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Olive Opus: First Impressions - Page 3

post #61 of 1136
Alright, got the 2.3 upgrade installed no problem. Looks like lots of rearranging of the menus has happened.

However, I'm not sure how to access the new Web interface. When I access via the player's IP address (as before), I'm just seeing the old Web interface that I had before. Any suggestions?
post #62 of 1136
Brad,

Simply delete the old IP address and start anew.

When this is done the new "screen face" will come with it.
post #63 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blindamood View Post

Alright, got the 2.3 upgrade installed no problem. Looks like lots of rearranging of the menus has happened.

However, I'm not sure how to access the new Web interface. When I access via the player's IP address (as before), I'm just seeing the old Web interface that I had before. Any suggestions?

Check the IP address that is being assigned to the Opus by going to network and then pushing the info button. Presumably the IP is being assigned dynamically so it proabaly has changed on your system since the last time you used the web interface. Once you know what IP is assigned to the Opus by your system you can type that into the address box on your web browser.
post #64 of 1136
Thanks, guys. Will give it a shot when I get home tonight.
post #65 of 1136
Okay, got it working now -- very sweet! I was able to review and update the genre of every CD in my collection in about 45 minutes. With the previous interface it would have taken all night...

And the ability to sit here on my couch with my laptop and play songs is a pretty nice perk indeed! Kudos to Olive on this major improvement.
post #66 of 1136
For the benefit of those who may be considering an Olive music server, here are a few screen shots of the new Web interface. First one is a list of albums; second is information about the current selection; and the third is one of one of the configuration pages.
LL
LL
LL
post #67 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blindamood View Post

Okay, got it working now -- very sweet! I was able to review and update the genre of every CD in my collection in about 45 minutes. With the previous interface it would have taken all night...

And the ability to sit here on my couch with my laptop and play songs is a pretty nice perk indeed! Kudos to Olive on this major improvement.

Yeah I agree. It makes a world of difference. Now you really have your entire collection at your fingertips for your listening pleasure.
post #68 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blindamood View Post

Okay, got it working now -- very sweet! I was able to review and update the genre of every CD in my collection in about 45 minutes. With the previous interface it would have taken all night...

And the ability to sit here on my couch with my laptop and play songs is a pretty nice perk indeed! Kudos to Olive on this major improvement.

I stayed away from this thread after hearing from Olive that they were about to release a new version of their software, as it was pointles to discuss shortcomings that might be addressed by the new version.

I have an Opus and installed version 2.3 a week ago. Here are my first impressions:

1. Overall, Olive has achieved three dramatic improvements in one sweep. First, it streamlined the menu system, rearranging options in a more logical and understandable fashion and adding some very useful ones, such as "convert", which lets you convert files to and from any supported format (more about that later). Second, it replaced a very basic, clunky and slow web interface with one that makes editing metadata extremely easy (that is crucial for those who have a lot of classical music, as album/artist/track info as supplied by CDDB is very erratic). Third, and MOST IMPORTANT, whereas the old web interface was strictly for editing the music library, Olive has now added FULL CONTROL of the music server from the web interface. All menu options are available and can be selected and activated from the web interface (except of course network settings). That solves the problem of the "blind" remote control that in theory made it possible to access menu options, but was in fact only useful for controlling playback after a music selection had been made from the music server itself, due to the impossibility of reading the display from a distance. Olive provides three "flavors" of the web interface, including one that is designed for the smallish screens of PDAs and handheld tablets. This means that an Opus or Musica can be fully controlled remotely from any wifi-enbled handheld device with a touchscreen, which eliminates the convenience handicap Olive servers had relative to systems like the Sonos systems, that come with a screen-equipped control device.

2. My experience with a Nokia 770 Internet tablet: the 770 (that show up on the Olive web site as the "Rondo" is a fairly inexpensive wifi-enabled device (costs about $350) which has an Opera web browser. The touchscreen is of very high quality and larger than that of any PDA (4 diagonally); the Olive web interface fits that screen perfectly, and there you have a pocketable intelligent remote that can even be used for light editing of metadata (serious editing still requires a computer with a keyboard rather than the virtual keyboard available on the 770 for text entry). Of course the Nokia 770 ihas many features besides a web browser, but this is not the place for a review of those, except one: the 770 lets you install a Upnp streaming client, that will instantly recognize the Opus and let you stream wirelessly any music in your library (not FLAC files though) for private listening on headphones wherever you are within range of your wifi network. This highlights one of the improvements made to the Olive software: it now includes support for third-party Upnp-compliant streaming clients such as the Rokku and Squeezebox devices.

3. Other improvements/additions: the metadata editing function now lets you change info in any field of the database, whereas the old version was very limited in that respect. Classical music lovers will be happy to find that the Composer category, which in the old version showed up in the Opus library sub-menu, but not as an editable category in the web interface, has been duly added to the new editing interface. The Convert function, mentioned earlier, lets you change the format of music files on the hard disk. This is handy for converting to FLAC or whatever files imported from a computer in WAV or AIFF format. However, that function need further refinement: currently, when you choose to convert a music selection, the files are converted to the default format you have set for importing CDs that you rip on the Opus; in other words, if you have set the default to FLAC and want to convert FLAC files to WAV or MP3, you need to temporarily change the dfautlt format. Also, if you convert a selection to MP3 for exporting to an iPod or other portable player, you cannot of course reconvert the files later to a lossless format (you can, but the resulting files arejust a reformatted version of the lossy files, you do not restore what has been lost). In order to make the Cnvert function more useful, Olive should let the user choose the conversion format regardless of what the default has been st to, and also, and more important, offer the option of crating converted copies of eisting files and storing those copies in a special folder for exporting to portable payers. Another feature Olive says it added is full support for Upnp-compliant NAS external storage. I have not tested it, but that feature would be a big improvement over the current backup solution (copying the HDD to an external USB drive).

4. Observed glitches: the new web interface occasionally freezes when listening to internet radio and attempting to perform ogher functions at the same time; iTunes integration only works one-way now: you can stream files in compatible format from the Opus to a computer running iTunes, but iTunes, although it shows up as amusic server on the Opus, refuses to connect for streaming to the Opus (according to Olive, this is actually a glitch in the latest version of iTunes 7.x that will be corrected by Apple).

5. Neede improvements: anew user manual is sorely neede. The current one was already obsolete when the previous software update was released last June. It is now even more obsolete. It is also too skimpy on technical aspects and shoud be expanded. Althoug the new software is pretty much self-explanatory, new users of an Olive music server will find the manual only marginally useful.

BUT BASICALLY< PEOPLE AT OLIVE HAVE MADE A GIGANTIC STEP FORWARD. They definitely listen to thei customers, so keep posting...

MG.
post #69 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DIGINOTE View Post

I stayed away from this thread after hearing from Olive that they were about to release a new version of their software, as it was pointles to discuss shortcomings that might be addressed by the new version.

I have an Opus and installed version 2.3 a week ago. Here are my first impressions:

1. Overall, Olive has achieved three dramatic improvements in one sweep. First, it streamlined the menu system, rearranging options in a more logical and understandable fashion and adding some very useful ones, such as "convert", which lets you convert files to and from any supported format (more about that later). Second, it replaced a very basic, clunky and slow web interface with one that makes editing metadata extremely easy (that is crucial for those who have a lot of classical music, as album/artist/track info as supplied by CDDB is very erratic). Third, and MOST IMPORTANT, whereas the old web interface was strictly for editing the music library, Olive has now added FULL CONTROL of the music server from the web interface. All menu options are available and can be selected and activated from the web interface (except of course network settings). That solves the problem of the "blind" remote control that in theory made it possible to access menu options, but was in fact only useful for controlling playback after a music selection had been made from the music server itself, due to the impossibility of reading the display from a distance. Olive provides three "flavors" of the web interface, including one that is designed for the smallish screens of PDAs and handheld tablets. This means that an Opus or Musica can be fully controlled remotely from any wifi-enbled handheld device with a touchscreen, which eliminates the convenience handicap Olive servers had relative to systems like the Sonos systems, that come with a screen-equipped control device.

2. My experience with a Nokia 770 Internet tablet: the 770 (that show up on the Olive web site as the "Rondo" is a fairly inexpensive wifi-enabled device (costs about $350) which has an Opera web browser. The touchscreen is of very high quality and larger than that of any PDA (4 diagonally); the Olive web interface fits that screen perfectly, and there you have a pocketable intelligent remote that can even be used for light editing of metadata (serious editing still requires a computer with a keyboard rather than the virtual keyboard available on the 770 for text entry). Of course the Nokia 770 ihas many features besides a web browser, but this is not the place for a review of those, except one: the 770 lets you install a Upnp streaming client, that will instantly recognize the Opus and let you stream wirelessly any music in your library (not FLAC files though) for private listening on headphones wherever you are within range of your wifi network. This highlights one of the improvements made to the Olive software: it now includes support for third-party Upnp-compliant streaming clients such as the Rokku and Squeezebox devices.

3. Other improvements/additions: the metadata editing function now lets you change info in any field of the database, whereas the old version was very limited in that respect. Classical music lovers will be happy to find that the Composer category, which in the old version showed up in the Opus library sub-menu, but not as an editable category in the web interface, has been duly added to the new editing interface. The Convert function, mentioned earlier, lets you change the format of music files on the hard disk. This is handy for converting to FLAC or whatever files imported from a computer in WAV or AIFF format. However, that function need further refinement: currently, when you choose to convert a music selection, the files are converted to the default format you have set for importing CDs that you rip on the Opus; in other words, if you have set the default to FLAC and want to convert FLAC files to WAV or MP3, you need to temporarily change the dfautlt format. Also, if you convert a selection to MP3 for exporting to an iPod or other portable player, you cannot of course reconvert the files later to a lossless format (you can, but the resulting files arejust a reformatted version of the lossy files, you do not restore what has been lost). In order to make the Cnvert function more useful, Olive should let the user choose the conversion format regardless of what the default has been st to, and also, and more important, offer the option of crating converted copies of eisting files and storing those copies in a special folder for exporting to portable payers. Another feature Olive says it added is full support for Upnp-compliant NAS external storage. I have not tested it, but that feature would be a big improvement over the current backup solution (copying the HDD to an external USB drive).

4. Observed glitches: the new web interface occasionally freezes when listening to internet radio and attempting to perform ogher functions at the same time; iTunes integration only works one-way now: you can stream files in compatible format from the Opus to a computer running iTunes, but iTunes, although it shows up as amusic server on the Opus, refuses to connect for streaming to the Opus (according to Olive, this is actually a glitch in the latest version of iTunes 7.x that will be corrected by Apple).

5. Neede improvements: anew user manual is sorely neede. The current one was already obsolete when the previous software update was released last June. It is now even more obsolete. It is also too skimpy on technical aspects and shoud be expanded. Althoug the new software is pretty much self-explanatory, new users of an Olive music server will find the manual only marginally useful.

BUT BASICALLY< PEOPLE AT OLIVE HAVE MADE A GIGANTIC STEP FORWARD. They definitely listen to thei customers, so keep posting...

MG.

I think the first web interface was really a beta that they included just because they hadn't got a full functioning version ready but they wanted to say they had a web interface. In any case, as everyone has noted, this is a great step.

My main problem with the Opus now (or is it with iPod?) is that I have to have two sets of ripped files, one in FLAC for the Opus and one in mpa for the iPod. That is a pain. I normally rip on my computer in iTunes in aiff and then copy over to the Opus but then I have to convert to FLAC for the Opus and mpa for the ipod to save space on both devices. A real hassle. In fact I haven't really found a good solution and my ripped collection is getting disorganized as a result. I have to find a way to maintain one library that suits both the Opus and iPod. It would be so much easier if the two devices supported the same lossless, compressed format.
post #70 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DIGINOTE View Post

2. My experience with a Nokia 770 Internet tablet: the 770 (that show up on the Olive web site as the "Rondo" is a fairly inexpensive wifi-enabled device (costs about $350) which has an Opera web browser. The touchscreen is of very high quality and larger than that of any PDA (4 diagonally); the Olive web interface fits that screen perfectly, and there you have a pocketable intelligent remote that can even be used for light editing of metadata (serious editing still requires a computer with a keyboard rather than the virtual keyboard available on the 770 for text entry). Of course the Nokia 770 ihas many features besides a web browser, but this is not the place for a review of those, except one: the 770 lets you install a Upnp streaming client, that will instantly recognize the Opus and let you stream wirelessly any music in your library (not FLAC files though) for private listening on headphones wherever you are within range of your wifi network. This highlights one of the improvements made to the Olive software: it now includes support for third-party Upnp-compliant streaming clients such as the Rokku and Squeezebox devices


I'm interested in the 770. Can you tell us a bit more? Is there a cradle for charging or does it charge like a cell phone? Is it much of a deal to install the streaming client? Are there alternatives to the 770 (and laptop) that could be used to control the Opus? thx.
post #71 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack D View Post

I'm interested in the 770. Can you tell us a bit more? Is there a cradle for charging or does it charge like a cell phone? Is it much of a deal to install the streaming client? Are there alternatives to the 770 (and laptop) that could be used to control the Opus? thx.

Jack,

The Nokia 770 charges like a cell phone (actually it uses the very same charger as my Nokia phone). Battery life is decent for the size of the device: about three hours with the display on and the device in active use, but much longer in "standby" mode (to which the 770 automatically reverts after a delay you can specify; when used as a remote, it goes to standby and wakes up as neede, extending battery life). The streamer is offered as an optional download on the 770 (it connects to a site where new applications developped for the device are posted). Installation takes a minute and requires no setup. The 770 got a so-so review in PC Magazine, but the reviewer seems to have missed the point by downrating the device for not having features that its designers never intende to include. Like Olive music servers, that are designe to do just a few things as well and conveniently as possible without an arsenal of separate devices connected through miles of cables, the 770 is designed to do essentially one thing: give web access anywhere there is a wireless network available (wifi, Bluetooth, plus any flavor of packet data network through a Bluetooth-enabled cell phone) and offer a good browser and an excellent display for the purpose.
Of course you can use a slew of other devices: a PDA with a decent screen and wifi, like the Palm F/X, might do if you have good eyesight and do not mind doing some scrolling. Any small tablet PC would work fine. And the new Sony Mylo would also work. I chose the Nokia because of the screensize and quality (you get the full Olive web interface opening screen without scrolling, with a highly legible font size). You could even use a wifi-enabled cell phone such as the Nokia N80 and some BenQ models, if you can live with the small screens and the awkward navigation controls.

Hope that helps.

M.G.
post #72 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack D View Post

I think the first web interface was really a beta that they included just because they hadn't got a full functioning version ready but they wanted to say they had a web interface. In any case, as everyone has noted, this is a great step.

My main problem with the Opus now (or is it with iPod?) is that I have to have two sets of ripped files, one in FLAC for the Opus and one in mpa for the iPod. That is a pain. I normally rip on my computer in iTunes in aiff and then copy over to the Opus but then I have to convert to FLAC for the Opus and mpa for the ipod to save space on both devices. A real hassle. In fact I haven't really found a good solution and my ripped collection is getting disorganized as a result. I have to find a way to maintain one library that suits both the Opus and iPod. It would be so much easier if the two devices supported the same lossless, compressed format.

Jack,

This is mostly an Apple/iTunes problem in my opinion: Apple is pushing its Lossless format, which does not seem to offer significant advantages over FLAC, and refuses to support FLAC. I understand that they may license the use of Apple Lossless decoders to third-party vendors, so Olive might acquire a license and ad the format to its options. With 80 GB iPods now on the market, storing files in Apple Lossless format for both the Olive server and the iPod would be a viable solution, but that would make music stored on an Olive server unplayable on third-party streaming clients unless they hade native decoding capability for Apple Lossless.

In the meantime, there seems to be no convenient solution to th iPod problem. Mking things worse, neither iTunes nor Olive music servers, as far as I know, let you convert an existing file to a different format without overwritng the original. So if you want to have two sets of files for albums you intend to export to an iPod, there seems to be no other solution than ripping the same CD twice.

Well, forget it, rip everything in WAV and buy two 80 GB iPods and two Olive servers!

M.G.
post #73 of 1136
Thread Starter 
1. I was fiddling last night for a few minutes with the new interface and I couldn't find a way to add a song to a playlist. I was listening to a song and wanted to add from the player screen to a playlist. Am I missing something or do you have to do that directly from the Opus?

2. Diginote: How big is the actual screen on the 770? The Nokia site says that the dimensions of the unit are 5.5 x 3.1 inches. I suspect that is the entire unit and so the screen is smaller.

thanks.
post #74 of 1136
The Nokia 770 has a 4.13" diagonal 800x480 pixel display. It could be the biggest display for a handheld device in its class. Every review I've seen of the Nokia 770 praises the quality of the display, even the negative reviews. Gadget blogs are reporting that Nokia has developed a new version of the 770.

Some reviews of the Nokia 770:

http://arstechnica.com/reviews/hardware/nokia770.ars

http://www.mobileburn.com/review.jsp?Id=1376

http://www.brighthand.com/?newsID=2760

http://www.infosyncworld.com/reviews/n/6534.html

http://www.howardchui.com/modules.ph...icle&artid=203

http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,1893574,00.asp

http://reviews.cnet.com/Nokia_770_In...-31396042.html

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...041500125.html
post #75 of 1136
Thread Starter 
I wonder what improvements there are in the new version of the 770.

The alternatives to the 770 that I've dug up so far are from AMX and Crestron. I haven't been able to get prices on those units however. They seem to have a lot more functionality so I suspect that they are much more expensive.

edit: YIKES! I just saw a price on an 8.4 inch from AMX: $4500. OK so maybe the 770 is not so bad after all!
post #76 of 1136
Thread Starter 
So if the 770 screen is 4.1 inches that means that the Opus player that pops up on my laptop screen is going to be compressed on the 770. I am not at home but if I recall that default size of the Opus player is at least 5 inches diagonal. My main concern, then, is ease of viewing. I'm not blind but I don't want to have to strain to see the player and the menus.
post #77 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack D View Post

So if the 770 screen is 4.1 inches that means that the Opus player that pops up on my laptop screen is going to be compressed on the 770. I am not at home but if I recall that default size of the Opus player is at least 5 inches diagonal. My main concern, then, is ease of viewing. I'm not blind but I don't want to have to strain to see the player and the menus.

The number of pixels (800x480) is more important than the physical dimensions of the screen for legibility.

Let's say your laptop has a 1200x800 display. Then an application that takes up a quarter of your laptop screen (half of the height and half of the width) is only using 600x400 pixels and will easily fit on the Nokia 770's 800x480 display.
post #78 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hatchback View Post

The number of pixels (800x480) is more important than the physical dimensions of the screen for legibility.

Let's say your laptop has a 1200x800 display. Then an application that takes up a quarter of your laptop screen (half of the height and half of the width) is only using 600x400 pixels and will easily fit on the Nokia 770's 800x480 display.

Well I hope you are correct. I decided to give it a shot. I ordered one which should arrive in a few days. It sure will be great to control the Opus from a pocket-sized device. I think a lot of the negative comments about the 770 were based on the software when it was first released (late 2005?). I think the newer version of the software is much improved. In any case, I mainly want the 770 to control the Opus so I'm not really asking too much out of it.
post #79 of 1136
Hi Jack,

I was wondering if you had any problems downloading the software updates for your Opus. Whenever I press the update software button the unit gives me an error message. I called Olive and the guy was on the phone with me for a while and we couldn't figure it out. He said it must be something with my ISP (Verizon) or the router (Apple). I called Verizon and I don't think it's a problem on their end, the internet radio stations come in fine when I plug the Opus directly into the modem (same with direct plug from Opus to Apple router). Did you experience anything like this?
post #80 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by amenon View Post

Hi Jack,

I was wondering if you had any problems downloading the software updates for your Opus. Whenever I press the update software button the unit gives me an error message. I called Olive and the guy was on the phone with me for a while and we couldn't figure it out. He said it must be something with my ISP (Verizon) or the router (Apple). I called Verizon and I don't think it's a problem on their end, the internet radio stations come in fine when I plug the Opus directly into the modem (same with direct plug from Opus to Apple router). Did you experience anything like this?


With a hard-wired connection to my router, I had no trouble updating. It took about one minute to download the software, two minutes while the Opus was installing it automatically, and then the unit rebooted.

Given my experience with Verizon, I would not trust their so-called "customer care" (makes it sound like the customer is sick). Why not just download the new software from Olive's web site, burn it to a CD and run it from there?

M.G
post #81 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack D View Post

1. I was fiddling last night for a few minutes with the new interface and I couldn't find a way to add a song to a playlist. I was listening to a song and wanted to add from the player screen to a playlist. Am I missing something or do you have to do that directly from the Opus?

2. Diginote: How big is the actual screen on the 770? The Nokia site says that the dimensions of the unit are 5.5 x 3.1 inches. I suspect that is the entire unit and so the screen is smaller.

thanks.

About adding tracks to playlists: The Olive web interface screen, when you play music, can be toggled between a "player" view showing playback controls and info on the current song, and a "browser" view that shows all tracks on the album. To add the current track, just click on the box to the left of the track title, then select "add to list". That will open the list of your playlists; click on the bos to the left of the one you want and select "add to list".There is one aspect of that process that needs refinement: as far as I can tell, there is no way you can mark several tracks for inclusion in a playlist, so you have to select them one by one (of course you can select an entire album).

Concerning the Nokia 770, the discussion about screen size and software seems to be moot if you intend to use the unit primarily as a smart control device: the screen size is sufficient to accomodate the entire web interface with excellent legibility (I am "partially sighted" and have no trouble), and the only piece of sofware you need to use is the web browser, which is excellent (a version of Opera). Responsiveness certainly does not match that of a dual-processor desktop with a gaming graphics board, but it is quite sufficient for the modest requirements of navigating the Opus menus. Keep in mind that at 4.1", the screen is only marginally smaller that the 4.5" one on the Sony Vaio UX series tablet PCs (which costs about $1,800).

M.G.
post #82 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amenon View Post

Hi Jack,

I was wondering if you had any problems downloading the software updates for your Opus. Whenever I press the update software button the unit gives me an error message. I called Olive and the guy was on the phone with me for a while and we couldn't figure it out. He said it must be something with my ISP (Verizon) or the router (Apple). I called Verizon and I don't think it's a problem on their end, the internet radio stations come in fine when I plug the Opus directly into the modem (same with direct plug from Opus to Apple router). Did you experience anything like this?

When I initially set up my Opus I had a lot of problems linking it to my WLAN and in the end I just ran a LAN cable to it as I have another piece of equipment in my rack that needs to be connected to my LAN and doesn't have wireless capability. Once I did that I have had no LAN-type problems with my Opus.

I assume that the Olive tech guy walked you through the basics, like making sure that your router is assigning a relelvant IP, etc. I don't know about Apple network connections but I assume you are properly connected to your LAN or WLAN if you can get internet radio. Can you use the internet database to look up songs when you rip a CD?

I suppose the least headache would be, as DIGINOTE suggested, to make a CD and upgrade that way. It is certainly worth the trouble to get the new firmware.
post #83 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DIGINOTE View Post

About adding tracks to playlists: The Olive web interface screen, when you play music, can be toggled between a "player" view showing playback controls and info on the current song, and a "browser" view that shows all tracks on the album. To add the current track, just click on the box to the left of the track title, then select "add to list". That will open the list of your playlists; click on the bos to the left of the one you want and select "add to list".There is one aspect of that process that needs refinement: as far as I can tell, there is no way you can mark several tracks for inclusion in a playlist, so you have to select them one by one (of course you can select an entire album).

Concerning the Nokia 770, the discussion about screen size and software seems to be moot if you intend to use the unit primarily as a smart control device: the screen size is sufficient to accomodate the entire web interface with excellent legibility (I am "partially sighted" and have no trouble), and the only piece of sofware you need to use is the web browser, which is excellent (a version of Opera). Responsiveness certainly does not match that of a dual-processor desktop with a gaming graphics board, but it is quite sufficient for the modest requirements of navigating the Opus menus. Keep in mind that at 4.1", the screen is only marginally smaller that the 4.5" one on the Sony Vaio UX series tablet PCs (which costs about $1,800).

M.G.

I guess I was just being lazy about figuring out how to add a song to the playlist. Thanks.

Well, as I said, I ordered a 770 and should have it tomorrow. How did you know that I had a dual-processor desktop with a gaming graphics card? Yeah I really don't need to do serious web browsing or any fancy internet stuff from the 770. At this point I just want it to control my Opus. I use Opera most of the time for browsing on my desktop so that is fine with me for the 770.

I have to admit, however, that when I started looking at other touch screens I started to get ideas about controling all my equipment, including the Opus, with one touch screen. That would be nice but when I saw the prices of these things I figured I would stick with my Harmony remote and get the 770 for the Opus.

Random question: Is it relatively easy (buttons large enough and screen responsive to finger touches) to use your fingers to push the buttons on the 770 or do you have to use the pointing device?
post #84 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Has anyone used the Opus for streaming to other rooms? I haven't really investigated how that works but I'm setting up a second sound system in another room and might like to play around with that feature. I suppose at a minimum the receiver in the other room has to have some sort of wireless capability. I don't know if you have to buy a device to plug into the receiver or what.

Ok I just checked out the Olive site and it seems you have to buy a Sonata at $200 and it can be linked to your amp (via coax I suppose) in another room. Has anyone used a Sonata?
post #85 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by DIGINOTE View Post

With a hard-wired connection to my router, I had no trouble updating. It took about one minute to download the software, two minutes while the Opus was installing it automatically, and then the unit rebooted.

Given my experience with Verizon, I would not trust their so-called "customer care" (makes it sound like the customer is sick). Why not just download the new software from Olive's web site, burn it to a CD and run it from there?

M.G

I just downloaded the software and burnt it to a cd. I will see if it works when I get home. I'm still worried that there might be some problem with the Opus though and that might be why it's not able to get the update. I'll see what happens. Thanks.
post #86 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amenon View Post

I just downloaded the software and burnt it to a cd. I will see if it works when I get home. I'm still worried that there might be some problem with the Opus though and that might be why it's not able to get the update. I'll see what happens. Thanks.


I don't know for sure but if your OPUS is able to access the internet as you say for internet radio it's a bit unclear what might be the problem with downloading the firmware.

To clarify: How is your Opus connected to the LAN (wired or wireless)? Have you tried both ways and with the same problem? Have you tried ripping to your computer hard drive and then importing the music to your Opus via the LAN? And: Have you been able to maintain a consistent connection to the internet (i.e, you have listened to internet radio for prolonged periods?).
post #87 of 1136
I usually have the Opus connected through my wireless network and I can access the internet radio stations. The connection seems fine but I never listen to internet radio for extended periods so I can't say for sure. I also tried connecting through the LAN by wiring it directly to both my router and then directly from the modem. In both cases the internet radio works but the software update fails. I already sent an email to the Olive support guy I dealt with last night. Hopefully the software update will work when I try it tonight. I'll post later with an update.
post #88 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amenon View Post

I usually have the Opus connected through my wireless network and I can access the internet radio stations. The connection seems fine but I never listen to internet radio for extended periods so I can't say for sure. I also tried connecting through the LAN by wiring it directly to both my router and then directly from the modem. In both cases the internet radio works but the software update fails. I already sent an email to the Olive support guy I dealt with last night. Hopefully the software update will work when I try it tonight. I'll post later with an update.

Two thoughts: 1. Maybe your current Opus firmware got corrupted and loading the new version will fix that 2. I assume you have a software and/or hardware firewall on your LAN and maybe a setting there is preventing you from downloading the firmware but allows internet radio to function. Can you use the internet database lookup function on the Opus?
post #89 of 1136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack D View Post

Two thoughts: 1. Maybe your current Opus firmware got corrupted and loading the new version will fix that 2. I assume you have a software and/or hardware firewall on your LAN and maybe a setting there is preventing you from downloading the firmware but allows internet radio to function. Can you use the internet database lookup function on the Opus?


1. That might be part of it. Before I did the update I was unable to load the music on the Opus into iTunes. Today after the update I opened iTunes and all the music on the Opus showed up in iTunes. So maybe there was some problem with the old software.

2. As far as the software/hardware firewall on my LAN, I'm not sure. I have WEP encryption but the Opus has the encryption key and I can now use my web browser to play the Opus so I know its getting onto the network. I'm not sure what a hardware firewall is so maybe that's an issue I need to look into. I've tried connecting the Opus directly to my DSL modem and I still can get the update (internet radio works though), so I think there's something wrong with the Opus. The tech i spoke with yesterday wasn't able to find out what the issue is yet so hopefully he'll have an idea how to take care of it.

The update installed properly so I'm in no big rush at this point.
post #90 of 1136
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by amenon View Post

1. That might be part of it. Before I did the update I was unable to load the music on the Opus into iTunes. Today after the update I opened iTunes and all the music on the Opus showed up in iTunes. So maybe there was some problem with the old software.

2. As far as the software/hardware firewall on my LAN, I'm not sure. I have WEP encryption but the Opus has the encryption key and I can now use my web browser to play the Opus so I know its getting onto the network. I'm not sure what a hardware firewall is so maybe that's an issue I need to look into. I've tried connecting the Opus directly to my DSL modem and I still can get the update (internet radio works though), so I think there's something wrong with the Opus. The tech i spoke with yesterday wasn't able to find out what the issue is yet so hopefully he'll have an idea how to take care of it.

The update installed properly so I'm in no big rush at this point.

Regarding the hardware firewall, if you don't know what it is then you don't have one unless someone else set up your LAN for you. It is a box that has a board in it dedicated to firewall protection. Your cable or DSL modem would take the signal from outside your system and there would be an RJ45 cable to the hardware firewall. Then all the other equipment on your network would link to the router in the firewall.

So at least you have the new firmware installed and it is working which is good. Can you acess the internet data base for looking up the information about a CD that you rip directly to your Opus? Hopefully the Olive tech can resolve any remaining issues if there is a glitch in your Opus but it sounds like you have close to full functionality.
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