or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › Bad isf calibration
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Bad isf calibration - Page 3  

post #61 of 139
There are a few answers here, commenting on my statement that ISF will not tell you up front, before parting with cash, that a picture set to D65 may not be to everyone's taste. There's a lot of implication that 'the good ones will tell you.

Let me put it this way - it doesn't say that at the ISF website!

Also, ISF pride themselves on being an organisation who fully train people before they're ISF certified, and they're very precious about who they'll certify. If ISF don't say this at their website, do you think they'll train the calibrators to let this slip? Even the good ones?

We've also had lots of comments that some TVs are impossible to calibrate to a good picture - this isn't some new argument, I've actually heard this before from ISF calibrators, and their customers. Apparently LCD displays are particuilarly bad.

Fair enough, that's not ISF's fault.

But in that case, surely a professional should not take your money, at least not without a very clear warning.

ISF like to sell themselves as uber-professional. If ISF calibrators want to follow the example of true professionals, this is what they should do. If they enter your house and see a display known to be impossible/difficult to correctly calibrate, thyey should have a standard form to give you to read, and sign, to say you appreciate the risks.

That would be a professional approach, wouldn't it?

Steve W

EDIT ADDITIONAL COMMENT:

Just in case my comments appear biased, I'd like to add the following. I'm sure many ISF calibrators are honest, hard-working passionate people, determined to do the best job possible, and keen to give people value for money.

It's just that having an ISF certification clearly doesn't guarentee this, and that it's quite possible to pass the ISF exams, then not offer people a very good service, whilst not breaking any of ISF's rules.

My main problem is the idea of ISF as a faux-professional qualification/body. In my job as a teacher, if I told every parent/pupil that their child would leave with the top grade, or led them to believe that, I'd not be behaving professionally. If a doctor let a patient believe they'd definitely be cured of any illness, they'd not be behaving professionally. In both cases, the teacher's/doctor's professional bodies would have something to say about this.

SW
post #62 of 139
People seem to be getting very defensive towards the whole idea of an ISF Calibration and to me it seems they are even starting to get defensive towards the calibrators themselves. All I ask is don't start insulting what the true professional calibrators do for a living. Getting a set calibrated can be great and definintely worth every penny. If I did something for a living that people labeled a "scam" or "worthless" that would hurt a lot. I am not saying anybody said that on this thread but it has been said plenty of times before in other ones. These are very professional people that have a great love for A/V equipment and really do want to share their knowledge with people. Any good calibrator will tell you what their purpose is in calibrating the set before hand. They will tell you they are setting your tv to a standard and that you may actually not be used to the picture when it gets done. You should do a calibration if you love films and feel that you need to get a picture and color as close to what the director intended. They can also do lots of other things (convergence, fix geometry issues, etc.). If you don't care about that stuff then don't get a calibration. Simple as that.
post #63 of 139
Thread Starter 
Well the post has gotten a little off track. As I have said more than once I was looking for advice as who to believe. I have now made my conclusions thank you all for the help.

Here are the results of my spyderTV Pro. I think reading 1 looks worse than it really was, the spyder seems to get a little confused when the set is far off.

Numbers 1 and 6 where where done in white balance menu number 8 was done in the w/b move menu.

TV now looks great still more to do but for now I am done I am going to go watch a movie

 

SpyderTV Pro ReportComp run 1.pdf 372.9638671875k . file

 

Spyder TV Pro reportComp 6.doc 51.5k . file

 

Spyder TV Pro reportComp 8.doc 118k . file
post #64 of 139
I'm sure there are good teachers and bad teachers, but the schools don't tell you this, or that your kid isn't very bright and won't be a lawyer but they take your money and teach him just the same. I think it's fair to assume that some teachers are better than others, and that the end result is that in the most part, the pupil has learned something to one degree or another. We pay for this service one way or another too, but if one pupil hasn't learned as much as another pupil, it's clearly the teachers fault and the parents have been ripped off. Well, not really, but hopefully you get my point.

It's not easy to police many industries to the nth degree and calibration is no different, and although they may all be getting paid similar monies, you may not always get the same results, especially when there are so many variables involved.

It can almost be a case of buyer beware given the variables, and unfortunately a lot of the negative comments here come from people who don't know what's involved, so it's easy to point a finger at the calibrator IMHO.

Gary
post #65 of 139
Tower,

I would use a test disk with visual cues to set the white and black levels rather than the colorimiter, as it will give you far more accurate results, especially if you do it under your normal viewing conditions.

Are the results for the same input as the pdf results looks different to the word results.

Gary
post #66 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Lightfoot View Post

Tower,

I would use a test disk with visual cues to set the white and black levels rather than the colorimiter, as it will give you far more accurate results, especially if you do it under your normal viewing conditions.

Are the results for the same input as the pdf results looks different to the word results.

Gary

The spyder Pro is very limited in what it can do and it took many runs to get it right or as close as it can. To that end you are very correct and I used the test patterns on the disk as well as DVE and the Sony Blu-ray to set brightness, contrast and confirm color (it was darn close on color maybe right on).

My next step will be to READ MORE then get calman and maybe a new sensor (eye1 maybe). For now I needed to "fix" the set ASAP, as Samsung only but it back to factory specs and after all my reading I had a hard time living with that (thanks a lot guys )
post #67 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Lightfoot View Post

Tower,


Are the results for the same input as the pdf results looks different to the word results.

Gary

Run 1 and run 6 (my last grayscale for component) I had to run HDMI 9 times to get it "right"

I had to change the PDFs to word to get under 500k so I could post here.
post #68 of 139
Tower101, you should be aware that very variable results have been reported with the spyder probes, particularly with DLP sets. I have one and have found that it is not very good for low level measurements and has produced some unusual results at higher levels. I use the EyeOne for nearly everything and can be more accurate on most displays aligning them visually than with the spyder. Thank you, however, for posting the data. I have still not seen the data from the calibrator, nor any info regarding what he used to calibrate your set.

It is interesting that the analogy of teachers came up, because I was one for a time and have two degrees in the field. In my experience, many more ISF people behave in a professional manner as a percentage of the total than do teachers. There are good and bad in any profession. The teaching profession certainly cannot claim to police its own and I do not believe that ISF does either. They do not claim to. I have never bothered to become ISF certified, and am not affiliated with them. If anything, they could be considered my competition. That said, no entity has done as much to improve the quality of what we get from manufacturers than ISF. I can think of few individuals who have had more of a positive impact on the industry as Joe Kane and Joel Silver.

So let's put this thread to bed and in the future, if someone wants to debate the results of a calibration from either perspective, post the before and after data for all to see. And if you want to discuss the efficacy of teaching, let's see some pre and post data for each class.
post #69 of 139
I would recommend CalMAN as it is excellent value and works very well. You still have a long way to go to get the display to D65 though. All the RGBs should be more or less on the same line from at least 30%stim to 100%stim (under 30% can give inaccurate readings due to low light).

Other than having the right tools, there's a lot to knowing what you're doing to get good results.

Gary
post #70 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lcaillo View Post

Tower101, you should be aware that very variable results have been reported with the spyder probes, particularly with DLP sets. I have one and have found that it is not very good for low level measurements and has produced some unusual results at higher levels. I use the EyeOne for nearly everything and can be more accurate on most displays aligning them visually than with the spyder. Thank you, however, for posting the data.

I have read that, I have an LCD that can be even more of a problem. I was going to use a tripod but first wanted to see the results of putting it on the screen.

I only left it on the screen for as long as it took to do one run, I then took it off for the same amount of time. I believe this to be VERY important because if it is on the screen to long the readings start to go a little crazy. This took a very long time.
post #71 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Lightfoot View Post

I would recommend CalMAN as it is excellent value and works very well. You still have a long way to go to get the display to D65 though. All the RGBs should be more or less on the same line from at least 30%stim to 100%stim (under 30% can give inaccurate readings due to low light).

Other than having the right tools, there's a lot to knowing what you're doing to get good results.

Gary

As I said first I have more reading to do . According the spyder I am very close to 65D (see run 8) If you look at run 6 all you will see is blue but they are all at 100%, I do understand that spyder is only a two point test.

The TV now looks great results speak for themselves, as I am writing this I am watching Maverick in HD (showtimeHD).
post #72 of 139
Run 8 just seems to show the brightness and contrast. Run 6 just looks like an unused graph, especially as the cuts and gains are the same as the 'before' reading - I would have expected a white line there for all three colours (that's what other programs do when all three colors converge). It's also a lot flatter than is usual.

When you day it's a two point test, what does it do exactly?

Gary
post #73 of 139
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gary Lightfoot View Post

Run 8 just seems to show the brightness and contrast. Run 6 just looks like an unused graph, especially as the cuts and gains are the same as the 'before' reading - I would have expected a white line there for all three colours (that's what other programs do when all three colors converge). It's also a lot flatter than is usual.

When you day it's a two point test, what does it do exactly?

Gary

Page down on run 8 first page is brightness and contrast next page is color setting and temp chart.

Spyder shows blue not white. The grayscale is only measured at two point a High and low I forget the values off the top of my head and am to lazy to get up and look. There are most like (will certainty) that there are errors in the middle. That's why the chart is flat they where dead on (100%) both top and bottom.

As I get more into it I will need to find a compromise for most of the points I am sure.

I did not enter my ending values in the spyder I took a screen shot with my camera insted.
post #74 of 139
Before considering doing any of this, a quck money saving tip.

1 - Set up your TV using a DVE calibration disc.

2 - Using DVE, have a look at some grey-scale test cards. If the grey looks grey, rather than blue-ish grey or red-ish grey, you're probaby very close. If you can't spot that grey is off whilst staring at grey scale test cards, you aren't going to notice the difference in a constantly moving colour image.

And if it does look tinted, have a go yourself.

If this doesn't work, maybe you need an ISF calibrator.

A good tip is to check here and ask who's got a similar display to you, and how the felt about the calibration. You'd go by word of mouth in other industries, this shouldn't be any different.

Then, ring the ISF calibrator and tell him/her over the 'phone what your problem is, what your set is, and if they can deliver what you expect. If they say "I do D65, and that's it!", then maybe they're not for you.

Otherwise, they might be worth it.

Good luck to you, and respect to all the hard-working ISF technicians who love their job, and do their best. I'm sure there are lots of you out there.

And Gary, for bad/good teachers in the UK, we have OFSTED. For bad/good schools we also have league tables, published by the governent every year for Year 9 SATs, Year 11 GCSEs, Year 12 A/S Levels and A Level grades.

ISF equivalent?

No, there isn't, is there.

Steve W
post #75 of 139
Tower101

You should download ColorHCFR and use your SpyderII sensor..You will love this program...
post #76 of 139
Steve,

You may have controls in place, but the variables still exist.

Good advice though BTW...

Gary
post #77 of 139
Taking a big chance here....

I've actually read three pages of threads and have wondered why few other ISF techs have chimed in.

It is my policy to get confirmation from the client that they understand what is about to be done to their display. Top to bottom and side to side. While I cannot speak for Zygmunt here, from conversations I've had with him in the past, he is thorough.

Upon completion of the calibration, if the client simply does not like the look of an accurate display, I'd just go back into the service settings and replace them to their factory floor settings. No money would change hands, the clients display would be back to stone stock. Did I miss this somewhere? Post 48 or something?

As a side note, this has never happened as of yet to me. Never in the last 3 years. About 175 calibrations. (Part timer... I have another job I hate)

Seems like a simple fix and since it could be documented with data. I'm left to wonder just what is the problem here?

Hope we all can get on the same page, but this is America.

Thanks for your time,

Doug k
post #78 of 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by ltd76gold View Post

Upon completion of the calibration, if the client simply does not like the look of an accurate display, I'd just go back into the service settings and replace them to their factory floor settings. No money would change hands, the clients display would be back to stone stock. Did I miss this somewhere? Post 48 or something?

You see, that sounds like an utterly professional approach to the job.

Well done, that's probably above and beyond what I would expect.

I've certainly never seen that offered by anyone from ISF in the UK. Indeed, the majority charge you not only for the work, but also for the distyance they had to travel to your house to calibrate your equipment.

Unfortunately, ISF calibrators in the UK are few and far between, with not a one in the M62 coridoor, despite a quarter of the UK's population living there.

Steve W
post #79 of 139
I agree. I see no reason for a dispute. The data should show what was done. If the client does not like the result, there are easy remedies. I would not expect that there be no charge at at all, however, unless the job was simply bothched. Some work is done to identify where the display starts and to educate the client.

I price my work hourly, with an initial consultation fee that is non refundable that includes education regarding using the consumer adjustments and measuring the perfromance of the display. After that we discuss the expected outcome. That initial consultation and measurement is non-refundable and is a fair value for the on-site time, display documentation, and research. I am a professional and my time and expertise are not free. It is no different to me than going to a client's home to give an estimate on a repair. My time and experience get used and the client gets information. Whether they decide to accept the estimate or not, there is a cost and a benefit to the client. This differs from the way ISF people typically work, but that is their choice. I just don't see it as an all or nothing situation. I see calibration as simply an extension of the consulting, installation, and repair services that we already provide.

My initial consultation is $120-$150 (prepaid), and most calibrations are $180-240 total (either $60 or $75 per hour beyond the initital fee). Some are more for CRT based sets, systems that need other work or that have many inputs to be calibrated. The rate depends on the work done and the time it takes. This is all discussed in detail up front and if the client does not perceive the value, they just don't contract my services. If they do, they know exactly what they are going to get. If they decide to not go beyond the initial consultation, they get documentation of they performance of the display and detailed instructions on how to use it, as well as an evaluation of how the system is designed and any recommended changes or upgrades.

There should never be an unhappy client. There are imposible ones, no doubt, but they would never likely pay for the initial consultation to start with, and if they did, they would know exactly what they will get. If a calibrator is careless enough to take on a client that he cannot provide services in a manner that will leave a good feeling of value, or if the calibrator does not perform addequately, then he/she is simply not behaving in a professional manner. I believe that most ISF people do operate professionally and do communicate adequately. Obviously, there will be some that do not.
post #80 of 139
I must agree with "lcaillo" that no client should be left unhappy after a calibration. I always try to involve my clients in the calibration process and I always show them exactly what I am doing as well as showing them a spreadsheet of the "precalibration" and the "post calibration". I even let them set the colours and tint looking thru the blue filter as it is their eyes that will see the colours. Of course, I look thru it as well to make sure that they are not off and if they are, I explain to them why they may want to adjust it.

In the end, I always ask clients to pull out their favorite movie and watch scenes they are familiar with to see if they notice any different. To date, I have not had anyone that didn't like the changes.

Also, I always bring along the service manual as an added precaution.
post #81 of 139
Greetings,

Finding the right video calibration technician can not only be daunting, but also confusing. Recently, many questions have been raised as to what to look for in calibration equipment, service, and experience. For this reason, Avical has created an article on Hiring a Video Calibration Technician designed to assist you in making your decision.

Enjoy!

Dave
post #82 of 139
Thread Starter 
After much reading, learning I have found out more about a TV then I ever really wanted to know

I am posting this so any one that is going to hire some one to calibrate their TV will not have the problems I have. Knowledge is power.

After more than a week of working on this TV I sent this e-mail.

Quote:


Zygmunt,



To start with:



1. You have called me 2 times after you left my house (I have the phone logs to show this). I told you in an e-mail NOT to call me, as I do not want to get in to a he said she said. You have changed your story on what was said while at my house, maybe I heard you wrong. This way there is NO misunderstanding of what is being said.



2. I have not answered your e-mail dated 1-10-07 as I have been very busy doing my job as well as the one that I originally wanted you to do.



Now for the heart of the problems:



I contacted you to calibrate my TV - plain and simple. I had a few specific issues that I wanted fixed as well. They where:



1. In all modes (except movie), the set had very bad black detail - it was crushing the blacks.



2. Movie mode had a green tint to it, but it did a better job with the blacks but not so good with color.



3. The set was too bright.



4. When using HDMI with my cable box, I was getting red blocks in the blacks.



5. It was what I incorrectly called ghosting, but what I was getting was an after image of bright images when the screen went black.



You told me that:



# 4 & 5 was most likely being caused by a low cable signal. I have since had it checked by the cable company and a Samsung technician. Both agreed that I have a very good signal.



You said that you could fix # 2.



I guess your answer to # 1 was to only use movie mode.



Your answer to 3 was not to use Dynamic (as I am sure you know custom, standard and dynamic are all the same - only the factory presets are different).



Now for what you did when at my house:



1. You set D65 for movie mode warm1 (I think you said that was for component) and warm2 (HDMI?)



2. You tried to get RGB tracking lined up (in the w/b movie menu) so you could get a low DeltaE.



3. You changed the factor presets for movie.



When you left I was supposed to change from warm1 to warm2 every time I changed input, which is absolutely ridiculous. Additionally, I could only use movie mode (this softens the PQ and is not too good for say watching a football game).



I will say that the overall PQ in movie mode was better BUT down low an IRE of say 0 to 20 I was now getting greens and reds, NOT good almost to the point of making it unwatchable.



When you where at my house, you were obviously having difficulties. I told you that I was going to call Samsung and even asked you what they would say, you told me that you did not know as you did not deal with them directly that you had dealings with anther brand (I forget the name).



The following day I called Samsung and I explained the problems I was experiencing with the TV, and what I had hired you to do. Samsung suggested that you most likely did not have a good understanding of the set and/or Samsung in general. I wanted to give you the benefit of the doubt so I posted on the AVS forum to see if I could find additional information on who was right (although I did already feel you where not right). I emailed you the link to the post and stopped payment on the check I gave you.



As a result, Samsung sent out a technician to check my TV and if needed reset my TV back to the factory settings (which they did).



You e-mailed me back saying that Samsung was wrong, specifically on what the White Balance menu does. Samsung claims that it sets the grayscale for all modes and is = to cool1. You said that it does not affect movie mode. You are 100% WRONG and I can easy demonstrate this by turning up the red gain in the white balance leaving the SM. You will find a high red contrast in all modes INCLUDING movie.



Since that time I have gotten a syperTVPro and set the grayscale in white balance menu now all modes are D65 (on cool1) including movie. I have moved on to better software as the TVPro is very limited in what it does.



I will share with you some of my findings.



1. Indeed as stated white balance sets the grayscale for all modes.



2. The TV has 10 gamma modes. I am still working on that, and I have found the gamma is some what subjective BUT you said there where no gamma settings. This is incorrect.



3. While gamma is somewhat subjective, it did make a big difference on RGB offset tracking. I have not seen (nor do care to) your grayscale runs, but I bet that down low (below 40 IRE) your runs show spikes in red and green and the blue has big curves. By changing the gamma setting, I got a MUCH flatter run, blue is still a little wavy but not bad. In fact, I now have a DeltaE of less than 4 down low and almost 0 up high. I can get the gamma curve very close (2.12), but at 0 IRE it is about 2.8 (still crushing some blacks) then down to more or less steady 2 ish, but only a 300:1 contrast. I like my contrast to be more 700 to 900 so I had to make compromises. I bet that your 1.7 would show a 0 IRE of 5+ then a big drop to some where around 1.2.



4. The whole changing from warm1 to warm2 when changing input. I really have a hard time believing you did not know that you FRIST do your changes in HDMI (you did component then HDMI) as ANY changes made here (HDMI) change the settings in all the other inputs. AFTER you set HDMI you can make changes to component, AV what ever and the TV saves the changes for each input but you have to remember that if you go back into HDMI and make changes to something (red offset say) you will then have to go back and reset your red offset in the other inputs. How could you not know that??



5. The black crush in the modes other than movie as well as the ghosting was being caused by DNIe. This was fixed by turning down the DNIe feature in the SM under LBE. Simple, but you did not do this.



There are other things I pointed out like the set pulses in the background. You claimed you could not see this, but I didn't even have to point it out to the Samsung technician he saw it right away. I will now have the main-board replaced this week, and will have to reset the TV all over again. It should go much faster this time, as I do not have as much to learn.

,

I am done with you, you have wasted enough of my time. If you had been honest with me and told me that you did not have a good understanding of this TV but you would be willing to try that would have been one thing. Instead you led me to believe that you knew this set, you are either kidding yourself or flat out lying.



By the way, I now have over 100 grayscale runs and have backed up my conclusions with numbers. I can do demonstrations on the TV if it becomes necessary (for an independent third party).



William Martin


He responded by saying he was going to call the district attorney as giving a bad check in MA is illegal.


I do not take threats lightly so I call the States Attorneys Office and told them the story all of it. She was very nice and told me (paraphrasing) that I did not do any thing wrong per-say but that he could make my life hard and she recommended that I pay him the money and then sue him, making his life hard.

I have a meeting set up with a Lawyer (my wife's boss) for tomorrow.

I e-mailed him this:

Quote:


Just got off the phone with the State Attorney Office, they said that I did not do anything illegal per say but that you can make my life difficult. They suggested that a pay you the $400 and then file a claim in small claims court and that I can file for the full amount + any thing this has cost me (making your life more difficult). I call my wife and she has set up a consult with her boss for tomorrow, this will cost me money and yes I will be adding that to the amount.


Let me know if this is the route you wish to take.

If so I will send a certified check out FedEx right away and will file papers with the court tomorrow.


William Martin


So to all make sure the person you are contacting knows what they are doing with your set. Do some homework before you even call and do more after, ask specific questions if things don't look right when they are at your house ask, if they seem confused or can't answer make them stop and tell them to leave.

Having you set calibrated is a good idea my set now looks great the whites are white I can see more detail than ever before. I did find that indeed LCDs don't do blacks very well but do bright great LOL I have make some mistakes and still need to learn more, that whole gamma thing but I see by reading that I am not the only one with a gamma "deficiency" LOL
post #83 of 139
Very ugly dirty laundry. I understand there are two sides to every issue and almost certainly not all the facts are known to us, but if i were on the jury I'd have to say that you are more in the wrong Tower. Just my 2 cents...
post #84 of 139
Thread Starter 
Don't really know how I am wrong but if it shown that I am, I will apologize. Simple fact what he is telling me is wrong and again any one that would like to come out for a demonstration PM me.
post #85 of 139
this thread needs to seriously die..
post #86 of 139
Agree 200%, richlo. Moderators, can you lock this one now?
post #87 of 139
Stop reading it if you are not intereted. I found the thread informative, and the continued learning process of Tower101 interesting. I suspect that proponents of ISF calibration may be uncomfortable with the tile of the thread continually popping up, but it is a reality that not all calibrations lead to happy clients. As professionals, we should be very interested in the matter and the perceptions that revolve around it.

The issues regarding how these services are provided are very relevant and should be discussed. I am still surprised that no one from ISF got involved to sort the matter out. It could have given them some good PR to take on a mediation role.
post #88 of 139
I agree about ISF.

It appears that, at the moment, their role is to set up training courses and exams, and then send those who pass into the big wide world with a certificate, saying they're an official ISF calibrator.

Here's the website:

http://www.imagingscience.com/

Where's the policing that you'd get with any other professional body?

Where a code of conduct saying what you can expect from ISF?

I live in the UK. If I get a bad ISF, who is there employed by ISF who I can complain to, and who can come and have a look?

If ISF certification is to be worth the paper its written on, you must have some sort of standard to expect from a calibration, and some sort of comeback from ISF if the person you employ, holding their certificate, doesn't come up with the goods.

At the moment, if you were to take an ISF calibrator to court in the UK, who would be your expert witness? Another ISF calibrator?

There should be some sort of standard at ISF's site, some sort of policing, some sort of follow up.

There isn't.

From a general public point of view, ISF just appear to be there to take the money from its courses/exams, and run.

Steve W
post #89 of 139
Greetings

The ISF offers a two day seminar into the history of television and the very basics of calibration.

Calibrators learn their skills by working on one TV at a time. The ISF certificate says that you have successfully attended their two day seminar and have demonstrated that you retained enough knowledge to pass the exam ... that is all.

No one can ISF a TV ... there is no such thing. There is only the act of calibrating a TV. If you forget what the rules are ... you can screw up. They are not a professional organization like those for Engineers ... Lawyers ... Doctors ... nor does the ISF pretend to be.

People erroneously make the so called certification to be a lot more important than it actually is. It's like a beginners driving test. You pass ... but still there are plenty of bad drivers out there and they still passed their exam as well. The ISF only comes after its own if ... they find that the person is calibrating to their own personal taste ... contrary to the information provided. (ie ... person deciding to calibrate all TVs to 10000K because he likes it there.)

And all they can really do is take your name off their site.

Regards
post #90 of 139
You have stated it well, Michael. My point is that it would be smart for ISF to take a more proactive role in dealing with issues like this that may get aired publicly. One of the selling points that Joel made when we briefly discussed the value of ISF certification was that they help in building the business. It seems to me that if you want to add value to the ISF tag, and want certified individuals to be succesful in growing the business, there should be some interest in managing the public perception.

Perhaps a good analogy is NESDA, an organization that has allowed an entire business segment wither by not being proactive.

Perhaps we should not refer to ISF people as "professional calibrators?" I think a lot of them would have a problem with that. And rightly so. Most that I have had any interaction with have been very professional. I have said before, few individuals have done more to improve the performance of display products and positively affect the industry as have those involved with ISF. The business goes on, however, and a critical aspect of the success of calibration specialists is the public perception of what ISF means. A few bad calibrations can go a long way to ruin an image, however.

Just to be clear, I have not been ISF certified and have no relationship with the organization. If they were a bit more proactive, I might consider it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Display Calibration
This thread is locked  
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Display Calibration › Bad isf calibration