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"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 2112

post #63331 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by jonathanc View Post

Is it possible to calculate room modes for a room that isn't rectangle or square ? I'd like to apply some of your advice to my setup, however I'm having trouble wrapping my brain around my airspace.
It's kinda tricky. Imagine I have you walk across the front of the room and drop some breadcrumbs where you hear your first width mode null, you would drop the crumbs at the midpoint of your 11' room width. If we kept criss-crossing room width while working our way towards the rear of the room, the crumb trail would be a straight line down the middle of your room. About where your rear couch is, the line would start skewing towards the left side of the room, straightening out again a few feet into the bar area and continuing down a straight line at the midpoint of the new 13' width. But there would definitely be a transition area where the acoustics of two room widths meet.

If you have a single sub, place it at the midpoint of your front wall. If you have two subs, place each one a quarter of room width from the side walls. In either case, place your L/R speakers 2/3rds of room width apart (assuming you're using a centre speaker). The only way this will work is if the open doorway shown at the front left of your theatre room can be closed. If it is an open archway, then your room isn't really 11'2" wide and those placements won't work.

This will likely work for your first row (you'd have to measure to confirm), but not so much for the second row because the width of the bar area is having an influence at that point. Also, what is that light brown rectangle in the front right corner of your room?
post #63332 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Yea agreed. But IME wireless devices themselves are notorious for popping and crackling due to interference from other devices (Jerry's problem with them) or difficulties due to room topography, wall thickness and type and so on (if the wireless has to pass through any walls of course). Also, Roger's post has shed a lot of light on the wireless gizmo itself. If I had to bet money on the nature of the problem, I'd be betting on the wireless gizmo. ICBW of course...

And if it were me I would defintely try to find a way to use speaker cables instead of this wireless solution. This example surely brings up the importance of "Cable Management" regardless of it being green field or retro-fit. smile.gif

 

I can't see why he would find it impossible to run wires (maybe he will tell us), at least temporarily, to eliminate or confirm the wireless gizmo as the source of the problem. Until he does that he's not going to get very far IMO.

post #63333 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

 

BTW, with only one post, how do you get 10 'thumbs ups', especially as that one post has none?  Just interested...

 

I think the more important question, Keith, is why isn't there a "thumbs down" button when you need it the most?  Wink, wink, nudge, nudge....

 

LOL. Now that would get some use!

post #63334 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Length: 13 feet/ 4 meters
Width: 12 feet/ 3.7 meters

Your 12 foot width will result in room modes (resonances) at 47Hz, 94Hz, 141Hz, 188Hz, 235Hz, etc.

So, for example, if you played a 141Hz tone and placed a measuring mic at your left wall, you would see that frequency peaking. Move the mic 2 feet to the right and you would see a severe dip. 2 feet over and it is peaking again. 2 more feet over (midpoint of room width) and it is back in a null. 2 feet over and it's a loud peak. And so on until your reach the right side wall.

When you move your Audyssey mic every couple feet across your couch Feri, what is the fuzzy logic alogrithm supposed to do with those measurements? Pull down the peaks at 141Hz and make the dips even worse in other seats? Try to boost the dip in the main listening position and make the peaks worse in other seats (not to mention blowing up your amp)? Give up and not fix that problem since it is not consistent from seat to seat? (What's the point of room correction then?)

Ironically, this problem is worst at the sweet spot (midpoint of room width). 47Hz will be in a null. 94Hz will be peaking. 141Hz will be in a null. 188Hz will be peaking. 235Hz will be in a null. Come on Feri, do you really want that problem in what is supposed to be the best seat in your home theatre? Do you honestly believe that Audyssey can fix such severe swings in frequency response?

Best part about doing all this: it's FREE. Moving speakers around doesn't cost anything. And if it can give Audyssey consistent problems at each measurement location, then all the better.

 

I love your explanations of how to do this sort of thing and what the effects of it are. I can confirm to Feri, and indeed anyone, that following your advice on speaker placement is able to yield amazing differences in sound quality, and at absolutely zero cost. I won't post my 'before Sanjay's advice' and 'after Sanjay's advice' graph again (I posted it again only recently) but if anyone wants to see it they can PM me. 

 

Oh heck, no, here it is again, this time for you, Feri, as it was you who asked Sanjay how to optimise speaker placement. Well, in case you missed it the last time, here is the difference following Sanjay's advice can bring:

 

post #63335 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

I was told to use an spl meter to be on the safe side since I have tinnitus. How do you use if if I used Audyssey instead or can you use it after Audyssey?

 

Why would Audyssey affect the way your SPL meter works?  Sorry, don't understand the question. Regardless of Audyssey, set the meter to Slow and C weighting and put it roughly where your head is, then play the music or whatever at the volume you like and take a reading from the meter. Sounds above 85dB are considered potentially harmful unless they are of relatively short duration.

 

When you have calibrated with Audyssey, your system should play at Reference level. This means that if you select 0dB on the master volume control, the system will play at 85dB (average) and 105dB (peaks) (115dB peaks for LFE channel). If you use a MV setting well below 0dB, as most do, then a calibrated system should not put you in the realm of potential hearing damage. But if you are worried, just use the SPL meter as described to check the levels now and then.

 

I have tinnitus - got it at a King Crimson concert decades ago after 2 hours exposure to what we now know were insane levels. This was in the days before gigs were regulated by law for maximum SP<, so if you have a powerful system that can play at 85dB + for hours on end, you are right to be cautious. Tinnitus can be unpleasant and is incurable.

post #63336 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by cyberbrad View Post

I posted this in the Denon X series thread, but figured I'd post here too.
Unboxing my X4000. The mic has a black dot (sticker?) on top. Do I need to peel it off or is it a felt pad that needs to stay? It is off center, as you can see in the pic. So if it serves a purpose, I wish it had been applied with more care.

 

I have two standard Audyssey mics (one for a 4520, and one for a 4311).  Both have this "black dot" which appears to be the equivalent of a dust cap.  On one of my mics, the dot is slightly off center, but what is exposed is only a light-colored metal ring that is part of the mic's body.  The other "black dot" is centered better.

 

Since it is most likely acoustically transparent, I doubt if the fact that it is off-center will affect the mic's performance.  If it bothers you, you can probably re-position it with a tweezer, although I wouldn't bother.  These are mass-produced mics, so this slight quality issue is probably not uncommon.

 

I just dug out my silver AC1MH that came with the Onkyo 5509 and it too has the 'black dot'/dust cap - but mine is so perfectly centred that I had never even noticed it before. I agree with your conclusion - don't worry about it.

 

@cyberbrad: if even Jerry wouldn't bother trying to reposition the black dot, then you can be sure that the rest of us do not need to bother with it!!   :)

post #63337 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

I can't see why he would find it impossible to run wires (maybe he will tell us), at least temporarily, to eliminate or confirm the wireless gizmo as the source of the problem. Until he does that he's not going to get very far IMO.

I fear that we may have overloaded Obamafan with useful advice. It will be interesting if he ever returns and shares with us how and why he is happier with his sound now.
post #63338 of 70905
Alright, I'll leave the off-centered stick-on piece alone.... probably. ;-)
Thanks for your replies and taking the time to look at your mics to verify.
post #63339 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by asere View Post

I was told to use an spl meter to be on the safe side since I have tinnitus. How do you use if if I used Audyssey instead or can you use it after Audyssey?

I would guess that you were told to use an SPL meter to keep track of how loud you're playing your system. The Audyssey system is used to calibrate your speakers. It makes some test tones that aren't loud enough to cause hearing damage. Once calibration is over, put away the Audyssey mic, and you can use your SPL meter to give you an idea of how loud your audio is playing--just set it to C-weighting and SLOW while watching a movie or listening to music.

After you have done the Audyssey calibration, several versions of Audyssey have a feature called Dynamic Volume that compresses the peaks so things don't get too loud. You can alter how much it compresses the peaks.

I use DynVol when watching certain movies whereI find that if dialogue is audible, explosions are deafeningly loud. You turn on DynVol during a dialogue scene and adjust your AVRs volume dial until the dialogue is right for you, then you'll find the explosions/gunfire/etc. are not hugely louder.

If you don't have DynVol or dislike its effects, you can also save your hearing by using the Dynamic EQ feature of Audyssey, which turns up the surrounds and the subwoofer when your AVR volume is relatively low (yes, I know this is a simplified explanation--see the FAQ in post 1 of this thread for more details). Then you can listen to movies or music and get a good surround effect and good bass without having to play your system excessively loudly.

Generally, if tinnitus is triggered by noise, it's the higher frequencies that do it, rather than the bass. Mine gets triggered by listening to string quartets or a lot of solo violin classical music, especially over headphones.
post #63340 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by And3ers5on View Post

I'd love to hear from anyone else that wants to chime in or discuss issues.5.jpg

I think many here will be ready to discuss issues! What is your issue?
post #63341 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

If you blow air across the opening of an empty Coke bottle, you can get that small chamber to resonate (make that booooooohhh sound). Enlarge that space to your 12x13 room and air pressure will still cause that larger chamber to resonate (obviously at different frequencies than the Coke bottle).

Your 12 foot width will result in room modes (resonances) at 47Hz, 94Hz, 141Hz, 188Hz, 235Hz, etc.

So, for example, if you played a 141Hz tone and placed a measuring mic at your left wall, you would see that frequency peaking. Move the mic 2 feet to the right and you would see a severe dip. 2 feet over and it is peaking again. 2 more feet over (midpoint of room width) and it is back in a null. 2 feet over and it's a loud peak. And so on until your reach the right side wall.

When you move your Audyssey mic every couple feet across your couch Feri, what is the fuzzy logic alogrithm supposed to do with those measurements? Pull down the peaks at 141Hz and make the dips even worse in other seats? Try to boost the dip in the main listening position and make the peaks worse in other seats (not to mention blowing up your amp)? Give up and not fix that problem since it is not consistent from seat to seat? (What's the point of room correction then?)

Ironically, this problem is worst at the sweet spot (midpoint of room width). 47Hz will be in a null. 94Hz will be peaking. 141Hz will be in a null. 188Hz will be peaking. 235Hz will be in a null. Come on Feri, do you really want that problem in what is supposed to be the best seat in your home theatre? Do you honestly believe that Audyssey can fix such severe swings in frequency response?

Imagine a ragged landscape with mountains (peaks) and valleys (dips). Slicing off the mountains and flipping them over into the valleys will give you a flatter landscape. Likewise, taking your sources of sound pressure (subwoofer, speakers) and placing them where sound pressure is lowest in the room (nulls) will give you a flatter frequency response. Mountain meet valley.

If you place your subwoofer where 47Hz is in a null (midpoint of room width), you've just cancelled that room mode. If it is cancelled, then it is inaudible...in ALL seats. Centering the woofers of your L/R speakers 2 feet in from the side walls will cancell the next four modes. Now Audyssey doesn't have to deal with drastic changes in frequency response as you move the mic across your couch. Not so complicated, was it?

Just as your room has width modes, it also has length modes. But since all the listeners are sitting the same distance from the front and back wall, they all experience the same length-mode peaks and dips. So, for example, if your couch is where a frequency is peaking, Audyssey will see the same peak in all seats. No problem pulling that peak down, since it won't make things worse (create a dip) in another seat.

Having said that, you can further smoothen the frequency response my placing your listeners at one of the odd divisions (thirds, fifths) of room length, where there is less variation in frequency response (peaks are on their way down, dips are on their way up). For example: 2/3rds of room length from your front wall would be a really good location.

Best part about doing all this: it's FREE. Moving speakers around doesn't cost anything. And if it can give Audyssey consistent problems at each measurement location, then all the better.

Interesting info. Thank you Sanjay for taking your time. smile.gif
post #63342 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post


If you blow air across the opening of an empty Coke bottle, you can get that small chamber to resonate (make that booooooohhh sound). Enlarge that space to your 12x13 room and air pressure will still cause that larger chamber to resonate (obviously at different frequencies than the Coke bottle).

Your 12 foot width will result in room modes (resonances) at 47Hz, 94Hz, 141Hz, 188Hz, 235Hz, etc.

So, for example, if you played a 141Hz tone and placed a measuring mic at your left wall, you would see that frequency peaking. Move the mic 2 feet to the right and you would see a severe dip. 2 feet over and it is peaking again. 2 more feet over (midpoint of room width) and it is back in a null. 2 feet over and it's a loud peak. And so on until your reach the right side wall.

When you move your Audyssey mic every couple feet across your couch Feri, what is the fuzzy logic alogrithm supposed to do with those measurements? Pull down the peaks at 141Hz and make the dips even worse in other seats? Try to boost the dip in the main listening position and make the peaks worse in other seats (not to mention blowing up your amp)? Give up and not fix that problem since it is not consistent from seat to seat? (What's the point of room correction then?)

Ironically, this problem is worst at the sweet spot (midpoint of room width). 47Hz will be in a null. 94Hz will be peaking. 141Hz will be in a null. 188Hz will be peaking. 235Hz will be in a null. Come on Feri, do you really want that problem in what is supposed to be the best seat in your home theatre? Do you honestly believe that Audyssey can fix such severe swings in frequency response?

Imagine a ragged landscape with mountains (peaks) and valleys (dips). Slicing off the mountains and flipping them over into the valleys will give you a flatter landscape. Likewise, taking your sources of sound pressure (subwoofer, speakers) and placing them where sound pressure is lowest in the room (nulls) will give you a flatter frequency response. Mountain meet valley.

If you place your subwoofer where 47Hz is in a null (midpoint of room width), you've just cancelled that room mode. If it is cancelled, then it is inaudible...in ALL seats. Centering the woofers of your L/R speakers 2 feet in from the side walls will cancell the next four modes. Now Audyssey doesn't have to deal with drastic changes in frequency response as you move the mic across your couch. Not so complicated, was it?

Just as your room has width modes, it also has length modes. But since all the listeners are sitting the same distance from the front and back wall, they all experience the same length-mode peaks and dips. So, for example, if your couch is where a frequency is peaking, Audyssey will see the same peak in all seats. No problem pulling that peak down, since it won't make things worse (create a dip) in another seat.

Having said that, you can further smoothen the frequency response my placing your listeners at one of the odd divisions (thirds, fifths) of room length, where there is less variation in frequency response (peaks are on their way down, dips are on their way up). For example: 2/3rds of room length from your front wall would be a really good location.

Best part about doing all this: it's FREE. Moving speakers around doesn't cost anything. And if it can give Audyssey consistent problems at each measurement location, then all the better.

 

Sanjay,

 

I have always tried to follow the logic that you describe in this interesting and useful post.  As you know, when I placed my front subs at the 1/4 and 3/4 points along the width, my bass response improved considerably.

 

What I am struggling with is the 1/3 and 2/3 recommendations for the left and right speakers.  Here is my mode calculator:

 

 

This predicts a mode at 87Hz associated with the 3rd mode associated with the width.  Sure enough, my REW measurements reveal a 15dB dip at that frequency (before RC).  Here is my current speaker layout:

 

 

The current location of the left and right speakers is 30% out from the side walls, which results in a 26-degree angle with the MLP, slightly less than the typical 30-degree angle.  Not shown on the diagram are my DSX Wide speakers, which are at a 52-degree angle with the MLP, again slightly short of the 60-degree recommendation.  Unfortunately, the Wides cannot be placed "wider" because of a brick fireplace on the left wall.

 

So, following your guidance to consider placing the left and right speakers at the 1/3 and 2/3 marks to ease the dip at 87Hz, this would place the two speakers 156" apart, 39" from the side walls, and would increase the angle with the MLP to 37 degrees, quite a bit more than the recommended angle.  Furthermore, this would place the left and right speakers very close to the Wides, which would impact the DSX effect (at least I think it would).

 

My conclusion is that I have an unfortunate trade-off between good stereo imaging and DSX effects, and the pesky dip at 87Hz.  BTW, with Audyssey correction, here is how bad the dip remains:

 

 

Note that I have also applied the "Sub distance tweak" in an attempt to smooth out the dip (crossovers are at 80Hz).  Do any other ideas come to mind with regards to addressing the 87Hz dip, and keeping my left and right speakers reasonably positioned?

post #63343 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

As you know, when I placed my front subs at the 1/4 and 3/4 points along the width, my bass response improved considerably.

What I am struggling with is the 1/3 and 2/3 recommendations for the left and right speakers.
It's either how I phrased it or how you parsed what I wrote.

If I were to suggest spreading your subwoofers 1/2 room width apart, that might sound confusing to someone used to hearing placement in terms of 1/4 points of room width, but it's the same thing. 1/4 of room width in from the side walls is 1/2 room width apart.

Likewise, suggesting the L/R speakers be 1/3 room width from the centre speaker is the same as suggesting the L/R speakers be spread 2/3 of room width apart. That will put your L/C/R speakers at 1/6, 3/6 and 5/6 of room width:



Which happen to be the null locations of your 3rd width mode (87Hz). What do you think will happen when you place the woofers of your L/C/Rs there? Remember what happened when you placed your subs at the 2nd width null locations.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

So, following your guidance to consider placing the left and right speakers at the 1/3 and 2/3 marks to ease the dip at 87Hz, this would place the two speakers 156" apart, 39" from the side walls, and would increase the angle with the MLP to 37 degrees, quite a bit more than the recommended angle.
Right numbers, wrong fractions. 1/3 and 2/3 of room width would be 78" from the side walls, not 39" (that's 1/6 of room width in from the side walls).

IF your L/C/R speakers span 156" (13') in a straight line, then sitting 11' from your centre speaker will give you the old stereo recommendation of creating an equilateral triangle with your L/R speakers (60° spread).

Looking at your room diagram, you are sitting in-line with your side speakers, which are 12' away from your front wall. From that seating location, isn't it possible to have your centre speaker 11' from you, such that a 13' spread would result in your L/R speakers are at ±30° from centre line (which Audyssey recommends as well)?
post #63344 of 70905
Did any of you guys, Keith, Jerry ever watch this video from Paul Hales "The science of the room", very controversial I would have thought?
He's doesn't believe in auto EQ systems like Audyssey or measuring rooms with systems like REW.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YPPWbNQFvc


He's not a fool, he designs some of the most high end speakers and subs.
http://www.professionalhomecinema.com/
post #63345 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Interesting info. Thank you Sanjay for taking your time.
Since it won't cost you anything, are you going to actually try those locations?

Or were you not expecting that sort of reply to your snarkiness?
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Lay it on us Sanjay, the know-how to make every seat have the same problem.
post #63346 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

I think many here will be ready to discuss issues! What is your issue?
His issue is that he posts robospam and is not really here to discuss anything. See his other 6 posts... I reported them.
post #63347 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by RapalloAV View Post

He's doesn't believe in auto EQ systems like Audyssey or measuring rooms with systems like REW.
Without measuring it would be difficult to use the parametric EQ filters built into the power amps he himself sells.

His dislike of automated room correction systems has to do with them EQing above the bass/modal range (above 200Hz is the number he used). He's unaware that some room correction systems let the users choose how high up the correction goes (Anthem) while others do minimal correction above the bass range (XT32).

He makes 'perfect' the enemy of 'good'. Room correction doesn't have to be perfect, it just has to be better On than Off. Some improvement is better than no improvement.
post #63348 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

I fear that we may have overloaded Obamafan with useful advice.
I think you just turned Bamafan35611 Irish by adding an O to the begining of his monicker (not to mention the political implications). My chuckle for the day.
post #63349 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

I fear that we may have overloaded Obamafan with useful advice.
I think you just turned Bamafan35611 Irish by adding an O to the begining of his monicker (not to mention the political implications). My chuckle for the day.

Ole 'Bama turned the Irish AND the stringy beeves every way, but loose.
post #63350 of 70905
Considering the electoral map, there's a good chance 'Bama ain't gonna be happy with that typo wink.gif
post #63351 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post


I think you just turned Bamafan35611 Irish by adding an O to the begining of his monicker (not to mention the political implications). My chuckle for the day.

 

Always happy to provide some amusement, Sanjay.   biggrin.gif

 

And I thought he was a Democrat, not a Crimson Tide fan....

post #63352 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post


It's either how I phrased it or how you parsed what I wrote.

 

 

Obviously, I need to re-check my arithmetic, Sanjay.  Let me cogitate for a while.

post #63353 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

It's kinda tricky. Imagine I have you walk across the front of the room and drop some breadcrumbs where you hear your first width mode null, you would drop the crumbs at the midpoint of your 11' room width. If we kept criss-crossing room width while working our way towards the rear of the room, the crumb trail would be a straight line down the middle of your room. About where your rear couch is, the line would start skewing towards the left side of the room, straightening out again a few feet into the bar area and continuing down a straight line at the midpoint of the new 13' width. But there would definitely be a transition area where the acoustics of two room widths meet.

If you have a single sub, place it at the midpoint of your front wall. If you have two subs, place each one a quarter of room width from the side walls. In either case, place your L/R speakers 2/3rds of room width apart (assuming you're using a centre speaker). The only way this will work is if the open doorway shown at the front left of your theatre room can be closed. If it is an open archway, then your room isn't really 11'2" wide and those placements won't work.

This will likely work for your first row (you'd have to measure to confirm), but not so much for the second row because the width of the bar area is having an influence at that point. Also, what is that light brown rectangle in the front right corner of your room?

Ok some clarification:

-Only a single row of seating right now, with ears at 10' from the front wall (8.5' from speakers). When I add the second row, sound quality there won't be a priority.
-The projector screen limits my ability to bring the speakers in closer from the side walls. If I convert over to a false wall and transparent screen I would move them in.
-Subwoofers are 13ft^3 sonotube style measuring around 5' tall, 18" drivers with 650 watts available to each. They're 26" diameter enclosures moved against the walls about 3 feet behind the listening position. There is a huge peak behind them about 5 feet into the bar. Actually the whole bar area has more bass than the listening area. This isn't really a bad thing, as it's nice to have some extra bass back there for parties etc.


Bass sweep no EQ:


Bass Sweep with EQ:
Notice the huge dip at 100hz is gone. The Dip at 275hz is improved.


Here is a Full Range sweep, with EQ, and Audyssey's Movie curve.


This is kind of wandering off the Audyssey discussion, but is there any suggestions you could offer based on those measurements and geometry ?
post #63354 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

Since it won't cost you anything, are you going to actually try those locations?

Or were you not expecting that sort of reply to your snarkiness?


Dear Sanjay, I would really like to try those locations, but I have my own limitations in a living room where there are other considerations to be kept "as is". In my room the relocation of speakers/sub and especially the couch is practically unimaginable.

For your ref., here are some pictures of my room:


Front end:



A close-up of the sub placement:



Couch side:



Front LCRs are nudged off the shelf by about an inch or so, tilted to face MLP and the distance between L & R was set with protractor to be +/- 30 deg as seen from MLP.




So, no way out for me, but to rely on room correction s/w. Folks with HT system set up in their living room have three things to do: compromise, compromise, compromise. BTW, the system itself doesn't sound as bad as theory may dictate, bass is deep, smooth and even, imaging is dead on, even for the surround speakers, speakers are set to "small", crossovers are set to 80Hz for all satellites.



P.s.: no snarkiness was intended from my side, really, I just got excited by your idea to make every possible location equally bad for Audyssey, hence the request to lay it on us. smile.gif I even added two smilies to my sentence. smile.gifsmile.gif Kinda pitfall of Internet communications where we do not see each other face-to-face during a discussion. Think you've experienced the same before.
Edited by mogorf - 7/6/13 at 2:56pm
post #63355 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

others do minimal correction above the bass range (XT32).

I wouldn't call what XT32 does above the bass range a 'minimal' correction...
post #63356 of 70905
Now here's something strange.

This afternoon, I had to do another 8 position Audyssey calibration (moved furniture).
After the calibration was completed, I noticed that the bass was sounding bloated and more pronounced than before.

So I went into my AVR and dialed back the levels of my subs.
I reduced the level of my front subs, from -1.5dB to -2.0dB and my rear subs from -3.5db to -4.0dB.

That did it!

The soundstage returned to sounding balanced and natural, but with plenty of bass, for when the soundtracks call for it.
I know most people complain that there bass all but disappears, after running Audyssey.
Well here's an occasion where Audyssey provided to much bass.

It's amazing how just slightly scaling back on the bass levels, made everything sound "just right."
post #63357 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

P.s.: no snarkiness was intended from my side, really, I just got excited by your idea to make every possible location equally bad for Audyssey
Amazing to see you deny something while doing it (though I shouldn't be surprised by how you labelled my suggestions).
post #63358 of 70905
I need some help guys.

I picked up a 1713 about three weeks ago. I ran Audyssey after I got everything set up. I was pretty happy with the results. I normally set it to about -52.0 for just normal listening to tv and such.

I don't know why I ran Audyssey again today, but I did. The results this time are terrible. I have to turn the volume up to -35.5 to be about the same level as before. I have not changed the placement of any of the speakers.

Do y'all have any ideas? Did I do something wrong?

Thanks for any help.
post #63359 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

I think the more important question, Keith, is why isn't there a "thumbs down" button when you need it the most?
Or a "middle finger up" button.
post #63360 of 70905
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

I think the more important question, Keith, is why isn't there a "thumbs down" button when you need it the most?
Or a "middle finger up" button.

Rofl

"The author of this post is in your block list"

Disclaimer I don't own a "middle finger up" button...
Edited by SanchoPanza - 7/6/13 at 6:38pm
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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)