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B&W Owner's Thread - Page 454

post #13591 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVLDARI View Post

I personally can't hear enough difference to even come close to justifying the price difference. I think there is a big difference between 805 and 804. Then there is a big difference between 804 and 803. There is not as much difference between 803 and 802, but there is almost no difference to my ears between 800 and 802.

I would say if all you were ever planning on doing was to listen to 2.0 music, the right choice will probably be the 800D2. If you had any inklings of getting a sub or doing movies, I personally think you should save your money and spend it on... whatever else to make your entire experience more whole. Of course this is assuming you don't have "unlimited' money.

And for the record, I auditioned both 800D2 and 802D2 in the same room next to each other off the same equipment a while ago. Yesterday, the speakers were in different rooms and 800s were run off all Classe and 802s were run off all McIntosh ( tube amp).

funny thing, yesterday I auditioned of the 803 di side by side with the 804di with the same gear mcintosh and yes exist a huge difference but in a bad way although the bass in the 803 is wonderfull the mids and highs was really hidden, I not think that it will have a close performance to the 802di at least to my ears. just my two cents.
post #13592 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raldeby View Post

LL

You should get the Center on a stand and right bellow the TV screen, your sound will improve substantially :)

post #13593 of 17813
post #13594 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVLDARI View Post

Does MM1 come with a sub?

No, they're powered speakers for the PC.
post #13595 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by leo2498 View Post

funny thing, yesterday I auditioned of the 803 di side by side with the 804di with the same gear mcintosh and yes exist a huge difference but in a bad way although the bass in the 803 is wonderfull the mids and highs was really hidden, I not think that it will have a close performance to the 802di at least to my ears. just my two cents.

I am a fan of the 804 diamonds. I struggled a lot before I bought the 802. Hell, I could have bought two 804s and a pair of awesome subs and had money left over.

But all I am trying to say with this post is we must go and audition before we buy. everyone's mileage may vary (significantly) smile.gif
post #13596 of 17813
Hello All,
I new to the B&W form but want to jump in and ask you B&W pros a question / opinion. I purchased a pair of B&W matrix 3 series II speakers back in 1989 ish when I was 19 years old and is what got me into this wonderful world of audio. $2,000 for a pair of speakers when I was making I think $6 an hour...I must have been crazy but still doing the same thing today; spending way more than I have on audio!
These speakers have been with me longer than most of my friends and all of my wife's. I retired these to my 2nd system a few years back as I use a new set of Tekton Pengragons as I started using low power single ended flea tube amps ( 7-10 wpc) and if the B&W's were more efficient It would still be my main speaker. Do I need to replace the caps in the crossover because of the age? I did this in a 1970's pair of Altecs but the B&W's look so nice I do not want to do this with out getting some opinions as it looks like I may need to have it done and not try it myself. Any opinions? Anyone done it or know who would do it for me or think best to let it ride as is? Have considered selling these but are like family! Any opinions? Are they keepers?
Thanks!
post #13597 of 17813
I'm looking for a pair of decent speakers for my garage that will be used for music only. My only comparison to what i hope for is the speakers in the main house, deftech 8040 supertowers (i know they are powered).

I found a pair of B&W DM601 series 1 on craigs, the guy wants 150 for them with the stands. Is it worth it for the series 1, or keep looking. I want something that will sound as good as the 8040's not considering the bass.
post #13598 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVLDARI View Post

Is your conclusion that the only reason I think JL f113 sounds different from DB1 is that one was struggling and distorting more than the other?

Without exactly knowing everything about the comparison, I think most likely the setup could be the issue. Assuming both had good setup, then the biggest factor to me is going to be the output capability (power compression) followed by dampening capability (Q value) followed by distortion.

When people measure the subs, they usually look at MAX output. If the B&W could only hypothetically output a max of 108dB, it could be significantly distorting even at 90dB, say 15%. If the JL has a max of 116dB, it might not be distorting much at all at 95dB and say only 5% at 90dB. If a Funk or JTR or Seaton could output 120dB w/ less than 10% THD, outputting 90-95dB would be a walk in the park for them w/ a 0.1% THD.

A sub with a Q of 0.5 will sound "tighter" than a sub with a Q of 1.0 or 1.5.

And if you want that "Gut Punchy" bass, you gotta have a lot of dynamic output even for a split second of 115dB.
post #13599 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVLDARI View Post

I am a fan of the 804 diamonds. I struggled a lot before I bought the 802. Hell, I could have bought two 804s and a pair of awesome subs and had money left over.

But all I am trying to say with this post is we must go and audition before we buy. everyone's mileage may vary (significantly) smile.gif
I could not be more agree with you.
post #13600 of 17813
Can anyone tell me how many W the 685s can really take? It says 100'W 8Ohm on the back, but I am thinking of upgrading my receiver. I have the 2309 Denon right now, rated at I think 115w/ch (Eu Version which was rated higher than the US one IIRC) and am thinking of the 3313 or an Onkyo 818 or better. Both of them promise more than 100W/channel. I use them for my surrounds and center only. Basically, I love them and don't want to have to replace them when I upgrade my receiver (time to go to 3D and networking capabilities mainly...and a bit more headroom would be nice too). I know that manufacturers numbers are often inflated, but what are you guys running your 685's on?

Thanks!
post #13601 of 17813
Hello all and good afternoon.

Question, For a 25' by 25' dedicated home theater (not two channel) With 804"S" speakers....

What sub would be a good match to go 2 subs ( marantz av 8801) with my old paradigm refrence servo 15?

I do not know if it matters but I have an older QSC comercial amp that, I believe, is rated at 400watts a side at 4ohm... If you want to sugest a non amped sub.

Thank you...
post #13602 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by McStyvie View Post

Can anyone tell me how many W the 685s can really take? It says 100'W 8Ohm on the back, but I am thinking of upgrading my receiver. I have the 2309 Denon right now, rated at I think 115w/ch (Eu Version which was rated higher than the US one IIRC) and am thinking of the 3313 or an Onkyo 818 or better. Both of them promise more than 100W/channel. I use them for my surrounds and center only. Basically, I love them and don't want to have to replace them when I upgrade my receiver (time to go to 3D and networking capabilities mainly...and a bit more headroom would be nice too). I know that manufacturers numbers are often inflated, but what are you guys running your 685's on?

Thanks!

Nobody makes you to apply all the power. You will hear them distorting long before they break (unless you are seriously drunk). 685 will work happily with most modern receivers. This is 683 when you have to be selective - they need a lot of current to sound right.
post #13603 of 17813
From B&W

Star Wars: Use it to test: Everything!
Resplendent in 1080p HD and endowed with a freshly remastered HD-Audio soundtrack, Skywalker Sound’s Matthew Wood supervised a four-year audio restoration process, with every soundtrack sourced from the archival prints and remastered in uncompressed 24-bit/48kHz form – and the results are simply astonishing, especially with the older films. You’ll find familiar sequences take on a whole new energy, most especially in surround sound standouts such as the walker assault in The Empire Strikes Back or the Death Star’s destruction in A New Hope.
Test Track Moment: So many to choose from…but if you had to pick one moment, we’d go for the speeder bike chase in Return Of The Jedi. It’s a staggeringly realized 360-degree whirlwind of sound.


Super 8: Use it to test: Dynamics
Directed by J.J.Abrams and produced by Steven Spielberg, Super 8¹s soundtrack was created by what could best be described as a Supergroup of Skywalker Sound¹s finest engineers, with contributions from David Acord, Ben Burtt, Gary Rydstrom and Matthew Wood. The result is, quite simply, a masterpiece.
Test Track Moment: Chapter 3 begins with spaciousness, with expertly applied foley effects that transport you to the scene¹s remote train station in uncanny fashion. And thenŠthen there¹s a huge train crash, an extended, sofa-shuddering adrenaline rush of sound and fury unparalleled in modern home cinema. Hang on to your sofas!


Inception: Use it to test: Scale
Hans Zimmer formidable soundtrack sets an appropriately majestic tone throughout – it’s astonishingly dynamic – while Gary Rizzo (another Skywalker Sound alumni) relishes the film’s many opportunities to challenge every speaker in your system, most especially your subwoofer. The results are brilliant, as richly textured as they are formidably dynamic: Inception garnered both an Oscar and a Bafta for its sound in 2010, and rightly so.
Test Track Moment: The film’s final, climactic ‘kick’ scene, as everyone attempts to make it back to reality, is a masterpiece: sound effects and soundtrack intertwine to create a massive, seamless soundfield that can’t fail to excite.


Inglorious Basterds: Use it to test: Dialogue clarity
Forget explosions and firefights: here, the real weapons are words, with Tarantino’s exceptional ensemble cast relishing the opportunity to wrestle with the script’s crackling intensity. Historical accuracy be damned, too: throughout, Basterds is as exuberantly inventive as Brad Pitt’s cod-Italian accent in the film’s final scenes. The result is a war film like no other, and a great home cinema tester – but not in the sense you might expect.
Test Track Moment: To get a measure of your centre speaker’s clarity, check out the 20-minute long opener, as Christoph Waltz’s sadistic SS Colonel Hans Landa interrogates a French farmer he suspects of harbouring Jews. The tension is almost unbearable – as is the scene’s shocking, brutally dynamic finale.


Stop Making Sense: Use it to test: Musicality
Unlike almost every other Blu-ray release you can think of, Stop Making Sense picture quality is mediocre at best, its age (and the relative lack of care devoted to its 1080p transfer) showing through in its grainy, comparatively soft image. But the sound…now the sound’s a different story. Presented in DTS-HD Master Audio, it’s fantastic, capturing the band’s best-ever performances at their deliriously rhythmic best. If your system doesn’t sound musical when spinning this disc – and, in particular, if your subwoofer sounds sonically distinct from the rest of your speakers – then you need to rethink your system’s set-up.
Test Track Moment: As the concert unfolds you get the sense it’s been working its way towards one big moment, and ‘Girlfriend is Better’ is it. Byrne in his iconic ‘big suit’, keyboard player Bernie Worrell (formerly of Parliament) to the fore: it’s the very essence of funk.


True grit: Use it to test: Spaciousness
Cinematographer Roger Deakins conjures an evocative, sweeping feel to the film’s visuals, while Craig Berkey (sound designer in X-Men: First Class, above) creates an equally grand soundfield, one that should immerse you in the story from the first minute.
Test Track Moment: Nothing sums up a Western like a good-old-fashioned showdown, and True Grit’s confrontation is a peach, the wide-open atmosphere of the open prairie contrasting wonderfully with the brutal gunfire of both Cogburn’s pistols and LaBoeuf’s mighty Sharps rifle.


Star Trek: Use it to test: Bass
Kudos to J.J.Abrams for so successfully reviving Gene Roddenberry’s much-loved sci-fi saga: the director’s high-octane, all-action style and pitch-perfect casting ensures 2009’s take on Trek appeals to both devoted Trekkies and the wider audience alike.
Test Track Moment Most earlier Trek films relished any opportunity to blow up the Enterprise: here, director Abrams takes aim at an all-new and much larger target, destroying planet Vulcan – Spock’s home – in a dazzling fifteen-minute rush of full-bore sound and fury.


Saving private Ryan: Use it to test: Punch
Few soundtracks have been so rightly acclaimed as that of Steven Spielberg’s 1998 war epic. Conceived by seven-times Oscar-winner Gary Rydstrom, it’s a tour-de-force of authenticity, its shockingly graphic opening scenes proving so convincing that some WWII veterans reportedly felt traumatized watching them. The film’s key sonic signatures are absolute realism – as just one example, every gunshot is generated from a recording of an authentic weapon firing live ammunition – and thunderous, hitherto-unparalleled levels of volume. Your subwoofer will be assured of a thorough workout, most especially during the film’s climactic final battle.
Test Track Moment: Ryan is book-ended by a pair of savage battles, the first the assault on Omaha beach, the last a brutal confrontation to save the bridge at Ramelle from a German advance. Both are extraordinary sonic workouts in every possible regard.


Master & Commander: the far side of the world: Use it to test: Power
Master And Commander’s period sense of muscularity, set against the backdrop of the Napoleonic wars, there’s a thrilling sense of authenticity coursing through every scene: sound designer Richard King insisted that no stock (ie prerecorded) audio be used to create any of the film’s effects. Instead, virtually every audio component in the film’s soundfield was generated as a bespoke recording – and the result is wondrous. Cannonfire has seldom, if ever sounded this forceful before.
Test Track Moment: As Russell Crowe’s ship HMS Surprise chases its French quarry the Acheron around Cape Horn, your system should come alive: the soundfield is astonishingly complex, full of the furious power of the storm-lashed seas and the creaking protests of the tortured ship.


Foo fighters: Use it to test: Atmosphere
86,000 devoted fans do their best to wrap you in the action while the Foos thrash out hit after forceful hit, each performance made all the more exciting by the soundtrack’s 24-bit/48kHz-mastered PCM 5.1 audio. You’re placed at the heart of the crowd, with audience effects and stadium reverb wrapping you in the atmosphere. It’s a raw and raucous listen, the band preferring a warts’n’all presentation rather than the polished, studio-enhanced mixes favoured by some of their contemporaries, but none the less impressive for that.
Test Track Moment: As the concert nears its climax, Dave Grohl introduces two special guests – Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones – before taking to the drumkit to thrash into a blistering rendition of Rock and Roll. He’s grinning like an excited child throughout, and it’s easy to hear why…
Edited by wse - 4/16/13 at 9:58am
post #13604 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by ap1 View Post

Nobody makes you to apply all the power.

If you have a powered sub, then your receiver will rarely use more than a few watts per channel to play sound at very high levels. It's the sub that takes a lot of power to move a lot of air.
post #13605 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by pbarach View Post

If you have a powered sub, then your receiver will rarely use more than a few watts per channel to play sound at very high levels. It's the sub that takes a lot of power to move a lot of air.


yup, got two subs, so no worries there! The 683's sound fine with the Denon 2309. Though admittedly, I more often listen to music in 5.2...but they sound great alone or with the subs as well. Could be better ofc, can always be!
post #13606 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by baranowski View Post

Hello all and good afternoon.

Question, For a 25' by 25' dedicated home theater (not two channel) With 804"S" speakers....

What sub would be a good match to go 2 subs ( marantz av 8801) with my old paradigm refrence servo 15?

I do not know if it matters but I have an older QSC comercial amp that, I believe, is rated at 400watts a side at 4ohm... If you want to sugest a non amped sub.

Thank you...
2-4 Rythmik FV15HP would be great.
post #13607 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVLDARI View Post

I personally can't hear enough difference to even come close to justifying the price difference. I think there is a big difference between 805 and 804. Then there is a big difference between 804 and 803. There is not as much difference between 803 and 802, but there is almost no difference to my ears between 800 and 802.

I would say if all you were ever planning on doing was to listen to 2.0 music, the right choice will probably be the 800D2. If you had any inklings of getting a sub or doing movies, I personally think you should save your money and spend it on... whatever else to make your entire experience more whole. Of course this is assuming you don't have "unlimited' money.

And for the record, I auditioned both 800D2 and 802D2 in the same room next to each other off the same equipment a while ago. Yesterday, the speakers were in different rooms and 800s were run off all Classe and 802s were run off all McIntosh ( tube amp).

Thanks for elaborating.
post #13608 of 17813
Quote:

Agreed, those would be a better purchase
post #13609 of 17813
Hey guys. I'm new to B&W's. I am trying to buy a used set of M-1's to use as rear surrounds. I have been combing Ebay, but I have a question. I would like to have the newer version of the M-1. How can you tell the difference visually between the older ones and the newer ones? Are the older ones glossy, and the newer ones matte? If these will be used primarily as rear surrounds, will it matter if I get the older or newer ones? Thanks
post #13610 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcuDefTechGuy View Post

2-4 Rythmik FV15HP would be great.

thank you, but, that did not answer my question.

thanks
Bill
post #13611 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

From B&W

Star Wars: Use it to test: Everything!
Resplendent in 1080p HD and endowed with a freshly remastered HD-Audio soundtrack, Skywalker Sound’s Matthew Wood supervised a four-year audio restoration process, with every soundtrack sourced from the archival prints and remastered in uncompressed 24-bit/48kHz form – and the results are simply astonishing, especially with the older films. You’ll find familiar sequences take on a whole new energy, most especially in surround sound standouts such as the walker assault in The Empire Strikes Back or the Death Star’s destruction in A New Hope.
Test Track Moment: So many to choose from…but if you had to pick one moment, we’d go for the speeder bike chase in Return Of The Jedi. It’s a staggeringly realized 360-degree whirlwind of sound.


Super 8: Use it to test: Dynamics
Directed by J.J.Abrams and produced by Steven Spielberg, Super 8¹s soundtrack was created by what could best be described as a Supergroup of Skywalker Sound¹s finest engineers, with contributions from David Acord, Ben Burtt, Gary Rydstrom and Matthew Wood. The result is, quite simply, a masterpiece.
Test Track Moment: Chapter 3 begins with spaciousness, with expertly applied foley effects that transport you to the scene¹s remote train station in uncanny fashion. And thenŠthen there¹s a huge train crash, an extended, sofa-shuddering adrenaline rush of sound and fury unparalleled in modern home cinema. Hang on to your sofas!


Inception: Use it to test: Scale
Hans Zimmer formidable soundtrack sets an appropriately majestic tone throughout – it’s astonishingly dynamic – while Gary Rizzo (another Skywalker Sound alumni) relishes the film’s many opportunities to challenge every speaker in your system, most especially your subwoofer. The results are brilliant, as richly textured as they are formidably dynamic: Inception garnered both an Oscar and a Bafta for its sound in 2010, and rightly so.
Test Track Moment: The film’s final, climactic ‘kick’ scene, as everyone attempts to make it back to reality, is a masterpiece: sound effects and soundtrack intertwine to create a massive, seamless soundfield that can’t fail to excite.


Inglorious Basterds: Use it to test: Dialogue clarity
Forget explosions and firefights: here, the real weapons are words, with Tarantino’s exceptional ensemble cast relishing the opportunity to wrestle with the script’s crackling intensity. Historical accuracy be damned, too: throughout, Basterds is as exuberantly inventive as Brad Pitt’s cod-Italian accent in the film’s final scenes. The result is a war film like no other, and a great home cinema tester – but not in the sense you might expect.
Test Track Moment: To get a measure of your centre speaker’s clarity, check out the 20-minute long opener, as Christoph Waltz’s sadistic SS Colonel Hans Landa interrogates a French farmer he suspects of harbouring Jews. The tension is almost unbearable – as is the scene’s shocking, brutally dynamic finale.


Stop Making Sense: Use it to test: Musicality
Unlike almost every other Blu-ray release you can think of, Stop Making Sense picture quality is mediocre at best, its age (and the relative lack of care devoted to its 1080p transfer) showing through in its grainy, comparatively soft image. But the sound…now the sound’s a different story. Presented in DTS-HD Master Audio, it’s fantastic, capturing the band’s best-ever performances at their deliriously rhythmic best. If your system doesn’t sound musical when spinning this disc – and, in particular, if your subwoofer sounds sonically distinct from the rest of your speakers – then you need to rethink your system’s set-up.
Test Track Moment: As the concert unfolds you get the sense it’s been working its way towards one big moment, and ‘Girlfriend is Better’ is it. Byrne in his iconic ‘big suit’, keyboard player Bernie Worrell (formerly of Parliament) to the fore: it’s the very essence of funk.


True grit: Use it to test: Spaciousness
Cinematographer Roger Deakins conjures an evocative, sweeping feel to the film’s visuals, while Craig Berkey (sound designer in X-Men: First Class, above) creates an equally grand soundfield, one that should immerse you in the story from the first minute.
Test Track Moment: Nothing sums up a Western like a good-old-fashioned showdown, and True Grit’s confrontation is a peach, the wide-open atmosphere of the open prairie contrasting wonderfully with the brutal gunfire of both Cogburn’s pistols and LaBoeuf’s mighty Sharps rifle.


Star Trek: Use it to test: Bass
Kudos to J.J.Abrams for so successfully reviving Gene Roddenberry’s much-loved sci-fi saga: the director’s high-octane, all-action style and pitch-perfect casting ensures 2009’s take on Trek appeals to both devoted Trekkies and the wider audience alike.
Test Track Moment Most earlier Trek films relished any opportunity to blow up the Enterprise: here, director Abrams takes aim at an all-new and much larger target, destroying planet Vulcan – Spock’s home – in a dazzling fifteen-minute rush of full-bore sound and fury.


Saving private Ryan: Use it to test: Punch
Few soundtracks have been so rightly acclaimed as that of Steven Spielberg’s 1998 war epic. Conceived by seven-times Oscar-winner Gary Rydstrom, it’s a tour-de-force of authenticity, its shockingly graphic opening scenes proving so convincing that some WWII veterans reportedly felt traumatized watching them. The film’s key sonic signatures are absolute realism – as just one example, every gunshot is generated from a recording of an authentic weapon firing live ammunition – and thunderous, hitherto-unparalleled levels of volume. Your subwoofer will be assured of a thorough workout, most especially during the film’s climactic final battle.
Test Track Moment: Ryan is book-ended by a pair of savage battles, the first the assault on Omaha beach, the last a brutal confrontation to save the bridge at Ramelle from a German advance. Both are extraordinary sonic workouts in every possible regard.


Master & Commander: the far side of the world: Use it to test: Power
Master And Commander’s period sense of muscularity, set against the backdrop of the Napoleonic wars, there’s a thrilling sense of authenticity coursing through every scene: sound designer Richard King insisted that no stock (ie prerecorded) audio be used to create any of the film’s effects. Instead, virtually every audio component in the film’s soundfield was generated as a bespoke recording – and the result is wondrous. Cannonfire has seldom, if ever sounded this forceful before.
Test Track Moment: As Russell Crowe’s ship HMS Surprise chases its French quarry the Acheron around Cape Horn, your system should come alive: the soundfield is astonishingly complex, full of the furious power of the storm-lashed seas and the creaking protests of the tortured ship.


Foo fighters: Use it to test: Atmosphere
86,000 devoted fans do their best to wrap you in the action while the Foos thrash out hit after forceful hit, each performance made all the more exciting by the soundtrack’s 24-bit/48kHz-mastered PCM 5.1 audio. You’re placed at the heart of the crowd, with audience effects and stadium reverb wrapping you in the atmosphere. It’s a raw and raucous listen, the band preferring a warts’n’all presentation rather than the polished, studio-enhanced mixes favoured by some of their contemporaries, but none the less impressive for that.
Test Track Moment: As the concert nears its climax, Dave Grohl introduces two special guests – Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page and John Paul Jones – before taking to the drumkit to thrash into a blistering rendition of Rock and Roll. He’s grinning like an excited child throughout, and it’s easy to hear why…

What are these references for? You say from B&W but what are they trying to get across, I'm confused. Are they talking about specific speakers, just segments from the films to listen to on B&W speakers,???
post #13612 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rod#S View Post

What are these references for? You say from B&W but what are they trying to get across, I'm confused. Are they talking about specific speakers, just segments from the films to listen to on B&W speakers,???

Just suggestions of Blu Ray movie segment to demo your system & in particular your B&W speakers!
post #13613 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by BVLDARI View Post

Does MM1 come with a sub?

Nope, just 2 speakers.

Hopefully I don't have the issues with static.
post #13614 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

Just suggestions of Blu Ray movie segment to demo your system & in particular your B&W speakers!

OK, thanks
post #13615 of 17813
So I am wondering, if having full range surrounds make any sense especially since you have to cross them over to 80HZ. What do you think?
post #13616 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

So I am wondering, if having full range surrounds make any sense especially since you have to cross them over to 80HZ. What do you think?

I think it's cool. Overkill, but cool. cool.gif

I say if your budget is limitless, then get seven 800D2 or Salon2 or KEF 207/2, etc.

For the rest of us mere mortals, it's utter nonsense, but cool nonetheless. biggrin.gif
post #13617 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcuDefTechGuy View PostI think it's cool. Overkill, but cool. cool.gif
I say if your budget is limitless, then get seven 800D2 or Salon2 or KEF 207/2, etc.  For the rest of us mere mortals, it's utter nonsense, but cool nonetheless. biggrin.gif

Yes cool, unfortunately budget is limited in retirement :(

post #13618 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

Yes cool, unfortunately budget is limited in retirement frown.gif
I think (800D2 x 3) + (805D2 x 2) would be amazing.

But you know what you should do?

Sell all your B&W, JL, and Classe, and get JTR speakers & subs and Emotiva pre-pros and amps. eek.gifbiggrin.gif
post #13619 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcuDefTechGuy View PostI think (800D2 x 3) + (805D2 x 2) would be amazing. But you know what you should do?
Sell all your B&W, JL, and Classe, and get JTR speakers & subs and Emotiva pre-pros and amps. eek.gifbiggrin.gif

I think not the 800Diamond and the CA-M600 are here to stay! The front end is where the action is 80% of the time anyway.

 

Instead of the 805Ds for surround, I am going with KEF LS50 they sound great and cost a lot less.wink.gif

post #13620 of 17813
Quote:
Originally Posted by AcuDefTechGuy View Post

I think (800D2 x 3) + (805D2 x 2) would be amazing.

But you know what you should do?

Sell all your B&W, JL, and Classe, and get JTR speakers & subs and Emotiva pre-pros and amps. eek.gifbiggrin.gif


hmm, I agree with 800D2 x 3 but would probably do 804D2 x 2 instead of the 805.
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