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"Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779) - Page 2276

post #68251 of 70896
I have a Denon AVR-1613 and finally got a tripod to run Audyssey. I have Definitive Tech speakers and Klipsch Sub. It set my Center and Fronts Syrround Crossover to 150Hz and my rears to 110Hz. I am shocked to see the 150Hz setting. When I ran Auduyssey without a tripod it set the Fronts and Center to 120Hz. 150Hz seems really high for the 3 fronts. My room is rather large, 20'x20'x10' with a huge opening in the back to the kitchen and hallway. Any ideas why it set the Fronts to 150Hz?

Center: XTR-40 on top of stand
LR Fronts: DI 6.5s (in walls)
LR Sourround: UIW63/A (in ceiling)
Sub: Klipsch RW-12D
post #68252 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcalifornia View Post

I have a Denon AVR-1613 and finally got a tripod to run Audyssey. I have Definitive Tech speakers and Klipsch Sub. It set my Center and Fronts Syrround Crossover to 150Hz and my rears to 110Hz. I am shocked to see the 150Hz setting. When I ran Auduyssey without a tripod it set the Fronts and Center to 120Hz. 150Hz seems really high for the 3 fronts. My room is rather large, 20'x20'x10' with a huge opening in the back to the kitchen and hallway. Any ideas why it set the Fronts to 150Hz?

Center: XTR-40 on top of stand
LR Fronts: DI 6.5s (in walls)
LR Sourround: UIW63/A (in ceiling)
Sub: Klipsch RW-12D

I disregarded the crossovers set by Audyssey. I manually set all my speakers to 80 Hz.
post #68253 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by milehighou View Post


I disregarded the crossovers set by Audyssey. I manually set all my speakers to 80 Hz.

 

This is contrary to recommended procedure.  While you might find the results acceptable, it doesn't make sense to advise others to go against what Audyssey recommends.

post #68254 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcalifornia View Post

I have a Denon AVR-1613 and finally got a tripod to run Audyssey. I have Definitive Tech speakers and Klipsch Sub. It set my Center and Fronts Syrround Crossover to 150Hz and my rears to 110Hz. I am shocked to see the 150Hz setting. When I ran Auduyssey without a tripod it set the Fronts and Center to 120Hz. 150Hz seems really high for the 3 fronts. My room is rather large, 20'x20'x10' with a huge opening in the back to the kitchen and hallway. Any ideas why it set the Fronts to 150Hz?

Center: XTR-40 on top of stand
LR Fronts: DI 6.5s (in walls)
LR Sourround: UIW63/A (in ceiling)
Sub: Klipsch RW-12D

One reason as to why it set the crossovers that high it could be simply placement.
You have in wall and in ceiling speakers and that can be an issue because you won't be able to move them other than your center channel.
I have the same issue because mine are all in ceiling.
post #68255 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

This is contrary to recommended procedure.  While you might find the results acceptable, it doesn't make sense to advise others to go against what Audyssey recommends.

This is not entirely correct. I also discussed this issue with Chris of Audyssey and he confirmed that you should manually set the x-over frequencies, in case you are using a THX speaker set. However, if the x-over frequencies were set higher than 80 Hz by Audyssey and you set them lower, you have this infamous frequency range which would not be measured and treated by Audyssey. If the x-over frequencies were set lower than 80 Hz by Audyssey - e.g. 60 Hz - everything would be fine to set the x-over manually to 80 Hz after the measurement cycle has finished and you have a THX set. In other words, setting the x-over frequencies higher than Audyssey measured is OK, lower is not recommended.

However, it is also true that Chris recommends to keep the x-over frequencies where Audyssey sets them in all other cases. This may be the majority of cases.
But I have to say, if you find the x-over frequencies funny, I would recommend to reset the AVR to it's factory setting. I experienced this also and a very funny behavior about background noise with Audyssey-Pro.
Save the settings from your AVR to restore them later - if your AVR allows for this or write it down and then make a reset. This would be my recommendation.
post #68256 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcalifornia View Post

I have a Denon AVR-1613 and finally got a tripod to run Audyssey. I have Definitive Tech speakers and Klipsch Sub. It set my Center and Fronts Syrround Crossover to 150Hz and my rears to 110Hz. I am shocked to see the 150Hz setting. When I ran Auduyssey without a tripod it set the Fronts and Center to 120Hz. 150Hz seems really high for the 3 fronts. My room is rather large, 20'x20'x10' with a huge opening in the back to the kitchen and hallway. Any ideas why it set the Fronts to 150Hz?

Center: XTR-40 on top of stand
LR Fronts: DI 6.5s (in walls)
LR Sourround: UIW63/A (in ceiling)
Sub: Klipsch RW-12D

For a very good reason; your Klipsch sub has been measured flat to about 20 Hz, and your in-wall speakers don't come close to that in all likelihood. See here:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1390563/klipsch-rw-12d-omnimic-frequency-response-graphs

Conversely, your in-wall speakers have a combined midrange/bass driver, and while DT has them playing down to 26 Hz on their website, those are lab conditions, and they don't say how far down that is (-6 db or -3 db). Being in-wall means that you're not getting any bump up from corner placement either.

To put things in perspective, I have Gem XLs as surrounds, which use the same BDSS drivers as your speakers but 4 1/2 instead of 6 1/12 diameter. Even having my speakers on stands, and fairly close to corners as surrounds, Audyssey typically measure my XLs at anywhere from a 110 Hz crossover (standard Audyssey XT32) to 150 Hz with Audyssey Pro. I've seen this confirmed with my REW software as well. DT has them extending to 50 Hz.

I also see that the XTR-40 you have as a center is measured by DT to 100 Hz on the low-end, which is also probably generous for real world listening, Thus overall your crossovers determined by Audyssey really aren't all that surprising.

If you feel the bass is lacking, you might want to try different sub placements, or given the size of your room, picking up a second sub to even out the sound might be your best choice. Your room is slightly bigger than mine (24x17x9) and I have two HSU ULS-15. One sub in the same space would be IMO limiting.
Edited by sdrucker - 12/26/13 at 10:11am
post #68257 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrucker View Post

For a very good reason; your Klipsch sub has been measured flat to about 20 Hz, and your in-wall speakers don't come close to that in all likelihood. See here:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1390563/klipsch-rw-12d-omnimic-frequency-response-graphs

Conversely, your in-wall speakers have a combined midrange/bass driver, and while DT has them playing down to 26 Hz on their website, those are lab conditions, and they don't say how far down that is (-6 db or -3 db). Being in-wall means that you're not getting any bump up from corner placement either.

To put things in perspective, I have Gem XLs as surrounds, which use the same BDSS drivers as your speakers but 4 1/2 instead of 6 1/12 diameter. Even having my speakers on stands, and fairly close to corners as surrounds, Audyssey typically measure my XLs at anywhere from a 110 Hz crossover (standard Audyssey XT32) to 150 Hz with Audyssey Pro. I've seen this confirmed with my REW software as well. DT has them extending to 50 Hz.

I also see that the XTR-40 you have as a center is measured by DT to 100 Hz on the low-end, which is also probably generous for real world listening, Thus overall your crossovers determined by Audyssey really aren't all that surprising.

If you feel the bass is lacking, you might want to try different sub placements, or given the size of your room, picking up a second sub to even out the sound might be your best choice. Your room is slightly bigger than mine (24x17x9) and I have two HSU ULS-15. One sub in the same space would be IMO limiting.


Thanks for your detailed response. I think it does sound better with the higher crossover setting than before. I would have thought the DI 6.5S would have been measured in my room much lower than 150Hz. Somewhere in the 100-120Hz range.

The Klipsch has a pretty big drop-off starting at 70Hz and above and can only wonder how much it keeps going past 100Hz. I wonder if my mid-bass in the 100Hz-150Hz will be low.
post #68258 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

This is contrary to recommended procedure.  While you might find the results acceptable, it doesn't make sense to advise others to go against what Audyssey recommends.

Ooops, I should've said it's OK to set them higher than what Audyssey does, but not lower (this is per the FAQ). In my case, I went higher. It had mine set to 40 Hz after calibration, which is obviously wrong (my speakers aren't full range).
post #68259 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post


This is not entirely correct. I also discussed this issue with Chris of Audyssey and he confirmed that you should manually set the x-over frequencies, in case you are using a THX speaker set. However, if the x-over frequencies were set higher than 80 Hz by Audyssey and you set them lower, you have this infamous frequency range which would not be measured and treated by Audyssey. If the x-over frequencies were set lower than 80 Hz by Audyssey - e.g. 60 Hz - everything would be fine to set the x-over manually to 80 Hz after the measurement cycle has finished and you have a THX set. In other words, setting the x-over frequencies higher than Audyssey measured is OK, lower is not recommended.

However, it is also true that Chris recommends to keep the x-over frequencies where Audyssey sets them in all other cases. This may be the majority of cases.
But I have to say, if you find the x-over frequencies funny, I would recommend to reset the AVR to it's factory setting. I experienced this also and a very funny behavior about background noise with Audyssey-Pro.
Save the settings from your AVR to restore them later - if your AVR allows for this or write it down and then make a reset. This would be my recommendation.

 

Perhaps my post wasn't clear to you, Ganymed4, what I was saying is that it is not recommended to lower the crossover value below what the AVR set based on Audyssey reporting the speaker's F3 value.  So, I think we are in agreement, no?

post #68260 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcalifornia View Post

Thanks for your detailed response. I think it does sound better with the higher crossover setting than before. I would have thought the DI 6.5S would have been measured in my room much lower than 150Hz. Somewhere in the 100-120Hz range.

The Klipsch has a pretty big drop-off starting at 70Hz and above and can only wonder how much it keeps going past 100Hz. I wonder if my mid-bass in the 100Hz-150Hz will be low.

(FYI you might want to delete your double post in the xx13 thread as this question will be well answered here. Also if you haven't yet read through the sections on crossover freqs in the Audyssey 101/FAQ maintained here)

The thing to understand is that there is no setting in between 120Hz and 150Hz on your Denon receiver, so if your speakers are rolling off right around 120Hz you could go either way depending on a very small variance in the measurement positions. The crossovers are calculated based on ALL the measurement points, so if for example (making up numbers) the calculated -3dB point was 118Hz on one run, and 123Hz on a different run due to mic position variance, this tiny difference would result in a 120Hz crossover setting one time and a 150Hz setting another time. It has nothing to do with tripod vs. no tripod, but rather just the vagaries of the resultantly different positions for the mic.

Secondly, the readings Audyssey is providing may be "correct" for your speakers. That center for example has only 3.5" woofers and Def Tech specs the low end at 100Hz; DT is notorious for "generous" low end specs as they probably report the -10dB point instead of the traditional -3dB point, and it may be entirely reasonable for a small "flat panel" speaker to roll off well above 100Hz.

The mains may be able to go down even lower on paper, but then you come into the issue of room effects, especially so with in-wall speakers where the bass response is largely dependent on the interaction with the wall "enclosure". If for example there is a huge dip around 100-120Hz due to room modes the algorithm may be "correct" in deciding that the response drops off there, even if in an anechoic chamber they may go much lower. Unfortunately, with in-wall speakers, you can't really reposition them to compensate.
post #68261 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by jcalifornia View Post

Thanks for your detailed response. I think it does sound better with the higher crossover setting than before. I would have thought the DI 6.5S would have been measured in my room much lower than 150Hz. Somewhere in the 100-120Hz range.

The Klipsch has a pretty big drop-off starting at 70Hz and above and can only wonder how much it keeps going past 100Hz. I wonder if my mid-bass in the 100Hz-150Hz will be low.

The only way to know if that's really true is by measuring the results before and after Audyssey. The two most popular tools to do so among the Audyssey crowd are REW/HDMI (free, but you'll spend roughly $100 on a USB mic to make it functional) and OmniMic (approximately $300 with the supplied mic). Both require the USB mic, and while REW is more powerful, it's got a steeper learning curve than the OmniMic. Note the more frequent posters here use REW. Please see the how-to guide attached to AustinJerry's signature for more details.

From personal experience with Klipsch subs back when, I have a feeling you're right. To be honest, you might want to look into a sub (and ultimately, two subs given your room size) from an independent company like SVS or HSU. Both manufacture subs that have been measured flat at +/- 3 db to under 20 Hz, and as high as 200 Hz. While results in your room might differ, that may help you blend in your in-wall and center with the subs and produce a smoother bass response. Still, you don't know if that's happening without measuring.
post #68262 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by batpig View Post

...DT is notorious for "generous" low end specs as they probably report the -10dB point instead of the traditional -3dB point, and it may be entirely reasonable for a small "flat panel" speaker to roll off well above 100Hz.

The mains may be able to go down even lower on paper, but then you come into the issue of room effects, especially so with in-wall speakers where the bass response is largely dependent on the interaction with the wall "enclosure". If for example there is a huge dip around 100-120Hz due to room modes the algorithm may be "correct" in deciding that the response drops off there, even if in an anechoic chamber they may go much lower. Unfortunately, with in-wall speakers, you can't really reposition them to compensate.

BP - I for one don't take DefTech's measurement too seriously. Case in point: they rate my powered center (CS8080-HD, which has a 300 W, 5 x10 top-firing woofer) down to 20 Hz. I've never gotten a crossover from Audyssey lower than 60 Hz, and that's positioned on a speaker stand or the top, open shelf of my TV mount. Before that, when I had it on a shelf with 2" space above it, I'd get crossover in both Audyssey and Audyssey Pro of 90 to 110 Hz.

Even my top of the line Mythos ST, which they rate down to 14 Hz, I've never seen producing useful output below 35 Hz or so with REW. The only exception is from room gain, and when I've found that at 25 Hz, it shows up as an anomaly in REW (no EQ) - a kind of "crud" factor outside of the rolloff pattern.

Bottom line: the spec'd measurements are from perfect conditions, and not particularly believable in the real world.
post #68263 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Perhaps my post wasn't clear to you, Ganymed4, what I was saying is that it is not recommended to lower the crossover value below what the AVR set based on Audyssey reporting the speaker's F3 value.  So, I think we are in agreement, no?

We are! Thank you for the clarification.
post #68264 of 70896
Curious if there's any correlation between the quality of the laptop's soundcard and results attainable by Audyssey Pro? (Or laptop in general.)
post #68265 of 70896

^Hi. Nope the soundcard isn't used in a way that would make it relevant.  A pretty basic laptop will do the job.

post #68266 of 70896
Guys, actually setting the crossovers to 120 Hz is not necessarely a bad thing, especially for folks with non-XT 32. On one hand even at 120 Hz bass localization is still not a severe issue so why not toss over a bit more heavy duty job to the sub(s) and releive the sats, but on the other hand the gain is a lot more filter resolution in the sub-channel. So, instead of 80 Hz why not utilize the higher EQ'ing resolution of the sub-channel up to a higher crossover frequency?

Remember:

MultEQ : 128 x (sub), 2x (sat)
MultEQ XT: 128 (sub), 16x (sat)

Seed for thought! smile.gif
post #68267 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogorf View Post

Guys, actually setting the crossovers to 120 Hz is not necessarely a bad thing, especially for folks with non-XT 32. On one hand even at 120 Hz bass localization is still not a severe issue so why not toss over a bit more heavy duty job to the sub(s) and releive the sats, but on the other hand the gain is a lot more filter resolution in the sub-channel. So, instead of 80 Hz why not utilize the higher EQ'ing resolution of the sub-channel up to a higher crossover frequency?

Remember:

MultEQ : 128 x (sub), 2x (sat)
MultEQ XT: 128 (sub), 16x (sat)

Seed for thought! smile.gif

I would say, that you surely can do this. If it sounds OK for you and I can follow your arguments. Makes sense for me. However, as AustinJerry already wrote, Audyssey recommends to use the x-over frequencies Audyssey finds during the measurements - except for THX sets.
For me personally, I tried all three possibilities - setting them manually, using the x-over set by Audyssey and the 80 Hz for all - I have a THX U2 set - and found 80 Hz sounds best. But this is not valid for everybody and depends on the speakers you use, the room and personal listening habits.

But I agree to your arguments. Just try it. At least my 'two cents'.

PS: I may add, that I own the Audyssey installer kit and a Denon AVP-A1 HDCI 3D and I am using this with a 9.2 THX U2 set and I am a sound engineer and M.S. of computer science. Sorry for this 'blunt' introduction. I also discussed many aspects of the installer kit and other issues with Chris Kyriakis of Audyssey. Sorry for not introducing myself properly.
Edited by Ganymed4 - 12/26/13 at 7:54pm
post #68268 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundofMind View Post

 

But interestingly I just got some new KEF  speakers for my desktop and they sounded so good that just for giggles I stuck em in the main listening room for an impromptu David vs Goliath, big Dali MS5 vs little KEFLS50s comparison. 

 

I rather brilliantly (if I must say so myself) save my self some effort by using Audyssey Bypass L/R.  I didn't want to bother running Audyssey on the KEFS so I found Bypass quite handy as it allows me to take advantage of the subs EQ'd by AudysseyPro ( run earlier with the Dalis).  I've raised the xovers to 120 for the KEFS so many of the problematic major LF peaks/dips get some smoothing....and BTW  the little buggers sound really impressive:eek::)

 

I’d expect they would considering you are using good subwoofage. If all the Kefs are handling is above 120Hz, they will be pretty competent I think (I've always been a big fan of Kef speakers, going way back). What would you say the big Dalis add over and above the Kefs?  (Not being confrontational - genuinely interested).

post #68269 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View PostI’d expect they would considering you are using good subwoofage. If all the Kefs are handling is above 120Hz, they will be pretty competent I think (I've always been a big fan of Kef speakers, going way back). What would you say the big Dalis add over and above the Kefs? ...

^Keith, I'm having some fun with these little KEFS and I'm posting on the LS50 dedicated thread

 

To bring it back on topic here, I ran a quick n dirty regular mic XT32 calibration on the KEFs last night and Audyssey set them to 40!  Maybe sitting so close to the massive MS5s they're getting a boundary effect!  :D

 

KEF lists their F3 as 80Hz and Velo lists the DD10 subs as -3dB 18-120Hz.  In any case it seems to sound best crossed at 100 (I have a room dip  around 120).   The KEFs have a 51/2" driver, are 8 Ohm, only 85 dB sens and rated to 100W with max output 106 dB. This is a big room (16’X22’ w/ 8’ walls to vaulted 12’ceiling=3500 cu ft) so it is amazing that they can throw such a refined and convincing and dynamic soundstage, lovely vocals and lots of detail for well-recorded music, most particularly acoustic, positioned in a 10' equilateral triangle with MLP.

 

"And in the red corner, weighing in at 152 pounds, the champ-een..."

The Dalis are slightly more efficient (89dB) but as you can see are slightly further back from MLP.  These behemoths are rated to take up to 500W, max output 115dB and the Halcro MC30 amp driving them is rated to 400W RMS contin. into their 4 ohms. The 61/2" mid internally crosses to two 8" woofs at 685Hz; So a big difference is that the Dalis don't flinch no matter what I throw at them at any volume and can do that crossed at 40Hz (or full-range for that matter).

 

Another interesting Audyssey observation: Bypass R/L sounds better than the std Audyssey curve for the KEFS.  This may well be due to my quick (non-Pro) calibration.  Audyssey also called a phase error which may be due to their being so close to the Dalis. As I did not follow my usual OCD procedures of varying mic height, turning off the furnace, carefully aligning the mic vertically, etc. I am not concluding anything about Audyssey in general but just observing that the KEFs did not take kindly to this particular Audyssey calibration- it constricts the soundstage width and dulls the highs.  So this result may help explain why some folks prefer to listen in that mode, especially if they don't realize Audyssey is capable of doing better.


Edited by SoundofMind - 12/27/13 at 7:44am
post #68270 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundofMind View Post

Audyssey also called a phase error which may be due to their being so close to the Dalis.

I think Audyssey probably called the phase error because the woofers are wired out of phase with the tweeters. I get this too with some vintage Tannoy coaxials for the same reason.

[It is strange that so many "audiophiles" are suspicious of the LS50s because they have this arrangement for good reason, yet the "same" people will pay ridiculous prices for those Tannoy drivers which always did the same thing for similar technical reasons (though very different technology), the diff being they probably don't know Tannoy did this.]
post #68271 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoundofMind View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View PostI’d expect they would considering you are using good subwoofage. If all the Kefs are handling is above 120Hz, they will be pretty competent I think (I've always been a big fan of Kef speakers, going way back). What would you say the big Dalis add over and above the Kefs? ...

^Keith, I'm having some fun with these little KEFS and I'm posting on the LS50 dedicated thread

 

To bring it back on topic here, I ran a quick n dirty regular mic XT32 calibration on the KEFs last night and Audyssey set them to 40!  Maybe sitting so close to the massive MS5s they're getting a boundary effect!  :D

 

KEF lists their F3 as 80Hz and Velo lists the DD10 subs as -3dB 18-120Hz.  In any case it seems to sound best crossed at 100 (I have a room dip  around 120).   The KEFs have a 51/2" driver, are 8 Ohm, only 85 dB sens and rated to 100W with max output 106 dB. This is a big room (16’X22’ w/ 8’ walls to vaulted 12’ceiling=3500 cu ft) so it is amazing that they can throw such a refined and convincing and dynamic soundstage, lovely vocals and lots of detail for well-recorded music, most particularly acoustic, positioned in a 10' equilateral triangle with MLP.

 

"And in the red corner, weighing in at 152 pounds, the champ-een..."

The Dalis are slightly more efficient (89dB) but as you can see are slightly further back from MLP.  These behemoths are rated to take up to 500W, max output 115dB and the Halcro MC30 amp driving them is rated to 400W RMS contin. into their 4 ohms. The 61/2" mid internally crosses to two 8" woofs at 685Hz; So a big difference is that the Dalis don't flinch no matter what I throw at them at any volume and can do that crossed at 40Hz (or full-range for that matter).

 

Another interesting Audyssey observation: Bypass R/L sounds better than the std Audyssey curve for the KEFS.  This may well be due to my quick (non-Pro) calibration.  Audyssey also called a phase error which may be due to their being so close to the Dalis. As I did not follow my usual OCD procedures of varying mic height, turning off the furnace, carefully aligning the mic vertically, etc. I am not concluding anything about Audyssey in general but just observing that the KEFs did not take kindly to this particular Audyssey calibration- it constricts the soundstage width and dulls the highs.  So this result may help explain why some folks prefer to listen in that mode, especially if they don't realize Audyssey is capable of doing better.

 

Thanks for sharing that, SoM. Very interesting. I shall take a look at the LS50 dedicated thread...

post #68272 of 70896

Hi all

Got a X1000 from my gf for christmas to replace my z5500 ( keeping the speakers and sub to replace later on )
i have a question with the audyssey setup


it reveals all speakers besides my left front and sub are out of phase but they are wired red to red , black to black ...

anyone has a similar experiance or knows how i can test it with the x1000 if its really that case ?

post #68273 of 70896
^^
As noted in your X1000 Owner's manual, if the wiring is confirmed correct, simply "Skip" the error message and move on. For more helpful information, join us in the Denon E/X Owner's thread.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1465528/the-official-2013-denon-e-series-x-series-avr-model-owners-thread-faq/0_100#post_23134210
post #68274 of 70896

well , unfortunatly im the kinda guy if the systems says something i want to be 1000% sure :D

 

 

is there any way to test it properly myself ??

post #68275 of 70896
You already did ... you visually confirmed the wiring is correct. smile.gif

Refer to the Audyssey 101/FAQ for more information to include the following note that specifically addresses your issue ...

http://www.avsforum.com/t/795421/official-audyssey-thread-faq-in-post-51779/51700_100#user_b1
post #68276 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganymed4 View Post

I would say, that you surely can do this. If it sounds OK for you and I can follow your arguments. Makes sense for me. However, as AustinJerry already wrote, Audyssey recommends to use the x-over frequencies Audyssey finds during the measurements - except for THX sets.
For me personally, I tried all three possibilities - setting them manually, using the x-over set by Audyssey and the 80 Hz for all - I have a THX U2 set - and found 80 Hz sounds best. But this is not valid for everybody and depends on the speakers you use, the room and personal listening habits.

But I agree to your arguments. Just try it. At least my 'two cents'.

PS: I may add, that I own the Audyssey installer kit and a Denon AVP-A1 HDCI 3D and I am using this with a 9.2 THX U2 set and I am a sound engineer and M.S. of computer science. Sorry for this 'blunt' introduction. I also discussed many aspects of the installer kit and other issues with Chris Kyriakis of Audyssey. Sorry for not introducing myself properly.

Thanks for your reply and confirmation on an easy solution anyone with a non-XT 32 version can try even on-the-fly via menu without additional effort. Also agree that it needs some experimenting and careful listening tests, indeed.

And also thanks for introducing yourself. Appreciated. wink.gif
Edited by mogorf - 12/29/13 at 11:09am
post #68277 of 70896
OT for here, but some of you may know that I'm comparing a modified use of consumer Trinnov to Audyssey. I picked up a Sherwood R-972 (discontinued) and used it as a dedicated processor for an Oppo 103, with the pre-out from the R-972 connecting to my Denon 4311. The Oppo has HDMI inputs (so it's a simple switcher for my TiVo as well) and has independent HDMI outputs, facilitating A/B comparisons to XT32+Pro.

If anyone's interested, see http://www.avsforum.com/t/1179978/sherwood-r-972-user-thread/3000#post_24126807 for my first impressions. This isn't a superiority test, mind you, but I'm really looking forward to more A/B listening comparisons. IMO, the more room correction alternatives you have, the better LOL.
Edited by sdrucker - 12/28/13 at 12:14pm
post #68278 of 70896
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrucker View Post

OT for here, but some of you may know that I'm comparing a modified use of consumer Trinnov to Audyssey. I picked up a Sherwood R-972 (discontinued) and used it as a dedicated processor for an Oppo 103, with the pre-out from the R-972 connecting to my Denon 4311. The Oppo has HDMI inputs (so it's a simple switcher for my TiVo as well) and has independent HDMI outputs, facilitating A/B comparisons to XT32+Pro.

If anyone's interested, see http://www.avsforum.com/t/1179978/sherwood-r-972-user-thread/3000#post_24126807 for my first impressions. This isn't a superiority test, mind you, but I'm really looking forward to more A/B listening comparisons. IMO, the more room correction alternatives you have, the better LOL.

I am very interested in this and thank you for sharing this here. Will read your post...

Usually multi-channel Trinnov boxes are quite expensive but you took a very reasonable way to check it out. Great and thank you again.

AVSforum is always a great source of information.
post #68279 of 70896
Hey everyone,

After reading through the FAQ and various posts, I still have a question about how to properly set up my system to get the most benefit out of my floorstanding L/R's and my sub. I have a Marantz SR6008, Outlaw Audio 7125 amp, with Polk RTi100 L/R's, and a Polk Micro DSW 2000 subwoofer. The RTi100's both have an integrated powered subwoofer, so I would like to know what is the best way to hookup my RTi's? Currently, my Audyssey cal is set to all Small's, with the front crossover set to 40hz (I was going to set all the crossovers to 80hz as suggested by the FAQ, but then I also read that doing that is mostly for THX certification, so I figured I can just leave it alone for now). The RTi's are configured with the speaker top (high level) and bottom (low level) inputs electrically connected with a jumper.

These speakers also have LFE inputs for the sub, which I can configure in a number of ways: either using the sub 2 output on my Marantz, or using a y-cable to split the L/R preouts from the receiver to the amp and the powered subs.

Would providing a LFE input or pre-amp signal to the powered subs in these floorstanding speakers give me any real benefit, or should I just leave my setup-up as is? I understand that multi sub management/calibration is not very effective with the version of Audyssey my receiver supports, so would I be wasting my time?
post #68280 of 70896
I moved my towers and both subs to paint the room. They are now going back to basically in the same spot. Should I re-run Audyssey?
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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › "Official" Audyssey thread (FAQ in post #51779)