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Show me your RACK - Page 43

post #1261 of 2096
Well, the bundle with the Slim did not come with the power supply. If you buy the Kinect separate, you get the power supply and the usb conversion cable (It's one cord...) You WILL need this if you are extending to your play area...
At Amazon... I would recommend a MS one for this...If it is like the Branded vs Aftermarket VGA cables...
post #1262 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin g. View Post

Well, the bundle with the Slim did not come with the power supply. If you buy the Kinect separate, you get the power supply and the usb conversion cable (It's one cord...) You WILL need this if you are extending to your play area...
At Amazon... I would recommend a MS one for this...If it is like the Branded vs Aftermarket VGA cables...

Ah... thats exactly what I thought. The Kinect does not use a standard USB cable which is why I asked. I'm still slightly confused however as that power adapter looks like a standard usb end and not the kinect cable end. How is that supposed to work?
post #1263 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by ten8yp View Post

Ah... thats exactly what I thought. The Kinect does not use a standard USB cable which is why I asked. I'm still slightly confused however as that power adapter looks like a standard usb end and not the kinect cable end. How is that supposed to work?

http://www.amazon.com/Power-Supply-C...1901630&sr=8-5

The adapter has a proprietary female Kinect port that splits into the AC adapter and a male USB 2.0 port. You plug the USB extension into the standard USB 2.0 port, and then plug the other end into your 360.

If you look closely, the orange female port isn't USB.

post #1264 of 2096
yeah, that's a much better picture of the "splitter"...
post #1265 of 2096
Hi Guys,

I have gotten so many great ideas looking at these racks. I'm trying to put together my rack and hope that you guys can give pointers specifically regarding component position and thermal management.

Briefly, I have an AXS slide out rack going into a recessed wall so not much space on the sides or back for ventilation. There will be a screen wall with GOM fabric for the door so some circulation in the front.

I have:

1. Amps - Emotiva XPA-3 and two Emotiva UPA-2
2. Pre amp - Marantz AV7005
3. Furman rack mount conditioner
4. Oppo BP-95
5. Xbox
6. Mac Mini

How should I organize these components? Use vented vs covered blank spacers? Do I need active thermal management with fans, etc...

Thanks!
post #1266 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by newHTowner View Post

I have an AXS slide out rack going into a recessed wall so not much space on the sides or back for ventilation. There will be a screen wall with GOM fabric for the door so some circulation in the front.

How should I organize these components? Use vented vs covered blank spacers? Do I need active thermal management with fans, etc...

I have a similar setup (not as many Emotiva amps, though). I vent my AXS with an HVAC return fan assembly above the rack. Are you venting anywhere or are you going to to need to dump the warm air back into the room?

Read Middle Atlantic's Thermal Management white paper:

http://www.middleatlantic.com/pdf/ThermalManagement.pdf

But basically, you want to get cool air in, warm air out. Place the amps at the bottom, with some space and likely some vent panels between them to allow cool air in. Assuming you need to vent warm air out the front, look at the MA solutions:

http://www.middleatlantic.com/rackac/cooling/uqfp.htm

Honestly, my similar gear stack runs cool - some low-speed fans to pull air out of the rack may be enough. Stack the rack correctly, and if you over-provision the fans, make sure you use variable speed solutions so you can dial it down (low noise) if you end up not needing a lot of active cooling.

Jeff
post #1267 of 2096
There's a good article on our site about cooling a home theater:

http://hometoys.com/emagazine.php?ur...al01/index.htm
post #1268 of 2096
I used an in-line commercial bathroom fan with filtration and these fans are really neat because the better ones are not only dead quiet but they also include two stage fans. Mine runs at a low speed to move some air since a rack PC and multiple satelite DVR's are on all the time. When you turn on the theater amps the high speed turns on and runs at the higher speed while the amps are on. When the amps turn off the fan runs for 20 minutes at high speed and then moves to the lower speed. It sits inside the rack closet and brings filtered air into the closet through a in wall filter and then blows the air out the front of the rack. What is nice is that I have no dust in the rack closet since this always has positive filtered air pressure.

You can hear moving air when you put your head against the rack and you can feel the warm air moving out of the rack but you can not hear a fan motor. I experimented with fans in the begining and I could hear the inline fans that were built for this and I absolutely can not stand noise. This fan has run continuously since 2008 and all I do is change the filter every 6 months. I have a huge filtration system in the HVAC but this filter is still full of dust every 6 months.
post #1269 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

There's a good article on our site about cooling a home theater:

http://hometoys.com/emagazine.php?ur...al01/index.htm

Not really. It states the bleedin obvious and is just a covert advertisement.
post #1270 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by A9X-308 View Post

Not really. It states the bleedin obvious and is just a covert advertisement.

I didn't read it but it mentions bathroom fans being loud, quite the opposite if you buy a good one. I remembered that it was not originally my idea to use a bathroom fan and when I went back to my posts I see that someone on this thread recomended a Panasonic bathroom fan and I think I used a Panasonic. Who knew they made bathroom fans.
post #1271 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by scl23enn4m3 View Post

http://www.amazon.com/Power-Supply-C...1901630&sr=8-5

The adapter has a proprietary female Kinect port that splits into the AC adapter and a male USB 2.0 port. You plug the USB extension into the standard USB 2.0 port, and then plug the other end into your 360.

If you look closely, the orange female port isn't USB.


Quote:
Originally Posted by kevin g. View Post

yeah, that's a much better picture of the "splitter"...

Gotcha... yep that pic is much better and makes the adapter make more sense.

Thanks for all the info guys. Now back to topic...

Since you guys are talking about bathroom fans... does anyone know if you can mount them vertically? I would love to be able to mount one lower on the back wall of the closet down near all of the components instead of in the ceiling. Then on the outside wall just put some kind of vent grill like a round type... maybe something similiar to a speaker grill. The bonus of that for me would be that it would be completely outside my actual HT room so the noise wouldn't be a factor at all.
post #1272 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by ten8yp View Post


Gotcha... yep that pic is much better and makes the adapter make more sense.

Thanks for all the info guys. Now back to topic...

Since you guys are talking about bathroom fans... does anyone know if you can mount them vertically? I would love to be able to mount one lower on the back wall of the closet down near all of the components instead of in the ceiling. Then on the outside wall just put some kind of vent grill like a round type... maybe something similiar to a speaker grill. The bonus of that for me would be that it would be completely outside my actual HT room so the noise wouldn't be a factor at all.

So when I mounted my servers in a closet I used a 4" duct fan plus thermostatically controlled dual PC 120mm fans to get sufficient airflow but I did need high throughput as the setup was a but unusual. The cold air input was at the top, the rack mount servers and RAID were installed vertically and the fans and ducting was at the bottom, a bit unusual but it did work.
My point is that you may well e able to get sufficient airflow from a quieter solution.
post #1273 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Expat444 View Post

So when I mounted my servers in a closet I used a 4" duct fan plus thermostatically controlled dual PC 120mm fans to get sufficient airflow but I did need high throughput as the setup was a but unusual. The cold air input was at the top, the rack mount servers and RAID were installed vertically and the fans and ducting was at the bottom, a bit unusual but it did work.
My point is that you may well e able to get sufficient airflow from a quieter solution.

Sounds a bit confusing to me... I know absolutely zero about HVAC except how to adjust (and replace too actually) thermostats. I'm almost inclined to just rig some kind of cheap fan in the outside wall if it will get the job done. My basement stays pretty cool so I shouldn't have much of a problem.
post #1274 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by jongig View Post

I used an in-line commercial bathroom fan with filtration and these fans are really neat because the better ones are not only dead quiet but they also include two stage fans. Mine runs at a low speed to move some air since a rack PC and multiple satelite DVR's are on all the time. When you turn on the theater amps the high speed turns on and runs at the higher speed while the amps are on. When the amps turn off the fan runs for 20 minutes at high speed and then moves to the lower speed. It sits inside the rack closet and brings filtered air into the closet through a in wall filter and then blows the air out the front of the rack. What is nice is that I have no dust in the rack closet since this always has positive filtered air pressure.

You can hear moving air when you put your head against the rack and you can feel the warm air moving out of the rack but you can not hear a fan motor. I experimented with fans in the begining and I could hear the inline fans that were built for this and I absolutely can not stand noise. This fan has run continuously since 2008 and all I do is change the filter every 6 months. I have a huge filtration system in the HVAC but this filter is still full of dust every 6 months.

This sounds like a great solution, do you have make/model information?
post #1275 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by jongig View Post

What is nice is that I have no dust in the rack closet since this always has positive filtered air pressure.

Can you elaborate on this a bit? Sounds very intriguing. I'm real tired of having to clean my gear all the time. Does this need a sealed area for it to work?
post #1276 of 2096
Here are a few photos, cold air comes in at the top and is sucked out the bottom and vented outside, the closet doors were pretty much airtight, hopefully that makes more sense.
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post #1277 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Expat444 View Post

Here are a few photos, cold air comes in at the top and is sucked out the bottom and vented outside, the closet doors were pretty much airtight, hopefully that makes more sense.

definitely makes sense but thats a LOT more complicated than I need and definitely want to get with my fan setup... for my purposes anyways. Nice setup either way!
post #1278 of 2096
Ten8yp, read the Middle Atlantic Thermal Management white paper that jautor has linked above.

You want your closet to be relatively airtight, with an inlet and an outlet, with air moving in one direction, preferably lower to higher. Some options come with a 'thermostat', to control the fan.

What do you mean by exterior wall? Some fan systems have attractive inlet/outlet options, that do look like a speaker grill, and some have filters.

And, check out the coolerguys.com site.
post #1279 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by Expat444 View Post

Here are a few photos, cold air comes in at the top and is sucked out the bottom and vented outside, the closet doors were pretty much airtight, hopefully that makes more sense.

That doesn't make sense to me. Why fight the natural convection? (Hot air rises, you know...)
post #1280 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post

That doesn't make sense to me. Why fight the natural convection? (Hot air rises, you know...)

Because the servers and RAID box were installed vertically so they were blowing all the hot air out at the bottom, it was easier just to install the ducting and fan there and suck out that hot air.
It was a tight fit for the equipment in that closet so I couldn't work out a better way to route the airflow as the server air intake is at the top/front.
It was a compromise but it worked well, especially given how hot that garage got, I was able to get an external cold air input an dump the hot air outside the house.
post #1281 of 2096
Some "almost" done rack pics.

Rack almost done. I need the Control4 C300 controller faceplate and the temp control faceplate installed.



On service rails.



Back of the rack.

post #1282 of 2096
NJ Jackals,

How tall is your rack? I assume that is a MA rack? Looks great.
post #1283 of 2096
Yes. Middle Atlantic AX-SXR. Brushed metal face plates. Max for the model I believe is 43 spaces. Mine is 41U.
post #1284 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJ Jackals View Post

Yes. Middle Atlantic AX-SXR. Brushed metal face plates. Max for the model I believe is 43 spaces. Mine is 41U.

Thanks for the info. I think that is the rack I will end up ordering, but I just haven't decided the height yet.

Nick
post #1285 of 2096
Wow... droooooool. Very nice rack!

As much as I would LOVE to have the ease and instant great look of an MA rack like that, I'm still weighing out trying to build my own custom rack vs. buying one. I will have the advantage of not needing one that slides out like that... so that should save me a lot of money right?

Also, how much work is involved with putting an MA rack like that together and making it look right? Hours spent working on it approx?
post #1286 of 2096
You have to figure out what parts to buy first, and reading about the right way to wire everything. Cable management, IMO, is an art. Takes a lot of experience to make the back look good.

So, the amount of time it will take a beginner depends on how you want the back to look, I think, more than anything.

Great cable management requires making custom length cables, planning, and knowledge (which most people acquire with experience).
post #1287 of 2096
Hello everyone! I received so much inspiration on this thread that I thought I would provide some progress pics of my project! My equipment includes:

MA 5-29-26 rack
MA HBL blanks
MA RSH custom shelves
Cisco Explorer cable box
Pioneer BDP-51FD
Sherwood R-972
Crown XLS 402 2 Channel amp

Let me know what you think and thanks!

Attachment 241501

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Attachment 241504

http://imageshack.us/g/705/ht1p.jpg/
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post #1288 of 2096
At this stage in my life, I'd hate to think how many racks I've wired for audio, video, power and control but it would be hundreds.

THE essential ingredient is thinking about it and planning, well before you start actually wiring. You can do a very credible job first time if you are prepared to plan and to make custom cables.

Middle Atlantic* have a paper on cable management that should give some ideas on how to go about the 'doing' of it.

Things to consider:

- Will all items be fixed in place, ie can you slide out the rack or get to the wiring in the rear easily? This will determine whether you can loom and fix the cabling, or whether the loom will need to move.

- Will any wiring/looms need to move because they will be attached to a door or hinged panel? If so they will need to loomed in such a way that they are not kinked or stressed by the full range of movement. They will also likely need to be protected from rubbing on panel edges.

- How often do you change gear out? Most of the stuff I build will be in service without change for years, so we cable tie it all down tight. If you change things every other week, consideration should be given to flexibility of arrangement of the looms and velcro cable ties might be more appropriate.

- Layout of the signal and mains wiring. A good rule of thumb is to keep all signal wiring that crosses mains at 90* to reduce induction.

Another tip is to sketch it all out before starting to clarify what you're going to do. It doesn't need to be a mm accurate CAD drawing, and use different colours for different items, eg red for mains. Then install all the gear and start with one thing, eg mains wiring. Then move onto analogue audio etc.

If it's going to be a permanent install and you're going to custom wire it, then 'pre-loom'. Make some temporary fixing loops out of a bit of scrap wire etc and place these every couple of rack units along the path of the loom section making the loops large so you can thread all the cables through individually, one at a time. Thread each cable through them one at a time from point to point as required and leave some excess at each end. Mark each end of the cable for what it is. When all wiring is in place, remove the temporary fixing loops, neaten all the conductors into their final position, and cable tie the loom together and to the rack.

Now start working out the final lengths of each, snip to length and terminate. Use a meter to confirm that you have the markings correct and you are actually terminating the right conductor to the correct position. It's easy to make a mistake especially if all the wiring is one colour.

Take your time doing it, and realise it's going to take you much longer than you think first time.

Looming standard fixed length eg 1m cables is much more difficult to get neat especially if they are going to many locations, eg AVR to multiple amps and sources.

Mains wiring - get someone qualified to do it if you're actually terminating the conductors, not simply plugging them into a power strip. If you do do this DIY, and I strongly advise against it unless you know what you're doing, get someone to check it and test before powering it up. It would be a damn nuisance to have made a neat rack that because you got something wrong and the chassis is live and you end up frying your ass.

* They also have a thermal management paper on the same page that should be read by anyone building an enclosed rack.
post #1289 of 2096
Almost done with my install - just waiting for the Isotek Aquarius to turn up



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Will post some back panel pics when I get chance
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post #1290 of 2096
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

Hello everyone! I received so much inspiration on this thread that I thought I would provide some progress pics of my project! My equipment includes:

MA 5-29-26 rack
MA HBL blanks
MA RSH custom shelves
Cisco Explorer cable box
Pioneer BDP-51FD
Sherwood R-972
Crown XLS 402 2 Channel amp

Let me know what you think and thanks!

Attachment 241501

Attachment 241502

Attachment 241503

Attachment 241505

Attachment 241504

http://imageshack.us/g/705/ht1p.jpg/

Beautiful! That is exactly what I'm looking to do here soon. A quick question, if you dont mind; what kind of shelves did you use? I feel the MA site is not very user friendly and there are multiple shelves to use and I'm a bit lost here.

Thanks.
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