely to have access to or know what to do with the proper equipment. On the other hand, quality in this case is subject to the eye of the beholder, so, it's only got to be good enough to please me and if it's not spot on yet, it's close enough I'm confident I can get it there with a little more tweeking.

We readers of this thread are really fortunate to have such a helpful, knowledgable contributor as you on it Googer. Thanks.
post #703 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyv View Post

Googer:

The grayscale test pattern you linked looked great. It was a very consistant in tone and caused me to adjust my brightness and contrast a little (at first the two dark bars to the left looked the same now the left most is absolutely black and the next one is just really dark while the right most is pretty close to white).

I took your advice and went to the PANEL settings to adjust the green bias (having set it and green gain back to zero in the menu white balance). I had to pull it down from the 128 it was defaulted at to 118, but, now it looks great. I tried several source segments that had really exhibited the problem before and they look fine. I tried a few other things to make sure I hadn't fixed bad images only to mess up good ones and was satisfied with the results.

Enough so, I called and cancelled the service tech I had scheduled to come tomorrow.

Thanks.

jimmyv:

I have seen the same problem on my set. So except the green bias in the service menu, is there anything else we need to change to get rid of the green haze?

Thanks.
post #704 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by wstsao View Post

jimmyv:

I have seen the same problem on my set. So except the green bias in the service menu, is there anything else we need to change to get rid of the green haze?

Thanks.

I'll need to spend more time looking at more sources to see if this has completely addressed the problem, but, so far it's very encouraging. According to the way I read Googer's comments to me, if your green haze is strictly a low light / shadowed area issue, then green bias should handle it. If it also shows up on brightly lit areas, then green gain probably needs to be adjusted.

Mine was mainly the first, so, right now I've only lowered the green bias. I had noticed a little green tinging on some blond hair in brighter scenes previously, but, they were live (well not DVD or recorded by me) feeds, so, I can't easily go back and review them to see if I need to do further tweeking. And it could just be the source. As people here keep pointing out, that's often the most likely offender.

Before I will adjust the SXRD's settings further, I want a source (DVD or recorded broadcasts) on my HTPC that I can compare how it looks on my CRT to. I'm fairly confident the CRT computer monitor gives pretty accurate color, so, if the source doesn't exhibit the issue I'm concerned about on the CRT, then, I'll consider adjusting the SXRD, otherwise I'd first be skeptical of the source.
post #705 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by reidmier View Post

Can someone please direct me to the CNET test patterns? I've generated my own, but I'd like to see what others are talking about. Thanks in advance.

Perhaps I asked the wrong question. I followed the prior message link to the .TS files, but this isn't exactly what I was looking for. I'm looking for a static image (.JPG, .BMP) of a full 1920x1080 test pattern that I can load as the background of my extended Windows desktop (Sony 60A2000) so I can check the convergence, keystone, overscan... Any suggestions?
post #706 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgt12 View Post

Do you guys run your Xbox 360 at 720p or 1080i?

Owning both a 360 and an A2000 SXRD, I recommend going with 1080i. Outputting in 1080i does add some very minor motion adaptive issues, but they are pretty hard to notice (when compared to the 720p output on the SXRD). The 1080i output is noticeably sharper (to me who sits 8 feet away from a 60" TV) when looking at small objects on the screen (i.e. objects off in the distance in 3D games). I don't perceive much difference in frame rate with the games I've tested (Oblivion, Burnout Revenge, PDZ, etc.). Googer is right that virtually all of the games render internally at 720p, but the 360 seems to do a better job stepping up the 1080i/p resolution than the A2000 does (to my eyes at least).

Above all else, turn the detail enhancement to medium (I recommend medium, but you might like more or less). The Xbox 360 output looks worlds better when detail enhancement is running.

Better yet, try out all the modes yourself, and let your own eyes be the judge.
post #707 of 3250
There are several setting suggestions in this review of the 60A2000.
post #708 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue 911 View Post

There are several setting suggestions in this review of the 60A2000.

No backlight on the remote! I guess us owners can live with that review. That is probably the most positive overall review I have ever seen form S&V.
post #709 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue 911 View Post

There are several setting suggestions in this review of the 60A2000.

That review breaks my heart.
post #710 of 3250
This is from the Test Bench part of the review, I don't have a SXRD, but the info look interesting for you owners. So many Different DLP/LCOS, such are hard choice to make . arrhhh lol

http://www.soundandvisionmag.com/




" Test Bench: Sony KDS-60A2000 60-inch SXRD HDTV


Except where otherwise noted, all tests were performed via the HDMI input with test signals from a Sencore VP403 signal generator.

Brightness (100-IRE window before/after calibration): 99.2/35.4 ftL
Color temperature (Custom mode, Warm2 color temperature) before/after calibration:
IRE Before After
20 6,995 6,418
30 6,874 6,490
40 6,881 6,498
50 6,830 6,516
60 6,758 6,477
70 6,724 6,468
80 6,680 6,443
90 6,617 6,418
100 6,595 6,400

Setting the Sony's picture mode to Custom and its color temperature to Warm 2 resulted in a slightly bluish color temperature at low brightness levels, with accuracy improving as brightness increased. After calibration with the White Balance user menu controls, grayscale tracking was within ±100 degrees kelvin of the industry-standard 6,500K from 20 to 100 IRE very good performance. (Calibration needs to be performed by a qualified technician, so discuss it with your dealer before purchase or go to www.imagingscience.com to check for a technician in your area.)

Color decoding was excellent, with no error for green and blue and +3% for red. Viewing of program material after calibration revealed slightly oversaturated reds and a barely perceptible rosy hue on some bright scenes that did not show up in color-temperature measurements. Backing off the color saturation and red gain controls slightly resulted in a better balanced picture.

Early in our testing, we identified an anomaly in the set's ability to fully resolve the most detailed section of a 1080i multiburst test pattern. It turned out Sony had mis-set one of the TV's factory defaults. The company gave us a service-menu adjustment to correct this, after which the KDS-60A2000 fully resolved every line of 1080i and 720p test signals. Sony has said that some early samples may have left the factory with the original default setting, but we could not detect any difference in detail on regular program material before and after the fix. 480p test signals looked at little soft, and the set did not resolve the most detailed section of the pattern; the 480i pattern was a bit sharper overall. The set resolved 1080i signals perfectly via its component-video inputs, but the picture was a little softer and slightly noisy in the most detailed portion of the 720p pattern.

Picture uniformity was generally excellent. Full-field color and gray test patterns showed remarkably good coverage from edge to edge, with virtually no detectable hot-spotting and no unusual characteristics. Ramp and step patterns showed very even gradation from dark to light. Notably, the banding-check pattern from the Avia Pro test disc (played in 1080i format from our upscaling Denon DVD player) revealed essentially no noticeable false contouring on the red or green sections, only very fine contouring on blue, and slightly more on gray. This is excellent performance, exceeding that of Sony's older SXRD models.

The KDS-60A2000 exhibited no geometry issues on linearity test patterns (which measure its ability to display a perfect circle), and grid test patterns were essentially perfect save a very slight outward bending of vertical lines in the lower right corner of the screen. This would be essentially invisible in program material, and we're used to seeing much worse on rear projectors because of the vagaries in the manufacture of mechanical and optical elements.

The Sony passed or performed well in all the jaggies tests on the Silicon Optix HQV test disc played back at 480p through a Samsung Blu-ray Disc player. These test the TV's ability to display diagonal lines in images with a minimum of stair-stepping artifacts. After I optimized the KDS-60A2000's DRC processing for standard-def signals, it also performed very well on the HQV disc's demanding noise tests (with the Noise Reduction option set to High). The HQV's detail test, which shows a white stone bridge alongside a highway, was a bit soft at 480p, with some glossing-over of the bridge's finest mortar lines. The same scene, upconverted by the Samsung to 1080i, actually revealed more of the detail inherent in the disc."
post #711 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyv View Post

I'll need to spend more time looking at more sources to see if this has completely addressed the problem, but, so far it's very encouraging. According to the way I read Googer's comments to me, if your green haze is strictly a low light / shadowed area issue, then green bias should handle it. If it also shows up on brightly lit areas, then green gain probably needs to be adjusted.

Mine was mainly the first, so, right now I've only lowered the green bias. I had noticed a little green tinging on some blond hair in brighter scenes previously, but, they were live (well not DVD or recorded by me) feeds, so, I can't easily go back and review them to see if I need to do further tweeking. And it could just be the source. As people here keep pointing out, that's often the most likely offender.

Before I will adjust the SXRD's settings further, I want a source (DVD or recorded broadcasts) on my HTPC that I can compare how it looks on my CRT to. I'm fairly confident the CRT computer monitor gives pretty accurate color, so, if the source doesn't exhibit the issue I'm concerned about on the CRT, then, I'll consider adjusting the SXRD, otherwise I'd first be skeptical of the source.

Thanks a lot. That really helps. By the way, maybe there is only me don't know that the WB settings in service menu are related to color temp. So for different color temp, the default value is different.
post #712 of 3250
So, are there any hard settings numbers (similar to what Cnet posted) that the "novice" user such as myself can implement, or is it pretty much going with a couple set starting points ("Custom", "Warm 2", etc) and tweaking other things on your own?
post #713 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmyv View Post

According to the way I read Googer's comments to me, if your green haze is strictly a low light / shadowed area issue, then green bias should handle it. If it also shows up on brightly lit areas, then green gain probably needs to be adjusted.

I am slightly skeptical about using gain/bias controls to get rid of the green blob. If these are color non-uniformities adjusting gain/bias will not make those non-uniformities go away. What they may do, is to throw the gray scale so far away from a standard picture (D65 - 6500K) that the eye may not notice subtle shades of green.

I wish (well, not really) I had access to a SXRD set with the green blob issue so I could make some specific measurements on the impact of these adjustments - but I don't.
post #714 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by davehancock View Post

I am slightly skeptical about using gain/bias controls to get rid of the green blob. If these are color non-uniformities adjusting gain/bias will not make those non-uniformities go away. What they may do, is to throw the gray scale so far away from a standard picture (D65 - 6500K) that the eye may not notice subtle shades of green.

I wish (well, not really) I had access to a SXRD set with the green blob issue so I could make some specific measurements on the impact of these adjustments - but I don't.

Dave, since you are a calibrator I need some imput about what to do with my 2nd A-2000. This one has a slight magenta haze across the top and down the right side. It is not super obvious most of the time but it is there. What puzzles me is I have had 2 August build sets with these issues, but the reviewers of the sets never seem to note these issues...is Sony hand picking an extra-good set for these guys, or am I just unlucky? I have read the LCOS is prone to uniformity problems. The overall PQ on this thing is great. If some uniformity issues are 'normal' I can live with it..but if it's not normal I want another set. Anyones input is appreciated.
post #715 of 3250
Does anybody know what the different settings under the A/V sync menu option actually do? The manual tells me nothing other than it only applying to digital out. It doesn't say whether or not each setting just is a different amount of audio delay or if it also can delay the picture.

I use the built-in tuner straight from my co-ax and sometimes the sound is really off, even with the built-in speakers. I've tried using a delay on my receiver, but it seems that the picture is already ahead of the sound. So, introducing an audio delay just makes it worse. I don't have the digital out connected to my receiver yet, so I'm wondering if the A/V sync actually allows you to delay the picture to match with the sound in addition to being able to delay the sound. It this is true, I'll just go and grab the digital audio cable today. Since my 360 and DVD player have optical output direct to my receiver I hadn't really thought about adding the digital out from the TV as well.

I had forgotten about this thread until after I already posted this on the owner's thread as well. So, I apologize for the dual posting.
post #716 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanBuck View Post

Dave, since you are a calibrator I need some imput about what to do with my 2nd A-2000. This one has a slight magenta haze across the top and down the right side. It is not super obvious most of the time but it is there. What puzzles me is I have had 2 August build sets with these issues, but the reviewers of the sets never seem to note these issues...is Sony hand picking an extra-good set for these guys, or am I just unlucky? I have read the LCOS is prone to uniformity problems. The overall PQ on this thing is great. If some uniformity issues are 'normal' I can live with it..but if it's not normal I want another set. Anyones input is appreciated.

I think it is both Sony hand picking sets and luck. One thing is that warm-up time is important on these sets. One should allow at least 10 minutes (according to Sony), and preferably 1/2 hour before making uniformity evaluations.

An additional comment on these color non-uniformity issues: I do not believe that they are electronic. I've seen no statements as to the actual cause, but I've go to believe that it is an issue with light leakage, deterioration of the dicholoric mirrors, or some other optical/mechanical/chemical issue in the imaging engine (optical block).
post #717 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by davehancock View Post

An additional comment on these color non-uniformity issues: I do not believe that they are electronic. I've seen no statements as to the actual cause, but I've go to believe that it is an issue with light leakage, deterioration of the dicholoric mirrors, or some other optical/mechanical/chemical issue in the imaging engine (optical block).

Couldn't some sort of an electrical problem cause a mechanical/chemical problem, due to heat if nothing else?
post #718 of 3250
Hi SXRD owners.

I am getting the A2000 today & have the Toshiba HD-A1 player.

I was looking at my HDMI cable specs & noticed the cable accepts signals up to 1080 interlace.

The A2000 has 2 HDMI in's that accept 1080p, so will I have any problems with 1080i material?

...

Does the display itself scale all 1080i content to 1080p & does the display have user settings for resolution?

Thanks!

Any feedback on this, much appreciated!
post #719 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krammer1 View Post

Hi SXRD owners.

I am getting the A2000 today & have the Toshiba HD-A1 player.

I was looking at my HDMI cable specs & noticed the cable accepts signals up to 1080 interlace.

The A2000 has 2 HDMI in's that accept 1080p, so will I have any problems with 1080i material?

...

Does the display itself scale all 1080i content to 1080p & does the display have user settings for resolution?

Thanks!

Any feedback on this, much appreciated!

You will be amazed at the quality of the picture with your HD-A1. I've stunned many friends and family with this combo.
post #720 of 3250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Krammer1 View Post

The A2000 has 2 HDMI in's that accept 1080p, so will I have any problems with 1080i material?

No!
Quote:


Does the display itself scale all 1080i content to 1080p

Yes
Quote:


& does the display have user settings for resolution?

No - But not sure what you are asking. The set upconverts everything (except 1080p) to 1080p because that is what the display technology needs. Settings (if there are any) for scan rate are on the source end (DVD player, STB, broadcast station).
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AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Rear Projection Units › Owners ONLY thread - >>>KDS-A2000's<<< - Settings/Tweaks