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My Ultimate Vista Whole Home Streaming Was Ruined Today

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I had just finished teh wiring and was waiting on the availability of a Vista MCE with Dual Cable Card to go on sale, so I could stream HD and SD content around my home to Xbox 360's 4 total. I'm glad I was able to find out today that I will not be able to get Switched Video through my Cable Provider TWC with this version of Cable Card. This is very unfortunate as TWC where I live has started to implement Switched Video for two new HD channels and will do so for all new HD channels. This sucks. I mean I am not going to fork out a couple grand for an OEM cable card PC and then be locke dout of content because of switched video. As big as a fan of MCE as I have been, it is this kind of stuff lately that has just got me fustrated. MS is always running a technology cycle or two behind with this stuff and that is why I wonder if this stuff will ever gain mass adoption. I mean I got a little soar over the lack of HDMI on the 360, but I got over it, but now the thing I have been waiting on the most is going to be crippled before it even gets released......I mean what ever happened to this D* deal with MS......Wasn't there supposed to be some sort of D* reciever functionality out for Vista MCE and the 360?
post #2 of 9
Why are you blaming MS for this? All this DRM crap and cablecard certification is the content providers being paranoid.
post #3 of 9
The current version of CableCard does not support switched video, or any other two-way communication like PPV, VOD. This is not a Microsoft limitation, the card itself doesn't support it. CableCard 2.0, which hasn't been approved yet, will handle switched video and other two-way communication.

The DirecTV solution is still forthcoming, we just don't know when yet. See post #16 of this thread.
post #4 of 9
What's "switched video" and why is it important?
post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by lazyn00b View Post

What's "switched video" and why is it important?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Switched_video
post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by olyar15 View Post

Why are you blaming MS for this? All this DRM crap and cablecard certification is the content providers being paranoid.

I am just fustrated over all......I went through te Maybe Cable Card Support in MCE 2005 R2........Then no dice but the eventual announcement of support in Vista had me back with that pep in my step...and now this.Again it is just an overall fustrating experience.
post #7 of 9
Yes, it is frustrating, but you have to remember that this this new technology, and piecing it altogether takes a lot of knowledge and research. I like to blame Microsoft is much of the next guy, but you are blaming them for not supporting a cable card that is not even released yet that supports switched video. They do support current cable cards that are currently out, or at least some subset of functionality. But your cable company has decided to use switch video to deliver the HD content with a stand-alone receiver box. This provides good benefit for the cable company because they can distribute more channels, but requires specialized hardware, which they have worked with a hardware vendor to deliver and in turn can provide you a service. The functionality of that specialized hardware has not been integrated into cable card standards or products, and there are no cable cards available with that functionality (switched video), so it's kind of hard to blame Microsoft for that.

If all you're doing is distributing cable content around your house, both HD and SD. Why don't you just get multiple cable boxes, one for each TV. That is what they were designed for, and then you do not need to worry about integrating different functionality for your solution. If you're to spend two grand on a head end box plus multiple Xbox 360s, that comes out to about $3000-$3500 for the cost of distributing cable TV around your house. I pay Adelphia $14.95 a month for cable box with all the HD content and digital recorder. I have three of those in my house. At that price I can pay a lot a months service with the $3000 that you are laying out for your hardware.
post #8 of 9
I know this is frustrating, but first it's not Microsoft's fault at all. Believe me when I tell you they would love to support 2 way cable card and to be able to open up the Cable cards to all comers.

THe long term answer for this I believe is going to be the DirecTv card. When we will see it is still not known , but I'd start watching next week for some news. There was a report that a third party was working on a card for DirecTv as well. Now these may be the same card or 2 different cards. I am sure we will see DirecTv on MCE in the next few months. DirecTV will be having a big push towards the 3rd quarter of 2007 after their new sats are up and they will be adding LOTS of HD then, so I'd expect we'll see something by then if not before.
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by s.whiplash View Post

Yes, it is frustrating, but you have to remember that this this new technology, and piecing it altogether takes a lot of knowledge and research. I like to blame Microsoft is much of the next guy, but you are blaming them for not supporting a cable card that is not even released yet that supports switched video. They do support current cable cards that are currently out, or at least some subset of functionality. But your cable company has decided to use switch video to deliver the HD content with a stand-alone receiver box. This provides good benefit for the cable company because they can distribute more channels, but requires specialized hardware, which they have worked with a hardware vendor to deliver and in turn can provide you a service. The functionality of that specialized hardware has not been integrated into cable card standards or products, and there are no cable cards available with that functionality (switched video), so it's kind of hard to blame Microsoft for that.

If all you're doing is distributing cable content around your house, both HD and SD. Why don't you just get multiple cable boxes, one for each TV. That is what they were designed for, and then you do not need to worry about integrating different functionality for your solution. If you're to spend two grand on a head end box plus multiple Xbox 360s, that comes out to about $3000-$3500 for the cost of distributing cable TV around your house. I pay Adelphia $14.95 a month for cable box with all the HD content and digital recorder. I have three of those in my house. At that price I can pay a lot a months service with the $3000 that you are laying out for your hardware.

Are you kidding me??? Cable box dvrs are terrible at best!!!!
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