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Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip on NBC - Page 5

post #121 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by gruven42 View Post

You've seen a TV show before, right?

Oh, I get it now, maybe when I watch some more of these here TV show things, I will notice that. Thanks!
post #122 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by jake14mw View Post

II did like it overall, but did anyone else think that it was a little TOO smart and snappy?

Yes, it never had a character stopping to think about when he or she was about to say. Even when Peet couldn't find her office, she kept talking like it was nothing out of the ordinary. I was wondering if the show was trying to say something about TV people becoming like TV characters but maybe there wasn't an intentional message with it.
post #123 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Yes, it never had a character stopping to think about when he or she was about to say.

That's a hallmark of Sorkin's writing: the characters always have blazing quick wit, and the perfect snappy comeback is but a millisecond away. But it's not limited to his shows, of course. He just does it better than most.
post #124 of 1324
Anyone having trouble with snappy comebacks should never attempt to watch House.
post #125 of 1324
Or Gilmore Girls.
post #126 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMilner View Post

Anyone having trouble with snappy comebacks should never attempt to watch House.

Nice snappy comeback...
post #127 of 1324
Or diff'rent strokes
post #128 of 1324
Maybe it's just me but I'd rather watch a show where all the characters are quick on the comeback, as opposed to watching a show with a bunch of slow witted people like me that think of the perfect reply an hour or so after the fact .


ron
post #129 of 1324
Uh...
post #130 of 1324
I agree with Ron.
post #131 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathRay View Post

Or diff'rent strokes

To what are you referring, Deathray?
post #132 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by R11 View Post

Maybe it's just me but I'd rather watch a show where all the characters are quick on the comeback, as opposed to watching a show with a bunch of slow witted people like me that think of the perfect reply an hour or so after the fact .

Well, an hour (or 42 minutes) of this kind of dialog delivery without natural pauses starts to sound like a bunch of actors roboticly reciting their lines in a read-through to me. A major question about this show is whether or not they're going to show behind-the-scenes television production realistically and I doubt everyone in television is as quick witted as these characters are!
post #133 of 1324
Quote:


I doubt everyone in television is as quick witted as these characters are!

Yeah, I mean, I would rather watch security camera footage from NBC. 'Cause then I know I'm not being misled about what goes on behind-the-scenes. Screw this scripted stuff! I mean, The Simpsons?! Come on! Nobody looks like that!
post #134 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by scowl View Post

Well, an hour (or 42 minutes) of this kind of dialog delivery without natural pauses starts to sound like a bunch of actors roboticly reciting their lines in a read-through to me. A major question about this show is whether or not they're going to show behind-the-scenes television production realistically and I doubt everyone in television is as quick witted as these characters are!

That's why they added the Timothy Busfield character. He gets to stand around going dar...ergh...umm...oh...what? for a couple of minutes each episode so we all have someone we can relate to while these smarties are wizzing one-liners over our heads.
post #135 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathRay View Post

That's why they added the Timothy Busfield character. He gets to stand around going dar...ergh...umm...oh...what? for a couple of minutes each episode so we all have someone we can relate to while these smarties are wizzing one-liners over our heads.

you know, maybe that's why I liked the Timothy Busfield character. He seemed just like me.
post #136 of 1324
Well, it's definitely a signature characteristic of the Sorkin writing style and it can be an acquired taste which doesn't agree with everyone. It can take some getting used to. And it is a show about comedy writers and such so giving them the benefit of the doubt, at least some of them should be a little quicker witted than most. And let's not forget, these are the golden boys come home to save the show too!


ron
post #137 of 1324
Quote:


I doubt everyone in television is as quick witted as these characters are!

I can GUARANTEE it...
post #138 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by R11 View Post

Well, it's definitely a signature characteristic of the Sorkin writing style and it can be an acquired taste which doesn't agree with everyone.

My ex girlfriend was a huge Gilmore Girls fan. That might be why I've lost my taste for anything that sounds like stream-of-conciousness dialog in TV shows.
post #139 of 1324
Did anyone else think it was odd that Timothy Busfield's character said he left Judd Hirsch on the air for 53 seconds, when in reality Hirsch went on ranting for like two and a half minutes? Maybe Sorkin just couldn't whittle down all of his issues to less than a minute
post #140 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoJames View Post

Did anyone else think it was odd that Timothy Busfield's character said he left Judd Hirsch on the air for 53 seconds, when in reality Hirsch went on ranting for like two and a half minutes? Maybe Sorkin just couldn't whittle down all of his issues to less than a minute

He meant 53 seconds after the S&P guys told him to take him off.
post #141 of 1324
yeah but what the "critics " like the general public doesn't usually.
We'll see how the show does ;-)

Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

The critics generally love it.

Here are a few of the reviews I've been posting in the Hot Off The Press thread.

The backstage-at-a-sketch-comedy show that isn't "30 Rock" from Aaron Sorkin, the man who brought you "Sports Night" and "The West Wing" and from whose house style this departs not at all. Big sets, fast talk and a fascination with the life of a workplace are again at the heart of things. Bradley Whitford, making the leap from "West Wing," is paired with Matthew Perry as a producer-writer team hired to adrenalize a moribund "SNL"-lookalike. Timothy Busfield, Amanda Peet and D.L. Hughley are here too, making themselves fun to watch.
By Robert Lloyd Los Angeles Times

Nutshell: New network boss (Amanda Peet) wants to revive venerable but unfunny late-night variety show, hires two troubled ex-writers (Matthew Perry and Bradley Whitford) and promises them creative freedom.
Aaron's take: Talented ensemble (D.L. Hughley, Evan Handler, Sarah Paulson) should feast on whatever comes out of writer-producer Aaron Sorkin's (The West Wing) computer. But America switched off Sorkin's last TV-show-within-a-show, Sports Night, and if he's serious about weighing in on the culture wars, as he promised critics this summer, he could drive a lot of potential viewers over to ESPN or CSI: Miami.
Verdict: Appointment TV.
By Aaron Barnhart Kansas City Star

The most buzzed-about pilot for fall actually, in this writer's opinion, lives up to the hype. Set behind the scenes at a show very much like Saturday Night Live, the latest drama from the pen of Aaron Sorkin is not just a showcase for the scribe's natural TV-writing gifts, but it provides Matthew Perry with the opportunity to give an absolutely stellar performance. Even if the rest of the season is only 80 percent as good as the pilot, I'll be glued to this show each week.
By Maureen Ryan Chicago Tribune


Aaron Sorkin satirizes broadcast television, a milieu he is intimately acquainted with as the creator of "The West Wing" and "SportsNight." This time, late-night TV is the conduit for Sorkin's social commentary. Bradley Whitford and Matthew Perry play writing partners brought in to save a ratings-challenged "Saturday Night Live"-type show. Amanda Peet, Timothy Busfield, Steve Weber, D.L. Hughley and Sarah Paulson co-star.
By Marisa Guthrie The New York Daily News
post #142 of 1324
We finally watched this show last night. Not bad, but pilots are, many times, better than the subsequent shows. (The previews for next week seemed to bear this out). I was a big fan of Sports Night, but West Wing was not my cup of tea at all. It will be interesting to see which of the two this one will be closer to. We decided to give it another week before passing judgement.

Lots of controversy here about the Amanda Peet character. I think she'll be great, personally, if they let her grow into the role. (Would Felicity Huffman have been better? You bet!)

My wife and I were ROF laughing about Mathew Perry's character running around the set and bounding up steps less than a week after L5/S1 back surgery - with or w/o pain killers!

Brad
post #143 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradtothebone View Post

My wife and I were ROF laughing about Mathew Perry's character running around the set and bounding up steps less than a week after L5/S1 back surgery - with or w/o pain killers!

And he quickly sat down on a couch with absolutely no sign of stiffness or pain. Either his character had a morphine drip hidden in his shirt or Mathew Perry also had no idea what L5/S1 surgery was either.
post #144 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

NBC as usual sucks for technical presentation. The picture was just about the worst HD I've ever seen, looking softer than some VHS tapes I own.

The 5.1 audio was also awful. The dialogue was so low I had to crank my volume about 15 db higher than normal, which then nearly shook my room apart when the 3-6 Mafia started performing.

I suspect the grainy picture was intentional and "artistic" on the part of Sorkin and Schlamme. Personally I'm with you and can't see how a super-sharp "West Wing" HD clarity could have hurt, but this show is darker and reminds me more of "Sports Night". I'll give it a few more weeks, and I suspect I'll get used to the look and feel.

As far as audio, NBC shows in general have been about 15db below where they should be ever since they started with 5.1 in time for the 2004 Athens Olympics. I've complained to NBC here in LA but to no avail. There's been plenty of discussion about the very low level of audio on all NBC shows, but apparently the NBC engineers believe they have it right.

Personally, I'm with you and feel strongly that it greatly detracts from the audio quality when you have to turn the volume up in order to hear what they're saying. The dynamic range of the audio originally recorded at such a low level really ruins the fidelity when you turn the volume up to what might be considered "normal". Just dreadful, and has been for 2 years now.

I mark NBC shows at around -18db to -22db (on my EQ), while CBS shows are at around 0db to -4db and ABC shows are at around -2db to -6db. HBO and SHO are both at around -2db. Like night and day, NBC being unbelievably lower. And yet they continue to insist they've got it right (Dolby values and all). I don't know what they're listening to, but it doesn't sound good to me and turning the volume up just makes it harsh and intense and loud.
post #145 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSperber View Post

I mark NBC shows at around -18db to -22db (on my EQ), while CBS shows are at around 0db to -4db and ABC shows are at around -2db to -6db. HBO and SHO are both at around -2db. Like night and day, NBC being unbelievably lower. And yet they continue to insist they've got it right (Dolby values and all). I don't know what they're listening to, but it doesn't sound good to me and turning the volume up just makes it harsh and intense and loud.

See I always thought CBS just jacked up their DBs...its by far the loudest DD 5.1 network
post #146 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradtothebone View Post

We finally watched this show last night. Not bad, but pilots are, many times, better than the subsequent shows.

And sometimes the pilots are worse than the rest of the series. Unless a show is just completely awful (or simply way outside of a type of show I would enjoy), I give everything at least 3 episodes to grab me.
post #147 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

And sometimes the pilots are worse than the rest of the series. Unless a show is just completely awful (or simply way outside of a type of show I would enjoy), I give everything at least 3 episodes to grab me.

Yeah, just look at the pilot of Seinfeld.

I thought that the guy in the beginning was spot on about the FCC. There's almost no point in regulating stuff that goes on the Big 5 networks. It's pointless. If parents have problems with their kids watching certain shows, then turn off the TV or put the V Chip on. Leave the rest of us alone.
post #148 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by SJKurtzke View Post

If parents have problems with their kids watching certain shows, then turn off the TV or put the V Chip on. Leave the rest of us alone.

Hear hear!
post #149 of 1324
Are Amanda Peet and Mathew Perry a couple, good friends who get each other gigs, or what?? They star in just about everything together it seems.

I'm going to have to Netflix SportsNight because this show and West Wing (in its prime) have a lot going for them. Seeing West Wing on DVD (I never watched it during its run) was like a breath of fresh air when Sorkin was at the top of his game (and hadn't quit the show).

Yes, I do agree with the Herche character's rantings, and yet I do think they over played it a bit and vented a lot of stuff too quickly (and out and out telling us it was like the scene in the film Network, was a bit much). Unless Sorkin was laying out the gist of his show right at the start afraid that it would be canceled before he could make all his points.

Who knows if Sorkin decided to write in Peet's "condition" or if they'll play it like Gillian Anderson on The X-Files who got pregnant early on in the show and they chose to shoot her with heavy coats and in tight close ups as if nothing had happened. Perhaps her character having a baby will be written in and cause her studio head job to be put on the line and others have to go to bat for her. Who knows? In today's network world they may just replace her and not allow time to explore the character.

I think Peet is supposed to be like a wide-eyed idealist (someone like us regular Joe's/Jane's) who thinks they can single handidly change a network (the fictional NBS reminds me of a cross between NBC, where they're getting their jabs at SNL in, and Fox because of the insipid crap they tend to spew out--the joke about the masturbation show waiting in the wings was a good example--, especially Fox) from within and bring quality back to the forefront and remove the stench of the dreck that has become a staple of TV. Perhaps she'll become jaded or just chewed up and spit out... who knows? Only Sorkin does.

It's great seeing some of the cast of The West Wing back. And nice to see Huffman make a guest appearance for her buddy Sorkin. As mentioned here, it's too bad she's wasted on Housewives.

Dan
post #150 of 1324
Quote:
Originally Posted by DSperber View Post

As far as audio, NBC shows in general have been about 15db below where they should be ever since they started with 5.1 in time for the 2004 Athens Olympics. I've complained to NBC here in LA but to no avail. There's been plenty of discussion about the very low level of audio on all NBC shows, but apparently the NBC engineers believe they have it right.
__________________________________________________________

I mark NBC shows at around -18db to -22db (on my EQ), while CBS shows are at around 0db to -4db and ABC shows are at around -2db to -6db. HBO and SHO are both at around -2db. Like night and day, NBC being unbelievably lower. And yet they continue to insist they've got it right (Dolby values and all).

Quote:
Originally Posted by lax01 View Post

See I always thought CBS just jacked up their DBs...its by far the loudest DD 5.1 network

Right now none of the OTA networks are using AC3 dialnorm the way it's intended. Dialnorm is supposed to attenuate dialog levels to -31db on a program basis. CBS uses a dialnorm value of -31db which has no attenuation. NBC uses -22db which adds 9 db attenuation. Fox uses -25db. Most everyone else uses the default -27db, which matches the dialog levels on most features. It's understandable why CBS might want to sound louder than other networks, but why NBC wants to be lower than everyone else is beyond me. The local NBC stations are often set to -27db (the local NBC O&O is here) and their audio is usually higher and jarring compared to the network. Stations can use their own dialnorm on the network audio instead of the network's metadata to correct that issue. NBC's 5.1/2.0 switching hasn't worked since the Olympics. At the moment disabling decoder dialnorm correction usually improves channel to channel volume differences. It really helps on NBC.

Networks typically don't change the actual volume of the audio sent on the HD network from what's on the delivered tapes.

As for the show I thought is was great. I'm looking forward to it next week. I hope it does well.
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