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Show me your RACK - Page 45

post #1321 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

As far as my cutout, I tried to put my 2x4 framing and drywall cutouts as close to the rack frame as possible. I slid my rack in from the front as the back is pretty snug. I think I probably have less than an 1/8 inch on either side. Then I left the rack out about 1/8 to 1/16 inch from the drywall and pushed my trim right up against the rack. This way you see no gaps or the drywall. It turned out exactly as I hope. Let me know if you need close up pics!

Great, thanks for the info!

So, it looks like you framed the opening pretty snug to the outer dimensions of the rack. So if I reframed my opening to be about 1/8" - 1/4" of the outer dimensions that should be similar to yours and enough clearance. Did you have any trouble with sliding the rack in with your clearance (about 1/8" on either side) or would a little more been better?

And it looks like the inside edge of your trim goes past the framed opening a bit to close off any gaps between the rack and framing.

If you could post a few close up pics that would be helpful, or you could PM me if you like.

Thanks!
post #1322 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Seems that many blank plates are available on craigslist and eBay.

I just did a quick search (for an HBL2) and only found 1 or 2 listings at the moment. I don't know how representative that one was, but when you factor in shipping, it seems like the ebay deal is more than just getting it from some of the vendors mentioned earlier.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Can anyone confirm that the black color and texture are difficult to match, if MA branded?

Good question. Unfortunately, I can't answer that yet as I haven't actually seen any of these. But you raise a good point if one were to consider non-MA branded plates.

Also, on a related note, I wonder if there is a noticeable difference between the rack (powder coated) and the custom and blank face plates (brushed anodized aluminum)? I got the BAA face plates to match the BAA faces on my components, but the rack itself is PC.

I guess when all the plates are on, you won't actually see the rack itself from the front?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Also, michaeljoo, take a look at the MA Trim Strips, to cover the screwheads. And, consider some lacer bars and wheels. Figure out the number of screws you'll receive with your parts.

I'm glad you mentioned this, Neurorad; I was thinking of posting a question about these anyway.

How does a rack completely covered with custom plates and matching blanks look?

Does it look unfinished seeing the screws, or is it look nice enough (just not as sleek) that you don't really need the trim strips. I know you don't really need them, just like you don't really need the custom face plates, but how much nicer does it look with the trim strips? I decided it was nice enough and worth it for me to spend about 2X for the custom plates vs. universal shelves. I guess I'm trying to decide whether the trim strips would be worth the added cost as well.

Maybe more importantly, how about the lacer bars?

Chris at CustomAVRacks recommended them, and I dismissed the idea initially. However, as I read a little more and thought about it, I decided that it may not be a bad idea to keep things organized. But are the lacer bard a significant improvement over just tying wires and cables down to the rack frame (which is what I was going to do)?

While I am trying to keep costs down, if there is a big enough difference for the cost (aesthetically for the trim strips and functionally for the lacer bars), I'd rather just spend the money now instead of regretting and/or end up getting it later anyway and end up paying more (for example due to the extra shipping costs). Also, I wish that you could buy them in smaller bundles than a 10 pack. I think I would only need a few.

I definitely don't want the wheels in my particular application. My rack will be fixed, and I won't have to move it in and out too much, if at all. I'll have full access from the front and rear. The only time I could see needing to pull the rack out would be if I'm adding or rearranging components in the rack, and even then I'm not sure I would have to actually move the rack (this will be my first real rack, so I don't know if you can just slide components in and out easily with the rack in place).

But since my rack will be up off the floor (like in radchad3's set up) having the rack on wheels would make me very nervous that it might accidentally roll or be pushed off its platform at some point. I can just see it that one day I'll be doing something in the back of the rack and then the entire thing starts rolling towards me, off the platform, and squishes me underneath!

Regarding screws, I plan to just get a 100 ct of the 10-32 3/4" HP standard rack screws. Way more than I need, but it's only a few bucks more than the 50 ct.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

You seem to want to buy everything at once

Yes, I'm trying to keep the costs down and everything seems to have an initial minimum shipping charge. For example if you want to just purchase a single blank or a single pack of screws that might only be about $10-$15 and not weigh much, you still get hit with a minimum shipping charge that is still at least $6-10, depending on where you are shopping. Those additional shipping costs can really start to add up if you order smaller items piecemeal.

Conversely, once you are paying the shipping charges for an order already, usually the shipping cost only goes up incrementally if you are just adding items to the same order.

For example, adding that same extra blank plate or a pack of screws mentioned above to your existing order will usually only increase the shipping costs marginally ($1 or less) or maybe not at all. But if you order that same pack of screws or blank later by itself, you will be paying the minimum shipping fee all over again (usually at least $6-10), no matter how small or light the item is. That $10 pack of screws will all of a sudden be $20.

Actually, now that I've discovered that Performance Audio seems to ship most of the smaller in stock items free, I may revise my approach. Up until I found them (thanks, radchad3), every other site seemed to have minimum shipping fees (i.e. no free shipping), unless your order reach a certain minimum amount (e.g. $200 minimum order).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Anyone think wheels might be a good idea, for a rack that will rarely, if ever, be moved?

Does your rack have access from the rear? If so, and you don't ever really plan to move it, or if it is on a raised platform (see my concern above), I would think maybe forgo the wheels. But if you may have to move the rack every so often, even only once/year, I would probably get the wheels because it's probably preferable to having to completely take the rack apart every time just to get access.
post #1323 of 2100
I would think the wheels are just based on the application. I would not use them for my application, for example. The lacing bars I think are functionally necessary. But I have to admit I am a little OCD. I figure I want the back to look as good as the front. I think the trim pieces are truly optional. I looked at getting them but once my setup was complete I was certain that they weren't needed. I think the exposed screws add a little "professional" to the look. I will post some closer pics of my setup tonight.
post #1324 of 2100
Lacer bars are about $60 for a pack of 10 if I recall. I think they're worth it to tidy the horizontal runs (across the shelves).

You can tie stuff to the rack, but you still normally have to run cables from the post to the other side of the shelf in many cases. For example, power on left, speaker cables on right. AV receiver's speaker outputs are frequently all the way across the back, so you got 5 or more speaker cables going across the shelf to reach all the speaker terminals

Typical choices are:
  • Tie to shelf if it has holes/slots in it
  • Get stick down tie wraps
  • Use lacer bars

Regards

Mark
post #1325 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

I would think the wheels are just based on the application. I would not use them for my application, for example. The lacing bars I think are functionally necessary. But I have to admit I am a little OCD. I figure I want the back to look as good as the front.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

Lacer bars are about $60 for a pack of 10 if I recall. I think they're worth it to tidy the horizontal runs (across the shelves).

You can tie stuff to the rack, but you still normally have to run cables from the post to the other side of the shelf in many cases. For example, power on left, speaker cables on right. AV receiver's speaker outputs are frequently all the way across the back, so you got 5 or more speaker cables going across the shelf to reach all the speaker terminals

Typical choices are:
  • Tie to shelf if it has holes/slots in it
  • Get stick down tie wraps
  • Use lacer bars

Regards

Mark

LOL, OK you guys convinced me on the lacer bars, I think I'll add them to the package. I just wish they came in smaller bundles, although the 10 packs are about half the price what you mentioned, Mark.

I'm usually more willing to pay for functionality vs. aesthetics, so the functional value of cable management of the lacer bars will probably be well worth it IMO.

I'm sure I'll agree with this more wholeheartedly after I get everything and start wiring everything up. In our family room we have our AV equipment in a built in cabinet and the "cable management," ahem, of that cabinet is horrendous, it's rather embarassing.

It doesn't have a pro type rack like the MA rack, just some MDF shelves in a double sided cabinet that I had designed in our double-sided fireplace. After that experience, if the lacer bars will help keep things organized, it'll be worth it to me.
post #1326 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

I think the trim pieces are truly optional. I looked at getting them but once my setup was complete I was certain that they weren't needed. I think the exposed screws add a little "professional" to the look. I will post some closer pics of my setup tonight.

Thanks again for the info, radchad3. That's exactly the type of input I was looking for.

So it seems like the rack still looks professional, just in a more industrial vs. sleek way.

I would be more willing to spring for those as well, but I would need 2 and they are not cheap. I think I'll pass on these in light of the cost to benefit ratio, which in this case, unlike the lacer bars, to me is not as high.

Getting the custom plates and blanks (vs. just leaving the rack open) really added to the cost, but I think brought the aesthetics more to where I wanted it. Since it made such a huge aesthetic difference (as well as functionally by controlling air flow through the front of the rack) vs. just an open rack, I was OK with the added cost.

However, I don't know how much I would even notice the trim strips and, thus, don't know if the high cost would be justified in my eyes.
post #1327 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljoo View Post

However, I don't know how much I would even notice the trim strips and, thus, don't know if the high cost would be justified in my eyes.

I was surprised at how much of a difference the trim strips made...

Before:



After:



The only other differences between those two images was the change-out of the silver trim on the Emotiva amp for black trim, and the removal of a couple of stickers... The lack of visible screws remove a lot of "distracting visual elements".

So yes, I think you'll notice it. And +1 on springing for the custom faceplates. Before I built mine I was quite anti-faceplate due to the cost and the issues with upgrading. But finding good discount sources, and the fact (that I didn't know) that you can replace the faces without buying new shelves helped. And seeing the real results confirmed it...

Jeff
post #1328 of 2100
Wheels help if you have it flush-mounted out an opening and it's not just a few steps around. You can wheel it back from the opening to do whatever work is necessary and then wheel it back. Otherwise you're walking back and forth a lot getting things done. Once it's up and running, yeah, you're unlikely to be wheeling it out.

As for device placement, devices with no expected user interaction get put low, devices with only very infrequent access get placed high. The stuff you need regularly, like a receiver, work well in the middle. Just make sure there's enough airflow around everything. You don't want to put something that cranks out a lot of heat too close to the devices above it.

Yes, those trim strips do make it look cleaner. Nice job.
post #1329 of 2100
Here are a couple more pics close up of the sides of my rack and the lacing bars in action for those interested. Thanks!!

I have to admit those trim pieces do look nicer than I have seen in other applications. Nice work!
LL
LL
LL
post #1330 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljoo View Post


Yes, I think you are right about that.

In general, the guiding principles I used in determining the order of components in my rack were:

1. In general, bigger, heavier things towards the bottom (hence, the Emo XPA-5, which weighs a ton, and any other heavy amps will likely go towards the bottom). I would imagine this would be something of a general rule of thumb most people would use? I'm thinking it's not a good idea to put all the heavy stuff up top?

2. Put the components that I have to fiddle with more frequently at the most comfortable position for access. The opening starts about 18" off the riser in the rear of the HT, so the components towards the top half (about 4-5') will probably allow comfortable access without having to bend down. So the BDP and the AVR, the two that I'll access frequently will be in those spots.

3. If space is available, space/distribute the components vertically to aid in ventilation and minimize heat build up.

4. I suppose it would be better to put components that generate a lot of heat towards the top vs. bottom, but I'm sure this criterion will sometimes conflict with some of the others and then it's about prioritizing. Since my components will be spaced out and I have active ventilation, this wasn't as big of a concern for me.

If others have other rationales or criteria by which they organize and order the components in their racks, I'd love to hear them.

I put my amp right at the top - 4RU filler panel and a 1RU fan unit above it. The amp is the hottest piece of kit in most racks. Why cook the rest of your gear by putting it at the bottom? Plus this is more or less eye level for me and the amp is the thing I most access.

I put my CD player below the amp with a 2RU filler, then the same down to the BD player. Cable length (My most expensive cables are only 0.6m and go between amp & CD player) was the factor in determining that order.

Power unit was next down below my xbox & apple tv.

I put everything else below with NAS drive, patch panel, network switch etc all at the bottom back - behind filler panels so I dont have to see them.
post #1331 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post


I was surprised at how much of a difference the trim strips made...

Before:

After:

The only other differences between those two images was the change-out of the silver trim on the Emotiva amp for black trim, and the removal of a couple of stickers... The lack of visible screws remove a lot of "distracting visual elements".

So yes, I think you'll notice it. And +1 on springing for the custom faceplates. Before I built mine I was quite anti-faceplate due to the cost and the issues with upgrading. But finding good discount sources, and the fact (that I didn't know) that you can replace the faces without buying new shelves helped. And seeing the real results confirmed it...

Jeff

Yep - thats a huge improvement. Going to track some down now
post #1332 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

I was surprised at how much of a difference the trim strips made...

The lack of visible screws remove a lot of "distracting visual elements".

So yes, I think you'll notice it. And +1 on springing for the custom faceplates. Before I built mine I was quite anti-faceplate due to the cost and the issues with upgrading. But finding good discount sources, and the fact (that I didn't know) that you can replace the faces without buying new shelves helped. And seeing the real results confirmed it...

Jeff

Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

I have to admit those trim pieces do look nicer than I have seen in other applications. Nice work!

Quote:
Originally Posted by damienbuckley View Post

Yep - thats a huge improvement. Going to track some down now

Thanks, Jeff, for posting those pics.

All I can say now is "Rats," now I'm going to have to get those trim strips.

I thought I was fine with the exposed screws, but after looking at your pics, I have to agree with radchad3, those trim pieces do look nice. Which means that eventually I will probably be getting them.

However, I think I will have to qualify that purchase with "eventually" vs. right now just due to the cost. I think they come in 72" strips, so I would have to get 2 (since one won't be enough for both sides).

At this point, I'm trying to keep costs down as much as possible, since I hadn't planned on getting a real rack to begin with.

I decided to go for the custom faceplates now, but the trim strips seem like something that can easily be added later without having to drop an existing part (which is what would have happened if I got universal shelves now and then later upgraded to custom faceplates, since the faceplates aren't compatible with the the unviersal shelves).

But the trim strips are something that seems like it will be easy to add later without sacrificing any functionality in the present.
post #1333 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljoo View Post

However, I think I will have to qualify that purchase with "eventually" vs. right now just due to the cost. I think they come in 72" strips, so I would have to get 2 (since one won't be enough for both sides).

Yep, same was true for me, and probably just about everyone...

Quote:


I decided to go for the custom faceplates now, but the trim strips seem like something that can easily be added later without having to drop an existing part (which is what would have happened if I got universal shelves now and then later upgraded to custom faceplates, since the faceplates aren't compatible with the the unviersal shelves).

But the trim strips are something that seems like it will be easy to add later without sacrificing any functionality in the present.

Correct. You just need to pull out a few screws to add the washers that clip the strip into place. I had mine but didn't install them until several months after the rack was complete. Note that they are rigid aluminum U-channels, not some cheapo rubber/plastic weatherstripping... Which also explains the cost and shipping!

But yes, you can absolutely do this later with no cost penalty. Just be prepared for us to poke you about it when you post your pictures.

Jeff
post #1334 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by damienbuckley View Post

I put my amp right at the top - 4RU filler panel and a 1RU fan unit above it. The amp is the hottest piece of kit in most racks. Why cook the rest of your gear by putting it at the bottom? Plus this is more or less eye level for me and the amp is the thing I most access.

I put my CD player below the amp with a 2RU filler, then the same down to the BD player. Cable length (My most expensive cables are only 0.6m and go between amp & CD player) was the factor in determining that order.

Power unit was next down below my xbox & apple tv.

I put everything else below with NAS drive, patch panel, network switch etc all at the bottom back - behind filler panels so I dont have to see them.

Thanks for the response, damienbuckley.

Yes, I can see your reasoning for putting the amp at the top due to its heat production and I have thought of that (see point 4).

However, I guess concerns with the rack being top heavy (I'm assuming the amps are usually the heaviest components in a typical rack, I know mine are) and thus being potentially easier to topple (although guess it would take a lot to push one of these things over), as well as which positions offer the most accessibility have me leaning towards keeping my amp at the bottom.

I am curious though that you said the amp is the component you access most. Why is this?

I'm imagining that I will almost never access my amp since I'm planning on controling it with a 12V trigger from my receiver.

I figure the component I will access all the time (almost everytime I use the HT) is the BDP so that I can put in the BD that I'm going to watch.

After that, maybe the receiver to potentially adjust settings and functions that I may not have programmed into my Harmony remote, or at least in the first level or two of screens. I may also look at my power conditioner to see what is going on every now and then, but I assumed that I would probably never have to do anything with the amp (I think there is only the power button?).

However, after your comment I may consider putting the amp at the top of the unit seems stable enough. Since I'll have the rack raised up on a platform about 2' off the ground, the very top levels of the rack may not provide optimal accessibility, so may be a possible location for a component that is not often accessed. Currently I have 5U of blanks up at the top.
post #1335 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

Yep, same was true for me, and probably just about everyone...



Correct. You just need to pull out a few screws to add the washers that clip the strip into place. I had mine but didn't install them until several months after the rack was complete. Note that they are rigid aluminum U-channels, not some cheapo rubber/plastic weatherstripping... Which also explains the cost and shipping!

But yes, you can absolutely do this later with no cost penalty. Just be prepared for us to poke you about it when you post your pictures.

Jeff

LOL, OK.

I'm sure I'll just be happy that I got the custom plates vs. just getting the universal ones and having the rack open in the front.

Actually, I was just going to see if I could find a sheet of dark plastic or plexiglass and just cut out my own "custom" openings in that sheet for my components to poke through.

With that perspective, I think I can take a little poking about trim strips vs. exposed screws.
post #1336 of 2100
BTW, what are people using for cable management to tie down their cables and wires?

I just placed my order for the rack and accessories on Friday (before the price increase) at CustomAVRack, including the lacer bars for organizing the cables, but I didn't order any ties or velcro strips.

I assumed that the ones marketed as being used in racks would be overpriced and that one could find generic ties or velcro strips elsewhere.

Should I have ordered some ties/strips from CustomAVRack? I may be able to still call them and add some in.

I'm thinking I would probably lean towards velcro strips vies ties as I could readjust things as necessary with the velcro.
post #1337 of 2100
I would go velcro without question. You will be surprised how many times you unvelcro something to add another cable! I have these and they work great!

http://www.amazon.com/Velcro-Reusabl...3402329&sr=8-1

They are normally $6.99 from amazon but it looks like amazon is OOS.
post #1338 of 2100
One question I have for folks with a solid front like mine. I have the 3 eye emitter with the eyes stuck on my components. Does the eye emit on the flat side or the curved side? I am having trouble getting a response from my components since I have added the eyes to the system. Any thoughts? Thanks! Chad
post #1339 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

One question I have for folks with a solid front like mine. I have the 3 eye emitter with the eyes stuck on my components. Does the eye emit on the flat side or the curved side? I am having trouble getting a response from my components since I have added the eyes to the system. Any thoughts? Thanks! Chad

flat side

what trouble are you having?
post #1340 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

I would go velcro without question. You will be surprised how many times you unvelcro something to add another cable! I have these and they work great!

http://www.amazon.com/Velcro-Reusabl...3402329&sr=8-1

They are normally $6.99 from amazon but it looks like amazon is OOS.

I have those ones, but don;t liek them much as they're tricky to tighten/loosen. I've seen (but never used) ones that have a plastic "eyes", so velcro doesn't stick while pulling through. I'll buy those next time I need some.

Whichever ones you get, way better than cable ties
post #1341 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

I would go velcro without question. You will be surprised how many times you unvelcro something to add another cable! I have these and they work great!

http://www.amazon.com/Velcro-Reusabl...3402329&sr=8-1

They are normally $6.99 from amazon but it looks like amazon is OOS.

check out Rip-Tie: they are more expensive but really dress up a rack
post #1342 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

I was surprised at how much of a difference the trim strips made...



The only other differences between those two images was the change-out of the silver trim on the Emotiva amp for black trim Jeff


How did you change the silver trim on your Emo to black? This is one thing in my rack I wish Emotiva would have thought about.
post #1343 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljoo View Post

BTW, what are people using for cable management to tie down their cables and wires?

I use this stuff: http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2
post #1344 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljoo View Post


Thanks for the response, damienbuckley.

Yes, I can see your reasoning for putting the amp at the top due to its heat production and I have thought of that (see point 4).

However, I guess concerns with the rack being top heavy (I'm assuming the amps are usually the heaviest components in a typical rack, I know mine are) and thus being potentially easier to topple (although guess it would take a lot to push one of these things over), as well as which positions offer the most accessibility have me leaning towards keeping my amp at the bottom.

this is true though in my case the rack is static and I have the legs screwed down with it in place. Its very stable - dont forget these things are generally built to hold huge piles of servers with much more weight than most of us will ever add.
Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljoo View Post

I am curious though that you said the amp is the component you access most. Why is this?

I'm imagining that I will almost never access my amp since I'm planning on controling it with a 12V trigger from my receiver.

I figure the component I will access all the time (almost everytime I use the HT) is the BDP so that I can put in the BD that I'm going to watch.

After that, maybe the receiver to potentially adjust settings and functions that I may not have programmed into my Harmony remote, or at least in the first level or two of screens. I may also look at my power conditioner to see what is going on every now and then, but I assumed that I would probably never have to do anything with the amp (I think there is only the power button?).

this is all true as well - I just got my control system installed but DO like to have access to the display to see whats going on - source & surround modes etc and at the top its at eye height for me. I agree 100% on the disc drawers - BD, CD, whatever, being the most accessed parts though. I've only just finished my install so still getting used to it all and with having put the rack at the back of the room, up until yesterday when the ipad control went in, have spent most evenings pointing remotes at the front of the room and taking a few seconds for the 'duh' to kick in

Quote:
Originally Posted by michaeljoo View Post

However, after your comment I may consider putting the amp at the top of the unit seems stable enough. Since I'll have the rack raised up on a platform about 2' off the ground, the very top levels of the rack may not provide optimal accessibility, so may be a possible location for a component that is not often accessed. Currently I have 5U of blanks up at the top.

Yep, above any other consideration, my amp was always going to be the hottest component and this was the biggest determining factor for its placement. It surprises me just how many pro installs I see with amps sat lower and very little space above to CD and BD players etc, all enclosed in a rack so the heat has nowhere to go but up - right through the other components. If I placed my Susano close under my other components they would be toast and Pioneer actually recommend leaving a huge space (30cm I think without checking the manual) around it.

Just make sure to anchor the rack and you wont lose any sleep over it. You can see the big gap above my amp and the fan at the top in this pic.

Attachment 242472
LL
post #1345 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by markrubin View Post

check out Rip-Tie: they are more expensive but really dress up a rack

Those are the ones: http://www.riptie.com/Pages/cwb.html
post #1346 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iusteve View Post

How did you change the silver trim on your Emo to black? This is one thing in my rack I wish Emotiva would have thought about.

Iusteve,

They sell them as an accessory on their site. $20, I believe.

It's in the same section as the rack ears for their stuff.
post #1347 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by radchad3 View Post

I would go velcro without question. You will be surprised how many times you unvelcro something to add another cable! I have these and they work great!

http://www.amazon.com/Velcro-Reusabl...3402329&sr=8-1

They are normally $6.99 from amazon but it looks like amazon is OOS.

Those are exactly the ones I was thinking of. I already placed an order, but yes, they are currently out of stock.

I didn't know if the Middle Atlantic ones, or something like that made any difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

I have those ones, but don;t liek them much as they're tricky to tighten/loosen. I've seen (but never used) ones that have a plastic "eyes", so velcro doesn't stick while pulling through. I'll buy those next time I need some.

Whichever ones you get, way better than cable ties

Good to know.

I'll try to look around for some like this. Since the ones I ordered from Amazon (the ones without eyes) are temporarily out of stock, I probably have a little time within which to cancel, if needed, if I can find a suitable replacement.

Is there a specific velcro strap with eyes you could recommend?
post #1348 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by markrubin View Post

check out Rip-Tie: they are more expensive but really dress up a rack

Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

Those are the ones: http://www.riptie.com/Pages/cwb.html

Wow, those look nice, but, yes, they're expensive.

At this point, for me, if regular velcro strips will do the job, I'll probably go for the less expensive option. (This after he spends hundreds and hundreds of dollars on a custom AV rack. )
post #1349 of 2100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Horstkotte View Post

I use this stuff: http://www.monoprice.com/products/pr...seq=1&format=2

Thanks, Brad. If I had thought about how to tie down cables earlier I may have just ordered these as I recently placed an order with monoprice (just received the package today, actually).

Now, for just one item, I'll probably try to stick with getting something from Amazon where I have free Prime shipping.
post #1350 of 2100
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