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20/20 offer from ReplayTV

post #1 of 39
Thread Starter 
I got this in my email box yesterday.

ReplayTV® PC Edition 20/20 offer

ReplayTV® is pleased to announce a 20/20 offer for ReplayTV® PC Edition, the Ultimate DVR experience for your PC.

ReplayTV® PC Edition 20% Off
Download, try and activate ReplayTV PC Edition by February 27th and get 20% off the regular price of $99.95.

Use coupon code ******* at checkout.

Get a free 30-day trial today and turn your PC into the Ultimate DVR*.

Need a Tuner? Get $20 Off
Purchase a Hauppauge WinTV®-PVR 150 or WinTV®-PVR USB2 model tuner by January 31st and get a $20 rebate direct from Hauppauge. See what you need to get started .


Thanks,
The ReplayTV Team
Methinks they might be having a hard time selling this package...
post #2 of 39
Yeah I got the same thing...(and have the same thoughts)
post #3 of 39
Same thoughts here, Replay didn't drop the ball, the ball isn't even on the same planet.
post #4 of 39
It's actually quite pathetic. It isn't as though a bunch of premadonna's on AVS are unrealistically bashing a product. This thing really is as pathetic as it looks.

I just wonder if they are going to try and release a real product down the road (version 2?) or if they'll just give up.
post #5 of 39
I got that too..

Lessee... 20% off $99 worth of crappy software.. and $20 off a $90 card that would replace an existing card that works just fine for every other piece of video software... I don't think so.

If they gave me the software, and it worked with my existing card, I'd be hard pressed to give it a try... and I'm the type of guy that likes to try new things and have the newest gadgets and software to show off to my friends.. I wonder what their target audience is!?
post #6 of 39
i got same email and had same thought .ive been doing some research on replay boards and it seems not to have gone over real big maybe theyll go back to stand alones? i have three and i recomend them to everyone that mentions tivo had one of them too got rid of it.they need to advertise word fo mouth just wont do it .thanks for letting me ramble .pat
post #7 of 39
Got the same email last night- I didn't even bother to read it!
Not interested if it doesn't do HD
post #8 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobcrane View Post

I just wonder if they are going to try and release a real product down the road (version 2?) or if they'll just give up.

i bet they give up. they'll say something like "see, we tried to come out with something new, but it just lost us money"...which in reality, if they would listen to their users (the people that will actually use and recommend their product(s)), they would see that their ReplayTV PC software is a joke of a product.

we all, collectively, want 1) HD support and 2) legacy support for interaction with existing hardware. i gotta figure there are thousands of RTV 4xxx and 5xxx owners that would upgrade to a standalone unit that has those features...HD on the PC can be a little difficult to set up from what i've heard, which is why i mentioned a new standalone instead of updates to the PC software.

sturmie
post #9 of 39
Replay? Give up? They've done it before.

For $160 shipped I bought the Sage HD package: Software license, OTA HD tuner, and remote. And no $20 guide update fees. figuring the tuner and remote are worth $110 so I got the software license for $50.

My wife and I wanted a replay interface for our HD PVR. But I wanted it before I died. I'd give up legacy support... in fact... I did give up legacy support by buying Sage
post #10 of 39
It's just a shame that Replay is finally owned by a company with a lot of money behind them and this is the best they could come up with. Why are they so clueless? Don't some of their emplyees read and/or respond to posts on these boards?
post #11 of 39
My only guess is they are trying to enter a market they know nothing about. They understand the high-end audio market. What level of quality they must have, how to make a profit on such a high priced, narrow market item.

Then they try and service a market on the lower end, in video no less, and fall apart.

When they were building a standalone high-end DVR (that never made it to market) they didn't offer HD support either.

WHO WOULD BUY ANYTHING WITHOUT HD SUPPORT AT THIS POINT? Tivo and Replay have pretty much explored everything that can be done SD.
post #12 of 39
I would even buy it if it were merely a mildy enhanced version of dvarchive (spec=whatever) with the double select bug fixed in the Replay, and if they promised me that some day in the distant future they would support HD (even if they didn't)

If I were them;

500,000 units x $40 = 20,000,000 (revenue from installed base at $40 each)
Buy dva from Gerry <1,000,000>
Upgrade cost <1,000,000> (probably also to Gerry or other geniuses)
Admin,mktg,support <3,000,000>
Net 15,000,000
========

I made up the numbers, but conceptually I don't know why they didn't do something like this

Once that revenue stream gets rolling and before it gets tapped out, plow back the profits into development to enable the PC to operate as a webisode collector, itunes like distribution hub, etc, etc, etc. Get revenue contracts from blockbuster, et all to distribute full DRM protected content through the Replay network described above in a play once or twice mode.

They are still in this game with a name, but fading fast.

For now, I love my 5xxx units, use them every day and that won't change. I will always why it didn't go a different way.
post #13 of 39
I imagine the competiton from Motorola, Scientific Atlanta, and even TiVo is too great to go into the standalone HD DVR market. The first two sell directly to cable companies wholesale in the USA and cater to relatively unknowledgeable home users who are the majority. I doubt there's a big demand for an HD ReplayTV in India or China.
post #14 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by replayrob View Post

Not interested if it doesn't do HD

or talk to the other boxes!
post #15 of 39
It's NOT "replay TV" if it does not connect to other REPLAY TV UNITS!
post #16 of 39
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigjohns View Post

It's NOT "replay TV" if it does not connect to other REPLAY TV UNITS!

Oh come on. I was a ReplayTV 2000 and SS owner prior to purchasing 5Ks. They were and are GREAT machines. The software on the 2000, 3000 and SS was much more stable than the 5Ks even those there was no networking. Now don't get me wrong, I LOVE the networking in the 5Ks but I really hate the maintenance reboots.
post #17 of 39
Dear DNNA, if you'd like to make some money off of the ReplayTV base, forget the ReplayTV software and sell us "Service Pack 1" for our existing 5xxx series boxes.

I don't care about HD, but I'd happily pay $25 each to upgrade my eight boxes to the potential promised when we bought our units.

I want to see all decks in a unified grid. (the "hive mind")
I want to be able to delete old record settings from any deck.
I want to see available space when I set up a recording on a remote deck.
I want to be able to save my setups from one deck and have all the other decks use that set-up instead of having to set them up one at a time. (and to save multiple set-ups for those that move decks from place to place)
I want previous searches to pop up when you start to enter them again and to do a better job with partial matches.
I want you to fix the double select bug and turn on the USB port.
I want to be able to hide the category "all shows"
I want to record FM radio/internet radio and stream MP3.
I want to prepare a file for recording to DVD.
I'd like the decks to have a simple html interface so all the setup could be done from a PC on the LAN. And this would allow for real time access to decks over the Internet so we (and you) wouldn't have to mess with MyReplayTV anymore.
I want there to be a simple open format so the user base can make new code sets for the IR blaster and serial port as new tuners from other companies come on the market. (ie for controlling cable boxes and HD tuners)
In fact the more you can expose the code or at least built simple interface to it, the more we'll do your work for you and keep the boxes up-to-date through the close of the analog era.

I know much of this is available as 3rd party solutions, I think I've tried them all. Some are OK, some are teriffic, but nothing beats having the features built right into the deck.

-John
post #18 of 39
Got the same message.

How do you get taken off the ReplayTV mailing list?
post #19 of 39
RE: service pack 1

Sure makes you wish they'd just release the damn 5xxx code as open source and let anyone hack on it. Subject to activation being mandatory, of course.
post #20 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnHeller View Post

Dear DNNA, if you'd like to make some money off of the ReplayTV base, forget the ReplayTV software and sell us "Service Pack 1" for our existing 5xxx series boxes.

I don't care about HD, but I'd happily pay $25 each to upgrade my eight boxes to the potential promised when we bought our units.

I want to see all decks in a unified grid. (the "hive mind")
I want to be able to delete old record settings from any deck.
I want to see available space when I set up a recording on a remote deck.
I want to be able to save my setups from one deck and have all the other decks use that set-up instead of having to set them up one at a time. (and to save multiple set-ups for those that move decks from place to place)
I want previous searches to pop up when you start to enter them again and to do a better job with partial matches.
I want you to fix the double select bug and turn on the USB port.
I want to be able to hide the category "all shows"
I want to record FM radio/internet radio and stream MP3.
I want to prepare a file for recording to DVD.
I'd like the decks to have a simple html interface so all the setup could be done from a PC on the LAN. And this would allow for real time access to decks over the Internet so we (and you) wouldn't have to mess with MyReplayTV anymore.
I want there to be a simple open format so the user base can make new code sets for the IR blaster and serial port as new tuners from other companies come on the market. (ie for controlling cable boxes and HD tuners)
In fact the more you can expose the code or at least built simple interface to it, the more we'll do your work for you and keep the boxes up-to-date through the close of the analog era.

I know much of this is available as 3rd party solutions, I think I've tried them all. Some are OK, some are teriffic, but nothing beats having the features built right into the deck.

-John

I'm not sure what's funnier...DNNA thinking their approach for that software they tout was actually viable and valuable, or you thinking that you can get all of what you ask for at only $25 a box and still turn DNNA a profit.
post #21 of 39
AWESOME SPEC!

I would buy all that in a heartbeat, 6 units x $25 each, plus give them $100 for the hive program on the PC

Looking at it with my software engineer hat on, 1/2 of it would be "simple" for someone with the source code.


Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnHeller View Post

Dear DNNA, if you'd like to make some money off of the ReplayTV base, forget the ReplayTV software and sell us "Service Pack 1" for our existing 5xxx series boxes.

I don't care about HD, but I'd happily pay $25 each to upgrade my eight boxes to the potential promised when we bought our units.

I want to see all decks in a unified grid. (the "hive mind")
I want to be able to delete old record settings from any deck.
I want to see available space when I set up a recording on a remote deck.
I want to be able to save my setups from one deck and have all the other decks use that set-up instead of having to set them up one at a time. (and to save multiple set-ups for those that move decks from place to place)
I want previous searches to pop up when you start to enter them again and to do a better job with partial matches.
I want you to fix the double select bug and turn on the USB port.
I want to be able to hide the category "all shows"
I want to record FM radio/internet radio and stream MP3.
I want to prepare a file for recording to DVD.
I'd like the decks to have a simple html interface so all the setup could be done from a PC on the LAN. And this would allow for real time access to decks over the Internet so we (and you) wouldn't have to mess with MyReplayTV anymore.
I want there to be a simple open format so the user base can make new code sets for the IR blaster and serial port as new tuners from other companies come on the market. (ie for controlling cable boxes and HD tuners)
In fact the more you can expose the code or at least built simple interface to it, the more we'll do your work for you and keep the boxes up-to-date through the close of the analog era.

I know much of this is available as 3rd party solutions, I think I've tried them all. Some are OK, some are teriffic, but nothing beats having the features built right into the deck.

-John
post #22 of 39
Just got a survey email from ReplayTV asking my opinion. Hah! Basically, I wrote the following (below). But I have to say that I don't think the Replay folks did a proper SWOT analysis before jumping in this market. They did the right thing dropping the hw set-top boxes, but they're not executing a strong strategy. I personally believe they won't catch up at this point. Anyways, here are my comments:

As a long-time user of ReplayTV (a couple of 2020s and a 5040), I was excited about the PC-based version of ReplayTV. However, I was very disappointed in the final product once I got my hands on it. My comments/analysis:

1. The lack of compatibility between ReplayTV-PC and the 5000-line of PVRs is a serious mistake. You have a large installed base of 5000-series owners, and you've given us little reason to stick with the ReplayTV brand. It's well accepted that it costs 10 times more to gain a new customer than to retain a current customer. You're missing the boat on this point.

2. In an ever-crowding field of PC-based PVR products, you need to differentiate yourselves from the competition sufficiently. I believe you failed to do that. There is little _compelling_ about your product vs. BeyondTV, SageTV, Microsoft's MCE, or even open-source PVRs like MythTV, GB-PVR, or MediaPortal.

3. The pricing model may benefit ReplayTV/D&M Holdings, but most people don't want to pay $99 for the first year and $20 each additional year for the privilege of downloading the EPG. Other than the Surprise Me feature (of dubious value and not "exciting" in the least), there are no compelling features to warrant paying a continuous subscription fee.

4. With the imminent release of Vista and the Vista MCE for the last 6 months, your release of the product in Oct (?) seemed ill-timed, especially since the features you had are basically the same as what was in Vista. Given that we're all waiting for Vista, all salivating at the "sexy" Vista MCE interface, the highly-active forums regarding said product, I'm not sure what you folks were thinking in releasing such a feature-poor and uncompelling product a few months before Vista is released. Having run the Vista MCE now for a few weeks, you folks simply cannot compete with Vista MCE (not to mention features of SageTV and BeyondTV). All of these offer the same or better experience, without the subscription fees. And, to boot, there is not a lick of information on your website in regards to Vista compatibility.

5. Allow me to make a few suggestions about the types of features "we" are all clamoring for in a PVR, that would set you apart from your competitors:

a. Ability for multiple units to share media btw each other, like the 5000-series did. Not a difficult thing to do and your competitors have this feature (i.e. BeyondTV). And while you're at it, make it compatible with older 5000-series Replays.

b. How 'bout tapping into Social Computing features, such as:
- enabling a viewer to "vote" on show,
- enabling a viewer to see what the "community" rated a show
- maybe even share comments regarding shows or movies (like on Amazon)
- share shows amongst users (even in a limited fashion, if legal issues arise)

c. Ability to easily re-encode video for portable devices, like MCE/WMP/iTunes/BeyondTV/etc.

d. Support multiple tuners, support HDTV tuners, etc.

e. Set up or support a ReplayTV social computing site that encourages users to freely discuss your product, future features they want to see, how they're currently using the product, etc. Have some of your employees actively participate, but not control. You'll get a lot of potentially valuable ideas from the community and it will help build a cultic following.

f. Put together sample hw/sw configs that someone could follow to build a ReplayTV rig (instead of the pathetic "requirements" page you currently have). Not everyone's a techno-geek, and they need help. Sponsor a contest for best ReplayTV setup. Have a gallery of ReplayTV setups/rigs. etc.

g. Allow people to customize the interface and the ReplayTV experience to their hearts content. You can build options/settings screens for almost every setting, allowing the user to pick what duration of skip-ahead or skip-back they want, how many channels to display, where things show up on the screen, etc.

h. Where's PIP and/or POP? We all want it, and nobody is giving it to us.

i. Playing file formats other than built-in, live DivX, Xvid, MPEG, etc.

j. How 'bout bringing back Auto-Commercial Skip? What an amazing feature that was later pulled. Yet, more and more products are offering it once again now (i.e. BeyondTV).

h. Interface speed was too slow for me. Bringing up the program was slow, bringing up menus was slow. Much slower than Vista MCE or SageTV. And while we're on the subject of the interface, about an interface face-lift more in-line with Vista MCE's? Make me LOVE the interface.

i. Integrate music play-back with Windows Media Player.

j. I could go on...
post #23 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by neuhoover View Post

I personally believe they won't catch up at this point.

I don't see ReplayTV continuing with the ReplayTV PC Edition. The days of useful PC-based DVR's are basically over. The vast majority of viewers get their TV by cable or satellite (mostly cable). Thanks to corrupt politicians, between the analog cutoff, DRM, and CableLabs restrictions, PC's henceforth will be essentially closed hardware and software boxes with no more capabilities than a cable box, when it comes to TV. All of the cable providers are rushing to encrypt all QAM channels (they're presently not encrypting the major over-the-air networks, and although the law permits them to encrypt those, they probably won't). Many cable providers are switching to all-digital, and I suspect virtually all will within a couple of years. So, you'll have a box that will probably be limited to two tuners (certainly in the near term), virtually all channels will be encrypted and DRM'ed, with no possibility of writing your own software or using open-source software, so no commercial advance, no recording to DVD, no transferring shows to another computer, no nothing. But hey, according to the DRM-lovers, this is a great situation, all for our benefit. According to the DRM-lovers, we wouldn't have HD without DRM.
post #24 of 39
great post neuhoover...too bad, i have a feeling your feedback is going to fall on deaf ears at DNNA...personally, i'd hire you to run my PC based DVR department any day ...i seriously loved all your ideas.


sturmie
post #25 of 39
@Spacecadet, DVRs are now in 1 in 6 homes. There are 13.6 million "DVRs" today, and it's expected that there will be significant growth in households with DVR capabilities, mainly from satellite, cable, and new Telco TV subscribers. Standalone DVRs are expected to rise, but at a slower pace than the above three, and PC-based DVRS (accounting for only 1% of marketshare today) will rise only slightly.

The issue you're making over content becoming unrecordable in the future is alarmist yet unfounded. All the evidence points to continued DVR usage and support. Indeed, all the major companies are heavily invested/investing in DVR products, technologies, and infrastructure. DirecTV, Tivo, EchoStar, Microsoft and others are developing and deploying multi-room and centralized media center systems with DVR functionality. Everyone in the industry including the studios, marketing agencies, broadcasters, and content deliverers are working on delivering content in this new media paradigm. There are still issues that the content-providers have over how their shows are being recorded, time-shifted, and shared, but these issues will probably be resolved within the next few years.

The genie is out of the bottle - consumers prefer this mode of content delivery, and all the above-mentioned players are scrambling to align their strategies in this new media age. Will it be easy? No. Will it all be open? No. Will there be changes for all of us? Surely. But the above mentioned entities wouldn't be spending billions of dollars on technologies and service delivery that is simply going to go away.

So, will ReplayTV still be in the game? I agree with you that the answer is "No." But it's not due to PC-based vs. other modes; they are just sucking big-time these days. And our beloved Replays will probably be boat anchors within a few years. But other PC-based systems, like Microsoft with their clout, will still be there with access to content like anyone else. There may be limitations versus what we can do today, but PC-based systems will still be there (for us affeciandos). And remember, all encryption can be hacked. Just look at history (as well as today, with both HD DVD and BluRay DVD getting hacked within a few months of release). If content gets seriously locked down, someone will figure out how to open it up.

But I seriously believe that studios will eventually figure out that opening up access to their programming and letting consumers "have it their way" (DVR, mobile video, multiroom access, etc) will ultimately increase their profits. The cassette increased profits, the VCR increased profits, the DVD player increased profits, and now we are in a new era of digital media which, given time, will shake out and increase profits for all the players.

But the studios won't really have any choice - there is this thing called The Internet that is currently a small blip of a threat to their business. And like most disruptive technologies, by the time the studios figure out that they have a problem it will be too late. Internet video is exploding, young consumers are spending less time watching TV and more time on the Internet, and the new technologies these days is allowing user-generated content to ambush the established media business.
post #26 of 39
@sturmie, thanks for the kind words. Yeah, Replay won't listen. Had they been listening the last few years they would have had a killer product on their hands.

They clearly weren't paying attention in grad school when they went over Porter's Five Forces (which essentially says that you have to differentiate yourself vs. the competition or get trounced). And they're not paying attention to analysts like Gartner and Forrester about what's happening with new media and social computing these days, and how they can tap into that. And they're not paying attention to their competition like Microsoft (hello, 800 lb gorilla?), BeyondTV, SageTV, and open source projects like MythTV. And, no, they're clearly not paying attention to their customers who hang out on AVS and other forums, from whom they could have gotten a lot of suggestions for free. Surprise Me? Whatever. Search capabilities - yeah, we expect that feature these days in any PVR.

Bill Loewenthal, VP of ReplayTV, and Ian Shea, Director of Business Planning and Operations, should both be fired with extreme prejudice. They have not done their parent company nor their brand any favors over the last year. D&H Holdings, Replay's parent company, is a Japanese firm listed on the Tokyo exchange and seems to be doing well in spite of Replay. I think D&H needs to cut Replay loose or do a complete overhaul of the division. On the other hand, most of their other holdings (Boston Acoustics, McIntosh, Denon, Marantz) are high-end audio, so I'm not sure what D&M knows about this new media space. I'm also not sure why they have Escient in their fold AND Replay.
post #27 of 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by neuhoover View Post

The issue you're making over content becoming unrecordable in the future is alarmist yet unfounded. DirecTV, Tivo, EchoStar, Microsoft and others are developing and deploying multi-room and centralized media center systems with DVR functionality. There are still issues that the content-providers have over how their shows are being recorded, time-shifted, and shared, but these issues will probably be resolved within the next few years. But other PC-based systems, like Microsoft with their clout, will still be there with access to content like anyone else. There may be limitations versus what we can do today, but PC-based systems will still be there (for us affeciandos). And remember, all encryption can be hacked. Just look at history (as well as today, with both HD DVD and BluRay DVD getting hacked within a few months of release). If content gets seriously locked down, someone will figure out how to open it up.

But I seriously believe that studios will eventually figure out that opening up access to their programming and letting consumers "have it their way" (DVR, mobile video, multiroom access, etc) will ultimately increase their profits. The cassette increased profits, the VCR increased profits, the DVD player increased profits, and now we are in a new era of digital media which, given time, will shake out and increase profits for all the players.

But the studios won't really have any choice - there is this thing called The Internet that is currently a small blip of a threat to their business. And like most disruptive technologies, by the time the studios figure out that they have a problem it will be too late. Internet video is exploding, young consumers are spending less time watching TV and more time on the Internet, and the new technologies these days is allowing user-generated content to ambush the established media business.

You misunderstood what I wrote. The issue isn't whether content will be recordable, it's what you will be able to do with that content, which is essentially nothing. This isn't some future vision, it's today. If you buy a Windows Vista PC with CableCARD support in a few weeks, and your cable provider is using all-digital delivery (which many are, and all will be within a couple of years), then it's near-certain that all channels will be encrypted except the major networks' local feeds. Most of what I watch doesn't come from the major networks. Because the channels are encrypted, they are protected by the DMCA, and because CableLabs has chosen the most severe restrictions, I wouldn't be able to do a darn thing with those channels except play them back on the same computer or via some extender that I would have to buy, and I would be limited to what playback features were built into Windows Vista. If I later upgraded to a better computer, I would lose all of my recorded shows.

Tivo is struggling, and is having to make deals with satellite and/or cable providers (I suspect much of this will fall through). Cable providers are even trying to cut out their own cable box manufacturers--look at Time-Warner, it's writing its own crappy DVR software. Of course Microsoft is in on the act. But remember, they completely caved in on this, and have agreed to restrictions that make the DVR side of Vista no better than a cable box. Microsoft loves DRM because their single biggest threat is open-source software, and open-source is completely incompatible with DRM.

I wouldn't count on useful hacks. The hacks that I've read about are quite limited. All such work has to be done outside the US, in a country that doesn't have computer crime laws comparable to the US, and anyone using such hacks in the US will be committing felonies.

No, the media corporations don't get it, they never have and they never will. I've written about this before--new technologies have always benefitted content producers, going back to the days of radio, which initially nearly killed the record industry, until the record industry figured out that they could use radio to promote records. It doesn't matter what consumers want, the only way that there will be a change in the current situation is if laws are changed, and the only way to do that is to vote anyone who supports DRM out of office, and voters have not been willing to do that. As I've said before, with so many issues, it's tough to have single-issue political tests, but DRM is so restrictive, anti-democratic, and anti-free-enterprise that I'll vote against any politician who supports it.

I wouldn't count on the masses to get it. Look at the extraordinary support for iTunes--one of the most restrictive, overpriced hardware, and extraordinarily overpriced content systems available, and look how many people support it and think it's great. I'll certainly never buy anything like iTunes service or products.

Internet video isn't a disruptive technology. It still goes back to content, and without revenue, you don't get significant content. Revenue-generating Internet streams will be heavily DRM'ed.
post #28 of 39
It seems pretty obvious to everyone here that Replay released a beta just to put a toe in the water and show that they're 'doing something'. They must have been under some pressure to release a totally uninspiring product like this. But now that they've laid the egg, why aren't they aggressively announcing some of these new features that people might actually care about? That's the great mystery.

And I agree with SpaceCadet about PC-based DVR's in general - they are a dying breed as we move farther into HD land. All you have to do is look at that dog ATI Cablecard USB adapter to see that the providers are going to do whatever it takes to make sure that PC's will not have the features that we want for encrypted content recording and playback. Namely, free portability and networkability of the kind we already have with RTV's. Sure it will be hacked if needed, but how big of a userbase will there be for hacked systems? And what about Myth? There's no answer for Linux now or in the forseeable future if Cablecard is all we have. That answer will have to wait for some other tech to come along.
post #29 of 39
Spacecadet, apologies. I now understand what you were saying. Okay, I agree with your assessment in regards to CableCARD and it's affect on our ability to have freedom with content. But only time will tell what the future holds in terms of what we will be able to do with content, industry-wide. I personally haven't been paying too much attention to CableCARD since I have DirecTV. Maybe I should start paying attention to all of this nonesense.

Oh, two points. 1. iTunes and iPod are popular because they work, and they work well enough for most. I suspect if video delivery/viewing goes the same way, most won't care about certain restrictions. 2. I do indeed believe the Internet is a disruptive technology in terms of how we all watch tv today vice the future (i.e. Internet video). Time will tell, but take a look at what kids are doing today and the future may look similiar.
post #30 of 39
I read the 20/20 offer from ReplayTV looked into the offered features and laughed out loud. I had very high hopes for the ReplayTV PC Edition. What were they thinking?
I'm staying with Sage
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