or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 2096

post #62851 of 70909
I once again agree with Jerry on the measuring aspect. Keith's graph even shows what having speakers not perfectly in phase can do as well. Bottom line is if you like it where you have it, leave it and measure to see. It might (forget all your troubles) be that you are just particularly sensitive to that area of the frequency spectrum, or that the mixing team for the Town wanted the exact effect you were getting. Who knows! That is why you always cater your theater to your own personal tastes. No one posting on this thread is going for the same exact thing, or even moreso, they aren't hearing everything in the same fashion. It is were the laws of subjectivity really cross with the science of the audio hobby. If I, Keith, Jerry, and yourself all sat in your room and listening to the exact same scene with the boominess going on vs your own personal preference, we all would more than likely still draw very different conclusions (from an unbiased standpoint) on which way sounded the best or "better" than the other. Such is the game we all play constantly. It is why we are here....."For the love of the game"

There come a time when trying to strive for what the manuals and white papers TELL you to do to have a proper system tuning just ends up turning you slightly insane, and the time right after where you throw some of it out the window and start working the theater to your own "personal specifications" where you really begin to start enjoying what you have and the sanity in your head begins to return. I am not saying this as a fix-all for everyone, but certainly in your case, it may be something where you just go against certain recommendation i.e. setting the XO's at 80hz all around, and just enjoy what sounds good to you.

Now let's let it be for now, go enjoy your theater as it is for the weekend and once you start dumping loads of REW graphs for us to look at, know that at least for now you are happy smile.gif
post #62852 of 70909
Also, FWIW, when I watched the Town, there was some really hot bass scenes like when the old man gets offed at the end. That gunshot got me almost falling out of the chair it had so much impact. I loved it, the g/f said it was too much. There are going to be areas in any 4-5 star bass movie where stuff like that will be mixed hotter than the average sitcom. Just sayin biggrin.gif
post #62853 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Regardless, in my opinion, you are using a single note in one movie to tune your entire theater. 

Sorry wrong Jerry, I am not using "one note" to tune the cinema, Im using Audyssey to do that and after raising all speakers to 80Hz except the highs and surrounds. Im sure we all have discs that we use and keep going back for to for testing, some stand out better for the purpose than others.
There was many low deep notes that boomed/resonated in the back row, if they are eliminated this way its a good thing. Measurements may tell the truth, but you know Im still waiting for the mic from the USA, but my ears still tell me the truth and eliminating the boom is certainly a good thing!

The speakers in question go down to 20Hz, so I see no reason leaving them where Audyssey finds them.

As they say most discs are recorded with the deep bass up front, as often the cheaper speakers are the surrounds so less bass is directed to those.

I know you are finding this hard to believe Jerry but its true I'm sorry to say. I'm happy so who cares if the highs and surrounds are not on 80Hz, I never lowered them so that's good thing.....cool.gif

The question was not what the crossovers were finally set to, it was could the design of the speaker, port, the ceiling acting as a baffle or whatever have caused the issue....
post #62854 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Let's think about it.  Raising a crossover transfers the reproduction of frequencies below the crossover from the speaker to the array of subs.  So, you are saying that raising the crossover to 80Hz is causing more of the undesirable resonance for the so-called "tone" at the back row, even though it's the subs that are handling the increased load of the change?  This seems counter-intuitive.

Unless, and this is going to seem really far-fetched, the so-called "tone" is a very low frequency effect recorded only on the surround channels.  By lowering the crossovers for the surrounds, you are asking the surrounds to handle a very low frequency tone that they are incapable of reproducing, which results in the undesirable tome being suppressed completely (i.e. no longer being reproduced by the subs, and not capable of being reproduced by the surrounds).  That would be weird, no?

Hi Jerry, or maybe better to address the question to Murray,...is that horrible low tone really recorded into the surround channels? ...Isn't it an LFE effect that throws off the 4 subs in an unpredictable way? If it 's an LFE effect it is not supposed to have anything to do with surround channels, coz LFE is not a bass managed redirected signal, but a signal directly coming from the 0.1 channel, aka LFE channel routed directly to the sub array. If all this is true I'm puzzled why the effect of changing XOs has anything to do with the overall effect of taming that horrible sound you hear in 'The Town".
post #62855 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

There come a time when trying to strive for what the manuals and white papers TELL you to do to have a proper system tuning just ends up turning you slightly insane, and the time right after where you throw some of it out the window and start working the theater to your own "personal specifications" where you really begin to start enjoying what you have and the sanity in your head begins to return. I am not saying this as a fix-all for everyone, but certainly in your case, it may be something where you just go against certain recommendation i.e. setting the XO's at 80hz all around, and just enjoy what sounds good to you.

Now let's let it be for now, go enjoy your theater as it is for the weekend and once you start dumping loads of REW graphs for us to look at, know that at least for now you are happy smile.gif

Very correct!
I have a friend (now retired) who was the sound engineer for 25 years of one of the worlds biggest pop idols of all time, and still alive. You all know him, everyone does both young and old, but its probably best I don't identify him here. He always said to me he never goes by the books looking for a flat response from the massive concerts they performed, he used his ear. He tells me he has an uncanny knack of changing everything after going for flat to improving it more by using his ears. He must have done something right or else he wouldn't have been with the same pop idol for 25 years. cool.gif
Edited by RapalloAV - 6/22/13 at 2:24pm
post #62856 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

Very correct!
I have a friend (now retired) who was the sound engineer for 25 years of one of the worlds biggest pop idols of all time, and still alive. You all know him,

Alan Parsons, eh? smile.gif
post #62857 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Hi Jerry, or maybe better to address the question to Murray,...is that horrible low tone really recorded into the surround channels? ...Isn't it an LFE effect that throws off the 4 subs in an unpredictable way? If it 's an LFE effect it is not supposed to have anything to do with surround channels, coz LFE is not a bass managed redirected signal, but a signal directly coming from the 0.1 channel, aka LFE channel routed directly to the sub array. If all this is true I'm puzzled why the effect of changing XOs has anything to do with the overall effect of taming that horrible sound you hear in 'The Town".

Mogorf, Im sorry I have no idea I just don't know what channels it is in.

Please guys remember this is not just a one "note" thing, please please know that it was always there on many movies with lots of deep bass. BOOM BOOM resonating in the back row, its gone, good!

Ive played no tricks with mic positions or anything like that, Ive followed all those rules in the FAQs. All I have done is not raised the crossovers to 80Hz on the four speakers with the port design.

I don't think this has anything to do with what channel the bass is directed to, I think its a design thing of the speakers in question, I don't know????
Maybe if I was to connect box speakers to the highs and surrounds maybe it might be fine on 80Hz but really I don't care now.

Leaving these very good THX speakers set on 40/50Hz where Audyssey finds them every single time doesn't really matter, Im not breaking any rules here, Im only pointing out my observations....
post #62858 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Alan Parsons, eh? smile.gif

No, much more famous!wink.gif
post #62859 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

Mogorf, Im sorry I have no idea I just don't know what channels it is in.

It might be interesting to find out what channel is producing such phenomenon. Can you disconnect all speaker but leave the subs connected?
Quote:
Leaving these very good THX speakers set on 40/50Hz where Audyssey finds them every single time doesn't really matter, Im not breaking any rules here, Im only pointing out my observations....

AFAIK, THX speakers are spec'd to roll off like hell at 80 Hz. If Audyssey finds their roll-off of -3 dB at 40-50 Hz then there is something ,...ummm, ...wrong! smile.gif
post #62860 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

No, much more famous!wink.gif

Then it must be Chuck Norris! LOL Just kidding!tongue.gif
post #62861 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post


Very correct!
I have a friend (now retired) who was the sound engineer for 25 years of one of the worlds biggest pop idols of all time, and still alive. You all know him, everyone does both young and old, but its probably best I don't identify him here. He always said to me he never goes by the books looking for a flat response from the massive concerts they performed, he used his ear. He tells me he has an uncanny knack of changing everything after going for flat to improving it more by using his ears. He must have done something right or else he wouldn't have been with the same pop idol for 25 years. cool.gif

Performance tuning has little to do with reproduction tuning.  He is/was contributing to the creation of the sound and we are trying to reproduce it.  Of course, one can do anything in the privacy of one's home.rolleyes.gif

post #62862 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kal Rubinson View Post

Performance tuning has little to do with reproduction tuning.  He is/was contributing to the creation of the sound and we are trying to reproduce it.  Of course, one can do anything in the privacy of one's home.rolleyes.gif

Sure can and if a problem is fixed we should all celebrate!
post #62863 of 70909
Murray, before I retire for the evening, I want to assure you that no one is being critical of what you have done. It is more a curiosity at this point--we would like to understand your results from a more analytical perspective.
post #62864 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Murray, before I retire for the evening, I want to assure you that no one is being critical of what you have done. It is more a curiosity at this point--we would like to understand your results from a more analytical perspective.

Thanks Jerry I understand. I wish I had the answers too, I would love to know why the boom and horrid resonating bass have gone from the back row too. I just wish someone could explain to me, maybe Keith might have some ideas. I just thought it might be the ported speakers they are. They always say integrating ported subs with sealed is very hard, I don't know if this too applies for speakers....

I have been in the cinema today for hours and hours, replaying all the stuff that used to sound bad. Even the really low bass as the engines start up in Titanic used to resonate and sound shocking in the back row, perfect now just as good as the middle and front rows!

I don't care what the crossovers are set to on these four speakers, but if the horrid stuff is gone halleluiah I say!

Just wish I understood the reason why. rolleyes.gif

BTW the subs are all set to 75db, I have so much low end it would be impossible to run them hot or higher than this. Finally clean sound, Audyssey may have not helped me in this case, but leaving it as I did on that first test the other day proved changing "all" the crossovers was upsetting something that's still a mystery to all of us. I only wish I had trusted Audyssey the very first time without doing the usual move everything up to 80Hz, I certainly would have saved some time.

But better late than never, I have learnt something from all this debacle. Today I would say "trust Audyssey first" before major changes are made. Make small changes and test, plus write down each change as you go so you can return to Audyssey settings. Today I have no changes to any settings except the fronts and wides turned up to 80Hz, the rest are as found from the EQ. I'm happy with that, now I can watch movies finally.smile.gif
Edited by RapalloAV - 6/22/13 at 7:43pm
post #62865 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

+1 concurred. I too find it amazing that such a small change has made such a big difference, but there is no doubting what Murray is hearing and he has tested it with his 'test passage' from The Town and is very happy with the result. HST, I too would love to see the measurements that reveal the change.
Keith I have more to report on my findings...... I did many more tests last night changing the cross overs and have found the culprit on that one horrid note in the "Town"
Now some may not believe me but the problem is fixed, that very same horrid "tone" is now the same in every row, let me explain.... That "note" was soft and low in the middle row but when I sat in the back row it was loud and would warble and resonate, it was absolutely intolerable!!!

Last night I started to raise the crossovers on different groups of speakers rather than moving all up to 80Hz. Remember I left them were Audyssey found them below.

Front 70Hz
Centre 60Hz
Surround 40Hz
Front wide 70Hz
Front high 40Hz

I started with the front centre moving it up to 80Hz, the "note" was the same. I then moved up the front left & right to 80Hz, the "note" was exactly the same (what the heck I think????)
I raised the wides to 80Hz still no change....
The I started on the front highs raised them from 40Hz up to 80Hz, OMG the "note" started to resonate again, what on earth is going on here I think....I turn them back down to 40Hz and the "note" from the Town is great again. I then try the surrounds moving them from 40Hz up to 80Hz, the "note" is horrid again.... I then move the highs and the surround's up to 80Hz and the "note" is out of control, exactly the shocker Ive been listening to over and over again for the last 1.5 years!!!!

Ok the light bulb is coming on in my head...... Im starting to feel happy as I now know whats causing the problem with the so called horrid "note", frequency in the "Town" and the boom at the back wall, which has now been eliminated completely though the tests. I moved every speaker up to 80Hz except the highs and the surrounds, the sound, the bass, the boom and the "note" is superb in every row, all the three rows sound exactly the same to my ear. The horrid back wall boom has gone forever!

Now my thoughts came down to the speaker design of the surrounds and highs, interesting that they are all the same and not used anywhere else in the cinema. Lets take a look at them and maybe you guys might tell me why is it these four speakers introduce the boom and the horrid frequency in the "Town" when I start to move the crossovers higher than 40/50Hz?

We are dealing with four top of the range Klipsch THX in ceiling THZ KL-7502 speakers. Enclosed design tuned port chamber, feq response 45Hz - 20kHz.
http://www.klipsch.com/kl-7502-thx-in-ceiling-speaker

Is there any possibility that since these are the only speakers in the cinema with a port design that the port creates the problem? Everything else is sealed including the 6 subs. The room also is sealed.

Ok I know we still don't have measurements yet, but at the end of the day after doing hundreds of Audyssey EQ's trying to EQ the "note" and boom out of the room/back row, all along it was four speakers causing the problem.

Every speaker is now set to 80Hz except the four ported ceiling speakers. The sound is magnificent throughout all the three rows, Im over the moon!
And finally the "note" in the back row is hardly heard, its soft and hard to hear, there is no LOUD warbling resonance from it, spectacular!!!

I thank all the guys here especially Keith and Jerry for offering help and ideas. I thank myself too for not giving up. I never thought I would discover this even though I don't understand it, but its fixed. Who cares if the highs and surrounds arnt at 80Hz, I certainly don't, but the rest of the speakers are;)

Guys please chirp in if you know why the ported highs and surrounds don't work well set higher than 40/50Hz, considering they go down to 20Hz.......

 

Murray, I agree with Jerry 100%.

 

I don't have any experience of in-ceiling speakers but it wouldn't be hard to convince me that the ceiling cavity might be having some sort of influence on the sound and that you have somehow tamed it.

 

I also agree with Jerry that it isn't good practice to base an entire system sound around one note in one movie. When you get REW up and running, please bring this to the REW HDMI/USB thread where we can analyse further what exactly is going on. I don't think it is an Audyssey issue as such now.

 

Glad, BTW, you are happy with the sound right now!

post #62866 of 70909
RapalloAV,
until your measurement equipment arrives and you can take some measurements in that back row, we can't know for sure what's going on, but based on acoustics, it might be possible to hypothesize.

First off, you say that it's boomy WHEN you set the Height and Surround speakers to 80Hz, and it's NOT boomy when you leave the crossovers at the default calibration result of 40Hz. This alone confirms that it's not possible for the ported design of your Heights and Surrounds to be CAUSING the boominess. When you increase the crossover, you are taking away frequencies from those speakers and instead sending them to the subs. The fact that they're using a ported design MIGHT be a potential cause ONLY if they CAUSE the problem when you add material for them to play back. For instance, to use an extreme exaggeration, you can't say that the Surround speaker is causing the problem if you could hypothetically set the crossover to 20,000Hz, because the surround speaker would be playing nothing as everything below 20,000Hz is being redirected elsewhere.

This narrows the potential problem to the subs.

One of the many (and main) reasons why it's not recommended to have your seating backed up against a wall is that bass reinforcement is strongest nearest to the boundaries (walls). This is in fact, why the optimal placement for bass traps IS at the boundaries/walls (especially where numerous boundaries meet, i.e. the corners).

By having the back row of seats close to the back wall, you're already subjecting that row to more boundary reinforcement of the bass than the other rows.

Regardless of what lower frequencies the speakers might be able to play down to, the subs are very likely able to do a better job of playing the low frequencies louder. This will make the boundary reinforcement worse. In addition, what are the dimensions of your room? We can potentially calculate what frequencies you might encounter room modes in.

So how does any of this explain in particular, why the bass in the back row is boomy when the crossovers are raised to 80Hz and not boomy when they are at 40Hz? In testing the Wides and Heights in Audyssey DSX, 2 things I noted (with Wides anyway, didn't test the Heights), is that the audio reproduced by the DSX speakers is very similar to the audio from the Mains (L&R), but slightly delayed. I tried turning off the amps to my mains (externally amplified) and I could watch the movie using the Wides without the Mains. When you test DSX with a fast transient (like a click sound), you can actually hear the delay as the click is heard first from the mains and then a fraction of a second later, from the Wides.

It's possible that you have a room mode at the frequency of that tone in that movie. Coupled with the bass reinforcement from the proximity to the rear wall, the results are overbearing. One possible explanation is that those frequencies simultaneously being produced by the speakers and sub are neutralizing/cancelling the mode (if this is true, the tone must be somewhere in the 30-50Hz region).

For this theory to work though, it would have to mean that the soundtrack is recorded with frequencies down to that region in the surrounds.


Max
Edited by djbluemax1 - 6/23/13 at 4:30am
post #62867 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

 
The speakers in question go down to 20Hz, so I see no reason leaving them where Audyssey finds them.
 

 

I’d be suspicious about claimed FR from a manufacturer. What matters is the response in your room, not in the manufacturer's anechoic chamber.

 

 

Quote:

I know you are finding this hard to believe Jerry but its true I'm sorry to say. I'm happy so who cares if the highs and surrounds are not on 80Hz, I never lowered them so that's good thing.....cool.gif
 

 

It matters not one bit if the surrounds are set to 80Hz in principle. Nobody is telling you that you have them set up 'wrong'. Jerry's (and mine) confusion is that the solution doesn't seem to be 'logical' so far. The most important thing, as Beast says, is that you are happy with the sound.

 

 

Quote:

The question was not what the crossovers were finally set to, it was could the design of the speaker, port, the ceiling acting as a baffle or whatever have caused the issue....
 

 

IMO, yes, it could.

post #62868 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

 
AFAIK, THX speakers are spec'd to roll off like hell at 80 Hz. If Audyssey finds their roll-off of -3 dB at 40-50 Hz then there is something ,...ummm, ...wrong! smile.gif

 

No there isn't. It is the influence of the room and the position of the speakers in the room. My own THX speakers are invariably crossed over (until I raise them) by Audyssey at  40Hz too. And I can tell you without question, there is no problem in my room. I have the ears and the graphs to prove it ;)

post #62869 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Murray, I agree with Jerry 100%.

I don't have any experience of in-ceiling speakers but it wouldn't be hard to convince me that the ceiling cavity might be having some sort of influence on the sound and that you have somehow tamed it.

I also agree with Jerry that it isn't good practice to base an entire system sound around one note in one movie. When you get REW up and running, please bring this to the REW HDMI/USB thread where we can analyse further what exactly is going on. I don't think it is an Audyssey issue as such now.

Glad, BTW, you are happy with the sound right now!

Keith I now know that it isn't an Audyssey issue or even an exact mic postion and believe me Ive done hundreds!!!!!
OMG I don't believe how many times I have done the EQ over and over and over again, ripping my hair out with frustration. mad.gif
If you saw all the A4 paper notes I have made with mic positions etc etc you would die.

I really believe it is a speaker/room thing. Only these speakers create the problem. They are large and up hard against the ceiling/wall. The ceilings and walls are constructed with double gib board and green glue, I think all that must be influencing the speakers in some way as a massive baffle when I raise the crossovers to 80Hz.

I spent forever on this problem on another thread before I knew the problem......, Ethan helped me design a number of bass traps which cover the back wall, this helped to a certain extent but the boom and resonating never went away. 80Hz >>>>> changed to 40Hz and the BOOM/resonating GONE!!!! The back row is a pleasure to sit in!!!!

Ok we all know that the back row will have stronger bass than any of the others, that's nothing new and it still does, but its only a tiny amount more than the other rows now. Plus the small amount extra is really nice, it sounds good, even I like it. Since I don't need to run any of the subs hot as I have HEAPS of low end, the small amount extra bass in the back row is fine now. At least all that horrid boom and resonating on low end has gone from the back row.

Guys its crazy to believe I know.
If I connected box speakers to the surrounds and highs I'm sure this unbelievable phenomenon would change, but who really cares now.rolleyes.gif
Edited by RapalloAV - 6/23/13 at 11:59am
post #62870 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

So how does any of this explain in particular, why the bass in the back row is boomy when the crossovers are raised to 80Hz and not boomy when they are at 40Hz? In testing the Wides and Heights in Audyssey DSX, 2 things I noted (with Wides anyway, didn't test the Heights), is that the audio reproduced by the DSX speakers is very similar to the audio from the Mains (L&R), but slightly delayed. I tried turning off the amps to my mains (externally amplified) and I could watch the movie using the Wides without the Mains. When you test DSX with a fast transient (like a click sound), you can actually hear the delay as the click is heard first from the mains and then a fraction of a second later, from the Wides.

It's possible that you have a room mode at the frequency of that tone in that movie. Coupled with the bass reinforcement from the proximity to the rear wall, the results are overbearing. One possible explanation is that those frequencies simultaneously being produced by the speakers and sub are neutralizing/cancelling the mode (if this is true, the tone must be somewhere in the 30-50Hz region).

For this theory to work though, it would have to mean that the soundtrack is recorded with frequencies down to that region in the surrounds.


Max

Interesting....

Ok if there is some delay with the wides/highs compared to the front speakers, maybe that delay is causing the problem for me when the wides/highs are set to 80Hz. That means more low end is sent to the subs which collect at the boundaries which may heighten the boom, resonating in the back row.

Let me try and explain what you hear.... Ive mentioned often boom, loud resonating.... But there is also during that loud resonating sound a warble if that's the right word. The warble raises and lowers (up/down) within a one long note of music, its hard to describe but simple to demo to anyone changing between 80Hz and 40Hz.

Is this delay thing between the wides/highs and fronts only a DSX thing?
I wonder as a test if its also there on THX setting or any others?
Have to go to work now so might test that later.....
post #62871 of 70909
Is it possible one of the subs has an issue when playing multiple frequencies simultaneously? I've seen bass torture tests that will play a series of subsonic and 50-80hz frequencies simultaneously and my subwoofer starts to soft clip during these sequences. So relieving your sub of the higher frequency during one of these movie moments could fix it in that scenario.
post #62872 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Is it possible one of the subs has an issue when playing multiple frequencies simultaneously? I've seen bass torture tests that will play a series of subsonic and 50-80hz frequencies simultaneously and my subwoofer starts to soft clip during these sequences. So relieving your sub of the higher frequency during one of these movie moments could fix it in that scenario.

The more thinking I've been doing on this subject I really believe you are absolutely right!
The horrid resonating/tone/warble only comes from the subs when the highs/surrounds are set to 80Hz, gone when they are at 40Hz.

The surrounds have their own dedicated channel. The highs come from which channel?
I think the wide's are from the rear channel but these are not the problem as they are on 80Hz like the three fronts.
post #62873 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

The more thinking I've been doing on this subject I really believe you are absolutely right!
The horrid resonating/tone/warble only comes from the subs when the highs/surrounds are set to 80Hz, gone when they are at 40Hz.

The surrounds have their own dedicated channel. The highs come from which channel?
I think the wide's are from the rear channel but these are not the problem as they are on 80Hz like the three fronts.

In other words you may have a broken driver in one or more of your subs. Time for a close scrutiny! smile.gif
post #62874 of 70909
I wasn't suggesting its broken though it could be. It could pass normal sweeps, but a scenario is happening that pushes it to its limit and the audible soft clip produces the warble. From researching the audyssey over boosting issue I found a lot of special sweeps at one time designed to show the limits of any particular sub.
post #62875 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

I wasn't suggesting its broken. It could pass normal sweeps, but a scenario is happening that pushes it to its limit and the audible soft clip produces the warble.

Ok, but let's not rule out a broken driver till Murray comes back with an affirmative answer. smile.gif
post #62876 of 70909
Sure. Takes one minute to run a standard bass sweep - remember to do it with audyssey off.
post #62877 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

In other words you may have a broken driver in one or more of your subs. Time for a close scrutiny! smile.gif
There are no broken drivers, all the subs are brand new and work perfectly.
post #62878 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

In other words you may have a broken driver in one or more of your subs. Time for a close scrutiny! smile.gif

Seriously?????

Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

There are no broken drivers, all the subs are brand new and work perfectly.

Don't worry about a broken driver, that MOST likely has nothing to do with your situation

On the other hand, every time I read your findings, my thinking takes me in the exact wrong direction to your problem. It is so bas-ackwards I have trouble thinking about it biggrin.gif Regardless, you are making progress but I will remain in suspense until you get those graphs up biggrin.gif methinks we might see a smooth bass response in the back with a slight dip in the first two rows, more prominent in the first. It won't be much, but just enough to make you feel like all is good! Just pure speculation at this point until you start posting some FR graphs of course!!!!!
post #62879 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post


...Guys please chirp in if you know why the ported highs and surrounds don't work well set higher than 40/50Hz, considering they go down to 20Hz.......

Congratulations on getting your HT where you want it and I am in the process of getting some questions up for my own dilemma, but your situation also puzzled me: 1) I had no idea that in-ceiling speakers could measure so low and I didn't see where they are rated at 20 Hz on the bottom end 2) I don't understand why the crossover on them and your surrounds would be lower than your mains.
post #62880 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zen Traveler View Post

Congratulations on getting your HT where you want it and I am in the process of getting some questions up for my own dilemma, but your situation also puzzled me: 1) I had no idea that in-ceiling speakers could measure so low and I didn't see where they are rated at 20 Hz on the bottom end 2) I don't understand why the crossover on them and your surrounds would be lower than your mains.

The speakers in question are not your typical in-ceiling speaker, these are HUGE and heavy. The enclosure is massive and deep, I and the installer were shocked when they first arrived. Also Ive never seen a in-ceiling speaker with a port, obviously to get more bass from them.

BTW. They probably don't go down to 20Hz as Keith mentions, but Im sure they must be playing 40Hz fine where they are now set to. Doesn't matter where I place the mic in the room or what positions, Audyssey always finds them at 40Hz, unlike the other in wall speakers from the same family (sealed) they always are found at 60Hz.

Keith also mentioned that his THX speakers are found at 40Hz after the EQ with Audyssey.
Edited by RapalloAV - 6/24/13 at 11:49am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)