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post #62251 of 70896
Louder does not equal better. "Better" in the context of Audyssey means "closer to the intent of the audio mixer". i.e. 75dB.

The primary listening position usually is the farthest from all of the speakers because it's usually equidistant from them all. Other positions will be closer to one or another of the speakers. As a result, the sound level from that nearby speaker will be higher than what is heard from that speaker at the primary location.
post #62252 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post

Feri,

Ok now you're scaring me! I have checked each speaker a few months ago by putting my ear up really close to them and all were fine. But I'm gonna check again tonight. I never listen at reference levels anyway.....most of the time I watch movies at -14db's and music at -9db's.

As for the SW......I'm running a 5.3 system ( 3 SVS SB13 Ultra's). I trust the sub distance as of right now.....but will confirm that when I get the CSL UMIK-1 Mic in on Monday.


I dont feel like there is any need to be scared. Feri's gross assumption that you may have a blown speaker is not only unfounded, it is uncalled for without ANY basis behind it. You haven't even given us the trim levels to even see what else might be going on.

The sub distance with three subs I wouldn't worry about too much either until we sort out the main speaker situation.

What is interesting me most is, what is behind your MLP? Anything not exactly symmetrical back there? Do you have any rear wall treatments?
post #62253 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

I dont feel like there is any need to be scared. Feri's gross assumption that you may have a blown speaker is not only unfounded, it is uncalled for without ANY basis behind it. You haven't even given us the trim levels to even see what else might be going on.

The sub distance with three subs I wouldn't worry about too much either until we sort out the main speaker situation.

What is interesting me most is, what is behind your MLP? Anything not exactly symmetrical back there? Do you have any rear wall treatments?

yeah I checked it again last night and all speakers are good.

Everything in the room is pretty much symmetrical except the sound panels on the back wall and the piece of foam I have in the left front corner (which I will remove before running Audyssey again). The 2 sound panels behind the MLP is off centered by a foot closer to the right wall because of the closet door. Should the panels behind the MLP be symmetrically centered?
post #62254 of 70896
It doesn't take much in room differences to cause Audyssey to throw back some different results (closet doors and slightly off acoustic panels). And no one's ears are dead perfect for that matter. It may have even been Audyssey picking up some other noise in the adjacent room while doing a sweep, or even highway noise a mile away. Way too many variables to be stressing over when the simple fix is to just adjust those distances down right and call it a day.
post #62255 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

It doesn't take much in room differences to cause Audyssey to throw back some different results (closet doors and slightly off acoustic panels). And no one's ears are dead perfect for that matter. It may have even been Audyssey picking up some other noise in the adjacent room while doing a sweep, or even highway noise a mile away. Way too many variables to be stressing over when the simple fix is to just adjust those distances down right and call it a day.


Yeah your right! And that's what I did. It sounds good to me so we are done with it!!! lol thanks beastaudio.
post #62256 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post


yeah I checked it again last night and all speakers are good.

Everything in the room is pretty much symmetrical except the sound panels on the back wall and the piece of foam I have in the left front corner (which I will remove before running Audyssey again). The 2 sound panels behind the MLP is off centered by a foot closer to the right wall because of the closet door. Should the panels behind the MLP be symmetrically centered?

 

IMO, it's not that the panels need to be centered.  They need to be placed such that they cover the reflection points from the left and right front speakers, whether that is centered or not.  And, if you have a gap between the panels, i.e. they aren't mounted flush on the sides, you could have a reflection coming from the gap between the panels that originates from one of the front speakers, but not the other.  Reflections can come from the smallest of surfaces, and can affect the soundstage.

post #62257 of 70896
is there anyone wants to buy from radioshack? i have $10 coupon, i am not gonna use it. let me know. if you buy SPL meter from radio schack $40 investment is not bad.
post #62258 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

It doesn't take much in room differences to cause Audyssey to throw back some different results (closet doors and slightly off acoustic panels). And no one's ears are dead perfect for that matter. It may have even been Audyssey picking up some other noise in the adjacent room while doing a sweep, or even highway noise a mile away. Way too many variables to be stressing over when the simple fix is to just adjust those distances down right and call it a day.


Yeah your right! And that's what I did. It sounds good to me so we are done with it!!! lol thanks beastaudio.

 

Sorry if this has already been stated, but if you didn't have measuring equipment (or Audyssey for that matter) before you placed these sound panels, I would think the first thing you would want to do is establish a baseline room measurement and then subsequent measurements to compare the effect of each change?  As beastaudio points out, any small change in the room can affect the Audyssey calibration.  Also, as Jerry notes, placing your acoustic panels in the "correct" locations may not imply symmetry depending on the layout/construction of your room.  Understanding the base characteristics of your room and then placing the panels in such a way to have the most meaningful impact on your sound quality and finally doing an Audyssey calibration is probably the order you want follow.  YMMV

post #62259 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

IMO, it's not that the panels need to be centered.  They need to be placed such that they cover the reflection points from the left and right front speakers, whether that is centered or not.  And, if you have a gap between the panels, i.e. they aren't mounted flush on the sides, you could have a reflection coming from the gap between the panels that originates from one of the front speakers, but not the other.  Reflections can come from the smallest of surfaces, and can affect the soundstage.

Thanks Jerry,

Good thing all my panels are flush mounted. I used the mirror trick to find first reflection for both sided....as for the back wall I try to center it directly behind the MLP. Can't wait to get my mic from CSL to really see what we can't see. I been over at the REW thread and also read up on your write-up. Good job. Nice Work. Looking forward to reading more from that thread. Luke
post #62260 of 70896
So my first try with audyssey did not go so well. I installed a Marantz AV7005 into my system today, replacing a Rotel RSP-1066. So I'm seeing and hearing DirecTV through HDMI, and I can see and hear Blu-Ray movies from my Oppo through HDMI. But when I ran Audyssey, I continuously received the error message that my speaker couldn't be detected when the auto setup began. Suggestions appreciated. Thanks in advance.
post #62261 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maccur View Post

So my first try with audyssey did not go so well. I installed a Marantz AV7005 into my system today, replacing a Rotel RSP-1066. So I'm seeing and hearing DirecTV through HDMI, and I can see and hear Blu-Ray movies from my Oppo through HDMI. But when I ran Audyssey, I continuously received the error message that my speaker couldn't be detected when the auto setup began. Suggestions appreciated. Thanks in advance.

You can try swapping a known working speaker for the 1st position and if you still get the speaker error message contact Marantz for a mic replacement.
post #62262 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maccur View Post

So my first try with audyssey did not go so well. I installed a Marantz AV7005 into my system today, replacing a Rotel RSP-1066. So I'm seeing and hearing DirecTV through HDMI, and I can see and hear Blu-Ray movies from my Oppo through HDMI. But when I ran Audyssey, I continuously received the error message that my speaker couldn't be detected when the auto setup began. Suggestions appreciated. Thanks in advance.

I suspect you have a bad Audyssey mic. I had the same problem with my Onkyo receiver. Audyssey ran fine the first couple times I calibrated then suddenly couldn't detect speakers. I could tell it was a mic problem b/c the first step of Audyssey shows SPL for the sub so it can be adjusted to 75db and that reading was suddenly 20db below where it should have been. I contacted Onkyo's warranty dept and they sent me a new mic - ran Audyssey and it worked perfectly again.

If you have an old Audyssey mic from another receiver, try it and see what happens. That will confirm if it's a mic problem. You want to calibrate using the version of the mic that came with your AVR though so still get a replacement.
post #62263 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Agree entirely,  Jerry. I have tried several software SPL meters - both Apple and Android and they are all useless. I believe it is the mic in the device that is the problem. I am amazed that someone would spend thousands of dollars on HT gear but baulk at spending a tiny fraction of that on a device that will help them get the best out of their setup. It is the same thing with boom mic stands that cost 20 bucks. If people wish to to use old broomsticks and bath towels to support their Audyssey mic rather than spend 20 bucks so be it,  but count me out of that group! 

For anyone to suggest that members will find it too difficult to use an SPL meter is not only bizarre but it is IMO also insulting,  especially as there is no shortage here of willing volunteers who will guide them through every step. AVS is all about getting the very best results and to that end buying and learning to use a SPL meter is a very easy and valuable first step. 

As to Audyssey being a totally automated system,  well,  62,000+ posts in the longest AVS thread in history tends to cast some doubt on that IMO wink.gif

Very well said sir. I can't agree more. I honestly have three measurement rigs now and I still on occassion fire them all up to make sure the results are all on-par with one another, or pretty close for that matter. But just to reiterate, I have found so many things that I otherwise wouldn't have without a simple measurement rig. I am not one to just "assume" that a simple blip test will optimize my system to its fullest. That is silly talk. I have managed to take the IMPROVED results that Audyssey [typically] gets me and improve on them even more by measuring and figuring out what needs changing. 5dB differences in areas of the bandwidth may not make much a difference to a lot of people, but it certainly does to me biggrin.gif

 

Yes, some of us know that Audyssey results can be improved upon by careful post-Audyssey measuring and tweaking. We even have the graphs to prove it ;)  Others believe Audyssey achieves 'perfection' that cannot be improved on. The impartial observer can decide which camp he is in :)

post #62264 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Your description of the foam suggests that the doorway is at the front of the left sidewall, near the left front speaker. That foam and/or having the doorway open during the calibration are likely causes of the difference in the speaker's calibration.

Selden & Keith,

Correct....the doorway is in the front left side wall. I always keep the door closed and only calibrate at night when the noise is the lowest and everyone's asleep.

Ceiling is not slope.

Room is 12' x 11' x 9'

Room is 100% drywall....other than the closet door and entry door which is a solid wooden door (that's probably not good huh?).

I would consider the back wall to be more dense then all the others because the other side of it (which is outside the house) is brick.

One large window 2' x 8' with plantation shutters on the right side wall. I always keep the shutters closed and have a sound panel on it.

I have 10 - 2' x 4' x 1" OC703 sound panel symmetrically placed through out the room ( front wall, back wall and first reflections).

Oh and two bass traps in the rear corners of the room....and that piece of foam in the left front corner.

Room is carpeted through out.

I'm usually laying down on the ground or sitting on the ground next to the chair when I run Audyssey ( never between the mic and speakers).

Never thought about removing the foam. Maybe I'll give it a try...because the definition of insanity is to do the same thing over and over, but expecting different results right?
Don't get me wrong, the sound in my room right now is phenomenal. It's only the stereo image that's off centered a tad.

Thanks Luke

 

I have been away for a few days and hate replying on a tablet so please excuse my late response to you. I honestly think there is no need to sweat this - the small adjustment you have made gives you what you are looking for and won’t cause any significant issues with the Audyssey calibration. Personally I'd leave it as you have it and just enjoy. HST, if you really cannot rest without getting to the bottom of it I think Selden is offering the best advice and the best starting place for a solution: the room and any asymmetrical aspects to it. Also, as Jerry has pointed out, it won’t be enough to just ensure that the treatments and furnishings are symmetrical - it is the reflections that you need to concern yourself with and you may have to set up the treatments deliberately asymmetrically in order to achieve a symmetrical sound, if you follow me. It could be a lot of work - if this is the only issue you have in your room -- and you have effectively solved it with the small distance tweak you have made -- I'd consider it good to go.

post #62265 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Thanks Luke,

Distance in feet seem more or less OK. I'm a bit worried about the SW at 1.4 feet! Is that really the correct value? I remember from your photo that the sub is near to the FR speaker. But sub distance less than the physical is another issue.

Back to channel level setting, it would be interesting to see how Audyssey adjusted the FL and FR. In case despite the 4 inch difference in distance there is a sizable difference between the two mains level trims (that is the FR is more that 3 dBs higher compared to the FL) that may suggest a blown driver in your Right tower speaker. You may also go up close and listen to each driver careully. A broken driver could explain why your phantom center in stereo mode drifts to the left, while it remains (relatively) unnoticed with 5.1 HT soundtracks.

Report back please.

Feri,

Ok now you're scaring me! I have checked each speaker a few months ago by putting my ear up really close to them and all were fine. But I'm gonna check again tonight. I never listen at reference levels anyway.....most of the time I watch movies at -14db's and music at -9db's.

As for the SW......I'm running a 5.3 system ( 3 SVS SB13 Ultra's). I trust the sub distance as of right now.....but will confirm that when I get the CSL UMIK-1 Mic in on Monday.

 

There is no evidence at all that you have a blown driver -- and if you had you would probably have far more significant issues than a slight asymmetry to the soundstage -- so I doubt if that is the problem. 

post #62266 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Two obvious possibilities come to mind. One is that if you move closer to the speakers you would expect the sound to get louder!  The other is the influence of the room. Audyssey is designed to give 75dB at the MLP not all over the room! 

Then that would mean the others would get a better seat since spl is higher?

 

No, it wouldn't even begin to mean that. Higher SPL isn't the same as 'better sound'. The room is always the most significant factor in the overall sound, so it is to be expected that the sound will change as you move to different parts of the room. You can minimise this effect by extensively treating the room. Otherwise you have to live with it and decide what it is you are primarily after: a) the best sound at one location or b) a good sound at several locations. If you follow the Audyssey setup advice, Audyssey aims to give you b).

post #62267 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by luketo View Post

Feri,

Ok now you're scaring me! I have checked each speaker a few months ago by putting my ear up really close to them and all were fine. But I'm gonna check again tonight. I never listen at reference levels anyway.....most of the time I watch movies at -14db's and music at -9db's.

As for the SW......I'm running a 5.3 system ( 3 SVS SB13 Ultra's). I trust the sub distance as of right now.....but will confirm that when I get the CSL UMIK-1 Mic in on Monday.


I dont feel like there is any need to be scared. Feri's gross assumption that you may have a blown speaker is not only unfounded, it is uncalled for without ANY basis behind it. You haven't even given us the trim levels to even see what else might be going on.

The sub distance with three subs I wouldn't worry about too much either until we sort out the main speaker situation.

What is interesting me most is, what is behind your MLP? Anything not exactly symmetrical back there? Do you have any rear wall treatments?

 

+1

post #62268 of 70896
Kbarnes - you mention that you can tweak Audyssey post calibration. Is this true for MultiEQ versions that do not have installer ready options?
post #62269 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Kbarnes - you mention that you can tweak Audyssey post calibration. Is this true for MultiEQ versions that do not have installer ready options?

You can't tweak Audyssey's EQ settings with any consumer version (not sure about pro). You can change x-overs, levels, and distances post Audyssey calibration with any version of Audyssey.
post #62270 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Kbarnes - you mention that you can tweak Audyssey post calibration. Is this true for MultiEQ versions that do not have installer ready options?

You can't tweak Audyssey's EQ settings with any consumer version (not sure about pro). You can change x-overs, levels, and distances post Audyssey calibration with any version of Audyssey.

 

There is limited potential tweakery with Pro using the Target Curve Editor. The only real tweak possible with MultEQ is the 'sub distance tweak' which optimises the splice at the XO region, which Audyssey fails to get right when two or more subs are involved. There has been much discussion of this in this thread and a search will show it up (REW or similar required). In addition to that, as you say, one can change the recommended XOs and this is often a good idea (see the FAQ for more detail). Levels and distances don't usually need changing from the recommended settings, although sone people like to run their bass hot as preference. That is about it. 

 

I didn't mean to suggest that Audyssey can be tweaked post calibration. Rather, I meant that the system can be tweaked after Audyssey has been run, if one has suitable measuring gear, such as REW, plus a calibrated mic plus the knowledge to use it. But the best idea IMO is to do as much adjustment as possible before running Audyssey, as the more that can be done then, the better the calibration is likely to be because Audyssey has 'less to do'. I am thinking in terms of speaker and subwoofer placement, and any room optimisation, such as installing room treatments or simply rearranging furniture and furnishings to try to provide the best environment for the system. All of this will pay dividends when Audyssey is eventually run.

post #62271 of 70896
Thanks. I thought as much, but if there were something I was not doing, I definitely would want to be doing it smile.gif
post #62272 of 70896
If Audyssey set each of my speaker level to -10dB, does that mean the AVR is powerful enough to drive the speaker at reference level? Should I be worried about AVR's amplifier power when using speaker with high sensitivity?

(Imagine Klipsch in a small room)
post #62273 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylinestar View Post

If Audyssey set each of my speaker level to -10dB, does that mean the AVR is powerful enough to drive the speaker at reference level?

This is a good situation Skylinestar! The lower Audyssey sets your level trims, the less amplifier power is required to drive the speaker to a given SPL, reference or otherwise. A trim level at -10dB is calling on the AVR to deliver one tenth of the power that would be required for a 0dB level trim.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylinestar View Post

Should I be worried about AVR's amplifier power when using speaker with high sensitivity?

(Imagine Klipsch in a small room)

Quite the opposite. The higher the (genuine) speaker sensitivity, correspondingly less power will be required from the amps to deliver a given SPL. The +/-3dBSPL <-> double/half the power rule applies. For example, a speaker with 92dB/W/m sensitivity will require half the power of a 89dB/W/m sensitivity speaker to achieve the same SPL.

High sensitivity speakers require surprisingly little power, particularly in small rooms (which generally translates to closer listening distances and greater "room gain") to reach high SPL's. Here is a short video by a AVS member Archaea that, while using very high (101dB/W/m) sensitivity speakers, illustrates this really well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlSTiV5NruQ
post #62274 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

I suspect you have a bad Audyssey mic. I had the same problem with my Onkyo receiver. Audyssey ran fine the first couple times I calibrated then suddenly couldn't detect speakers. I could tell it was a mic problem b/c the first step of Audyssey shows SPL for the sub so it can be adjusted to 75db and that reading was suddenly 20db below where it should have been. I contacted Onkyo's warranty dept and they sent me a new mic - ran Audyssey and it worked perfectly again.

If you have an old Audyssey mic from another receiver, try it and see what happens. That will confirm if it's a mic problem. You want to calibrate using the version of the mic that came with your AVR though so still get a replacement.

Thanks for the response. Since only some of the speakers were working, I thought I would have to pull everything out and check connections to the amp. Fortunately, after searching through several AVS topics, I tracked the problem to the AB speaker switch on the front of the unit. I pushed the button and Presto, instant 5.1 channel sound. I will try again with Audyssey early tomorrow morning.
post #62275 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maccur View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by benunc View Post

I suspect you have a bad Audyssey mic. I had the same problem with my Onkyo receiver. Audyssey ran fine the first couple times I calibrated then suddenly couldn't detect speakers. I could tell it was a mic problem b/c the first step of Audyssey shows SPL for the sub so it can be adjusted to 75db and that reading was suddenly 20db below where it should have been. I contacted Onkyo's warranty dept and they sent me a new mic - ran Audyssey and it worked perfectly again.

If you have an old Audyssey mic from another receiver, try it and see what happens. That will confirm if it's a mic problem. You want to calibrate using the version of the mic that came with your AVR though so still get a replacement.

Thanks for the response. Since only some of the speakers were working, I thought I would have to pull everything out and check connections to the amp. Fortunately, after searching through several AVS topics, I tracked the problem to the AB speaker switch on the front of the unit. I pushed the button and Presto, instant 5.1 channel sound. I will try again with Audyssey early tomorrow morning.

Ah, I didn't realize that some of your speakers weren't producing sound; I thought audyssey just wasn't picking it up. ...Glad you figured it out.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 2
post #62276 of 70896
Slightly off topic but it has to do with good sound. Would it be an accurate statement to say that as one learns more about what good sound is, I'm thinking the bass department mainly at this moment, that what we think is good evolves. Particularly I'm thinking about a flat EQ line the subwoofer gives. I'm 29 so it's not like I've had decades to hone my ears. And really until I got into HT 7 months ago I didn't know anything. Before that it was a Boston SPG 555 sub and a 1000 watt Alpine amp in my truck. Now I'm constantly learning more. I look forward to getting into REW, XT 32 and perhaps a pro kit some day. And this flat EQ line for the sub has me looking at Seaton Submersives! Anyway I currently have an HSU VTF 15H. It is versatile and can go sealed, one port open, or two ports open. Extension modes and an output mode. I've always been particular to 2 ports open ( flat until 30 then drops 17 db until it hits 15hz). But earlier I decided to run all 3 with a track that goes from 1hz -100hz. It really showed where the line began with some output. I then played the hospital explosion scene from the dark knight in all 3. Suddenly I noticed the flatter line (1 port open, still considered extension mode, offers decently flat to 15hz until it rolls off. 40-15 hz is a 7db drop). Anyway...
post #62277 of 70896
Jpowell, yes and no.

In a way, yes, as you learn more about audio, your tastes begin to develop and refine. Where the uneducated may have been fine with a Bose HTIB, with holes in the frequency response and nothing above 13kHz or below 40-50Hz, once you hear a system with even frequency response from 10Hz or less to 20kHz, you may have a hard time settling for less.

Likewise, one of the common examples in this thread is a smooth bass response without the peaks and dips common to uncalibrated systems. Often times, the immediate reaction from new users to Audyssey after a calibration is, "Where's my bass?", because they're used to overblown bass and the now flattened response has removed the extra bass from the peaks. The normal suggestion is, "Listen to it as is for a while". Very often, people will recalibrate their perceptions as they begin to notice things like how much tighter the bass is, with minimized ringing and overhang, and as a result, how much crisper and cleaner everything sounds without flabby bass muddying it all up.

It's much like how it can take folks who've never had a calibrated display a while to get used to it if all they've been exposed to thus far are the bluish toned overblown stock settings. After getting used to a Reference level calibrated display, it's hard to go back as you notice all the unnatural looking flaws in uncalibrated displays.

In a way though, the answer can also be No. The Harman group has conducted a lot of studies in both acoustics and psychoacoustics and one of those studies was about preferred speaker frequency response. Interestingly enough, the results of the study showed that not only highly educated/trained listeners prefer a smooth frequency response, even untrained listeners preferred speakers with smooth frequency responses.

The main difference between the trained vs untrained listeners was that the trained listeners were better able to articulate and pinpoint why they preferred a particular speaker vs another.

Incidentally, the frequency response from the study that received the most praise (for music listening) is one that is very smooth from ~30Hz - 20kHz with a descending slope, meaning although there are no big dips or peaks in the frequency response, it is NOT flat. It actually descends smoothly about 10-15db from 30Hz to 20kHz. I've taken to calling this the Harman preferred FR.

This is why their room correction (unlike Audyssey) does not correct for room gain. In their view, room gain at lower frequencies is natural and expected, and removing it skews what we view as perceptually flat (as opposed to measurably flat). It's also related to the audio sensitivity curves. I have to say, for music listening, I agree. I have speakers that measure close to flat anechoically and due to room gain, in typical sized rooms, this tends to naturally produce this descending slope when measured in-room, and I find this response more engaging when listening to music (as opposed to a flat in-room measured response).



Max
post #62278 of 70896

To add to Max's excellent response, it is important to be able to assess where you are with respect to smooth response, and the best way to do this is to invest a small amount of money in a good measuring system, and to spend the time getting to know how to use it.  The perceived quality of the audio is influenced by modal ringing in the bass region, and room reflections in the mid and upper frequencies.  The best way to assess the state of both, and to assess progress as changes are made, is to measure the results.  If you are interested in REW, take a quick look at the Guide referenced in my signature, and join the discussion here.

post #62279 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Thanks. I thought as much, but if there were something I was not doing, I definitely would want to be doing it smile.gif

 

I know that feeling :)  Audyssey is terrific at what it does - automates the process of getting the speaker and room interaction optimised. For many, that is all they need and they can happily then listen to and enjoy their systems for many years to come. For others, there is more to be done. Audyssey is good at what it does but it is also limited at what it does (by cost, by ease of use considerations, by processing power needed etc).

 

To go further requires an investment of cash (in REW and a calibrated mic) and of time (in learning how to use it). If one takes that next step then there is much that can be done by measuring the in-room responses and using the information to determine the best placement for speakers and (especially ) subs and then using additional measuring information to determine the best places to install acoustic panels and what sort of panels are needed etc etc.

 

If one goes down that particular rabbit hole, there is much that can be accomplished without any use of Audyssey at all - the better one makes the room, the less there is a need for automated 'room correction' of course. When my room was untreated, Audyssey MultEQ XT32 made a phenomenal difference to the final SQ. But as I learned more and started to measure and treat the room, the resulting SQ became better and better, to the point where even with Audyssey disengaged the sound is still very, very good. Of course, I still then use Audyssey as the 'icing on the cake' and it still makes subtle but important improvements, so I would not want to be without Audyssey entirely. It's all a question of how far down the rabbit hole you want to go.

post #62280 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Slightly off topic but it has to do with good sound. Would it be an accurate statement to say that as one learns more about what good sound is, I'm thinking the bass department mainly at this moment, that what we think is good evolves. 

 

In addition to the excellent responses from Max and Jerry, the reply I just made to mo949 about going 'into the rabbit hole' is also perhaps relevant to your question. I have found that the more I have learned, the more I have realised that there is so much more to learn!  Each step on the learning curve takes me a little bit closer to that elusive 'ultimate sound' we all seek. But beware: acoustics can soon become a hobby in its own right and can, if you're not careful, overtake the former primary hobby of listening to music or watching movies. You have to be clear what it is you are after.  Whatever it is, there is so much help here on AVS, all freely given, that I am sure you will be able to develop in any way you choose.

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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)