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"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 2075

post #62221 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by caloyzki View Post

I did this. Follow everything. Because of my mismatched subs. Move the first sub knob til I get 72db then turn off did the same thing to the other sub til get 72db.connect both subs using y adapter Run the avr test tone both subs read 71-72 db. run the first measurement check the trim and how come the sub trim is -11.0db???

Well I guess at this point we need to identify what exactly you are using to measure. I was using a basic radio shack spl meter in which I had to set at 65db in. Order to achieve a -1.5 db after running Audyssey. I recently learned its inaccurate at lower frequency levels. If you have nothing else I would say run one single round of chirps then calculate and see where you level on your sub is. Too much? Lower the gain knob and run again just once to see where it's at. From what I read the Audyssey mic is accurate within 2db so this would work.
post #62222 of 70896
Btw what mismatched subs are we talking about?
post #62223 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

Ok I asked this with owners of the Anthem DV2

ARC or AUDYSSEY Multi EQ 32 which is best

Hi wse,
Bob P gave a pretty short reply in the D2v thread (not surprisingly, as very few people have the opportunity to compare both systems)
My take is as follows:-
The filter/correction resolution of ARC (in the D2v) and MultiEQ XT32 would appear to be similar (based on pre-amp output measurements taken by various posters - more for Audyssey than ARC).
ARC performs a simple spatial average of the measurement positions, there has never been mention of 'fuzzy logic' by Anthem in relation to ARC.
ARC attempts to correct the measured room frequency response - again there is no mention of time domain (reflections) by Anthem.
Due to the use of an externally connected PC for running the ARC application the user is able to see the measured responses of all connected speakers (smoothed to approx. 1/6 octave) from 20Hz to 20kHz, and also observe the calculated 'after correction' response.
The user can manually alter the cutoff/crossover frequency of each speaker pair, plus centre and subwoofer, many 'ARC experts' advise against this saying that ARC knows best - I'm no expert but it's only software and on my system I fiddle with all the settings to get the best 'calculated' response before uploading.
ARC calculates its filters once all the crossover - room gain - filter range parameters have been set - so its processing resources are used most efficiently.
By default ARC stops applying correction at 5kHz, but D2v users can change this limit up to 20kHz.
ARC attempts to preserve measured 'room gain' below approx. 100Hz - the level of gain is capped at 4dB, but this can be increased by the user.
ARC only supports a single subwoofer channel.
Speaker positions/delays must be entered manually.

Audyssey runs as a 'turn-key' solution in most AVRs - unless you've got the Pro add-on. ARC is more manual in its approach (there is an AUTO mode - but most posters run in manual).

My MRX model uses the same PC application as the D2v, but it's processing is about half as powerful, consequently the correction filters are not as fine - definitely lower resolution than those published by posters within this thread.

Sorry that the above does not attempt to say which is best, but that would depend on so many other factors. I sometimes think I should have stayed with Audyssey, especially when the Onkyo 818 came out with XT32, but in the end I prefer the way ARC works, and at least on my modest system - sounds.

Regards, Mike.
post #62224 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Well I guess at this point we need to identify what exactly you are using to measure. I was using a basic radio shack spl meter in which I had to set at 65db in. Order to achieve a -1.5 db after running Audyssey. I recently learned its inaccurate at lower frequency levels. If you have nothing else I would say run one single round of chirps then calculate and see where you level on your sub is. Too much? Lower the gain knob and run again just once to see where it's at. From what I read the Audyssey mic is accurate within 2db so this would work.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Btw what mismatched subs are we talking about?
Yes I just bought radioshack spl. What do you mean adjust 65db? Where and how am I gonna adjust it? And my mismatched subs are dayton 1200 and klipsch rw 12d.
post #62225 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by caloyzki View Post


Yes I just bought radioshack spl. What do you mean adjust 65db? Where and how am I gonna adjust it? And my mismatched subs are dayton 1200 and klipsch rw 12d.

I imagine he means he had to adjust the gain on his subs so that the test signal produced a 65db reading on his spl meter. The radioshack spl meter is not accurate in lower frequencies so when you adjusted to 72db on it, you were actually calibrating them louder than they should be. Audyssey is more accurate in setting levels for those frequencies. If you want the sub trim to be closer to 0 after running Audyssey then lower the gain on each sub first; 65db on the radioshack spl meter will probably work for you too. That said, -11 is within the trim limits of Audyssey (which are either +/-12 or +/-15 on the AVRs I've owned) so there's really no need to adjust anything; as long as you aren't at that limit, you're fine.
post #62226 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

I imagine he means he had to adjust the gain on his subs so that the test signal produced a 65db reading on his spl meter. The radioshack spl meter is not accurate in lower frequencies so when you adjusted to 72db on it, you were actually calibrating them louder than they should be. Audyssey is more accurate in setting levels for those frequencies. If you want the sub trim to be closer to 0 after running Audyssey then lower the gain on each sub first; 65db on the radioshack spl meter will probably work for you too. That said, -11 is within the trim limits of Audyssey (which are either +/-12 or +/-15 on the AVRs I've owned) so there's really no need to adjust anything; as long as you aren't at that limit, you're fine.

yup that's what i did. sit on MLP with the SPL meter and adjust the 1st sub knob to get until i get 72DB from my listening position, same thing i did with my 2nd sub adjust the knob til i get 72db from my MLP. but i dont like the -11db result after the first measurement that is why i didnt finish the whole measurement. what i did is i didnt use my SPL meter, connect the 1st sub and run aud. 1st measurement it gives -0.5db and connect the 2nd sub run the aud first measurement and it also gives me -0.5 db. and now both of them are on the same leveL volume and run the full aud. measurement and aud give -0.4db for the sub. and check both subs on my MLP using the SPL meter both of them give me 62-65db. i think im good now.
post #62227 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

I imagine he means he had to adjust the gain on his subs so that the test signal produced a 65db reading on his spl meter. The radioshack spl meter is not accurate in lower frequencies so when you adjusted to 72db on it, you were actually calibrating them louder than they should be. Audyssey is more accurate in setting levels for those frequencies. If you want the sub trim to be closer to 0 after running Audyssey then lower the gain on each sub first; 65db on the radioshack spl meter will probably work for you too. That said, -11 is within the trim limits of Audyssey (which are either +/-12 or +/-15 on the AVRs I've owned) so there's really no need to adjust anything; as long as you aren't at that limit, you're fine.

Exactly. About 65 db on my radio shack is actually 75db.

Apparently the audyssey mic is accurate to +-2 db. So you can always set everything up, run one round of chirps (even turn off extra speakers) then calculate. This will give a better idea
post #62228 of 70896
Quote:
Oiginaly Posted by mogorf View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Myndaddy used to say that when one gets something for nothing, they invariably get what they paid for wink.gif  Anyone even a little bit serious about this hobby should invest a few dollars, IMO, in a proper SPL meter. It will last forever and be useful in numerous ways.

I can never understand the reluctance to spend relatively tiny sums of money in order to get the best out of an expenditure of relatively huge sums of money. It's the same with mic stands - people go to the most ludicrous lengths to kludge up some form of Heath-Robinson/Rube Goldberg contraption rather than spend just $20 on a proper stand. Never ceases to amaze me.

Keith,

With all due respect and a million more to your granddaddy, nonetheless I’d like to raise an issue in general that may catch the attention of both long time members as well as new posters here when it comes to discussing issues some may have during auto-setup and chime in here for advice on what to do.

Without a lengthy speech, I’d like to point out that most of Audyssey users buy their gear with the expectation that once the procedures in the User’s Manual are followed they will get a room EQ system that works as advertised. We all know by now that there are a lot of further considerations to be taken into account, FAQ’s, speaker setup “best practices”, crossovers, WAF, etc., just to name a few.

On the other hand, I do believe majority of the questions can be answered by friendly and knowledgeable members here to the satisfaction of the inquirers within a short period.

What my point is that telling people to invest into “gizmos and gadgets” (regardless of its price) that will last forever may make some members frustrated, surely more than they were before posting here. The “gizmos and gadgets” may be worth a million for you, but will be absolutely alien to others. Most probably they won’t understand why it is recommended when they bought a system that is supposed to do everything automatically.

Should measurements be the only solution for an inquirer it might be better to direct them to a measurement thread provided they are interested and ready for the steep learning curve of such it order to gather worthy details of their room-speaker-Audyssey interaction. Over at those threads you will need to quote granddaddy no more! smile.gif

 

Feri,  it was YOU who suggested to the member that he use a SPL meter,  but you suggested a free software meter that is in all likelihood useless for his purpose. I simply suggested using one that many,  many members use daily. By all means feel free to follow in the footsteps of Rupe G yourself,  but please do not have a go at me for suggesting a solution that might actually be of some use. 

post #62229 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Feri,  it was YOU who suggested to the member that he use a SPL meter,  but you suggested a free software meter that is in all likelihood useless for his purpose. I simply suggested using one that many,  many members use daily. By all means feel free to follow in the footsteps of Rupe G yourself,  but please do not have a go at me for suggesting a solution that might actually be of some use. 

Not to wade into the latest Feri/Keith dogfight, but I think you're both correct - to a point. Which may mean both of you think I'm wrong rolleyes.gif.

Feri's correct that the typical user of Audyssey is interesting in "set and forget", and software that works in improving their HT room vs. not having electronic-based room correction. If they're on AVS, they come to this thread to read the FAQ and ask specific technical questions about how Audyssey is working in their system. They're generally not interested in the fine details of the distance tweak, whether Audyssey is optimizing individual speakers or pairs of speakers together in combination of the subwoofer, or to address specific shortcomings of Audyssey that more advanced users have concerned themselves with outside the frequency domain. Of course, they should be... tongue.gif. I'd even argue a large number of them haven't invested in room treatments. eek.gif

In that narrow context, I think we can agree that Audyssey (especially XT32) typically does a better job, particularly in the subwoofer region, if properly used, than any other room correction software available to those of us that aren't regular participants of the $20K+ thread with regard to the frequency domain. Notice I say "typical"; there are cases where particular HT setups may work better that focus on other corrections than in just the frequency domain and method of delay setting..

I also think that we've had WAY too much bleedover of discussion on the threads that some of the more "enthusiastic" among us frequent. At times I don't know if I'm here, the REW thread, or the Denon 4311/4520 thread because the comments and particpants can be so interchangeable. Let's try to stay more focused, guys?

Having said that, IMO Keith's absolutely correct that to use Audyssey to best advantage, investing in relatively cheap SPL and mic stand is mandatory to have a stable and reference-level calibration (which you change later by adjusting the volume/trim of your channels and/or distance settings of subs). I don't see the point of running Audyssey if you can't start with a verified common level or gain volume for the joint impact of all subs, and minimize the impact of vibrations. If you're going to spend in the four figures typically for an AVR, spending another hundred dollars or so should be trivial. IMO it's no more strange than the advice to not run speakers as Large, or to why "double bass" is a poor substitute for sub placement and the number of subs in a HT. And even picking up OmniMic or REW to compare Audyssey calibration alterantives isn't overly expensive these days.

The fact of it is that for what Audyssey was "designed" for, which was effective room correction aimed at the mass market, it does the job of capturing the intent of the mixer, and speaker/room interaction, better than other such alternatives like MCACC, YPAO, and ARC. But it's not the end-all solution to determining flat response in a room that jointly optimizes all channels simultaneously at high resolution, and marketing hype aside, it's NOT a substitute for learning acoustics - something I need to invest more time in personally to keep up with the Joneses - or for understanding the areas of frequency-specific delay setting and impulse response that it doesn't address. Or maybe I'm just lusting after Trinnov solution that doesn't involve a compromised AVR (a TEQ-8) or a Datasat RS20 LOL....
post #62230 of 70896

Still no receivers with DSX2 from Audyssey, I am sure Onkyo will have them at CEDIA

post #62231 of 70896
One of those FREE SPL Meters has a free Flashlight utility, called Pocket Knife
post #62232 of 70896
Stop the presses! biggrin.gif
post #62233 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

Stop the presses! biggrin.gif

Only reason I have the iPhone is for the Denon Remote ap; @ least something on the SPL Meter ap works correctly.


Found out yesterday the iPhone even can be used to make phone calls! rolleyes
post #62234 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View PostDespite the reception, I'm still curious about the tech. With the original DSX, stereo sources had to be converted to multi-channel first (using PLII or Neo), at the very least to extract centre content out of the L/R channels so that DSX doesn't spread it wide and high.

But if DSX 2 is going to do all the converting itself, then it is going to have to provide surround and centre outputs, and it can't do the latter by adding early reflections (as original DSX did). Now that Audyssey has lifted that limitation, it will be interesting to see how they derive the 11 channels from 2-channel material.

OK, back to walking the floors at the Las Vegas Convention Centre.

Which receiver has DSX2?

post #62235 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Feri,  it was YOU who suggested to the member that he use a SPL meter,  but you suggested a free software meter that is in all likelihood useless for his purpose. I simply suggested using one that many,  many members use daily. By all means feel free to follow in the footsteps of Rupe G yourself,  but please do not have a go at me for suggesting a solution that might actually be of some use. 

From the perspective of one who has both an iPad SPL application (AudioTools), and a legacy RS SPL, I can say that the former falls woefully short when it comes to absolute level measurements. The AVR speaker level test tones measure pretty close to 75dB on the RS SPL, while AudioTools (using the iPad internal mic) measures only 65dB. The RS SPL shows flat levels across the speakers (except the subs), while the AudioTools app shows a 2-3dB variance across speakers. This suggests that the iPad mic might be more directional.

Regardless, count me in the group that believes a small investment in an SPL is a must for even the casual audiophile.
post #62236 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Feri,  it was YOU who suggested to the member that he use a SPL meter,  but you suggested a free software meter that is in all likelihood useless for his purpose. I simply suggested using one that many,  many members use daily. By all means feel free to follow in the footsteps of Rupe G yourself,  but please do not have a go at me for suggesting a solution that might actually be of some use. 

From the perspective of one who has both an iPad SPL application (AudioTools), and a legacy RS SPL, I can say that the former falls woefully short when it comes to absolute level measurements. The AVR speaker level test tones measure pretty close to 75dB on the RS SPL, while AudioTools (using the iPad internal mic) measures only 65dB. The RS SPL shows flat levels across the speakers (except the subs), while the AudioTools app shows a 2-3dB variance across speakers. This suggests that the iPad mic might be more directional.

Regardless, count me in the group that believes a small investment in an SPL is a must for even the casual audiophile.

Agree entirely,  Jerry. I have tried several software SPL meters - both Apple and Android and they are all useless. I believe it is the mic in the device that is the problem. I am amazed that someone would spend thousands of dollars on HT gear but baulk at spending a tiny fraction of that on a device that will help them get the best out of their setup. It is the same thing with boom mic stands that cost 20 bucks. If people wish to to use old broomsticks and bath towels to support their Audyssey mic rather than spend 20 bucks so be it,  but count me out of that group! 

 

For anyone to suggest that members will find it too difficult to use an SPL meter is not only bizarre but it is IMO also insulting,  especially as there is no shortage here of willing volunteers who will guide them through every step. AVS is all about getting the very best results and to that end buying and learning to use a SPL meter is a very easy and valuable first step. 

 

As to Audyssey being a totally automated system,  well,  62,000+ posts in the longest AVS thread in history tends to cast some doubt on that IMO ;) 


Edited by kbarnes701 - 5/22/13 at 1:36am
post #62237 of 70896
I have a question about DSX which I hope you can help me with. If I were to try DSX in my theater, am I then forced to enable the Audyssey room correction or does DSX work independently of the room correction?
post #62238 of 70896
Independent technologies so Audyssey MultEQ not required.
post #62239 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Agree entirely,  Jerry. I have tried several software SPL meters - both Apple and Android and they are all useless. I believe it is the mic in the device that is the problem. I am amazed that someone would spend thousands of dollars on HT gear but baulk at spending a tiny fraction of that on a device that will help them get the best out of their setup. It is the same thing with boom mic stands that cost 20 bucks. If people wish to to use old broomsticks and bath towels to support their Audyssey mic rather than spend 20 bucks so be it,  but count me out of that group! 

For anyone to suggest that members will find it too difficult to use an SPL meter is not only bizarre but it is IMO also insulting,  especially as there is no shortage here of willing volunteers who will guide them through every step. AVS is all about getting the very best results and to that end buying and learning to use a SPL meter is a very easy and valuable first step. 

As to Audyssey being a totally automated system,  well,  62,000+ posts in the longest AVS thread in history tends to cast some doubt on that IMO wink.gif 

Very well said sir. I can't agree more. I honestly have three measurement rigs now and I still on occassion fire them all up to make sure the results are all on-par with one another, or pretty close for that matter. But just to reiterate, I have found so many things that I otherwise wouldn't have without a simple measurement rig. I am not one to just "assume" that a simple blip test will optimize my system to its fullest. That is silly talk. I have managed to take the IMPROVED results that Audyssey [typically] gets me and improve on them even more by measuring and figuring out what needs changing. 5dB differences in areas of the bandwidth may not make much a difference to a lot of people, but it certainly does to me biggrin.gif
post #62240 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Murphy View Post

Having the speakers the same distance from adjacent walls is typically not a good practice. Most speaker companies recommend against it.

http://www.gcaudio.com/resources/howtos/speakerplacement.html

http://www.polkaudio.com/polk-university/articles/optimizing-the-sound-of-your-room

http://www.rivesaudio.com/files/spkr_plcmt.pdf

I stumbled on the 'golden ratio' (1 X 1.6) a while back and have set my front speakers using it and have been very happy with the results.

http://stereos.about.com/od/introductiontostereos/ht/sprkplace.htm

A more in depth article but not as practical, for home theater setups, from George Cardas;

http://www.cardas.com/room_setup_rectangular_room.php

Patrick,

The mains in my room are 2 feet from the back walls and 3 feet from the side walls.
post #62241 of 70896
In other news.....I just ordered The UMIK-1 Mic and a Galaxy Cm-140 from Cross spectrum Labs to get a better understanding of what's going on in the room. I've been old schooling it with the rat shack meter & warble tones for too long. This should be fun.....can't wait. Luke
post #62242 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Your description of the foam suggests that the doorway is at the front of the left sidewall, near the left front speaker. That foam and/or having the doorway open during the calibration are likely causes of the difference in the speaker's calibration.

Selden & Keith,

Correct....the doorway is in the front left side wall. I always keep the door closed and only calibrate at night when the noise is the lowest and everyone's asleep.

Ceiling is not slope.

Room is 12' x 11' x 9'

Room is 100% drywall....other than the closet door and entry door which is a solid wooden door (that's probably not good huh?).

I would consider the back wall to be more dense then all the others because the other side of it (which is outside the house) is brick.

One large window 2' x 8' with plantation shutters on the right side wall. I always keep the shutters closed and have a sound panel on it.

I have 10 - 2' x 4' x 1" OC703 sound panel symmetrically placed through out the room ( front wall, back wall and first reflections).

Oh and two bass traps in the rear corners of the room....and that piece of foam in the left front corner.

Room is carpeted through out.

I'm usually laying down on the ground or sitting on the ground next to the chair when I run Audyssey ( never between the mic and speakers).

Never thought about removing the foam. Maybe I'll give it a try...because the definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over, but expecting different results right?
Don't get me wrong, the sound in my room right now is phenomenal. It's only the stereo image that's off centered a tad.

Thanks Luke
Edited by luketo - 5/22/13 at 11:05am
post #62243 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

I can hear even the slightest difference in adjusting the distance image. Even one step sometimes makes a difference to me.


I notice it most with a track on my test cd where the guy is walking around the stage beating a frying pan with a drum stick, and as he moves around the stage he tells you where you should be hearing the sound and this is one way I discovered it to be off center.

lol....maybe we have golden ears and just don't know it yet!
Edited by luketo - 5/22/13 at 10:54am
post #62244 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post

I notice is most with a track on my test cd where the guy is walking around the stage beating a frying pan with a drum stick and as he moves around the stage he tells you where you should be hearing the sound and this is one way I discovered it to be off center.

lol....maybe we have golden ears and just don't know it yet!

Which test cd is this Luke? Can you repeat the same test with the same cd and a headphone plugged into your AVR? It the guy still off-center?

You still didn't send the distance and level trims set by Audyssey for each of your speakers!
post #62245 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Which test cd is this Luke? Can you repeat the same test with the same cd and a headphone plugged into your AVR? It the guy still off-center?

You still didn't send the distance and level trims set by Audyssey for each of your speakers!

Feri,

I must have missed the post asking to send settings.

Distance in Feet set by Audyssey:

FL - 6.6...............Which I bumped up one to 6.8
Center - 7.0
FR - 7.0..............Which I bumped down one to 6.8
SR - 5.6
SL - 5.6
SW - 1.4

I don't know the trim numbers of the top of my head, however I did measured with the RS meter and they were pretty spot on...I didn't feel the need to change them.

The test cd I was using is from Stereophile. I can't remember if it's test disc 2 or 3. They send so many over the years. I'll have to get back to on that when I get home.

The headphones seems to be a good idea. I'll give it a try. Thanks Luke.
post #62246 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post

Feri,

I must have missed the post asking to send settings.

Distance in Feet set by Audyssey:

FL - 6.6...............Which I bumped up one to 6.8
Center - 7.0
FR - 7.0..............Which I bumped down one to 6.8
SR - 5.6
SL - 5.6
SW - 1.4

I don't know the trim numbers of the top of my head, however I did measured with the RS meter and they were pretty spot on...I didn't feel the need to change them.

The test cd I was using is from Stereophile. I can't remember if it's test disc 2 or 3. They send so many over the years. I'll have to get back to on that when I get home.

The headphones seems to be a good idea. I'll give it a try. Thanks Luke.

Thanks Luke,

Distance in feet seem more or less OK. I'm a bit worried about the SW at 1.4 feet! Is that really the correct value? I remember from your photo that the sub is near to the FR speaker. But sub distance less than the physical is another issue.

Back to channel level setting, it would be interesting to see how Audyssey adjusted the FL and FR. In case despite the 4 inch difference in distance there is a sizable difference between the two mains level trims (that is the FR is more that 3 dBs higher compared to the FL) that may suggest a blown driver in your Right tower speaker. You may also go up close and listen to each driver careully. A broken driver could explain why your phantom center in stereo mode drifts to the left, while it remains (relatively) unnoticed with 5.1 HT soundtracks.

Report back please.
post #62247 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Thanks Luke,

Distance in feet seem more or less OK. I'm a bit worried about the SW at 1.4 feet! Is that really the correct value? I remember from your photo that the sub is near to the FR speaker. But sub distance less than the physical is another issue.

Back to channel level setting, it would be interesting to see how Audyssey adjusted the FL and FR. In case despite the 4 inch difference in distance there is a sizable difference between the two mains level trims (that is the FR is more that 3 dBs higher compared to the FL) that may suggest a blown driver in your Right tower speaker. You may also go up close and listen to each driver careully. A broken driver could explain why your phantom center in stereo mode drifts to the left, while it remains (relatively) unnoticed with 5.1 HT soundtracks.

Report back please.

Feri,

Ok now you're scaring me! I have checked each speaker a few months ago by putting my ear up really close to them and all were fine. But I'm gonna check again tonight. I never listen at reference levels anyway.....most of the time I watch movies at -14db's and music at -9db's.

As for the SW......I'm running a 5.3 system ( 3 SVS SB13 Ultra's). I trust the sub distance as of right now.....but will confirm that when I get the CSL UMIK-1 Mic in on Monday.
post #62248 of 70896
How come after running Audyssey I get 75db at mlp and more spl at the other locations?
post #62249 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

How come after running Audyssey I get 75db at mlp and more spl at the other locations?

Two obvious possibilities come to mind. One is that if you move closer to the speakers you would expect the sound to get louder!  The other is the influence of the room. Audyssey is designed to give 75dB at the MLP not all over the room! 

post #62250 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Two obvious possibilities come to mind. One is that if you move closer to the speakers you would expect the sound to get louder!  The other is the influence of the room. Audyssey is designed to give 75dB at the MLP not all over the room! 

Then that would mean the others would get a better seat since spl is higher?
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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)