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post #61561 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

So XT32 will eq 2 subs as one but will eq to the level of the inferior sub (for mismatched subs) and Sub Eq HT will do the same but also set the distance and phase individually. Am I correct?

 

"EQ to the level of the inferior sub" may not be exactly correct.  Rather, if one sub has significantly different (i.e. inferior) performance, the combined performance of the two subs could be degraded.  This is a complex question that depends on a number of factors, including placement of the two subs.  That's why the recommendation is to always have matching subs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post


I looked into those features before buying my Onkyo 818 which has XT32 but no Sub EQ HT. Here's my understanding:
XT32 (with or without Sub EQ) will eq the combined response of the subs. It doesn't know if one sub is inferior to the other since it measures them together. Yes, Sub EQ sets individual distance and phase for each sub; it then applies a single eq filter to both subs (same thing XT32 without Sb EQ does). In other words, XT32 will always apply a single filter to all subs based on the combined response. If you have 2 subs, Sub HT will first set distance and phase for each sub before applying that single filter. If you have 1 sub, Sub EQ HT provides no benefit. If you have more than 2 subs, it may not provide a benefit either.

 

If you have more than two subs, you still get the benefit of SubEQ HT.  However, you should pay close attention to the placement of the subs.  For example, I have four subs, and each sub "pair" is equidistant from the MLP on a separate sub channel.  Each sub in a "pair" is gain-matched with the other sub.  This way, SubEQ HT correctly sets the distance and trim for each pair.

post #61562 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

"If you have more than two subs, you still get the benefit of SubEQ HT.  However, you should pay close attention to the placement of the subs.  For example, I have four subs, and each sub "pair" is equidistant from the MLP on a separate sub channel.  Each sub in a "pair" is gain-matched with the other sub.  This way, SubEQ HT correctly sets the distance and trim for each pair.

I agree and that's exactly why I said it may provide no benefit rather than it will provide no benefit. I also have 4 subs however they are not arranged in pairs that are equal distance from the MLP. SubEQ wouldn't do anything for me; if it did happen to help, it would be more by chance than anything. I have an SPL meter that I used to set levels manually prior to running Audyssey. Of course, there's no way to set individual delay without SubEq aside from moving the subs and adjusting the phase, I guess.

I'd be curious how much more effective Audyssey with SubEq is in EQing your 4 subs as you have them set-up versus how it would do if you had all subs coming off a single sub-out and set levels manually. Guess it just depends on the room and your set-up.
post #61563 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post


I'd be curious how much more effective Audyssey with SubEq is in EQing your 4 subs as you have them set-up versus how it would do if you had all subs coming off a single sub-out and set levels manually. Guess it just depends on the room and your set-up.

 

I have seen several reports of people who have conducted research on the best way to set up multiple subs.  At least one such report concluded that, as long as you don't have restrictions on sub placement, optimization can be achieved using a single sub out on the AVR.  In other words, SubEQ HT isn't absolutely necessary, but in a typical listening room with the usual limited placement options, SubEQ HT can make a difference.

post #61564 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

I have seen several reports of people who have conducted research on the best way to set up multiple subs.  At least one such report concluded that, as long as you don't have restrictions on sub placement, optimization can be achieved using a single sub out on the AVR.  In other words, SubEQ HT isn't absolutely necessary, but in a typical listening room with the usual limited placement options, SubEQ HT can make a difference.

I do have restrictions for my 2 subs. They can't go anywhere except the on the front wall and left wall.
Edited by asere - 4/22/13 at 9:58am
post #61565 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson View Post

Don't.  The current MultEQ XT32 is superior in processing/integration to the rather dated outboard processor. Even more so with the Pro kit.  Also, the SE forces redundant A/D/A conversion.

Thanks Kal! Appreciate your opinion...
I was unsure because, even though I found the DSP info of Integra (FTC three 32-bit processing chips), there is no indication of Audyssey SE spec in this regard. So, I was thinking may be due to dedicated status of SE, it will be able to do a better job, since Integra is performing more than one jobs using it's powerful dsp.
BTW, can Audyssey SE be used with Arcam AV888 or Meridian G68adv et el? Just curious ...
Thanks again!
post #61566 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

So XT32 will eq 2 subs as one but will eq to the level of the inferior sub (for mismatched subs) and Sub Eq HT will do the same but also set the distance and phase individually. Am I correct?

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

So XT32 will eq 2 subs as one but will eq to the level of the inferior sub (for mismatched subs) and Sub Eq HT will do the same but also set the distance and phase individually. Am I correct?

I looked into those features before buying my Onkyo 818 which has XT32 but no Sub EQ HT. Here's my understanding:
XT32 (with or without Sub EQ) will eq the combined response of the subs. It doesn't know if one sub is inferior to the other since it measures them together. Yes, Sub EQ sets individual distance and phase for each sub; it then applies a single eq filter to both subs (same thing XT32 without Sb EQ does). In other words, XT32 will always apply a single filter to all subs based on the combined response. If you have 2 subs, Sub HT will first set distance and phase for each sub before applying that single filter. If you have 1 sub, Sub EQ HT provides no benefit. If you have more than 2 subs, it may not provide a benefit either.

 

XT32 incorporates Sub EQ on all XT32-equipped AVRs with the exception of the Onkyo 818. XT32+SubEQ will set the levels and distances for each sub separately and then EQ the two subs as one.
 
If one sub is significantly inferior to the other, then Audyssey will EQ to the lesser of the two subs. It has to do this because otherwise damage could occur to the lesser sub. For example, if one sub is capable of playing at 110dB at 20Hz (say) and the other is capable only of 90dB at 20Hz, clearly the latter sub would be in jeopardy if Audyssey attempted to bring it into line with the superior sub. One assumes that each sub's performance capability is determined when each sub is individually swept prior to the calibration run and this is how Audyssey 'knows' what each sub is capable of. 
 
For information on setting up dual or complex sub arrangements, see the FAQ, here:
 
post #61567 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by chambers1517 View Post

Well I am thoroughly disappointed but am unsure why. I have an Integra 70.2 reciever that I have been using for a while. It has been in my theater since I completed it about a year ago. I have Klipsch Lascalas across the front and Heresys as sides and rear surrounds. I also have an IB sub with 4 18" IB3's. The sound has been good with the Audyssey setup but I always felt something was missing. I added lots of acoustical treatment and was going to recalibrate with Audyssey. When I plugged the Mic in I lost all sound from the reciever and It would not come back. I took it back to the Dealer and they sent it away for repairs. I have an old Harmon Kardon 7200 which I put in the theater while my Integra was out. I manually adjusted the speaker levels and popped in a movie and I was blown away with the sound. I could not believe how much the treatment helped and could not wait to get my Integra with Audyssey back. It came back today and so did the subdued lifeless sound. I thought Audyssey was supposed to improve the sound. The surrounds seem non existant compared to the HK. The speaker levels were matched on the HK but it seems the surrounds got a lot more work. I use DOlby PL2 on both. Is this an Audyssey thing or an Integra vs HK thing?

I really have no clear answer for you, but since you have such great speakers and no one else responded to you I thought you at least deserved a comment. biggrin.gif

FWIW, I have K-Horns for my FL/R and a RC64ii for a center and get great sound from my Audyssey XT equipped Denon AVR - not that I'm even close to the awesomeness of your all Heritage surround system! eek.gifbiggrin.gif I'm very envious....

Not sure why you're getting lackluster results. Maybe it;s your method of calibration - are you using a tripod for the mic and doing all 8 positions? What are your speaker settings post-Audyssey? Does the Integra sound better if you turn up the volume?

Sorry, I got no real answers for you but if you can answer the questions, maybe someone more knowledgeable than myself can get you fixed up.
post #61568 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

If one sub is significantly inferior to the other, then Audyssey will EQ to the lesser of the two subs. It has to do this because otherwise damage could occur to the lesser sub. For example, if one sub is capable of playing at 110dB at 20Hz (say) and the other is capable only of 90dB at 20Hz, clearly the latter sub would be in jeopardy if Audyssey attempted to bring it into line with the superior sub.

Are you sure about that? I haven't read that before. This is about all I've seen Chris post on the Audyssey site:

MultEQ XT32 is the flagship version of our technology to measure and correct room acoustical problems. Sub EQ HT is a method we came up with to deal with multiple subs. If you only have one sub then it's not in use. The idea is to first measure each sub separately, then apply delay and level settings so that the two subs are now time and level aligned. Then we ping them once more as "one" sub to derive the room correction filter.

Aside from maybe not boosting frequencies below a certain point, I'm not sure how it would "EQ to the lesser sub" and provide a single set of filters based off the combined response.
post #61569 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

If one sub is significantly inferior to the other, then Audyssey will EQ to the lesser of the two subs. It has to do this because otherwise damage could occur to the lesser sub. For example, if one sub is capable of playing at 110dB at 20Hz (say) and the other is capable only of 90dB at 20Hz, clearly the latter sub would be in jeopardy if Audyssey attempted to bring it into line with the superior sub.

Are you sure about that? I haven't read that before. This is about all I've seen Chris post on the Audyssey site:
 

 

I don't think many people are sure about anything where Audyssey is concerned - they keep most of the way it works secret. Chris is the Master at answering questions on how Audyssey works without actually telling us much. ;)

post #61570 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

If one sub is significantly inferior to the other, then Audyssey will EQ to the lesser of the two subs. It has to do this because otherwise damage could occur to the lesser sub. For example, if one sub is capable of playing at 110dB at 20Hz (say) and the other is capable only of 90dB at 20Hz, clearly the latter sub would be in jeopardy if Audyssey attempted to bring it into line with the superior sub. One assumes that each sub's performance capability is determined when each sub is individually swept prior to the calibration run and this is how Audyssey 'knows' what each sub is capable of. 

Keith -- I don't think this is true at all. AFAIK no Audyssey system tests the "performance envelope" of the subwoofers. They do not push the subs to their limits to test max output, compression, distortion, etc.

Each sub is pinged individually to set distance/delay, and then they are combined to calculate the EQ filters. So the idea that Audyssey will EQ to the "lesser" sub has to do with that Jerry said above:

Quote:
"EQ to the level of the inferior sub" may not be exactly correct. Rather, if one sub has significantly different (i.e. inferior) performance, the combined performance of the two subs could be degraded.

I have never seen any evidence to indicate otherwise, so until we do I wouldn't go throwing out speculation as to Audyssey measuring the performance capabilities of the subs. I think it's nothing more complex than the fact that the *combined* performance could be held back by the weaker link if the two subs are unequal.
post #61571 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

If one sub is significantly inferior to the other, then Audyssey will EQ to the lesser of the two subs. It has to do this because otherwise damage could occur to the lesser sub. For example, if one sub is capable of playing at 110dB at 20Hz (say) and the other is capable only of 90dB at 20Hz, clearly the latter sub would be in jeopardy if Audyssey attempted to bring it into line with the superior sub. One assumes that each sub's performance capability is determined when each sub is individually swept prior to the calibration run and this is how Audyssey 'knows' what each sub is capable of. 

Keith -- I don't think this is true at all. AFAIK no Audyssey system tests the "performance envelope" of the subwoofers. They do not push the subs to their limits to test max output, compression, distortion, etc.

Each sub is pinged individually to set distance/delay, and then they are combined to calculate the EQ filters. So the idea that Audyssey will EQ to the "lesser" sub has to do with that Jerry said above:

Quote:
"EQ to the level of the inferior sub" may not be exactly correct. Rather, if one sub has significantly different (i.e. inferior) performance, the combined performance of the two subs could be degraded.

I have never seen any evidence to indicate otherwise, so until we do I wouldn't go throwing out speculation as to Audyssey measuring the performance capabilities of the subs. I think it's nothing more complex than the fact that the *combined* performance could be held back by the weaker link if the two subs are unequal.

 

You may well be correct BP. If so, then this bit of the FAQ (from f)2)) needs changing:"It is recommended to run identical subs or subs with very similar critical performance specifications because XT32 will EQ to the capabilities of the LEAST capable sub if the two subs are very different in performance."

 

It has been in there since time immemorial*, and nobody has ever challenged it ;) 

 

What do you think it ought to say instead?

 

* Time immemorial actually, in England, has a legal meaning: In 1275, by the first Statute of Westminster, the time of memory was limited to the reign of Richard I (Richard the Lionheart), beginning 6 July 1189, the date of the King's accession. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_immemorial). Not a lot of people know that :)

post #61572 of 70895
I think what Jerry said is perfectly eloquent and concise: "if one sub has significantly different (i.e. inferior) performance, the combined performance of the two subs could be degraded."

It's the same thing in principle, but it doesn't have the confusing implication that Audyssey actually measures and/or "knows" the performance capability of each sub individually.
post #61573 of 70895
Is it possible that Audyssey treats subwoofers like the other speakers and does not equalize below the f3 detected for the subwoofer channel? i.e. it doesn't equalize below the frequency where output falls off by 3dB?

This is would seem to be consistent with the statement that the output is determined by the subwoofer with the poorest performance, where performance is equated to its low frequency extension. i.e. when you get past the lowest frequency that the smaller subwoofer can generate, the combined sound level output by the two of them will be quite a bit lower.
post #61574 of 70895
It's not just possible, it's definitely the case. Audyssey's EQ filters taper off below the F3 (and actually for the sub ABOVE the upper limit as well).

Thus it's possible that when measuring the *combined* performance, the F3 may be limited by the weaker of the two subs.
post #61575 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

It's not just possible, it's definitely the case. Audyssey's EQ filters taper off below the F3 (and actually for the sub ABOVE the upper limit as well).

Thus it's possible that when measuring the *combined* performance, the F3 may be limited by the weaker of the two subs.

Moreover, IMHO, I dare to say this may even happen with two (or 3 or 4) identically same model subwoofers when placed in a "not-so-good" room (with openings, asymmetrical layout, no treatment, etc.) resulting in different -3dB points of each (due to room/boundary/corner gain) where Audyssey will surely pick the higher F3 as the starting point of roll-off. Probably the best (and only) remedy is to measure and move around each sub till best placement is found prior to "Audysey'ing" them together.

Jerry with 4 subs may want to comment here. smile.gif Jerry?
post #61576 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Moreover, IMHO, I dare to say this may even happen with two (or 3 or 4) identically same model subwoofers when placed in a "not-so-good" room (with openings, asymmetrical layout, no treatment, etc.) resulting in different -3dB points of each (due to room/boundary/corner gain) where Audyssey will surely pick the higher F3 as the starting point of roll-off. Probably the best (and only) remedy is to measure and move around each sub till best placement is found prior to "Audysey'ing" them together.

Jerry with 4 subs may want to comment here. smile.gif Jerry?

Audyssey has no way of knowing anything other than what it measures. For example, if you were to have two identical subs, but one of the subs were placed such that its performance was severely impacted by the room, then surely this could affect the overall result. It would be similar if one of the two subs had inferior performance characteristics. Audyssey would not be able to tell a difference between these two situations.

Nothing in my experience with four identical subs has provided any insight further than what has already been discussed.
post #61577 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Moreover, IMHO, I dare to say this may even happen with two (or 3 or 4) identically same model subwoofers when placed in a "not-so-good" room (with openings, asymmetrical layout, no treatment, etc.) resulting in different -3dB points of each (due to room/boundary/corner gain) where Audyssey will surely pick the higher F3 as the starting point of roll-off. Probably the best (and only) remedy is to measure and move around each sub till best placement is found prior to "Audysey'ing" them together.

Jerry with 4 subs may want to comment here. smile.gif Jerry?

I have 2 mismatched subs. Audyssey calibrated both at +5 separately and that was also the combined result. They both sound nice combined.
post #61578 of 70895
Beast with 8 subs here. I am running with 4 on one channel and 4 on another channel going into my DCX then to amplification. I haven't experimented with having them all on a single SW output but I will say that having them half and half between sw1 and sw2 yields excellent results and I can't complain at all. No big f3 issues but I wouldn't have any of those to begin with really. I am however DEAD flat (well if I wanted to be), in the entire subwoofer bandwidth.
post #61579 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

Beast with 8 subs here. I am running with 4 on one channel and 4 on another channel going into my DCX then to amplification. I haven't experimented with having them all on a single SW output but I will say that having them half and half between sw1 and sw2 yields excellent results and I can't complain at all. No big f3 issues but I wouldn't have any of those to begin with really. I am however DEAD flat (well if I wanted to be), in the entire subwoofer bandwidth.

Did you do any measurements? I mean, each of the 8 subs individually to see how their -3 dB points come out prior to EQ'ing? Would be interesting to see how close (or how far) the F3 points of 8 subs are! cool.gif
post #61580 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Audyssey has no way of knowing anything other than what it measures. For example, if you were to have two identical subs, but one of the subs were placed such that its performance was severely impacted by the room, then surely this could affect the overall result. It would be similar if one of the two subs had inferior performance characteristics. Audyssey would not be able to tell a difference between these two situations.

Agree with you Jerry. Meatime I think it's not Audyssey that needs to tell a difference, but it's the enduser who already decided to have a multiple subwoofer setup, do the careful placement of each sub, measure the F3 points, relocate subs, repeat measurement, and when F3s areclose enough then start the Audyssey EQing. Right? Without measurements the worst case can be that the multiple subs' F3 points are all over the map, eh? wink.gif
post #61581 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Is it possible that Audyssey treats subwoofers like the other speakers and does not equalize below the f3 detected for the subwoofer channel? i.e. it doesn't equalize below the frequency where output falls off by 3dB?

This is would seem to be consistent with the statement that the output is determined by the subwoofer with the poorest performance, where performance is equated to its low frequency extension. i.e. when you get past the lowest frequency that the smaller subwoofer can generate, the combined sound level output by the two of them will be quite a bit lower.

Based on what I've seen Chris post on the Audyssey site, I don't think that's what's happening. I think it's much more simple. SubEq HT sets distance and trim for both subs individually and nothing more. Then XT32 measures the combined response and applies a single set of filters to both subs. Period.

Based on what you're proposing, if you have one sub that can play down to 10hz and another that can only hit 30hz, Audyssey would only EQ the subs to 30hz. That wouldn't make sense. I think Audyssey sets filters all the way down to 10hz which will be applied to both subs. The <30hz filters will have little/no impact on the inferior sub but will improve the response of the better sub and improve the combined response (what you actually hear when listening to movies/music - this is what Audyssey's objective is). The only reason I can see that it might make sense to do what you've suggested is to avoiding boosting frequencies in the inferior sub that it can't produce; but I've not seen anything official from Audyssey suggesting that's the case so assume it isn't.
post #61582 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post



Based on what you're proposing, if you have one sub that can play down to 10hz and another that can only hit 30hz, Audyssey would only EQ the subs to 30hz.

Not Selden, but here's my take. So, Audyssey EQs down to 10 Hz or down to the F3 point, which ever comes first. In other words, if the F3 is higher than 10 Hz Audyssey stops. If F3 is lower then Audyssey (by all means) stops at 10 Hz.
Quote:
I think Audyssey sets filters all the way down to 10hz which will be applied to both subs.

See above.

Quote:
The <30hz filters will have little/no impact on the inferior sub but will improve the response of the better sub and improve the combined response (what you actually hear when listening to movies/music - this is what Audyssey's objective is).

The actual F3 point of those two subs you mention will be somewhere between 10 Hz and 30 Hz, hard to predict the exact frequency though. While the "inferior" sub will start to roll-off from 30 Hz the other sub will still perform by itself, although at a lower overall output level.
Quote:
The only reason I can see that it might make sense to do what you've suggested is to avoiding boosting frequencies in the inferior sub that it can't produce; but I've not seen anything official from Audyssey suggesting that's the case so assume it isn't.

I don't see any reason for a boost when the output is gradually decreasing and reaching the F3 point somewhere between 10 and 30 Hz causing Audyssey to stop further EQ'ing, as mentioned above.
post #61583 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Not Selden, but here's my take. So, Audyssey EQs down to 10 Hz or down to the F3 point, which ever comes first. In other words, if the F3 is higher than 10 Hz Audyssey stops. If F3 is lower then Audyssey (by all means) stops at 10 Hz.


The actual F3 point of those two subs you mention will be somewhere between 10 Hz and 30 Hz, hard to predict the exact frequency though. While the "inferior" sub will start to roll-off from 30 Hz the other sub will still perform by itself, although at a lower overall output level.
I don't see any reason for a boost when the output is gradually decreasing and reaching the F3 point somewhere between 10 and 30 Hz causing Audyssey to stop further EQ'ing, as mentioned above.

I agree with all of that. Which means there's no reason Audyssey would take separate f3 readings and adjust the filters based on them. In other words, it does not "EQ to the level of the inferior sub."
post #61584 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

I agree with all of that. Which means there's no reason Audyssey would take separate f3 readings and adjust the filters based on them. In other words, it does not "EQ to the level of the inferior sub."

Nope. When it comes to EQ'ing Audyssey actually does not know how many subs there are in the room. It measures the combined SPL of the subs carefully placed in the room by the HT enthusiast! And finally sets up one single filter for the subchannel. smile.gif
post #61585 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

I think what Jerry said is perfectly eloquent and concise: "if one sub has significantly different (i.e. inferior) performance, the combined performance of the two subs could be degraded."

It's the same thing in principle, but it doesn't have the confusing implication that Audyssey actually measures and/or "knows" the performance capability of each sub individually.

This sounds right.

My personal experience with the 50 square meter (floor area) home theater system of a friend: He had 3 subs - 2 x SVS PB-13 Ultra and a Velodyne CHT-15. The SVS subs go down to 15 Hz while the Velo goes down to 23 Hz.

He was running an SVS AS-EQ1, rigged as outputting to 2 subs. To one sub out, he put the single Velo and to the other sub out, he attached the 2 SVS subs, Y-connected. The setup was pretty strange and the result was incredibly bad. No serious low frequency output whatsoever.

We removed the Velo and ran the 2 SVS subs as a single sub and the difference, obviously, was like night and day. The whole room started to shake with serious low frequency output.

I guess you may conclude that MultEQ limited the output of the 2 SVS subs and matched them to the Velo.

Mark
post #61586 of 70895
Agreed, Feri. The key to optimizing more than one sub is to measure their simultaneous firing and exciting of room modes (IOW their combined output) in various spots-ie a measured sub haul. You may have as your objective the lowest F3, or as I do, smoothest overall bass response. Measuring individual F3s in various spots may not be useful or predictive of the combined response so one is well-advised to measure firing simultaneously. That, after all, is what Audyssey hears when pinging for EQ.*


*AFAIK there are very few exceptions to this. One is the option to measure and EQ multiple subs individually with the Denon AVP-A1.
post #61587 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post


Did you do any measurements? I mean, each of the 8 subs individually to see how their -3 dB points come out prior to EQ'ing? Would be interesting to see how close (or how far) the F3 points of 8 subs are! cool.gif

 

Feri,

 

What would the F3 for my subs be?

 

 

post #61588 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Prosoft7 View Post


Thanks Kal! Appreciate your opinion...
I was unsure because, even though I found the DSP info of Integra (FTC three 32-bit processing chips), there is no indication of Audyssey SE spec in this regard. So, I was thinking may be due to dedicated status of SE, it will be able to do a better job, since Integra is performing more than one jobs using it's powerful dsp.
BTW, can Audyssey SE be used with Arcam AV888 or Meridian G68adv et el? Just curious ...
Thanks again!

 

You can use it with any prepro but why not use a prepro with a better one built in? That way you do not encumber those additional A/D/A conversions.  I have an SE gathering dust.

post #61589 of 70895
Hey, Guys. Been a while since my last post. I'm looking for Audyssey suggestions for the system below. Audyssey is setting the center channel about 6dB hot. I'm taking all the measurements at ear level from assorted possitions on the 4 seat couch that's dead center. It sounds pretty good after I manually set the levels, but I think the line arrays are "confusing" Audyssey. The processor is an AV8801 with XT32. Any comments or suggestions would be great.

.
post #61590 of 70895
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Feri,

What would the F3 for my subs be?






Jerry, to me on these graphs it seems your subs' F3 are below 15 Hz.smile.gif
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