or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 1938

post #58111 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roger Dressler View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

I wish we had something similar in the UK. And it's not just the commercials here - the TV channels have massively different loudness levels, so every time you change channels, you need to adjust the volume too. PITA.
The whole world is moving in the same direction to address loud commercials, even the UK. See this info. Scroll down to the Audio Loudness page. It will take time to really get this into full effect, even in the US.

That is an interesting link, Roger. Channel 4 is one of our major terrestrial providers, along with BBC, ITV and Five. Those channels are actually not too bad (no commercials on the BBC of course, other than their own ads for their own programmes). The real problem is with the Satellite broadcasters, and especially the 'minor' channels. They have huge variations from programme to programme, channel to channel and commercial to commercial. Hopefully they will all be brought into line sooner rather than later.

post #58112 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

LOL. Yes, it is a *very* expensive upgrade. I did get a much younger model though (24 years younger than me in fact) and this resulted in improved performance in many areas wink.gif , although at times it can run very hot.

The new model also has a much lower noise floor than the older model and a very attractive faceplate and form factor. Running and maintenance costs are also lower. I am expecting that long-term reliability will be good. 

this whole post is pure gold. You cad. wink.gif Hope the ex doesn't read this forum though biggrin.giftongue.gifeek.gif

 

OMG. If she does, I am toast :)

post #58113 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

this whole post is pure gold. You cad. wink.gif Hope the ex doesn't read this forum though biggrin.giftongue.gifeek.gif

Probably better firmware in the newer models.
post #58114 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepar View Post

I'm sure the firmware is more recent.

 

Interesting word... firm... ware.... ;)

post #58115 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

LOL. Yes, it is a *very* expensive upgrade. I did get a much younger model though (24 years younger than me in fact) and this resulted in improved performance in many areas wink.gif , although at times it can run very hot.

The new model also has a much lower noise floor than the older model and a very attractive faceplate and form factor. Running and maintenance costs are also lower. I am expecting that long-term reliability will be good. 

this whole post is pure gold. You cad. wink.gif Hope the ex doesn't read this forum though biggrin.giftongue.gifeek.gif

yes, it is... biggrin.gif truly a classic...
post #58116 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Interesting word... firm... ware.... wink.gif
You probably rather think of ...hard...ware..., don't you wink.gif
post #58117 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Interesting word... firm... ware.... wink.gif

As opposed fo firmwear.
post #58118 of 70896
^^^wait ,what thread am i in? lol
post #58119 of 70896

you guys made me laugh loud for a good continuous 5 mins....

post #58120 of 70896

Is it a slow day at work?

post #58121 of 70896
^^^

My office is virtual, which means I work from home ... which means I don't really "work" at all, but I do it 18 hours a day.

http://www.agedwoods.com

Jeff
post #58122 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by pepar View Post

^^^
My office is virtual, which means I work from home ... which means I don't really "work" at all, but I do it 18 hours a day.
http://www.agedwoods.com
Jeff

Good for you - although I can't handle the virtual part for my business from home. That gets a little too claustrophobic when you live in a two BDR condo with a wife, a 15-year-old, and two small white dogs. But the 18 hours part is something I can occasionally sympathize with.

Ironically, the Timberland store you mention in your blog is literally around the corner from my office, and about five minutes' walk from our place.

Now I'm going to feel obligated to walk by on the way home and inspect the aged wood:).

Also, you never know: you may get to be the second person from AVS to spend our money (the first person is well known to anyone following the 4311 thread). We're thinking of redoing our floors in at least the living/dining room in the next year, to up the rescale value....
Edited by sdrucker - 12/13/12 at 3:22pm
post #58123 of 70896
I'm not sure I can get xt32 because it's steep. The xt might work
post #58124 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

I'm not sure I can get xt32 because it's steep. The xt might work

It's up to you, of course, but if you're seeking to upgrade from MultiEQ, your best bang for the buck is to move to a XT32-capable receiver. The biggest reason is that you're going to get the most benefit from Audyssey's ability to equalize the lower bass frequencies and the mains/sub splice. XT has a limited number of filters for mains (16 for main vs. 128 for subs), while XT32 has the same (512) filters for both subs and mains. That's going to give you not only more sensitivity to room effects from your subs, but in particular more control over how your mains and the subs work together in the critical crossover region.

It also has the not coincidental benefit of being able to equalize two subs simultaneously, which might come in handy if you've got multiple subs (or plan to in the future).

I'd see if I could still pick up a Denon 4311, if you really want to get the most cost efficient AVR. Unless you're planning on moving into the 4K world, that should keep you busy for a few years to come.

Edit - I see you have a HSU True sub. If you decide to add a second sub to your setup, you'll particularly appreciate moving to XT32. I know I did when I moved to Audyssey for my own Dual Drive ULS-15s.
post #58125 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

LOL. Yes, it is a *very* expensive upgrade. I did get a much younger model though (24 years younger than me in fact) and this resulted in improved performance in many areas wink.gif , although at times it can run very hot.

The new model also has a much lower noise floor than the older model and a very attractive faceplate and form factor. Running and maintenance costs are also lower. I am expecting that long-term reliability will be good. 

Not to go off into the gutter, but my own wife _thinks_ she's a younger model. It seems like you've hit the trifecta if you can keep those maintenance costs down:).
post #58126 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrucker View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

I'm not sure I can get xt32 because it's steep. The xt might work

It's up to you, of course, but if you're seeking to upgrade from MultiEQ, your best bang for the buck is to move to a XT32-capable receiver. The biggest reason is that you're going to get the most benefit from Audyssey's ability to equalize the lower bass frequencies and the mains/sub splice. XT has a limited number of filters for mains (16 for main vs. 128 for subs), while XT32 has the same (512) filters for both subs and mains. That's going to give you not only more sensitivity to room effects from your subs, but in particular more control over how your mains and the subs work together in the critical crossover region.

It also has the not coincidental benefit of being able to equalize two subs simultaneously, which might come in handy if you've got multiple subs (or plan to in the future).

I'd see if I could still pick up a Denon 4311, if you really want to get the most cost efficient AVR. Unless you're planning on moving into the 4K world, that should keep you busy for a few years to come.

Edit - I see you have a HSU True sub. If you decide to add a second sub to your setup, you'll particularly appreciate moving to XT32. I know I did when I moved to Audyssey for my own Dual Drive ULS-15s.

 

Stuart, FWIW, I endorse every word of that post.

 

The only point I would comment on is that the ability to upscale 4k (such as I have in my Onkyo 5509) is much overrated. Anyone with a 4k display will have inherent 4k upscaling, and now BD players are also appearing with 4k upscaling too (eg the new Oppos). The only question is whether the 4k upscaling in an AVR is going to be better quality that its counterpart in, say, a BD player. Given Oppo's credentials and reputation for upscaling ability, I would question whether it would be done better in the AVR.

post #58127 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrucker View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

LOL. Yes, it is a *very* expensive upgrade. I did get a much younger model though (24 years younger than me in fact) and this resulted in improved performance in many areas wink.gif , although at times it can run very hot.

The new model also has a much lower noise floor than the older model and a very attractive faceplate and form factor. Running and maintenance costs are also lower. I am expecting that long-term reliability will be good. 

Not to go off into the gutter, but my own wife _thinks_ she's a younger model. It seems like you've hit the trifecta if you can keep those maintenance costs down:).

 

LOL. It's the maintenance costs that can kill you I agree. Fortunately, my unit came with its own self-funding plan and rarely requires any additional input from me. :)

post #58128 of 70896
Guys, new to Audyssey here. Got a new NR818 that had XT32 during black Friday and should be delivered next Monday smile.gif

I had been reading up on the FAQ and 101. I do understand it is NOT OK to lower xover once Audyssey is done (that it creates hole), but I had a question on why it is OK to move up.

Let's say Audyssey determin that my speaker xover is 50Hz, so it will try to EQ all the way down to 50Hz only for that speaker. In the mean time, I am assuming that they will EQ the sub up to 50Hz only, so that I have a flat and continuous curve...
Now, if I move the xover say to 80Hz, then the sub is now handling those "extra" frequency (from 50-80Hz) which used to be only EQ on the speaker, but not the sub? Would I now have some "uncalibrated" frequency between the old xover and new xover?

I also assume that I cannot "fix" a crossover first, and then run Audyssey? Does it get override? (i.e. can I tell Audyssey that I have small speaker and want to xover at 80Hz so Audyssey can skip the -3dB check and just proceed with that assumption?)

Thanks,

Thomas
post #58129 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by fight4yu View Post

Guys, new to Audyssey here. Got a new NR818 that had XT32 during black Friday and should be delivered next Monday smile.gif
I had been reading up on the FAQ and 101. I do understand it is NOT OK to lower xover once Audyssey is done (that it creates hole), but I had a question on why it is OK to move up.
Let's say Audyssey determin that my speaker xover is 50Hz, so it will try to EQ all the way down to 50Hz only for that speaker. In the mean time, I am assuming that they will EQ the sub up to 50Hz only, so that I have a flat and continuous curve...
Now, if I move the xover say to 80Hz, then the sub is now handling those "extra" frequency (from 50-80Hz) which used to be only EQ on the speaker, but not the sub? Would I now have some "uncalibrated" frequency between the old xover and new xover?
I also assume that I cannot "fix" a crossover first, and then run Audyssey? Does it get override? (i.e. can I tell Audyssey that I have small speaker and want to xover at 80Hz so Audyssey can skip the -3dB check and just proceed with that assumption?)
Thanks,
Thomas

Audyssey will EQ the main speakers down to their -3dB point as measured in the room. Typically receivers set the crossover point at the first available frequency above the -3dB point for each pair of speakers. Audyssey will EQ the sub down to its -3 dB point and up to its -3dB point (ie where it starts to roll off at the "high" end). When you move the crossovers up, normally you are still well within the sub's passband, so Audyssey is EQing the "added" higher frequencies already.
post #58130 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

 

LOL. It's the maintenance costs that can kill you I agree. Fortunately, my unit came with its own self-funding plan and rarely requires any additional input from me. :)

But, I trust, she greatly appreciates any input you do provide.  ;-)

post #58131 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by fight4yu View Post

In the mean time, I am assuming that they will EQ the sub up to 50Hz only, so that I have a flat and continuous curve...

This assumption is where you go wrong -- Audyssey creates an EQ for each speaker (including the sub) that covers its ENTIRE operating range. So the sub is not just EQ'd up to 50Hz in your example, it will probably be EQ'd up to 200Hz or so. Each filter is independent; the bass limits of your other speakers do not impact where the EQ stops for the sub channel. This is why you can raise the xover -- as Jerry notes above, even if you'd raise it from 50Hz to say 100Hz you are well within the sub's passband, which is fully EQ'd.
post #58132 of 70896
I posted this on the Integra 80.2 thread but thought I would try here as well. Do the calibation test tones have Audyssey Filters applied to them? Or are they Audyssey-less?
post #58133 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by audioguy View Post

I posted this on the Integra 80.2 thread but thought I would try here as well. Do the calibation test tones have Audyssey Filters applied to them? Or are they Audyssey-less?

During the Audyssey calibration, all AVR settings are disabled. IOW, Audyssey ignores trims, distances, and crossovers, and disables any prior calibration filters. New trims, distances, crossover recommendations, and filters are created by the calibration process.
post #58134 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by fight4yu View Post

Guys, new to Audyssey here. Got a new NR818 that had XT32 during black Friday and should be delivered next Monday smile.gif

I had been reading up on the FAQ and 101. I do understand it is NOT OK to lower xover once Audyssey is done (that it creates hole), but I had a question on why it is OK to move up.

Let's say Audyssey determin that my speaker xover is 50Hz, so it will try to EQ all the way down to 50Hz only for that speaker. In the mean time, I am assuming that they will EQ the sub up to 50Hz only, so that I have a flat and continuous curve...
Now, if I move the xover say to 80Hz, then the sub is now handling those "extra" frequency (from 50-80Hz) which used to be only EQ on the speaker, but not the sub? Would I now have some "uncalibrated" frequency between the old xover and new xover?

I also assume that I cannot "fix" a crossover first, and then run Audyssey? Does it get override? (i.e. can I tell Audyssey that I have small speaker and want to xover at 80Hz so Audyssey can skip the -3dB check and just proceed with that assumption?)

Thanks,

Thomas

 

What JHaz said. The 'wrong' bit in your post, if I may call it that, is your assumption about how the sub gets EQd. You will be fine to raise the XOs and it won't adversely affect the sub's EQ.

 

To your last point, Audyssey ignores all settings in the AVR when it runs, so you cannot override it in any way.

post #58135 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

 

LOL. It's the maintenance costs that can kill you I agree. Fortunately, my unit came with its own self-funding plan and rarely requires any additional input from me. :)

But, I trust, she greatly appreciates any input you do provide.  ;-)

 

LOL. Yes, digital and analogue. (This is getting tooooooooo bad.....) :)

post #58136 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by audioguy View Post

I posted this on the Integra 80.2 thread but thought I would try here as well. Do the calibation test tones have Audyssey Filters applied to them? Or are they Audyssey-less?

 

The internal AVR test tones do not have Audyssey filters applied to them. Be aware of this when independently checking the SPLs with a meter - the Audyssey filtration may have boosted some frequencies enough to make a difference to the SPL detected if you are using the level test tones to verify Audyssey's settings. If you use an independent mic and independent tones (eg with REW or OmniMic), then of course you can check the levels with or without Audyssey's contribution. It's mentioned briefly in the last paragraph of this FAQ answer:

 

e)3.   Why does my My Sound Pressure Level meter give a different result to Audyssey?

post #58137 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrucker View Post

It's up to you, of course, but if you're seeking to upgrade from MultiEQ, your best bang for the buck is to move to a XT32-capable receiver. The biggest reason is that you're going to get the most benefit from Audyssey's ability to equalize the lower bass frequencies and the mains/sub splice. XT has a limited number of filters for mains (16 for main vs. 128 for subs), while XT32 has the same (512) filters for both subs and mains. That's going to give you not only more sensitivity to room effects from your subs, but in particular more control over how your mains and the subs work together in the critical crossover region.
It also has the not coincidental benefit of being able to equalize two subs simultaneously, which might come in handy if you've got multiple subs (or plan to in the future).
I'd see if I could still pick up a Denon 4311, if you really want to get the most cost efficient AVR. Unless you're planning on moving into the 4K world, that should keep you busy for a few years to come.
Edit - I see you have a HSU True sub. If you decide to add a second sub to your setup, you'll particularly appreciate moving to XT32. I know I did when I moved to Audyssey for my own Dual Drive ULS-15s.

I might just get the Onkyo 818 instead of the Denon 4311 because Onkyo is cheaper and seems to have more on board.
Also is XT32 better even if you use one sub?
post #58138 of 70896
I wouldn't get an XXX8 series Onkyo, many have trouble with their HDMI boards failing.
post #58139 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

I might just get the Onkyo 818 instead of the Denon 4311 because Onkyo is cheaper and seems to have more on board.

Sometimes more is less and less is more smile.gif
post #58140 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

I might just get the Onkyo 818 instead of the Denon 4311 because Onkyo is cheaper and seems to have more on board.
Also is XT32 better even if you use one sub?
The 818 does not have sub EQ for multiple subs where the 4311 does.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)