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'Jericho' on CBS - Page 3

post #61 of 3245
Wasn't there a show like this on Shotime a few years ago?
post #62 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jolard View Post

I do get bugged by suspension of deisbelief problems though, there is no way they would have been able to see Denver, but I give them the benefit of the doubt for now.

I have been doing a little research but even though they wouldn't be able to see the mushroom cloud, they would have definately have noticed the light. Now, of course, the kid looking into a bright spot of light from over the horizon isn't terribly dramatic and I would suspect most people would not realize what was giving off that light so I think they were forced to show a mushroom cloud. If for nothing else, just to make sure all the viewers knew what has happening. I am going to allow them to take a little creative license here.

Another intersting thought is that if this present day, I wonder if any of those kids had even seen a mushroom cloud before...

-- Jim
post #63 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by VideoJames View Post

I can almost buy the premise of the town being unable to communicate, except they didn't show a single person attempting to use the internet. There would be at least the telephone and cable company service, and possibly satellite and Wifi type services. Not even Blackberry or pager services?

Years ago it was claimed that the design of the internet was so robust, it could survive a nuclear war. Sure doesn't seem like the case in Jericho.

Yep and the Levees in NOLA where so robust they could survive a Category 3 Hurricane and looked how THAT turned out.

I have been in places where Cell phones, pagers, and blackberries don't work now. For exmaple, my Blackberry does not work where my parents live in the Tri-state area where Ohio, West Virginia, and Pennslyvania meet (Stubenville OH, Weirton WV area). It is very easy to lose cell phone coverage as you travel. Wifi is all but non existent down there and I am sure Internet service is routed through Pittsburgh and Cleveland so if you lost those two cities, they would not have any Internet even if the local dialup ports and broadband services were still active. About the only thing I would imagine that would still work would be a satellite phone and I don't think you are going to find one in such a small town.

Remember how much the Internet was disrupted in the US on 9/11 because all the Internet traffic was routed through some Verizon POP at WTC? That damage was contained within a 1 sq. mi. area of one city. Imagine what would happen if all or most of the major pops were hit?
post #64 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Schauer View Post

Monday near me a tree fell across an overhead fiber optic line and cut off all 911, DSL, and most cell phone access on the Olympic Peninsula (about 80,000 people spread out over hundreds of square miles) for hours.

It could happen.

Not in west Kansas, for a couple of reasons. Long haul fiber is always buried, but more importantly, there AREN'T any trees.
post #65 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

Not in west Kansas, for a couple of reasons. Long haul fiber is always buried, but more importantly, there AREN'T any trees.

I think you're forgetting that they don't have power and that its obvious other cities (possibly a lot of them) have been hit.
post #66 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by RDK006 View Post

Well the network does want people to actually watch the show - they can't make it too dul... lol

Then they should have picked a better location, like Aspen, or some other mountain resort where an avalanche could have really isolated the town, and communications was already naturally blocked by the terrain. But Kansas, dumb, dumb, dumb.
post #67 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

Then they should have picked a better location, like Aspen, or some other mountain resort where an avalanche could have really isolated the town, and communications was already naturally blocked by the terrain. But Kansas, dumb, dumb, dumb.


Nit

Nit

Nit

Nit

Nit


There are some nits for ya to pick. Come on man, lighten up a bit.
post #68 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by jblank74 View Post

I think you're forgetting that they don't have power and that its obvious other cities (possibly a lot of them) have been hit.

The fiber infrastucture in the US is redundant many times over, and is backed up with alternative power sources, battery and generator, at all critical locations.

And did Dish Network and DirecTV both lose their main and redundant uplink facilities all at about the same time.

Sorry, this might have made a good Twilight Zone episode back in the 50's, but anybody who understands anything about 2006 communications will find the entire premise laughable.
post #69 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by jblank74 View Post

Nit

Nit

Nit

Nit

Nit


There are some nits for ya to pick. Come on man, lighten up a bit.

No way. This is a great show to bash.
post #70 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

Not in west Kansas, for a couple of reasons. Long haul fiber is always buried, but more importantly, there AREN'T any trees.

And it really doesn't matter if the fiber is buried if there isn't anything on the other end of it. For the most part, Central Offices are not hardened facilities.

Also I would also point out that I live in Detroit and in the last big power outage...Cellular service was pretty much useless almost immediately. In the first few hours, so many people were trying to use the service that you couldn't setup a call and then a few hours later the backup batteries went dead. There were some towers that had generator power but they were few and far between and I am sure more generators have been added since but this was in a big city. I could see the one cell tower in Jeracho not having a generator and then the batteries going dead after the power went out.
post #71 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

No way. This is a great show to bash.

Yeah, so far, that's what I'm thinking too, maybe we can have a "Most Unbelievable and Ludicrous Moment" award, of course it would be constantly updated as I'm sure there will be more than one.
post #72 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

The fiber infrastucture in the US is redundant many times over, and is backed up with alternative power sources, battery and generator, at all critical locations.

And did Dish Network and DirecTV both lose their main and redundant uplink facilities all at about the same time.

Sorry, this might have made a good Twilight Zone episode back in the 50's, but anybody who understands anything about 2006 communications will find the entire premise laughable.

As a communications engineer that deals with the "redundant many times over" US system on a daily basis DO NOT believe what the telcos tell you...there are a lot of weak links in these networks that bring down sizable parts of the network on a daily basis. I have sites that have two leased lines AND dial backup and if the right cable gets cut or the right Central Office goes down we will lose the location. In fact, most of our outages are not caused by a our non-redundant premises equipment but in fact caused by the "highly redundant" telco system.

-- Jim
post #73 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmallory View Post

As a communications engineer that deals with the "redundant many times over" US system on a daily basis DO NOT believe what the telcos tell you...there are a lot of weak links in these networks that bring down sizable parts of the network on a daily basis. I have sites that have two leased lines AND dial backup and if the right cable gets cut or the right Central Office goes down we will lose the location. In fact, most of our outages are not caused by a our non-redundant premises equipment but in fact caused by the "highly redundant" telco system.

-- Jim

Even in west Kansas, one would expect to get a couple of dozen AM/FM broadcast channels from a variety of locations, and of course satellite service. If they don't address scientific believablity, they will lose their audience out the gate.
post #74 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmallory View Post

As a communications engineer that deals with the "redundant many times over" US system on a daily basis DO NOT believe what the telcos tell you...there are a lot of weak links in these networks that bring down sizable parts of the network on a daily basis. I have sites that have two leased lines AND dial backup and if the right cable gets cut or the right Central Office goes down we will lose the location. In fact, most of our outages are not caused by a our non-redundant premises equipment but in fact caused by the "highly redundant" telco system.

-- Jim

Very true. My web server normally has a 98% uptime record. Of that remaining 2%, half is time to reboot once a month for my Tuesday Microsoft patch fix and the other half is AT&T. My internal network and system hardware is so far 100% reliable. If I could afford to have a duplicate server, I'd have 99% uptime by still be up for the few minutes each month I apply patches. As it is, it's cheaper to put that money toward mirroring the data to another drive in the same server in case one fails, rather than run a second machine just for 4AM - 4:03AM one Tuesday each month. The Internet connection I can't do anything about, so I'll never be 100%.
post #75 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by bphisig View Post


1) Do they really expect us to believe that you can see mountains etc. from Kansas? Give me a break. Like someone said above, Denver is towards the middle of Colorado, so it's not like it's 50 miles from Jericho. I didn't even realize that Jericho is not a real town. But I remember the sign they showed at the beginning of the show said it was 396 miles from Kansas City. Where on I-70 would that be? Anyone with a lot of extra time on their hands?

Well, Goodland, KS is about 400 road miles west of KC and is close to the Colorado border. From Goodland to Denver is about 130 miles as the crow flys. This is pretty flat country both in Kansas and the east part of Colorado. You are not going to see any mountains in between. The mushroom, on the other hand, is quite possible.
post #76 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

Even in west Kansas, one would expect to get a couple of dozen AM/FM broadcast channels from a variety of locations, and of course satellite service. If they don't address scientific believablity, they will lose their audience out the gate.

This is a good point, unless they had cable TV, which would explain why the TV went off, otherwise if they were close enough to get Denver stations OTA, then they were close enough to have been impacted by the bomb itself.

No satellite is easily explained by having the uplink facilities lost to the bomb.
post #77 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

Then they should have picked a better location, like Aspen, or some other mountain resort where an avalanche could have really isolated the town, and communications was already naturally blocked by the terrain. But Kansas, dumb, dumb, dumb.

The multiple emoticons led me immediately to your last sentence where I assumed you were making a comment on Kansas' seemingly endless battle (along with Pennsylvania and Georgia) over replacing the teaching of evolution with creationism in their public school science classrooms. Thermonuclear war seems almost tame by comparison.
post #78 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmallory View Post

As a communications engineer that deals with the "redundant many times over" US system on a daily basis DO NOT believe what the telcos tell you...there are a lot of weak links in these networks that bring down sizable parts of the network on a daily basis. I have sites that have two leased lines AND dial backup and if the right cable gets cut or the right Central Office goes down we will lose the location. In fact, most of our outages are not caused by a our non-redundant premises equipment but in fact caused by the "highly redundant" telco system.

-- Jim

I have also been a communications engineer. The four 9's aren't much of a stretch these days.
post #79 of 3245
I think I might like this show but it is really too soon to tell. Eventually there may be just too many improbable events with no justification that will make it too hard to "suspend disbelief".

But it is certainly interesting enough for me to follow it for at least a couple more episodes.

- Tom
post #80 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

The multiple emoticons led me immediately to your last sentence where I assumed you were making a comment on Kansas' seemingly endless battle (along with Pennsylvania and Georgia) over replacing the teaching of evolution with creationism in their public school science classrooms. Thermonuclear war seems almost tame by comparison.

Well, it wasn't my intent, but if the shoe fits......
post #81 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv2chill View Post

I'm a sucker for anything involving Kansas, and I'm also a fan of post-apocalyptic dramas (therefore "The Day After" is perfection to me, despite its many flaws).

Have you ever seen 'Threads'? The UK equivalent of The Day After but far, far more bleak. I lived in (West) Germany at the time and it scared the hell out of us forces kids.
post #82 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

This is a good point, unless they had cable TV, which would explain why the TV went off, otherwise if they were close enough to get Denver stations OTA, then they were close enough to have been impacted by the bomb itself.

No satellite is easily explained by having the uplink facilities lost to the bomb.

Except that both Dish and DirecTV have redundant uplink locations in entirely different geographic locations. I simply won't buy the loss of all communication links in as short a period of time as depicted in this show.
post #83 of 3245
Remember the entire premise of this show is there MIGHT have been a nuc strike. Its supposed to be unclear what is going on and it can deal with any number of things and IF the show survives there will be many questions brought up some without any clear explanations ala LOST.
post #84 of 3245
Also read that Jericho could be a 'Lost'-like series, so perhaps the ambiguities and fudging will be endlessly extended. Suspect I'll tune out after a few more episodes if they're planning cat-and-mouse games indefinitely. -- John
post #85 of 3245
One wonders if the creators of the show have a clear cut idea as to where it will lead or are they going to make it up on the fly?
post #86 of 3245
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053137/

On the Beach - still my favorite post nuke war book and movie.
post #87 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by posg View Post

Except that both Dish and DirecTV have redundant uplink locations in entirely different geographic locations. I simply won't buy the loss of all communication links in as short a period of time as depicted in this show.

I should have said bomb(s), I'm guessing the implication of the Atlanta bomb is that all the major areas had been hit.

You know, it could have been Charlie Ergen and Ted Turner resorting to violence over some contract negotiation.
post #88 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by stephenC View Post

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0053137/

On the Beach - still my favorite post nuke war book and movie.

Yes, that was excellent.
post #89 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Yes, that was excellent.

And plausable, intellegent, believable, and well acted. And no school bus full of children in distress as I recall.
post #90 of 3245
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Yeah, so far, that's what I'm thinking too, maybe we can have a "Most Unbelievable and Ludicrous Moment" award, of course it would be constantly updated as I'm sure there will be more than one.

Wouldn't matter if we did - all the awards would belong to "24" anyway.
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