or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › DVD Players (Standard Def) › Laserfilm Videodisc Player Discs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Laserfilm Videodisc Player Discs - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by digitalbt View Post

LOL! Yep, its a hunk for sure. It must weigh 40 pounds! I think I got a hernia carrying it out of the Goodwill store.

Right now I'm pursuing finding someone at Boeing to see if anyone knows where to get media for this beast. I'll keep you posted!

Do you weigh 80 pounds?
post #32 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrico View Post

With ALL due respect what does CED that have to do with the laser technology?


It is the precursor of the LD, which is the precursor of DVD and now HD DVD and BD
post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Susilo View Post

It is the precursor of the LD, which is the precursor of DVD and now HD DVD and BD

Your chronology is correct BUT I still don't see the correlation with laserfilm, period.
In case you wonder I had the privilege of watching your beloved CED which was NOT read by a laser beam, OK?
Thank you
post #34 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Susilo View Post

It is the precursor of the LD, which is the precursor of DVD and now HD DVD and BD

CED was NOT the precursor to LD! LD launched to consumers in December of 1978 - CED didn't hit the market till March 1981.
post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disclord View Post

CED was NOT the precursor to LD! LD launched to consumers in December of 1978 - CED didn't hit the market till March 1981.

Ahhh. thanks for letting me know. In Indonesia CED hit first (about a year or two) before LD. But tha'ts seems to be just the importation history of the technology and not the invention.
post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Susilo View Post

Ahhh. thanks for letting me know. In Indonesia CED hit first (about a year or two) before LD. But tha'ts seems to be just the importation history of the technology and not the invention.

Yeah, LD started out as "test markets" and even when Pioneer launched their VP-1000 in November 1980, they rolled it out slowly, city by city. CED launched in March 1981 nationwide at every RCA dealer - a big mistake on RCA's part because it left them no room to maneuver and created the requirement of HUGE sales right from the start - which they didn't get - they did get big disc sales though - more than they had anticipated and if player sales had been higher, there would have been a shortage of discs, as there was with LD... but the LD disc shortage wasn't due to high player sales - it was due to defects and lack of manufacturing capability.
post #37 of 49
Here's some info on the LaserFilm format. It was created by a company called ARDEV started by Atlantic Richfield in 1978. The company was established to demonstrate the technical and commercial feasibility of a photographic disc system. Goals for the system included economical real-time, on-site recording, high interactivity, analog video, audio and data recording, and playback of the disc with either laser-based or standard light-bulb based players. The original 13-inch disc had a wide, 6-micron track pitch, over 4-times wider than that of the LaserDisc system. Duplicates used diazo, rather than traditional silver film emulsions. Duplication was by contacting the master with the recording film and exposing it to light. Development was by anhydrous ammonia. The player featured IEEE-488 and RS-232 connections. Time-compressed audio could provide over 13 hours of recording - a disc used for time-compressed audio-only would rotate at 180 RPM instead of the 1800 RPM used for video. The video was not FM modulated - it was a pure composite signal sent to the modulator.

ARDEV was acquired from Atlantic Richfield in June 1981 by McDonnell Douglas Corp, becoming the videodisc division. McDonnell Douglas continued to work on the system, extending the playing time from 8 minutes at 1800 RPM to 18 minutes at 1800 RPM... this was done by reducing the track pitch and giving up playback with standard incandescent light sources. Direct recording of the composite signal was changed to the more standard FM carrier using Pulse-Width-Modulation. The system was never intended to be marketed as a consumer product - it was meant for video/audio/data storage for corporations that could be quickly recorded and duplicated. There was no interest outside of McDonnell Douglas in the system - the biggest potential customer, IBM, had already invested heavily in LaserDisc with MCA, creating Discovision Associates and abandoning that company in 1982. So, it stayed within McDonnell Douglas and was used until replaced by CD-ROM technology.

Attempts at non-FM modulated photographic recording and playback were pretty numerous in the 70's. A company called I/O Metrics had a system that used 25 watt bulbs. It was also called Videonics but never reached anywhere near commercial development - at no demonstration on record did they exhibit even passable black and white pictures. Kodak, inspired by initial contact with MCA/Universal Studios Disco-Vision system, started some research into photographic discs but abandoned it by the late 70's. In 1972 MCA had asked Kodak if they were interested in building the players for their Disco-Vision system since MCA had no experience in something like that. Kodak passed.
post #38 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Disclord View Post

CED was NOT the precursor to LD! LD launched to consumers in December of 1978 - CED didn't hit the market till March 1981.

I appreciate you digging out that. My #33 thread therefore
it is incorrect as well. I gracefully stand corrected. I stated incorrectly that David Susilo's chronology is correct:
CED>LD>DVD>HD, BD
Per Disclord research:
LD>CED>DVD>HD, BD
The CD which of course is laser read(same LD wave length) should be after the CED.
Thanks
post #39 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrico View Post

I appreciate you digging out that. My #33 thread therefore
it is incorrect as well. I gracefully stand corrected. I stated incorrectly that David Susilo's chronology is correct:
CED>LD>DVD>HD, BD
Per Disclord research:
LD>CED>DVD>HD, BD
The CD which of course is laser read(same LD wave length) should be after the CED.
Thanks

CED and CD are REALLY close together in the timeline - although CD didn't launch until 1982, it was really visible, in the public-eye, in 1981. LD used a lower wavelength of laser before the CD came out - a visible red 640nm Helium-Neon gas laser for all top-loading players. The same wavelength DVD uses! It wasn't until the front-loading LD-700 came out in 1984 that LD switched to a 780nm solid-state laser diode like CD used. In almost every other aspect, track pitch, substrate thickness, etc... CD and LD were exactly the same. Philips just took the LD spec's and applied them to a smaller disc.
post #40 of 49
I worked for MDEC in Palo Alto, CA, as their lead optical engineer when they developed this technology. I improved the optics & electronics in the mastering system, developed the duplication process, & overhauled the player optics with the help of ORA out of Pasadena. When I left them in 1982, I believe the signal format was baseband NTSC which was recorded via simple amplitude modulation. The masters were then duplicated in large quantities for use in the players. The mastering systems were very large, complicated, & expensive. We only had two at the time. The players used air bearing technology in the form of a "flying shoe" to assist the focus servo. I believe we used Kodak SO-343 film (high resolution B&W holographic) for the duplication process. The contact printing required liquid gating to prevent Newton ring formation. The ARDEV player optics were a joke. The ORA designed optics were far superior (most likely diffraction limited) & used a red laser diode for illumination. I still have some masters & dupes with test signals on them if anyone is interested. I don't know if they'll play in the Sansui player. Sunsui's involvement was after my time. FYI everyone.
post #41 of 49
Thread Starter 
Finally back on topic, which is REALLY about the history of Video
Disc Formats, not about which technology came first, not about lasers, who is the smartest self-made technology historian, or about how much I weigh (what the ?). I hadn't visited this topic in years, but I still have my Laserfilm player and a "new" beloved (yes, beloved, as quoted above) CED player.

Optics Guy, I would enjoy seeing photos of your sample discs or purchasing a few discs from you if you are selling them.
post #42 of 49
At least this is not another HLD-XX vs. (even more obscure) HLD-XX player thread!


YAWN!!


post #43 of 49
Not every team plays in the same league you know.
post #44 of 49
Quote:


Not every team plays in the same league you know.

Yeah - I'm just sour as I've missed my chance for an X0 twice so far! -- Still love my X9, and still jealous!!
post #45 of 49
I was joking, no ofense


I also love the X9, it's a lovely player
post #46 of 49
Thread Starter 
I just looked it up, the X9 is like the Terminator of Laserdisc players, correct? It IS quite lovely!
post #47 of 49
Yes, it's a very High End Player... and beautiful by the way
LL
post #48 of 49
Anybody interested in a CLD-97?
post #49 of 49
Quote:


I just looked it up, the X9 is like the Terminator of Laserdisc players, correct? It IS quite lovely!

It IS, but the grass is always greener - next stop - HLD-X0

But you gotta love the glam shot with the Wadia god-knows-what in the background flanked by the even more esoteric $125K speakers (presumably made from the finest Borneo hand-oiled teak/depleted Uranium).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: DVD Players (Standard Def)
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › DVD Players (Standard Def) › Laserfilm Videodisc Player Discs