or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › CD Players & Dedicated Music Transports › Digital output on a turntable
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Digital output on a turntable

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm in the market for a turntable, and I've noticed that several models are now available with digital outputs. I plead complete ignorance: is any of the analog "warmth" of vinyl sacrificed by outputting digital? If not, digital would perhaps be a boon to me, since I have a spare toslink input on my switcher.
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by wzpgsr View Post

I'm in the market for a turntable, and I've noticed that several models are now available with digital outputs. I plead complete ignorance: is any of the analog "warmth" of vinyl sacrificed by outputting digital? If not, digital would perhaps be a boon to me, since I have a spare toslink input on my switcher.


Don't know how this could be considering there is nothing "digital" about a TT, one would have to go to a Analog-to-Digital converter first.......WHY !! The reason why most of us who are serious about LP's is because they are analog.

Now, with that being said if your intention is to record and archive to CD that's a different matter.
post #3 of 15
post #4 of 15


Pure junk, absolute disgrace to the analog community !!!
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by twitch54 View Post

Pure junk, absolute disgrace to the analog community !!!

I agree, it looks like POS.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by DOUBTINGTHOMAS29 View Post

I agree, it looks like POS.

It is. I saw it recently at my local CC, and it's very flimsy and cheaply made.
post #7 of 15
The Gemini iKey Pro looks to be a real promising way to record your records. I have no experience with it though.
post #8 of 15
Quote:


I'm in the market for a turntable, and I've noticed that several models are now available with digital outputs. I plead complete ignorance: is any of the analog "warmth" of vinyl sacrificed by outputting digital? If not, digital would perhaps be a boon to me, since I have a spare toslink input on my switcher.

Turntables with digital audio outputs seem to be marketed solely to the professional DJ crowd, where this connection can be useful for interfacing with outboard processors and digital recording devices.

I do remember laughing out loud when I stumbled across a turntable that outputs audio only out of a USB port. I don't remember who made it, but certainly wasn't from a manufacturer that had any solid reputation in the pro audio business.
post #9 of 15
Actually, I have one of these:

http://www.amazon.com/Stanton-STR8-8.../dp/B00006FXFU

Rock solid turntable, can do either digital or analog output. I bought it to transfer my album collection over to the computer, but still haven't started that project. I recommend it for anyone replacing an old turntable.
post #10 of 15
How about the Ion, Numark, or Audio Technica? I noticed they are all less expensive than the Stanton.

Anyone own any of these?
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tornillo View Post

How about the Ion, Numark, or Audio Technica? I noticed they are all less expensive than the Stanton.

Anyone own any of these?

Save up your money and buy a real turntable.
post #12 of 15
Many new home theater receivers have removed the "phono" jacks, so a toslink connection would be a good thing. I guess you could argue about the analog to digital conversion, but remember, a cartridge needs to run through an equalizer, so the sound is only as good as that component also.
post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Hef View Post

Many new home theater receivers have removed the "phono" jacks, so a toslink connection would be a good thing. I guess you could argue about the analog to digital conversion, but remember, a cartridge needs to run through an equalizer, so the sound is only as good as that component also.

You mean there is an equalization component in the signal path between the needle and the turntable's output?
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by wzpgsr View Post

You mean there is an equalization component in the signal path between the needle and the turntable's output?

No, but there needs to be one between the turntables output and the pre-amplification stage. To both boost signal level, and to EQ the RIAA eq applied during the recording stage of the record.
post #15 of 15
Yes, in the old days, it was argued about the receiver's built-in phono circuits, and their ability to play back the vinyl as it was intended. Today, we have the problem of converting a record into a CD with recording through a computer, and the sound card not having the proper equalization for this transfer. From a company selling outboard RIAA equalization processors:
"Because of limitations in the LP recording process, an equalization curve must be applied to the music or other sonic content prior to it being cut onto vinyl, so as to reduce backround noise and sibilance. Removing this equalization affect (called the RIAA curve) and restoring the music's original frequency response curve during playback is an important part of the phono preamp's job and differentiates it from other preamps used for microphones and musical instruments, which provide gain but no other modification of the original sound quality. Proper RIAA re-equalization during playback is a must in faithfully producing the original musical content without coloration or distortion."
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › CD Players & Dedicated Music Transports › Digital output on a turntable