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Pilgrims Pit - Design & Build - Page 8

post #211 of 523
What's that thing on the floor with the rack mounting brackets (in the last picture)?

Lookin good,

Tim
post #212 of 523
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Tim View Post

What's that thing on the floor with the rack mounting brackets (in the last picture)?

Lookin good,

Tim

NEC ISS 6010/6020 high-bandwidth modular video switcher, distribution amplifier, and (NTSC) transcoder.
It'll switch VGA, RGBHV, and transcode and switch NTSC Composite and S-VIDEO (and HDMI and component with the right goodies ) then feed up to four displays via RGBHV. Terribly common accessory for those of us with CRT projectors.
post #213 of 523
Follow-up... it'll probably also transcode PAL, not that standard definition is terribly useful at our screen sizes.
post #214 of 523
Thread Starter 
JTN has it, it is a NEC switcher, it has a moome card in it, so I will be able to run HDMI to the pre-hdmi crt projector. I wanted to bring a rack mounted component to make sure the rails were put at the right distance. There are a couple of blanks installeded at the top and bottom, but there is a significant amount of play in the mounting holes.

The carpenter didn't screw and glue the bracket the rails are in, because I wasn't able to be there, and he didn't want to make it impossible for me to adjust. Once I make the rack more structural, the switcher, the amps, and whatever else I have accumulated will go in.
post #215 of 523
Thread Starter 
Anyone have any tips on what tools are in the need vs want catagory for terminating wall plates with cable tv, phone, and ethernet. My electrician ran the wires, but said they aren't in the business of terminating them. So looks like it will be me.

I have been reading this website, but I suspect my needs are a bit more basic.

http://www.swhowto.com/ToolsCh1.htm

I was at a home depot by my parents place that is closing (Portsmouth NH 20%-40% off, no sales tax) and picked a few of the leviton quickport termination (ethernet, cable, phone?) but didn't get wall plates since I didn't remember what I will need. The tools were already cleaned out, except for a $6 coax stripper that I grabbed. We did well on the bathroom hardware towel bars and that kind of stuff. Not bad for a time killing stop.
post #216 of 523
Hi Dave,

If your using the quickport phone and ethernet connectors from leviton they should include a mini punchdown tool that will do the trick once you get used to it. Lowes has a decent compression tool for about $12.00 that can handle you coax connections. If you need to make ethernet and phone runs with the snap in plugs at the ends they also have a tool that was about $20.00 which included the phone and ethernet plugs. In fact if you want we could hook up and you can borrow these from me, you'll just have to get the connectors.
post #217 of 523
I can front you some tools also... You'll quickly learn to hate the plastic 110 punchdown that comes with the quickport I've got a couple nice 110 punchdown tools, and a few nice RJ crimp kits (if you want to make phone or ethernet cable to length.)
post #218 of 523
Thread Starter 
Sounds like for ethernet/phone I will just need a punchdown tool if I use the quickport stuff. Either the crap one that came with it, or a better one. For the coax it sounds like I need a crimper. I am just making wallplates, I have cables of various lengths and types already.

I will take an inventory of how many I have to do tonight and figure out when I'll get to it. The playroom for my daughter comes first, and I just did my 37 item to-do list, 22 of them come before H.T. I don't want to borrow any tools and sit on them. If its cheap enough I'll probably just pick up the basics for the next time.
post #219 of 523
That's fine,

Like I said I know you can get a compression tool for coax cables from Lowe's for about $12.00 bucks, they have an entire kit with the connectors for a little more. I know online though you can get the connectors for less. I highly recommend the compression type vs. the crimp type, for me they are easier, more secure(watertight), and cleaner looking.
post #220 of 523
Dave, I agree, spend a few bucks more for the compression tool. You can get compression F connectors for coax as well RCA connectors.

Bud
post #221 of 523
Check MPJA.com for punchdown and RJ tools... one of my favorite hobbiest sources.
post #222 of 523
DC,

I just went to Lowes and picked up the RJ45 and phone connector crimping tool kit. Not sure what it is called, but terminating my ethernet wire was much easier than I thought. I have always done all my RG-6 stuff, but I highly recommend you do it yourself.

Oh yea, your room is looking sweet as well!

Dave
post #223 of 523
Thread Starter 
Thanks Dave - you must be enjoying yours a lot these days. I'll catch up eventually.

I did an inventory. Looks like I have 6 ethernet jacks to terminate and about 9 coax to terminate. Looking at what I bought on closeout, the quickport F connectors are desinged so you terminate the wire to a standard end, then the quickport is basically a bracketed coupler that fits neatly into wallplate. Glad it isn't expensive. Anyways, since ethernet looks pretty straight-forward, I'll probably try a couple with the included tool and see how it is. I can always tighten it up with a proper punch tool if I get one, as a user suggested in PM. For the coax, I am going to look into the compression connectors Bud mentioned, and go from there.

On a different note, I was leaving work today, and I noticed that the security guard, who was elsewhere at the time, had left his computer on, with the browser pointed to AVS. He was reading an owner's thread on a display that didn't ring a bell to me. There are a couple different night guards, so I'll have to figure out which one it was.
post #224 of 523
Thread Starter 
Okay - our contractors are gone, and we are going to re-work a few things we didn't like.

The first project is in the playroom. An HVAC vent goes under a beam, and the box they made wasn't what we were looking for. We asked them to re-do, and the second draft was done pretty sloppy. So DIY. Here is an old shot of what we are working with. Its a tight crop on a low rez shot, so not great. There is now molding around the open space below, and the wall is now primed, not painted yet.



The vent profile looks kind of like this:

.....|
__/

We are trying to hug the enclosure as tight as possible, to make it as unobtrusive as possible. We are novices, this is our plan: - use 1x1 or smaller (maybe 1x1/2) to "frame" the vent. Attach them to the plaster+blueboard wall with liquid nails + a crown stapler. There isn't a lot to bite into (1/2"blueboard+veneer plaster walls), so I am thinking smaller fastners is best, it only has to hold it together. We would then take as thin of blueboard we can find (1/4" if we find it or 1/2"), and either glue and staple to the framing, or glue and screw. We will then plaster (we have a wall in the utility room to practice on), prime and paint it to match the wall.

Any flaws in our thinking? The thinner materials might be a little flimsy, but it is just cosmetic in function.
post #225 of 523
Thread Starter 
Finished re-securing the rack. The carpenter left it with only a couple screws in place because I wasn't there to supervise. So I took it out, lathered it up with construction adhesive, put it back in the opening. Clamped it and let it dry. I then painted the wood liner black, and put the rails back in last night, using a bunch of screws. I then attached one of the crown 402 amps, using just the 4 screws in the faceplate. This amp weighs around 25 lbs, and I wasn't sure how stable it would be held in with just the screws in the faceplate (I don't have rear rails). But it is solid as a rock. I am really pleased.

My door will go up later, as I need to work out a couple details on the trim. My hinges got misplaced, and the replacement set arrives today.

Here is my plan for the rack. Spaces went awfully quick. Shoulda gone bigger. I am tempted to move the amps to the bottom, since the sources would be better at eye level, but this plan seems better from a heat perspective. I have a few 1U blanks/vents in the plan that I will be ordering. I need to buy shelves for the receiver and sources too. And the drawer. Any flaws? I'll get a couple pics of the rack in the next day or two.

post #226 of 523
Dave, FYI. When I installed my power conditioner, I installed it in about the same location as you. Made sense to me initially, figuring it would be an equal run for equipment above and below it. If you install it on the top or the bottom, some components may have shorter power cords, so a potential issue.... BUT, the problem is that there is a master switch to kill it in within reach or kids. Also, the wife didn't know any better and just killed everything to the rack. Nothing tragic, just something to think about.

Bud
post #227 of 523
Thread Starter 
Not a bad thought Bud. My rack has a door which might protect against prying hands - but I realize now the lock on the door is meant to go into a full rack, not just rails. So I need to provide for a latch for that to be any defense - I didn't have a lot of thought into the power conditioner's placement, except it has a convenience outlet on the front (and several in the back) which I was trying to keep convenient - - though I will probably never use it.

I am debating custom mounts (pretty yes, but expensive and behind a door) and whether to ditch or downsize the drawer. I'd like to leave a little more space for expansion (eg another amp when I go 7.1 down the line, maybe HTPC or a scaler) but I think I'd like a place to store sundries like remotes and whatnot.

But if my door winds up being unlocked, I agree the power conditioner is going higher. My daughter loves buttons. Good tip.
post #228 of 523
Thread Starter 
Here is a few pics of the re-worked rack.

Re-installed, with all my rack-mount stuff installed (one amp needs to be moved down a slot, may eventually paint the NEC switcher black)

A closer cross section shows - some rough plaster, the painted wood lining the opening, the rails, and part of a vented blank

Back o'the rack-


Now here is what I am thinking about the door. The doors are made for full racks, and the instructions suggest on a full rack you just install the hinges on pre-machined slots, and walla. With rails only I will have to improvise. Calvin gave me a few pics in his thread which showed me how it sits in its natural setting.

My plan is add trim over the wood and plaster, flush with the inside seam of the wood, and the door will rest on the trim (to be painted black).

I would then just add the hinge to the meaty part of the trim, piercing it, and ultimately anchoring in the wood behind it. My fear here is that the trim will split (it comes in pine)

For context, the top hinge just rests on top male/female style

Then next concern is that the keylock will need to "lock" by cutting a slot in the trim. From what I have seen on the web/tv, a biscuit joiner would be ideal for this - I don't have one of those, so I will have to try a manual cheaper tool. I am thinking either perforating with a drill and then a knife, or maybe the hand-held drywall saw I just picked up.


Any flaws?
post #229 of 523
Be sure to pre dril your holes for sure to avoid splitting, as for the slot, do you have a router? you might be able to use a fine bit. how about a Dremel tool?

Where are you on the S. shore? might be able to loan you a biscuit cutter.
post #230 of 523
Dave - I read through this entire thread this morning and I must comment to say it is looking great! Excellent planning and the bumps are to be expected when everything is custom...
post #231 of 523
As always, McCall made a good suggestion. If you don't have a dremel, I am pretty sure you can get a drill bit that has a disc-shaped cut-off attachment. As a last resort, and if you are careful, you can just use a chisel and do it by hand. then cover the hole with a pocket door latch plate. You can get them at the home depot (probably need to buy the whole pocket door latch kit) here is a pic of what I am talking about, it's the little plate on the side:

click here
post #232 of 523
Thread Starter 
McCall - good idea to pre-drill. Probably would have done that, but I sometimes can be lazy and try to push the screw in. Based on a conversation via PM with another member I am leaning towards notching the trim at the latch and securing a metal plate, as the wood wouldn't be terribly strong. I also sent a message to tech support at middle atlantic to see if they had any comments. They asked a quick follow-up question and have been radio-silent - but I'll see what their opinion is.

I am in Raynham. My [growing] tools selection is pretty much miter saw, sawzall, couple drills, compressor+ nailor, hand tools, and a new shopvac. I should be able to notch it with some of these though.

Mark - glad you enjoyed the thread and took the time to read. I am not the artisan that some of the builders are here, but I do ask a lot of questions so there shouldn't be too many mysteries about by thought processes. Welcome to the thread and thanks for the kind words.
post #233 of 523
Dave- get a basic Dremel kit. I can't tell you the thousand uses you'll find for the tool during day-to-day house maintance projects. You don't need the super kit - even a $30 Black-n-Decker version works fine.
post #234 of 523
Thread Starter 
Michael - probably a good purchase. I'll add it to the list. I have wasted a bit of time watching the dremel infomercial, I am embarrassed to say.

Got a reply from Middle-Atlantic Tech Support. They suggested I return it. I think I can make it work without needing to do that. I appreciate the prompt reply though.

Quote:


Hello Dave,

We do have a door that attaches to rackrail but the largest one is 20
spaces.

http://www.middleatlantic.com/rackac...y/security.htm

I suggest you return the PFD-35 and get a door from the hardware store
or Home Depot that was designed to attach to millwork. Unfortunately
our door was not designed to be attached to millwork.
post #235 of 523
Well that sucks. At least they will take it back. You thinking of going all McGyver making it work anyway?
post #236 of 523
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cathan View Post

Well that sucks. At least they will take it back. You thinking of going all McGyver making it work anyway?

Yup, pretty much. I don't think I'd come up with a better option at HD. I'll need two holes per hinge, and an approach on the latch. It isn't like the door is structural. Besides, I ordered it online (from a reseller - MA doesn't do direct sales) months ago and this crate is no longer with us:



I need to buy more trim, get that painted and give it a shot. The good news is the modular hinges mean I can't really damage the door in anyway - though can't say the same for the to be added trim or the 1x4 behind it. What's a few drill holes, right?
post #237 of 523
DC, post some closeup pics of the hinges and latches... I've got several racks with unused doors and I may be able to provide the correct striker, or thoughts on how to do the striker/hinges cleanly.
post #238 of 523
Thread Starter 
JTN - I will take a few shots tonight. The hinges are basically four pieces. Two male "nubs" (no idea what the right term is) that affix to the rack/wall (top and bottom) and two female "nubs" that affix to the door.

Calvin posted a few pics in his thread that show how the install looks in a full rack setting (click for bigger pics).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Calv1n View Post



Door popped off:






I need to pick up some more trim first, but I am hopeful that it won't be too bad as long as I use the right anchors, and measure twice.
post #239 of 523
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by rm1759 View Post

As always, McCall made a good suggestion. If you don't have a dremel, I am pretty sure you can get a drill bit that has a disc-shaped cut-off attachment. As a last resort, and if you are careful, you can just use a chisel and do it by hand. then cover the hole with a pocket door latch plate. You can get them at the home depot (probably need to buy the whole pocket door latch kit) here is a pic of what I am talking about, it's the little plate on the side:

click here

Rob - I was posting at the same time as you, so missed this post till today. Good suggestion on a drill bit alternative, although I am pretty easily talked into picking up a dremel. A pocket door latch is also a good suggestion. Probably a more pro look than me digging around for a piece of metal to insert.
post #240 of 523
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtnfoley View Post

DC, post some closeup pics of the hinges and latches... I've got several racks with unused doors and I may be able to provide the correct striker, or thoughts on how to do the striker/hinges cleanly.

Forgot to grab a latch shot. Here are a couple of the hinges. I think at this point the plan is simple - measure the heck out of everything. Pre-drill the holes through the trim and into the side of the of the 1x4 beneath it, and screw securely. For the latch I will either dremel the side of the trim and insert metal reinforcements, or cut some trim away and affix a piece of metal in the place.



How they connect

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