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post #68101 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

If the sketch is accurate then you are not placing the mic correctly. All of the mic positions need to be over the couch. In fact if you just 'moved' the whole lot in the direction of the red arrow I have marked on your sketch, that would be a better idea. This assumes you mainly are interested only in the one seat, where the mic positions are clustered.





Something more like this would be a more 'normal' mic layout pattern to try - yellow is the No1 position:




That assumes you want to calibrate for all seats along the couch.

Make sure the centre speaker is angled down towards the MLP.

I am assuming you are not interested in the other couch. It would be very difficult to get a good calibration for both couches anyway, so I’d concentrate on doing the best you can for the one couch and letting the other 'fall where it may'. All seats on the other couch are in a pretty bad position anyway wrt to imaging.

Hey guys, ok yes it is a sectional couldn't find one in the drawing program so just used 2 couches lol.... Only reason I had put the mic there was I was afraid if I put it on the actual couch it would screw up the readings....Center channel is angled downward toward main listening area & if you noticed I had left out my surrounds in the original drawing....I will take readings again tonite from your indicated locations & report back once I'm finished....

Thank you again!!!!
Carmine
post #68102 of 70896
Carmine,

You might want to consider using a microphone boom stand. They only cost about $20 and would let you place the microphone anywhere without using a cushion.

See http://www.avsforum.com/t/795421/official-audyssey-thread-faq-in-post-51779/51750#user_d1

d)1. Do I really need to put the Audyssey mic on a tripod or stand?
post #68103 of 70896
I thought I would share that I have taken it upon myself to rename the RLOs to the correct name they should've been given by Audyssey:

1) 0db = Max (Film)

2) 5db = Medium

3) 10db = Low

4) 15db = Minimum

5) OFF

Carry on...................... cool.gif
Edited by D Bone - 1/2/14 at 11:27pm
post #68104 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Carmine,

You might want to consider using a microphone boom stand. They only cost about $20 and would let you place the microphone anywhere without using a cushion.

See http://www.avsforum.com/t/795421/official-audyssey-thread-faq-in-post-51779/51750#user_d1

d)1. Do I really need to put the Audyssey mic on a tripod or stand?

I have been using a tripod...Now here's 1 other question regarding height of mic placement - since I will be taking readings on couch should i still have positioned at "ear level" or raise it above back seat cushion?

Thanks again.
Carmine
post #68105 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by D Bone View Post

I'm guessing it's a sectional, and he used two couches for illustration purposes only.

 

Ah yes... that makes more sense than my thought! :)

post #68106 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by carminepesce View Post
 
 
Hey guys, ok yes it is a sectional couldn't find one in the drawing program so just used 2 couches lol.... Only reason I had put the mic there was I was afraid if I put it on the actual couch it would screw up the readings....Center channel is angled downward toward main listening area & if you noticed I had left out my surrounds in the original drawing....I will take readings again tonite from your indicated locations & report back once I'm finished....

Thank you again!!!!
Carmine

 

Cool!  One thing - do NOT place the mic on the couch. Never, never, never. Use a tripod or better still a proper boom mic stand that you can get for less than 20 bucks. 

 

I never asked what method you were using for supporting the mic - but it can cause problems and possibly incorrect crossovers too, 

post #68107 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Carmine,

You might want to consider using a microphone boom stand. They only cost about $20 and would let you place the microphone anywhere without using a cushion.

See http://www.avsforum.com/t/795421/official-audyssey-thread-faq-in-post-51779/51750#user_d1

d)1. Do I really need to put the Audyssey mic on a tripod or stand?

 

+1. A cheap boom stand is a really great investment and makes it much easier and quicker to do a calibration, as well as potentially giving superior results. 20 bucks guys... a fraction of a percent of the system cost...

post #68108 of 70896
Literally the best money I've spent on my setup is the mic stand with boom but don't forget the adapter to hold the mic like I did biggrin.gif there are cheaper ones but this one is a good one. For less than $35 I have something that is worth it's weight in sonic gold wink.gif


http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001GWCC4I
post #68109 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by comfynumb View Post

Literally the best money I've spent on my setup is the mic stand with boom but don't forget the adapter to hold the mic like I did biggrin.gif there are cheaper ones but this one is a good one. For less than $35 I have something that is worth it's weight in sonic gold wink.gif


http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001GWCC4I

+1 Got one after upgrading to the x4000. Makes it a hell of a lot easier to do those 8 measurements.
post #68110 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighou View Post

Interesting. So by listening (to CD's) at 0 RLO, the bass and treble are being overcorrected? I'll have to play around a bit more with the different offsets. I like DEQ, but I really don't think my speakers need any treble boost. They are pretty crisp as is. Worst case, I guess I could just use Audyssey EQ for music without DEQ, and bump my sub up a bit to get the bass I want.

**EDIT** I think I found a combo I like even more for music. I ran it in "bypass L/R" mode but left DEQ on. This way, my sub is still benefiting from the Audyssey filters and I'm getting nice, full bass, but my mains are not affected. To be honest, I think my mains sound better with their natural sound. It's almost like Audyssey was making them too crisp and clear, which is great for movies, but it seemed to make the music a little sharp. Not sure how to describe it exactly, but it just sounded a little off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighou View Post


So by using this "bypass LR" mode, Audyssey has no affect on my front speakers. Does this mean DEQ also has no effect on my fronts? It seems that using this mode will give me what I want. I want my subwoofer EQ'd, but that is it. I found a little bit about this on the Audyssey site and they mention that they "don't recommend or support" bypass mode. This is kind of funny, because I've found that this is how my CD's sound best.

Audyssey on seems awesome for movies, but it does something to my music that sort of grates on my ears. DEQ may be to blame, too. It really does seem to change the inherent sound of my speakers. While that's great for TV and movies, it's not so hot for tunes. I suppose Audyssey was mainly designed for HT and not 2-channel music?

MileHigh,

Just wanted to drop a line saying that the way you have your setup adjusted is exactly how I prefer mine for dedicated 2 channel listening as well, only difference is I leave dynEq off. I believe the effect of dynEQ is disabled as well in Bypass LR mode as the underlying target curve is nowhere to be heard obviously. Next time I run measurements I will try and see if enabling dynEQ in bypass mode changes anything.

Bypass LR does very well for stereo listening, while preserving the subeq that you so desire, but the biggest benefit I have found is that it starts my house curve sooner, down low, and doesn't boost the top end to attempt to level everything to the audyssey target curve. The funny thing is, I prefer the exact opposite of this when listening to movies/TV content.
post #68111 of 70896
Dynamic EQ is definitely still active when using the "Bypass L/R" target curve. Nothing else is changed in this mode except the target curve -- the front L/R speakers do not receive any EQ and the other speakers are filtered to a target curve that is the average response of the L/R fronts. The subwoofer is still EQ'd flat.

It's definitely not orthodoxy and I would probably never recommend it for movie viewing, but for music it can be useful if you prefer the "natural" sound of your speakers the Audyssey target curve, but don't want to throw the baby out with the bathwater by turning off Audyssey completely (i.e. you still want to get sub EQ and the loudness compensation of DEQ).
post #68112 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post


MileHigh,

Just wanted to drop a line saying that the way you have your setup adjusted is exactly how I prefer mine for dedicated 2 channel listening as well, only difference is I leave dynEq off. I believe the effect of dynEQ is disabled as well in Bypass LR mode as the underlying target curve is nowhere to be heard obviously. Next time I run measurements I will try and see if enabling dynEQ in bypass mode changes anything.

Bypass LR does very well for stereo listening, while preserving the subeq that you so desire, but the biggest benefit I have found is that it starts my house curve sooner, down low, and doesn't boost the top end to attempt to level everything to the audyssey target curve. The funny thing is, I prefer the exact opposite of this when listening to movies/TV content.

Good to know I'm not the only one smile.gif I listened to some more CDs this weekend, and I totally prefer my music in "Bypass L/R" mode. My only thing now is getting the bass dialed in. I've found that even with DEQ on, the sub trim at -6.5 dB (how Audyssey set it) is a bit weak for my taste. I just bump it up a bit and I'm good to go.

Like you, I think I like what Audyssey is doing for movies, but it made my music sound weird and I prefer the sound of my speakers without EQ. It sounded like it was boosting the treble and higher freq sounds too much.
post #68113 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighou View Post

Good to know I'm not the only one smile.gif I listened to some more CDs this weekend, and I totally prefer my music in "Bypass L/R" mode. My only thing now is getting the bass dialed in. I've found that even with DEQ on, the sub trim at -6.5 dB (how Audyssey set it) is a bit weak for my taste. I just bump it up a bit and I'm good to go.

Like you, I think I like what Audyssey is doing for movies, but it made my music sound weird and I prefer the sound of my speakers without EQ. It sounded like it was boosting the treble and higher freq sounds too much.

You can see in this graph why I like the bypass or regular response for music. You can see the boost up top that is more than likely the same thing you are hearing with your system, and now that I have corner loaded the speakers a little more, I get a better house curve down low than what this shows:

post #68114 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

You can see in this graph why I like the bypass or regular response for music. You can see the boost up top that is more than likely the same thing you are hearing with your system, and now that I have corner loaded the speakers a little more, I get a better house curve down low than what this shows:


Cool. Yeah, I have some Polk TSi speakers which seem a little on the bright side, but not overly so. They're very clear sounding. To my ears, they definitely don't need any boost towards the high end. They have a nice midrange and clear treble, but the bass is a little lacking. With a sub, that's not a problem, though.
post #68115 of 70896
It's worth noting that what you are describing isn't generalizable across all speakers/rooms. What is basically happening is that your speakers+room have a natural roll-off that you find pleasing with music, and Audyssey needs to boost the high end freqs to meet the target curve. So by enabling Bypass mode you are of course removing the high freq energy that MultEQ is putting in, restoring the pleasing sound that you are used to.

But if you have a different room -- for example an extremely live room and/or bright speakers -- you would get the opposite effect when engaging Bypass mode. It would be TOO bright without Audyssey MultEQ filters removing the excess high freq energy.

So it's really a case by case thing. I would never recommend Bypass mode for music listening universally (not that I am accusing you of doing so), but rather only in those situations where you subjectively prefer the "natural" top end of your speakers + room to Audyssey's target curve.
post #68116 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

It's worth noting that what you are describing isn't generalizable across all speakers/rooms. What is basically happening is that your speakers+room have a natural roll-off that you find pleasing with music, and Audyssey needs to boost the high end freqs to meet the target curve. So by enabling Bypass mode you are of course removing the high freq energy that MultEQ is putting in, restoring the pleasing sound that you are used to.

But if you have a different room -- for example an extremely live room and/or bright speakers -- you would get the opposite effect when engaging Bypass mode. It would be TOO bright without Audyssey MultEQ filters removing the excess high freq energy.

So it's really a case by case thing. I would never recommend Bypass mode for music listening universally (not that I am accusing you of doing so), but rather only in those situations where you subjectively prefer the "natural" top end of your speakers + room to Audyssey's target curve.

That makes sense. There are a ton a variables that come into play. The weird thing is, my room is fairly "live" with hard wood floors and a high ceiling, but I have an area rug and also a couple acoustic panels on stands behind the TV. I'd expect Audyssey to mellow the sound, but it seems to do the opposite (for music, at least). I'm just glad I can have it one way for movies and another for music.
post #68117 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighou View Post

That makes sense. There are a ton a variables that come into play. The weird thing is, my room is fairly "live" with hard wood floors and a high ceiling, but I have an area rug and also a couple acoustic panels on stands behind the TV. I'd expect Audyssey to mellow the sound, but it seems to do the opposite (for music, at least). I'm just glad I can have it one way for movies and another for music.

Using Audyssey XT, I find that most modern Blu-ray movies are very well balanced, and most CDs are a bit too bright. OTOH, a few CDs are dull enough above 8 - 10 K so as to require Audyssey Flat, rather than my usual preference, Audyssey reference. SACDs are somewhere in-between, but can be great.
post #68118 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

+1. A cheap boom stand is a really great investment and makes it much easier and quicker to do a calibration, as well as potentially giving superior results. 20 bucks guys... a fraction of a percent of the system cost...

OK so I just ordered a boom stand & adapter lol will wait till this arrives to take my next Audyssey readings......
Will post results then....

Thanks guys!!!
Carmine
post #68119 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by garygarrison View Post

Using Audyssey XT, I find that most modern Blu-ray movies are very well balanced, and most CDs are a bit too bright. OTOH, a few CDs are dull enough above 8 - 10 K so as to require Audyssey Flat, rather than my usual preference, Audyssey reference. SACDs are somewhere in-between, but can be great.

That's very true. The source really matters a lot. It varies a lot from CD to CD, unfortunately.

FWIW, I got a new TV stand tonight and I can put my center channel a lot closer (vertically) to the tweeters in my mains. I re-calibrated and it doesn't seem to have the same amount of brightness I was getting before.
post #68120 of 70896
Could use some advice.... i just read the FAQ (great read). Went out and bought a boom arm for my mic stand in one last attempt at getting my sub eq unit to work.

I can, with mini-dsp, dial in my seat with only level and delay adjustments - no filters. But this leaves my other chairs out of whack. Point is with four sub cabinets, and all of the room treatments I have, I dont need much eq. This is backed up by measurements taken with REW.

With the sub eq unit, I have been able to dial in two out of four seats flat, and the third seat ... Mine... Pretty close. Sometimes much closer than others so I know its a matter of measuring technique. Hence the purchase of the boom arm tonight. However Im wondering if the sub eq is having a hard time time aligning the subs more than it is eq ing them.

I have six subs in four cabinets. Two cabinets are powered off one channel of my amp, and the other two cabinets off the other channel of my amp. (Amp is a pro audio 7500 watter)

Two cabinets hold two subs each and are located in the front corner of my room. These get a combined 3750 watts. They are equidistant to the first measure location in between the two main seats.

The other two cabinets hold one sub each and are colocated about 3-4ft I think for alot of "new" the three chairs in question here. These get a combined 2000 watts.

Is there anything else besides the boom arm i can do to help Audyssey help me?

Let meknow if i can provide more info.......
post #68121 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdxrealtor View Post

Could use some advice.... i just read the FAQ (great read). Went out and bought a boom arm for my mic stand in one last attempt at getting my sub eq unit to work.

I can, with mini-dsp, dial in my seat with only level and delay adjustments - no filters. But this leaves my other chairs out of whack. Point is with four sub cabinets, and all of the room treatments I have, I dont need much eq. This is backed up by measurements taken with REW.

With the sub eq unit, I have been able to dial in two out of four seats flat, and the third seat ... Mine... Pretty close. Sometimes much closer than others so I know its a matter of measuring technique. Hence the purchase of the boom arm tonight. However Im wondering if the sub eq is having a hard time time aligning the subs more than it is eq ing them.

I have six subs in four cabinets. Two cabinets are powered off one channel of my amp, and the other two cabinets off the other channel of my amp. (Amp is a pro audio 7500 watter)

Two cabinets hold two subs each and are located in the front corner of my room. These get a combined 3750 watts. They are equidistant to the first measure location in between the two main seats.

The other two cabinets hold one sub each and are colocated about 3-4ft I think for alot of "new" the three chairs in question here. These get a combined 2000 watts.

Is there anything else besides the boom arm i can do to help Audyssey help me?

Let meknow if i can provide more info.......

Are all your seats in the same, or different rows? With four subs you should be able to get a good response, assuming you have decent flexibility on placement. Having just recently spent days(not consecutive smile.gif) optimizing my four subs I can say that it may not be easy, but it can be done.

My approach was not to obtain a flat response without EQ in any particular seat prior to EQ since that goal always seemed to be met with the same problems your experiencing, which is that when one or two seats were very good the others had problems. There always seemed to be a null that if squashed in one seat would pop up in another. Sort of like a game of wack-a-mole. It wasnt until I decided to have as my goal low seat-to-seat variability and no nulls that I had success. I just ignored peaks, bumps, and humps. So my pre EQ measurements didn't look great



But the post EQ did because it was all cuts for the EQ and corrections were essentially the same for all seats.


I didn't post all three seats, but they all look the same within a couple dB's of variability.

So my suggestion is to optimize the seating for the EQ rather than optimize for a flat pre-EQ FR. Just a different way if looking at things.
Edited by Gooddoc - 12/17/13 at 5:59am
post #68122 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooddoc View Post
 
 

But the post EQ did because it was all cuts for the EQ and corrections were essentially the same for all seats.


I didn't post all three seats, but they all look the same within a couple dB's of variability.

So my suggestion is to optimize the seating for the EQ rather than optimize for a flat pre-EQ FR. Just a different way if looking at things.

 

Everything I have read indicates that your approach is the one most likely to deliver: go for a respectable minimum seat to seat variation initially, not worrying too much about the overall response, and then let Audyssey take over once that has been achieved.  This is actually good advice regardless of the number of subs. Audyssey's aim is to make 'every seat a good seat' so getting all the seats into line initially, before running Audyssey, presents Audyssey with a much less difficult task and this should result in a better calibration once Audyssey is run. 

post #68123 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

This is actually good advice regardless of the number of subs.

Yes, but having four subs it is easy to start thinking that should nearly guarantee that a flat response should be achievable everywhere without EQ. That just wasn't the case in my room and it was an iterative process to figure that out (translation: many hours of frustration biggrin.gif). I had given up multiple times in frustration and was just running two subs for a while as a result.

Now, two of my subs have a HPF of 40 Hz since they lack the extension of my two heavy hitters, but I think the principle is probably applicable to all identical subs and any number of subs as well.
post #68124 of 70896
Hi guys,
I could use a piece of Audyssey XT guidance. I have a problem, but a good problem to have, I suppose. smile.gif

I finally finished up my new DIY satellites, each of the LCR is a SEOS-12 with a DNA-350 and 2 rows of 2 Aura NS6 woofers in a sealed cabinet. If you're familiar with the Daniel project on the DIYSG message board, that's the crossover design I used; it operates essentially like a 2.5 way with the lower row of Auras only playing lower bass (the rears are a single NS6 with a Denovo Mini-Elliptical in a tower-style cabinet ported at 40Hz, but they're not an issue). For sub-duty, I've got a pair of Image Dynamics IDQ-12 v1's in a huge ported box, tuned to 20Hz, with a Peavey PV500 driving them...

Up until a few days ago, I was running an HK AVR-247 that had a slew of issues. It drove my SEOS mains well, and sounded good, but it had a host of problems. First, the HK room correction wouldn't auto-correct the mains. It would try, and get most of the way through... It would partially run, then fail, telling me to check my connections. I think what was happening, was due to my mains dropping to about 4 ohms DCR for an octave from where the bottom woofers start dropping off to where they all cut to the SEOS, that the HK wasn't able to detect the lower impedance properlly and didn't think anything was connected (it was marketed for 8 ohms minimum). No matter, it sounded good without it, but in addition to that, one of the fans was going bad in it (probably because they ran 100% of the time, which I was unaware was improper operation until a few weeks ago). So I picked up a replacement, and while doing that, I was being careless, didn't have on a ground strap, and static-zapped the power supply with my finger. So, it's dead. eek.gif

I replaced it with a Marantz SR5007 from a4l, and man, what an UPGRADE from the HK! Power, features, interface, auto RC, EVERYTHING! ESPECIALLY video, the video section of the Marantz makes the HK look like it was from the stoneage. I'm so much happier with the Marantz it's not even a contest.

ANY WAY, my issue... I have everything in a fairly small room (14.5'x16'), and all the listening positions are about 9'-10' feet away. Audyssey set the level trims for LCRs AND the subwoofer to -12dB (maxed out). I wasn't too surprised about the mains (BWaslo was the crossover designer and estimates their sensitivity at about 94-96dB @ 1W), but was somewhat surprised that my 2 12"s with 500W needed attenuated -12dB, but I do have it in a corner (and I'm NOT moving it. That's where I like it wink.gif ), so it has a lot of room gain. My question is, can I put say, a headphone volume control, in series with the calibration microphone to reduce the voltage so that it can level match all the speakers accurately? I'm sure they're all -12dB because that's the maximum attenuation, not because that's the accurate setting to even everything out. Obviously, this will skew my reference level, but that doesn't mean as much to me as having all the speakers' levels set accurately in relation to each other. I was thinking, run the calibration once with a volume control to knock down the mic's input in order to get the proper levels (in relation to each other, not reference), then re-run the calibration without the attenuator to set the EQ (in case the attenuator alters the FR of the mic), and adjust the speaker levels manually to match the attenuated calibration level structure. Would that work you think?

Thanks,
Jason
Edited by Jason Galloway - 12/17/13 at 11:27am
post #68125 of 70896
I'm having an odd issue I noticed with XT. My speakers are BP7000SC, so they are not your ordinary speaker. However, the issue is that when I engage XT, the sound is generally better, especially the bass, however, it sounds like some sounds is coming off the left side wall. I do sit slightly closer to the left wall then the right wall. When I disenage the XT, it resolve the issue. I noticed that XT bumps up the eq in the 125 hz range since there is a dip between the mids and the woofer at the point, but I'm not sure if that's really the issue.. Anyone else notice this at all?
post #68126 of 70896
what did your distance settings for left and right mains come back saying after you ran audyssey?
post #68127 of 70896
Distance looked good from what I previously recalled. I wonder if I moved the speakers slightly since I ran XT. I'll run it again tonight to see if I have the same issue. Just curious if it was just me or not.
post #68128 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gooddoc View Post

Are all your seats in the same, or different rows? With four subs you should be able to get a good response, assuming you have decent flexibility on placement. Having just recently spent days(not consecutive smile.gif) optimizing my four subs I can say that it may not be easy, but it can be done.

Yes all my seats are the same row.
Quote:
My approach was not to obtain a flat response without EQ in any particular seat prior to EQ since that goal always seemed to be met with the same problems your experiencing, which is that when one or two seats were very good the others had problems. There always seemed to be a null that if squashed in one seat would pop up in another. Sort of like a game of wack-a-mole. It wasnt until I decided to have as my goal low seat-to-seat variability and no nulls that I had success. I just ignored peaks, bumps, and humps. So my pre EQ measurements didn't look great

The point of mentioning the mini-dsp in my post was to inform that in all reality I've got a pretty good placement already, and once the subs are time aligned and not cancelling each other out things look pretty good in my seat, but a bit off in the other two.

This same seat is the one giving problems when attempting to use the sub eq Audyssey box. I'm wondering why the sub eq is having such a hard time with the one seat when I can manually dial it in with simple delay adjustments.

See what I'm saying?

FWIW I don't plan to use the mini-dsp (if at all possible) in the chain with the sub eq. I'd like it to be one or the other.

My seats and subs are optimized as good as they are going to ever be.
Quote:


But the post EQ did because it was all cuts for the EQ and corrections were essentially the same for all seats.


I didn't post all three seats, but they all look the same within a couple dB's of variability.

So my suggestion is to optimize the seating for the EQ rather than optimize for a flat pre-EQ FR. Just a different way if looking at things.
[/QUOTE]

Here's a couple graphs-

Sub eq graphs-



Mini - dsp graphs




No EQ at all - note that the peaks here are easily leveled out with delay adjustments, as seen above




You can see the sub eq unit does not have many problems to work with.

Why it's not giving me the much touted excellent Audyssey sub eq results is what I'm trying to figure out here. Starting with the boom arm.
Edited by pdxrealtor - 12/17/13 at 2:17pm
post #68129 of 70896
Appreciate the help you guys. I just spent four hours measuring with Audyssey and it's just not going to even come close to what the mini-dsp is doing with simple delay adjustments.

I'm almost positive the problem is the fact I have four subs running off two channels, and two of those subs are located farther away and in each room corner vs. the other two which are very close to the LP and co-located.

SVS- EQ-1 still for sale. ...... Bummer too. I really wanted it to work for me.

I got the mini looking not to shabby in all four seats. Main thing there is no deep troughs and only one peak in one seat above 5db. Anyways......

Thanks again.
post #68130 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by beastaudio View Post

what did your distance settings for left and right mains come back saying after you ran audyssey?

Ran thru Audyssey again and it fixed the issue, must of moved the speaker a little which screwed everything up.
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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)