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"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 2242

post #67231 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maccur View Post
If I'm just swapping a large sectional with separate loveseat and couch in the same basic area of the living room do I still have to run audyssey again?


Yes, that is the recommendation as that will insure that the calibration is correct given the differences in absorbtion and reflection of the sound waves with the new pieces.   Though it would be interesting to take a very familiar passage and listen critically before the couch switch, then after.  If it doesn't make much of an audible difference, you may not feel any immediate need to rerun Autosetup.  After all, sometimes one doesn't have the placement finalized, or getting new pieces leads to making more design changes in the room. 

 

OTOH, running Autosetup is not that big a deal, is it? :)

post #67232 of 70909
I'm lazy
post #67233 of 70909

^Then the lovely leather couch will serve you well. :D

post #67234 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maccur View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

If moving the mic 2 feet from the back wall makes the mic at least 12 inches from the couch back, then there is no real need to raise it, especially with a non-leather couch.
Whoa! What about leather couches? I'm having a leather loveseat and couch delivered in a few weeks. Do I have to re-do audyssey?

 

Yep - it is always advised to run Audyssey again if something has been changed in the room. Leather couches can be more reflective than non-leather, so keep the mic 12 inches away from it even if that means it isn't exactly where your ears would be. It's the 'lesser of two evils' principle.  Beast suggests throwing a blanket or towel over the back of the couch during the measuring run and this is a good alternative, although generally we advise against measuring with things in place which will not be in place when listening. However, in this case, experience has shown this to be a good solution.

post #67235 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maccur View Post

If I'm just swapping a large sectional with separate loveseat and couch in the same basic area of the living room do I still have to run audyssey again?

 

Yes.

post #67236 of 70909

I am having a problem with consistent AudysseyXT32 results: I made the "mistake" of re-running Audyssey. My main complaint about the sound previously was that for what I was used to, I was hearing overly aggressive, distracting, high frequency sounds from the surrounds on the two Music Modes. I did not like that I could not trim down the side and rear levels (on Marantz 8801) on a per sound mode basis, and that there are also no settings on the 8801 for high frequency rolloff to the surrounds. My choices of setting panorama on/off; adjusting center volume via width, and adjusting for depth, did not create the desired effect of toning down the high frequency (cymbals, etc) sounds from the surrounds. I re-ran Audyssey to see if I could get a more pleasing result.

 

Now with no change to anything in my room and using mic positioning that did not vary except for a possible minor allowance, I got results that crossed over my main front channels at 120Hz. These are large speakers (Dahlquist DQ20is) and notably, the original Audyssey results produced crossover for these speakers at 60Hz (which I over-rode and upped to 80 Hz). I did not lose woofer (I checked)! Understanding that there would be in a gap in EQ if I set the crossovers LOWER than Audyssey, I re-ran the setup. This time, it came up with 150Hz crossovers! I have since run it another couple of times, making very minor speaker positioning changes (toeing them in/out, an inch or two closer/further from a wall) and the lowest crossover I was able to obtain was 100Hz.

 

I am most pleased with the sound of the system when the crossovers are all set at 80Hz. Am I losing the EQ in the fronts in the 80-100 range?  And I just don't understand the variation in Audyssey results that I am getting. (It is not due to ambient noise or any significant change in mic position). Also, if I need to further keep re-running Audyssey I'm going to upchuck!

post #67237 of 70909
spentmuch,

Audyssey reports to the receiver's software the "f3" frequency of the speakers -- a frequency near the low end of the speaker's response where its output has fallen off by 3dB from the higher frequencies. The receiver then chooses its next higher available crossover frequency setting.

A higher crossover implies that either something is causing Audyssey to have more difficulty hearing the lower frequencies, or that it's now hearing a higher frequency peak, so that the sound level of lower frequencies is falling off rapidly from there.

Has anything other than the speaker orientations changed about the room? Could doors to another room be open which were closed previously, or the opposite?

Are the speakers bi-ampable? Might the interconnecting straps on the speakers have come slightly loose so that less power can get to the woofers?

Another possibility is that the microphone has been damaged. You might try getting a replacement.

To really understand the room's audio response, you might want to consider investing in spectrum analysis equipment. OmniMic (~$300) and REW (~$100 microphone + free software) are popular tools for this.
post #67238 of 70909
Sorry if this was covered before and not sure if I got the answer I was looking for in the FAQs. If I choose a target curve (Say I designed one or chose one of the HF roll-off curves), how does the Audyssey Movie vs Music selection in the Integra DCH 80.3 affect the target I originally chose?
Thanks,
-Jai
post #67239 of 70909

Dear Selden Ball,

I very much appreciate your detailed answer. I guess the bottom line is that I am content with the sound I'm getting now with both music and movies (though I do wish Marantz would add the user changeable parameters I mentioned), so I doublt I'm going to spend more $$$ on room analyzing equipment.  I guess the microphone could have a problem, but dubious on that point because it does sense the low frequency response of my surrounds, which it crosses over surprisingly low (60-80 Hx). But otherwise no...no doors to open or close; no change in speaker locations (except as I mentioned, during experimentation with toeing and slight movement). So I do remain a bit mystified and do wonder about whether there is any dynamic EQ going on in my front speakers between the 80-120 Hz range since I did dial down the crossover point to 80Hz.

 

Regards,

post #67240 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmcomp124 View Post

Sorry if this was covered before and not sure if I got the answer I was looking for in the FAQs. If I choose a target curve (Say I designed one or chose one of the HF roll-off curves), how does the Audyssey Movie vs Music selection in the Integra DCH 80.3 affect the target I originally chose?
Thanks,
-Jai

The Audyssey Music curve should have no impact since it's supposed to be flat all over the whole frequency range (+/- 0 dB). Imagine a flat curve, eh? smile.gif

The Audyssey target curve will have a slight roll-off in the HF region, so your target curve and the Audyssey target curve will add up. In other words its simple arithmetics with decibels. For example, if Audyssey target cuts -6 dB at 10 kHz and your target curve cuts -4 dB, the result will be -10 dB at 10 kHz.
post #67241 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by spentmuch View Post

I am having a problem with consistent AudysseyXT32 results: I made the "mistake" of re-running Audyssey. My main complaint about the sound previously was that for what I was used to, I was hearing overly aggressive, distracting, high frequency sounds from the surrounds on the two Music Modes. I did not like that I could not trim down the side and rear levels (on Marantz 8801) on a per sound mode basis, and that there are also no settings on the 8801 for high frequency rolloff to the surrounds. My choices of setting panorama on/off; adjusting center volume via width, and adjusting for depth, did not create the desired effect of toning down the high frequency (cymbals, etc) sounds from the surrounds. I re-ran Audyssey to see if I could get a more pleasing result.

Now with no change to anything in my room and using mic positioning that did not vary except for a possible minor allowance, I got results that crossed over my main front channels at 120Hz. These are large speakers (Dahlquist DQ20is) and notably, the original Audyssey results produced crossover for these speakers at 60Hz (which I over-rode and upped to 80 Hz). I did not lose woofer (I checked)! Understanding that there would be in a gap in EQ if I set the crossovers LOWER than Audyssey, I re-ran the setup. This time, it came up with 150Hz crossovers! I have since run it another couple of times, making very minor speaker positioning changes (toeing them in/out, an inch or two closer/further from a wall) and the lowest crossover I was able to obtain was 100Hz.

I am most pleased with the sound of the system when the crossovers are all set at 80Hz. Am I losing the EQ in the fronts in the 80-100 range?  And I just don't understand the variation in Audyssey results that I am getting. (It is not due to ambient noise or any significant change in mic position). Also, if I need to further keep re-running Audyssey I'm going to upchuck!

Since you have speakers from the late '80's, may I ask what is the condition of the woofers? Here's a pair on sale where the seller says they are in great condition, but if you click on the close-up photo of the woofers, arrgh...gonna be surprised! Can you check your woofers' condition?
post #67242 of 70909

Mogorf,

 

Would have been my first concern as well. However, I am the original and only owner of these excellent speakers and only recently had the woofers rebuilt after the surrounds on each of them finally failed. They sound great listening in 2 channel mode sans subwoofers.

post #67243 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by spentmuch View Post

Mogorf,

Would have been my first concern as well. However, I am the original and only owner of these excellent speakers and only recently had the woofers rebuilt after the surrounds on each of them finally failed. They sound great listening in 2 channel mode sans subwoofers.

That's good news, so now we can rule out broken woofers, we can rule out a bad mic, we can rule out open doors. Could it be a case of HVAC? Are you sure every "noise maker" is turned off during auto-setup? Fridge near-by, aquarium, etc.?

Can you post a picture or two of your setup?
post #67244 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by spentmuch View Post
 

Dear Selden Ball,

I very much appreciate your detailed answer. I guess the bottom line is that I am content with the sound I'm getting now with both music and movies (though I do wish Marantz would add the user changeable parameters I mentioned), so I doublt I'm going to spend more $$$ on room analyzing equipment.  I guess the microphone could have a problem, but dubious on that point because it does sense the low frequency response of my surrounds, which it crosses over surprisingly low (60-80 Hx). But otherwise no...no doors to open or close; no change in speaker locations (except as I mentioned, during experimentation with toeing and slight movement). So I do remain a bit mystified and do wonder about whether there is any dynamic EQ going on in my front speakers between the 80-120 Hz range since I did dial down the crossover point to 80Hz.

 

Regards,

 

If you lowered the crossovers, Audyssey won't have created any filters between the suggested XO and whatever you lowered it to - in your case between 120Hz and 80hz. That's quite an important bit of the frequency spectrum so it may have an impact on the final SQ. 

 

Why Audyssey is setting your XOs so high is a mystery right now. What Audyssey does is 'listen' to the response in-room and when it detects the -3dB  point of the FR of the speaker, it tells the AVR which then figures out a XO and sets it. for some reason, Audyssey isn't seeing much below 120Hz, which is odd. Small variations in mic position can have big impacts on FR and it is possible you have set the mic in a null for example. I would try running Audyssey again and, while still following the advice in the FAQ wrt to mic positions, use different positions than you did the last time - deliberately vary them by a few inches (other than the first one which must be at the MLP). Then see if that makes a difference.

post #67245 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

The Audyssey Music curve should have no impact since it's supposed to be flat all over the whole frequency range (+/- 0 dB). Imagine a flat curve, eh? smile.gif

The Audyssey target curve will have a slight roll-off in the HF region, so your target curve and the Audyssey target curve will add up. In other words its simple arithmetics with decibels. For example, if Audyssey target cuts -6 dB at 10 kHz and your target curve cuts -4 dB, the result will be -10 dB at 10 kHz.
Thanks for your response. Still not clear to me so please bear with me.

There are three knobs to turn. "Audyssey Target Curve in the Pro Software", "Audyssey: Music" and "Audyssey: Movie". Let's say I want only the target curve I chose in the software to be the one. Should I choose "Audyssey:Music", "Audyssey:Movie" or "Audyssey:Off". When you say "The Audyssey Music curve should have no impact since it's supposed to be flat all over the whole frequency range (+/- 0 dB)" it seems to imply it overrides the target curve I chose in the Pro software.
Thanks,
-Jai
post #67246 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by jmcomp124 View Post

Thanks for your response. Still not clear to me so please bear with me.

There are three knobs to turn. "Audyssey Target Curve in the Pro Software", "Audyssey: Music" and "Audyssey: Movie". Let's say I want only the target curve I chose in the software to be the one. Should I choose "Audyssey:Music", "Audyssey:Movie" or "Audyssey:Off". When you say "The Audyssey Music curve should have no impact since it's supposed to be flat all over the whole frequency range (+/- 0 dB)" it seems to imply it overrides the target curve I chose in the Pro software.
Thanks,
-Jai

First off, you did not say you were using the Pro Software, you just said that you would create a target curve on your own. smile.gif Many are using external devices on top of Audyssey.

Using Pro is a completely different thing. Since I do not have Pro, I think you will be better seved at the Audyssey Pro thread. Good luck! smile.gif
Edited by mogorf - 11/23/13 at 12:06pm
post #67247 of 70909
Doesn't Audyssey compensate for noise and won't run if the noise floor is too high?
post #67248 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by comfynumb View Post

Doesn't Audyssey compensate for noise and won't run if the noise floor is too high?

Correct! but my OCD says Shhhh! quite biggrin.gif
post #67249 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

First off, you did not say you were using the Pro Software, you just said that you would create a target curve on your own. smile.gif Many are using external devices on top of Audyssey.

Using Pro is a completely different thing. Since I do not have Pro, I think you will be better seved at the Audyssey Pro thread. Good luck! smile.gif
Thanks. Sorry if I was not clear. Will try in the Pro thread.
post #67250 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post


That's good news, so now we can rule out broken woofers, we can rule out a bad mic, we can rule out open doors. Could it be a case of HVAC? Are you sure every "noise maker" is turned off during auto-setup? Fridge near-by, aquarium, etc.?

Can you post a picture or two of your setup?


mogorf

I appreciate your trying to help. I assure you, I was absolutely OCD about background noise. Furnace off, projector off, refrigerator off. I'll be happy to post a pic.

Note:  I stood at the back of the room. Just above and behind the camera, but out of the photo are the two rear surrounds.  You may also note that the right front speaker is near a side wall and the left front speaker is near an open corridor. This would explain why the audyssey curves created for the right and left fronts are quite different in the low end; whereas the bass looks pretty flat for the right, the left side rolls off sharply. Nonetheless, these are constants; and the first time I setup with Audyssey it clocked my front speakers at a 60Hz crossover. It remains possible that the left woofer may not be putting out the way it should, but it does sound fine to my ear...even after turning off all amps except the one to that speaker.

post #67251 of 70909

Dear mogorf, selden ball and kbarnes (and others): Again, many thanks. I tried one more thing just now: I played a Fleetwood Mac selection that contains reasonable bass content in Stereo. I first reconfigured my front speakers as "large" and subwoofers as "none":  I had enough decent sounding Bass that I had to go stick my ear next to the subwoofers to make sure they really weren't playing! Next I toggled between Audyssey Flat with Dynamic EQ on and Audyssey OFF.  I was hearing pure Dahlquist heaven. There was actually a very slight high end boost with Audysssey Flat vs Audyssey OFF; and even slightly, very slightly more high end boost with Audyssey. To my ears, Audyssey Flat and Audyssey OFF sounded best and very difficult to discern any difference in Bass. Reconfiguring to Fronts as "small", crossovers at 80; and Subwoofers "on" added the richness of the deep bass. So...guys...I'm satisfied with the sound and I've had enough effin around for a while. I'm just going to let it lay. (It'd be a different story if I didn't like the sound quality).  Thanks again.

post #67252 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by spentmuch View Post

Dear mogorf, selden ball and kbarnes (and others): Again, many thanks. I tried one more thing just now: I played a Fleetwood Mac selection that contains reasonable bass content in Stereo. I first reconfigured my front speakers as "large" and subwoofers as "none":  I had enough decent sounding Bass that I had to go stick my ear next to the subwoofers to make sure they really weren't playing! Next I toggled between Audyssey Flat with Dynamic EQ on and Audyssey OFF.  I was hearing pure Dahlquist heaven. There was actually a very slight high end boost with Audysssey Flat vs Audyssey OFF; and even slightly, very slightly more high end boost with Audyssey. To my ears, Audyssey Flat and Audyssey OFF sounded best and very difficult to discern any difference in Bass. Reconfiguring to Fronts as "small", crossovers at 80; and Subwoofers "on" added the richness of the deep bass. So...guys...I'm satisfied with the sound and I've had enough effin around for a while. I'm just going to let it lay. (It'd be a different story if I didn't like the sound quality).  Thanks again.

Good news again, although me thinks the original problem hasn't been solved yet. Looking at your pic I can not come around with anything lacking in your setup that could cause a) harsh highs and b) crossover for the Front L&Rs abnormally high above 100 Hz.

As a last resort you can always do a microprocessor reset on the Marantz. Look up the manual for procedures.

BTW, you have a very nice and comfy HT system indeed! Enjoyed looking at it. smile.gif
post #67253 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by spentmuch View Post

Dear mogorf, selden ball and kbarnes (and others): Again, many thanks. I tried one more thing just now: I played a Fleetwood Mac selection that contains reasonable bass content in Stereo. I first reconfigured my front speakers as "large" and subwoofers as "none":  I had enough decent sounding Bass that I had to go stick my ear next to the subwoofers to make sure they really weren't playing! Next I toggled between Audyssey Flat with Dynamic EQ on and Audyssey OFF.  I was hearing pure Dahlquist heaven. There was actually a very slight high end boost with Audysssey Flat vs Audyssey OFF; and even slightly, very slightly more high end boost with Audyssey. To my ears, Audyssey Flat and Audyssey OFF sounded best and very difficult to discern any difference in Bass. Reconfiguring to Fronts as "small", crossovers at 80; and Subwoofers "on" added the richness of the deep bass. So...guys...I'm satisfied with the sound and I've had enough effin around for a while. I'm just going to let it lay. (It'd be a different story if I didn't like the sound quality).  Thanks again.

I understand you are happy now and don't want to mess with things any more, but I just wanted to make one small comment. From your picture, it seems like you have two reflective surfaces on the left and right walls, right about the first reflection point. Of course I can't be sure just from the picture, but I would be concerned that these surfaces could be causing some unwanted reflections that could affect the Audyssey calibration. Next time you are feeling adventurous, try running a calibration with these surfaces removed--you might hear a positive difference.
post #67254 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post


Good news again, although me thinks the original problem hasn't been solved yet. Looking at your pic I can not come around with anything lacking in your setup that could cause a) harsh highs and b) crossover for the Front L&Rs abnormally high above 100 Hz.

As a last resort you can always do a microprocessor reset on the Marantz. Look up the manual for procedures.

BTW, you have a very nice and comfy HT system indeed! Enjoyed looking at it. smile.gif


Thanks mogorf.  That sounds like it might be the answer.  A reset.  I may try it sometime, but not anytime soon  :)

post #67255 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by spentmuch View Post
 
 

I appreciate your trying to help. I assure you, I was absolutely OCD about background noise. Furnace off, projector off, refrigerator off. I'll be happy to post a pic.

Note:  I stood at the back of the room. Just above and behind the camera, but out of the photo are the two rear surrounds.  You may also note that the right front speaker is near a side wall and the left front speaker is near an open corridor. This would explain why the audyssey curves created for the right and left fronts are quite different in the low end; whereas the bass looks pretty flat for the right, the left side rolls off sharply. Nonetheless, these are constants; and the first time I setup with Audyssey it clocked my front speakers at a 60Hz crossover. It remains possible that the left woofer may not be putting out the way it should, but it does sound fine to my ear...even after turning off all amps except the one to that speaker.

 

 

Crossover settings aren't going to be influenced by background noise during the cal. If there was significant background noise during the cal, Audyssey raises the levels of the chirps and tries again. It does this three times before giving up. If you did not get a second or third attempt, then Audyssey was not having any issues wrt to background noise. Crossover differences between cals are much more likely to be a result of differing mic locations. Did you try my earlier suggestion for proving or disproving this in your case?

 

I see you are happy with it now so no need to try my suggestion - if you do a recal at any time, give it a go. 

post #67256 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post
 

 

 Did you try my earlier suggestion for proving or disproving this in your case?

 

I see you are happy with it now so no need to try my suggestion - if you do a recal at any time, give it a go. 

kbarnes701: Admittedly, I did not directly try your suggestion. But in an indirect fashion I did set up enough different times that the mic position would have varied slightly since I did not use any sort of markers to hit precisely the same spot for each mic position.  They were just "eyeballed" to be very close for each subsequent setup. I'm not sure, but I suspect that Audyssey decides the proper high pass crossover point for each speaker on the first pass when the mic should be in the prime listening seat...which for me is perfectly centered. That mic position has varied the least because there is an actual visual marker there...namely, the impression left by my butt on the sofa!  I set the tripod right on the spot and raise it up to ear level.  You brought up an interesting point about the possibility of a null area. There are areas in my room that do have nulls that are obvious, but they are fortunately well outside of the main seating area (if you look at the photo I posted above, there is a bass null toward the rear of the room and to the left of the sectional sofa. (There is a small bar there, which you can't see in the photo and there is a near total bass null). But the obvious null appears to apply to the subwoofer frequencies, much lower than 80 Hz. You're suggesting that there could be a null at around frequencies somewhere south of 120 Hz that lies just a few inches in any plane from the #1 mic position. I'm not hearing it for sure, or the sound quality would change with my slightest head movement. But I think your point is sensible and possible and I will purposely alter that numero uno mic position the next time I am forced to run Audyssey... like if I change out my 5 channel Sunfire, which is becoming erratic in it's auto on sensing  mechanism... but that's another subject for another time.

post #67257 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by spentmuch View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post
 

 

 Did you try my earlier suggestion for proving or disproving this in your case?

 

I see you are happy with it now so no need to try my suggestion - if you do a recal at any time, give it a go. 

kbarnes701: Admittedly, I did not directly try your suggestion. But in an indirect fashion I did set up enough different times that the mic position would have varied slightly since I did not use any sort of markers to hit precisely the same spot for each mic position.  They were just "eyeballed" to be very close for each subsequent setup. 

 

I'm suggesting you do the opposite of that and deliberately use a set of mic placements that are NOT identical or close to the ones you used before. Remain within the broad guidelines of the FAQ on mic placement but use different locations to those you normally use. It has been seen quite often that small variations in mic placement can have a notable effect of choice of crossover. One thing that we have consistently seen in the REW measuring thread is that small movements of the mic can make big differences in FR.

 

 

Quote:

  I'm not sure, but I suspect that Audyssey decides the proper high pass crossover point for each speaker on the first pass when the mic should be in the prime listening seat...which for me is perfectly centered.

 

No - the first mic position sets levels and distances and also measures the response of each speaker from that location. Crossovers are determined by the F3 of each individual speaker together with the 'weighted average' response of all of the mic positions together AFAIK. The F3 of each speaker will vary according to its position in the room and also its location relative to the mic.  IOW, to give an example, if a speaker in a corner was listened to from the MLP it would exhibit a certain F3, but this would be different to the F3 if the listener moved to the exact centre of the room.

 

 

Quote:

 That mic position has varied the least because there is an actual visual marker there...namely, the impression left by my butt on the sofa!  I set the tripod right on the spot and raise it up to ear level.  You brought up an interesting point about the possibility of a null area. There are areas in my room that do have nulls that are obvious, but they are fortunately well outside of the main seating area (if you look at the photo I posted above, there is a bass null toward the rear of the room and to the left of the sectional sofa. (There is a small bar there, which you can't see in the photo and there is a near total bass null). But the obvious null appears to apply to the subwoofer frequencies, much lower than 80 Hz. You're suggesting that there could be a null at around frequencies somewhere south of 120 Hz that lies just a few inches in any plane from the #1 mic position. I'm not hearing it for sure, or the sound quality would change with my slightest head movement. But I think your point is sensible and possible and I will purposely alter that numero uno mic position the next time I am forced to run Audyssey... like if I change out my 5 channel Sunfire, which is becoming erratic in it's auto on sensing  mechanism... but that's another subject for another time.

 

I'm not sure how you are determining the location of the nulls. Have you used a room mode calculator? All rooms have a series of modes (peaks and nulls) dependent on the room dimensions. You can place speakers in or out of these naturally occurring nulls and they will sound differently, as they will if the listening position also happens to coincide with a null. If you are positioning the mic in a null, then it will skew the calibration because the mic will hear a lot less bass and will 'believe' that the speaker under test has limited low frequency capability. It will then raise the XO to allow more of the signal content to be reproduced by the subwoofer. I am not saying this is the problem you have.

 

It is true that the SQ would change as you moved your ears in and out of the null but I wouldn't agree that 'the slightest head movement' is all that would be required. 

 

Maybe a plan of suggested action would be to try measuring from a different location for the MLP, but with the same (or as close as you can get them) spots for the other 7 measurements and then another run using the original MLP but different mic locations for the other 7 spots (staying broadly within the guidelines). It would be interesting to see the impact on the selected XOs if you tried that.

 

Incidentally, I agree with Jerry's suggestion to try removing those huge reflectors from each side of of the room!  When seated in any listening position can you see any speakers reflections in those pictures or mirrors or whatever they are?  If so, then you do have a problem there.

 

Nice room BTW.

post #67258 of 70909
Yesterday my 2 Arx A1b arrived that i'm going to use for surround sides. One of the speakers when on the left side audyssey sets it to +9.5 and +12 on the right side. However the other speaker on left side is set to -1.5 and -2.0 on the right side. The speaker doesn't seem to be messed up other then audyssey setting it really high. Support said if i think it's the speaker they will replace it. Any ideas why this would be happening?
post #67259 of 70909
Quote:
Originally Posted by thanksinadvance View Post

Yesterday my 2 Arx A1b arrived that i'm going to use for surround sides. One of the speakers when on the left side audyssey sets it to +9.5 and +12 on the right side. However the other speaker on left side is set to -1.5 and -2.0 on the right side. The speaker doesn't seem to be messed up other then audyssey setting it really high. Support said if i think it's the speaker they will replace it. Any ideas why this would be happening?

 

It's odd to say the least. Identical speakers should reproduce a given SPL of a tone at the same level, as you are suggesting. IOW, if I feed a certain voltage into one speaker and it produces 75dB, I’d expect its identical twin to produce 75dB also. In fact, that is a test you can do if you have a SPL meter (if not download a free one for your phone - it will be good enough for this test). Then hook up speaker 1 to, say, the left speaker output of your AVR or amp and play a test tone through it. Measure the SPL. Then place speaker 2 in the exact same spot, hook it up to the same output and without touching the volume control on your AVR, measure the same test tone for speaker 2, from the exact spot you had the meter for the first speaker. Both speakers should give the exact same SPL reading (give or take a very small margin). If they are significantly different, eg by several dB then there is something wrong with the speaker.

 

Doing it this way will rule out any possibility of a problem with the AVR side surround channels.  If the speakers measure differently, the problem is with the speakers. If the speakers measure more or less the same, the problem is elsewhere - probably the AVR (although the test you already did to get the trims you mention would seem to rule that out).

 

Please let us know what the outcome is.

post #67260 of 70909

^+1. 

TIA,

IIUC the unusually high reading followed the speaker when you switched them and reran Autosetup.  The obvious problem is that speaker-probably a defective driver or internal crossover.

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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)