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"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 2007

post #60181 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrhooper1963 View Post

I am setting up a Marantz AV 7005 processor. I have already ran Audyssey, and I am currently "tweaking" the results. I have set all my speakers to small and set all my crossovers to 80 HZ in the manual setup menu and manually SPL'd my speakers. I have also enabled Audyssey.

Dynamic volume and Dynamic EQ are among the many settings in the audio menu. I don't think I need Dynamic Volume because loud commercials don't bother me. LOL Please correct me if it serves another purpose. But I am confused about the Dynamic EQ setting. Is Dynamic EQ something that most people enable ? I read on another forum that I should enable Dynamic EQ fot TV , but disable it for music and movie watching.

I would apppreciate the advice of anyone who would care to chime in on this. THANKS !!

Jim

 

Hi Jim - these FAQ answers may help:

 

g)2.   What is Dynamic EQ?


g)3.   What is Reference Level Offset in Dynamic EQ?

post #60182 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by IgorZep View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Aren't both placed on the floor? Isn't a tripod made to isolate vibrations,...errr,...from a camera? Don't the Audyssey mics come with a camera thread to easily fit on tripod?tongue.gif
Tripod have three legs, so it is supposed not to isolate vibrations, but to stand reliably as if camera is bound to the floor/earth.
The Audyssy mic has thread for tripod just because it is more common to find in homes than mic stands smile.gif There are a way more "photographers" than "sound engineers" )

 

That is right. Audyssey had a choice of mic support when they designed the Pro Kit. Did they include with the kit a) a tripod or b) a mic stand?  Their choice says all we need to know on this topic IMO.

post #60183 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by DisTreSs View Post

Hi, I've been searching around the forum and not coming up with much concerning DSX2. The reason I want to know more about it, is that I noticed that every single receiver that is listed on the Audyssey website with DSX capability now shows DSX2. I'm guessing this is just a website/marketing glitch and that older models will not benefit from an upgrade to DSX2?

If it isn't a glitch, then I would be most curious to know whether DSX2 has taken up more of a Neo:X direction or not as to how it interprets the sound. If it is still more or less conceived as an ambience generator but this time starting from a stereo source then I'm not that interested either way... smile.gif

Anyone??
post #60184 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

That is right. Audyssey had a choice of mic support when they designed the Pro Kit. Did they include with the kit a) a tripod or b) a mic stand?  Their choice says all we need to know on this topic IMO.
Well, Pro included an industry std professional tripod mic stand. wink.gif
The desirable features of that stand are not unique to that model but include
1. that the feet of the tripod legs have nice large rubber vibration-isolating feet, unlike many camera tripods. Importantl if placing the stand on a suspended wood floor, for ex.
2. The boom is a nice thin/low-profile design that reduces the likeihood of producing reflections, unlike bulky camera tripod shoe mounts.
3. The Pro mic holder itself has a nice vibration-isolating ring. In the past when using the std Audyssey mic I have inserted a thin sheet of rubber between the mic and the mount. Then I directed my OCD elsewhere. biggrin.gif
post #60185 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by IgorZep View Post

If you only hear it at max level then it is probably not that much echoing. But you should try to listen for it at the mic position, may be there echoing is stronger. Otherwise try to find if something is resonating in the room... May be it is resonating at frequency where our ears are not so sensitive, then it could be tricky to find it. May be the background noise is also at some really low frequency so you can't hear that... Just guessing, it is not easy... Could be anything from hidden noise or resonance to the faulty unit... Hopefully someone already solved something similar and will answer you soon wink.gif

I'm probably gonna try it one more time tongiht before I assume it's a defective mic. I'm going to try unplugging my refrigerator, it's really not that close at all to my speakers, but it can be heard faintly and is maybe putting out some low frequency.... I do wonder then why it's only effecting my center channel... sometimes it will randomly pass and all my other speakers go fine with one pass through. Right now I have it manually setup by measuring speaker distances and using an SPL meter to adjust level, but I feel that the Dynamic EQ is not working effectively if Audyssey wasn't used.
post #60186 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundofMind View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

That is right. Audyssey had a choice of mic support when they designed the Pro Kit. Did they include with the kit a) a tripod or b) a mic stand?  Their choice says all we need to know on this topic IMO.
Well, Pro included an industry std professional tripod mic stand. wink.gif
The desirable features of that stand are not unique to that model but include
1. that the feet of the tripod legs have nice large rubber vibration-isolating feet, unlike many camera tripods. Importantl if placing the stand on a suspended wood floor, for ex.
2. The boom is a nice thin/low-profile design that reduces the likeihood of producing reflections, unlike bulky camera tripod shoe mounts.
3. The Pro mic holder itself has a nice vibration-isolating ring. In the past when using the std Audyssey mic I have inserted a thin sheet of rubber between the mic and the mount. Then I directed my OCD elsewhere. biggrin.gif

 

:)  All good points. It's still a mic stand though and not a camera tripod.

post #60187 of 70910
^Right. I make the distinction simply because before Pro, I used one of my older mic stands, which has the traditional weighted disc base. It has small rubber pads under the base to isolate vibrations. Pretty hefty, used to haul those on gigs way back when.
post #60188 of 70910
From Chris:
Quote:
It could be a combination of the speaker, the room acoustics and the exact mic placement. Polarity is calculated from the first mic position so variations in that may cause different readings. Not worth worrying about. If the wiring is as the manufacturer asks then you should go with that. MultEQ completely ignores these warnings in the filter calculation.
Quote:
It's not unusual for the polarity warning to come up. It could be due to an acoustical effect or because one of the drivers in the speaker is intentionally wired out of phase by the manufacturer. This is a simple warning. It has no effect on the measurements. If you have checked the wires on the back of the speaker and the amp, then hit Skip and proceed with the calibration.
post #60189 of 70910
I have a question regarding point f.) 4. in the FAQ.
If I want to run my subs a little 'hot' where should I make the changes?

The first paragraph tells me to adjust the sub on the AVR and not on the back of the sub, but the statement of Ed Mullen tells the opposite.
So what is the correct way?

I also don´t understand why i should turn up the volume on the back of the sub, but at the same time trim down the setting in the AVR.
Doesn´t this nullify the whole action?
post #60190 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inspectah_Deck View Post

I have a question regarding point f.) 4. in the FAQ.
If I want to run my subs a little 'hot' where should I make the changes?

The first paragraph tells me to adjust the sub on the AVR and not on the back of the sub, but the statement of Ed Mullen tells the opposite.
So what is the correct way?

I also don´t understand why i should turn up the volume on the back of the sub, but at the same time trim down the setting in the AVR.
Doesn´t this nullify the whole action?

Lots of answers and tips here for setting up a HT, http://www.avsforum.com/t/824554/setting-up-your-home-theater-101
post #60191 of 70910
Thanks, but i just wanted to ask for this specific point in the faq, as i think it´s a little bit unclear/contradictory.
post #60192 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Inspectah_Deck View Post

I have a question regarding point f.) 4. in the FAQ.
If I want to run my subs a little 'hot' where should I make the changes?

The first paragraph tells me to adjust the sub on the AVR and not on the back of the sub, but the statement of Ed Mullen tells the opposite.
So what is the correct way?

I also don´t understand why i should turn up the volume on the back of the sub, but at the same time trim down the setting in the AVR.
Doesn´t this nullify the whole action?

 

I see where you might be confused.  The advice to turn up the level on the sub is to be performed BEFORE running the calibration, which will result in a lower sub trim level in the AVR after the calibration has completed.  Then, if you want to run the subs a little hotter, the lower trim level in the AVR gives gou more headroom for adjustment.  The recommendation is still the same--after the calibration has completed, adjust the AVR sub trim level to your satisfaction, leaving the sub gain control untouched.

post #60193 of 70910
Ah, now it makes sense.
Thanks AustinJerry.
post #60194 of 70910
@ Inspectah Deck -- how's the rest of the Clan doing? tongue.gif

Reading it now that section is a little confusingly worded, as the quote from Ed Mullen is not specifically discussing raising the trim AFTER calibration. It actually doesn't contradict the advice given; rather, it's there to reinforce the idea that setting the sub gain hotter will cause the calibrated sub trim in the receiver to come in lower, and thus allows for room for "upward adjustability" in the receiver.

EDIT: Jerry beat me to it, but hopefully it makes sense now! smile.gif
post #60195 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

@ Inspectah Deck -- how's the rest of the Clan doing? tongue.gif
We had better times, but my new album with 7L and Esoteric is hot. wink.gif

Yes, now it doesn´t contradict anymore.
It just wasn´t clear to me, that the sub gain should be upped before doing the calibration.
Thank you too.
post #60196 of 70910
I've used Audyssey by sitting in all the spots with the mic on my head; I've done it putting the mic on boxes stacked up to the ear/listening level; I've used a pillow propped up length-ways and put the mic on it to get my calibrations: all have been/sounded fine to me! I borrowed a camera tripod from a coworker recently but there was no way to 'bridge' the legs around my theater seat (so it the legs were on the floor) , the legs were huge and it sat up too high on its lowest height setting......so I used the pillow again.
post #60197 of 70910
Wryker,

If you enjoy the resulting sound, that's what matters.

Personally, I think it'd be nice to have some measurements showing the differences in the resulting sound when using the various microphone support techniques, That'd be quite time consuming, though. It seems to me that most people would rather spend that time enjoying the sound they've managed to coax out of their systems.

Perhaps some ot the contributors to the new REW thread might eventually do that comparison for us.
post #60198 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Wryker,

If you enjoy the resulting sound, that's what matters.

Personally, I think it'd be nice to have some measurements showing the differences in the resulting sound when using the various microphone support techniques, That'd be quite time consuming, though. It seems to me that most people would rather spend that time enjoying the sound they've managed to coax out of their systems.

Perhaps some ot the contributors to the new REW thread might eventually do that comparison for us.

Hey Selden, even though Wryker used not a single emoticon I still think he was just kidding with his post! smile.gif

Wryker?

As regagrds measurements with different support techniques I have also suggested this to volunteers a couple of posts before, but nobody checked-in on the case so far. Let's see. smile.gif
post #60199 of 70910
Personally I think putting a mic on your head and slouching down is a very reasonable thing to do. After all, is it better to calibrate the sound with or without the different acoustics caused by the presence of people in the room? (And, no, let's not beat that poor wounded horse any more!)
post #60200 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Personally I think putting a mic on your head and slouching down is a very reasonable thing to do. After all, is it better to calibrate the sound with or without the different acoustics caused by the presence of people in the room? (And, no, let's not beat that poor wounded horse any more!)

No emoticons? smile.gifcool.giftongue.gif
post #60201 of 70910
Nope. I personally wouldn't bother to do it, but how else are you going to have an acoustic environment similar to what it'll be when you're actually listening to calibrated audio?

It's the well known problem of any measurement: the things you do to make a measurement change the measured values. Someone sitting there is sure to make a bigger difference in the sound than will the use of different designs of microphone stands.

People do tend to absorb sounds instead of reflecting them, though, and most sofas and pillows absorb it, too. And you don't want the microphone to be shaking too much, either.
post #60202 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Nope. I personally wouldn't bother to do it, but how else are you going to have an acoustic environment similar to what it'll be when you're actually listening to calibrated audio?

It's the well known problem of any measurement: the things you do to make a measurement change the measured values. Someone sitting there is sure to make a bigger difference in the sound than will the use of different designs of microphone stands.

People do tend to absorb sounds instead of reflecting them, though, and most sofas and pillows absorb it, too. And you don't want the microphone to be shaking too much, either.

You gotta be kidding again, eh? eek.gifeek.gifcool.gifwink.gifbiggrin.gif
post #60203 of 70910
If your theater accommodates a largish family or you frequently have guests, perhaps stocking up on crash test dummies to leave in the relevant spots during calibration would be preferable. After all, I'm sure my wife sitting next to me has SOME effect on the sound that reaches my ears. I mean beyond the things she says or when she laughs at 1 in 10 of my stupid jokes.
post #60204 of 70910
Quick question: when running multieq xt32, where should I put the mic for listening positions 7 and 8? The diagram on audyssey website makes it look like I should put the Mic on the back of the couch. Is this right??
post #60205 of 70910
It doesn't really matter, the diagram is just a suggestion. Don't over obsess about mic positioning, just follow the general guidelines (stay within a relatively tight radius, avoid reflective surfaces, etc) and it will be fine.
post #60206 of 70910
I'm starting to get pretty frustrated... So my Audyssey passes no problem first time, in the initial position, and as soon as I move it the center channel gets high ambient noise warning every time I retry in EVERY other posotion. As I mentioned earlier, I thought it might be an echo issue, so I actually move my couch back up against the wall and re-do it. I notice my echo is gone and the Audyssey goes through the whole setup without a problem, I was pretty happy... It set my L/R front crossovers at 250 hz again, which is way too high, so I decide to re-run to see if it comes up again. As soon as I re-run it, center channel gets high ambient noise first time through and keeps getting it. I literally did nothing different and now it's not working. I'm at a loss at this point.
post #60207 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by Holiday121 View Post

So should I move the left and right speakers ?


hmm, if all else fails, you have a few things in your arsenal--engaging the dynamic volume has the effect of quieting the surrounds and the mains (volume spikes) without ruining the movie's ambiance (and in the procees, making the dialogue stand out) or you may turn up the volume of your center channel. or you may use both at the same time. both can be done thru the avr. thanks.
post #60208 of 70910
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheYC View Post

I'm starting to get pretty frustrated... So my Audyssey passes no problem first time, in the initial position, and as soon as I move it the center channel gets high ambient noise warning every time I retry in EVERY other posotion. As I mentioned earlier, I thought it might be an echo issue, so I actually move my couch back up against the wall and re-do it. I notice my echo is gone and the Audyssey goes through the whole setup without a problem, I was pretty happy... It set my L/R front crossovers at 250 hz again, which is way too high, so I decide to re-run to see if it comes up again. As soon as I re-run it, center channel gets high ambient noise first time through and keeps getting it. I literally did nothing different and now it's not working. I'm at a loss at this point.

This might be an obvious and stupid question, but what kind of background noise, if any, do you have while running audyssey? Is there a fridge and/or A/C running, or is there ambient (everyday) noise? We might get used to the ambient background noise and our brain learns to tune out such noise, but the audyssey mic hears everything. If you have audible noise like road noise, any kind/level of conversations during calibration, etc., might trigger warnings about ambient noise. It might also be possible that your calibration mic might have gotten damaged somehow. Give us more details about your room (layout, furnishings, etc.) and also the ambient conditions during measurement. Then we can troubleshoot further.
post #60209 of 70910
Thanks for the reply. I literally have everything off, fridge, heater, aquarium, you name it, it's pretty dead quiet. It's also strange that it's only my center channel that has given me this problem. The room is about 12 feet long by 8 feet wide. You can see a pic of my setup in my profile, nothing too crazy I don't think. I sit about 7.5 feet from the center channel and 8.5 feet to the TV. My center channel tweeter is slight lower than my L/R tweeters but not significantly so.
post #60210 of 70910
@CheyC,

I do that too while calibrating. I even take the batteries out of a wall clock in the living room so that its ticking does not pollute the audyssey measurements, and I go and stand in the same place in the room to avoid variables. smile.gif OCD !!

I see nothing out of the ordinary with your room, as you've posted elsewhere. Looks like carpeted floors, and cushy leather furniture, curtains ... standard fare. One best practice recommendation is to have your center channel installed such that its front extends a little further than the edge of your stand - so as to minimize unwanted distortion due to sharp edges of the tv stand. Check to make sure you have done that.

Other than that, I can't think of an environmental reason that might be causing your issues. When the speaker produces the Audyssey chirps, do you hear any ringing or echos of the chirps? (My sister's basement theater had horrible ringing to the calibration chirps due to the sparse furnishings, but adding thick curtains and adding some soft cushy sofas helped tame the echos/ringing and improved the sound.)

See if you could borrow an Audyssey mic from a friend or a store that carries either Onkyo, Denon or Marantz receivers and see if the calibration produces the same warnings. That might indicate whether your mic might have gotten damaged somehow.
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