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Best Articulating Arm Mounts - Page 2

post #31 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oasys View Post

Why did you decide to go with Sanus VMDD26 instead of Chief PDR? It's only $100 difference.

An individual on eBay had purchased the VMDD26 and discovered that the stud configuration in his wall was incompatible and I bought it brand new for $299 including shipping, which, I thought, was a great price. I've already received it and it really is a nice-looking mount. All steel, the articulating arms are almost 5/8 inch thick, and there's over 10 inches of horizontal adjustment of the arms on the wall mounting plate. I couldn't be happier.

Glenn
post #32 of 134
Skypalace, if you'll allow my 2 cents worth...

If you use the Sanus VMDD26 and mount the mounting plate flush with the right wall corner (there's most likely a double stud there), and plan on mounting the carriage at the extreme right end, that would put the center of your 48 inch display approx. 2 inches too close to the left corner wall. (30 - 8 = 22) You can easily shift the mounting attachments on the display panel at least 3 inches (to give you a 1" clearance at the coner) by either of the two methods discussed earlier. This would put the center of gravity 3" off-center of the mount, which MAY result in it being a little more difficult to level the display. It's normally assumed that the display will be centered, so it's possible that the two allen-head bolts used to lock it level MAY NOT be adequate to hold it level with it mounted off-center. I'd recommend using as little clearance as possible in the corner, in order to minimize the torque on the leveling mechanism. I apologize if this advice is redundant...I didn't thoroughly read all of the previous posts.

Glenn
post #33 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oasys View Post

I truely like the way Omni looks. I'm sure the lag bolt are designed to hold more than it can carry and there are six of them! Not to mention that robust lookin arms although they are made out of aluminum. But it's the other bolts and screws that I have concerns over. When you look at the screws that hold a TV adaptor, you can't help but thinking that it'll be the weakest link. It's hard to explain but when you look at them, something is bound to happen with this rack.

I am not in front of it, but IIRC, the only other load bearing attachment points are the ones from the panel to the mount and the massive ones that are at the pinch points on the mount. Somebody else mentioned a 509UK somewhere in this thread, that is what I have. Basically the bolt into the panel has over 30mm of thread depth so I don't worry about that at all. I ended up using a 60mm hex cap because the included button caps were too short. I had a 70mm as well, but those are a little too long. The exact analysis is not really needed but basically the bolts are all under tension from the mount to the panel. The standard working load for that bolt is about 400lbs. The actual breaking force is probably around 4000lbs.
post #34 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlennV View Post

Skypalace, if you'll allow my 2 cents worth...

If you use the Sanus VMDD26 and mount the mounting plate flush with the right wall corner (there's most likely a double stud there), and plan on mounting the carriage at the extreme right end, that would put the center of your 48 inch display approx. 2 inches too close to the left corner wall. (30 - 8 = 22) You can easily shift the mounting attachments on the display panel at least 3 inches (to give you a 1" clearance at the coner) by either of the two methods discussed earlier. This would put the center of gravity 3" off-center of the mount, which MAY result in it being a little more difficult to level the display. It's normally assumed that the display will be centered, so it's possible that the two allen-head bolts used to lock it level MAY NOT be adequate to hold it level with it mounted off-center. I'd recommend using as little clearance as possible in the corner, in order to minimize the torque on the leveling mechanism. I apologize if this advice is redundant...I didn't thoroughly read all of the previous posts.

Glenn

Thanks, that's exactly what I was planning to do (though mounting the plate inwards just a tad from the corner, as I have rounded corners so need to keep it about 1/2" in so that it stays flat against the wall without protruding over the rounded edge of the corner. I'll use a stud finder (verified with finish nails) to find the studs. Agree that I want to keep it as close to centered as possible to reduce torque.
post #35 of 134
bought a VMDD26B for my Pioneer 1540HD... 60" PLasma weighing 113 lbs. the installer tells me to get rid of it that he has seen articulating arms bend. I find that hard to believe, especially since this is a 2 arms system. has anyone ANY concerns that the arms might bend?
post #36 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by wassy View Post

bought a VMDD26B for my Pioneer 1540HD... 60" PLasma weighing 113 lbs. the installer tells me to get rid of it that he has seen articulating arms bend. I find that hard to believe, especially since this is a 2 arms system. has anyone ANY concerns that the arms might bend?

I seriously doubt that the arms of the VMDD26 will bend! The two arms are 5/8 inch thick solid steel! The mount is spec'ed at 175 pounds. You won't have any trouble with it.

Glenn
post #37 of 134
I just mounted my NEC 50XR6a on a CHIEF PNR mount. While I was installing it I decided to do a little test. Before I put the display on the mount I installed a plumb bob and then I hung on the mount (205 lbs). The mount deflected less than 1/16 of an inch. I dont think there is a stronger mount out there and I could not be happier with it. Definitely worth the bucks (under $500).
LL
LL
LL
post #38 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by wassy View Post

bought a VMDD26B for my Pioneer 1540HD... 60" PLasma weighing 113 lbs. the installer tells me to get rid of it that he has seen articulating arms bend. I find that hard to believe, especially since this is a 2 arms system. has anyone ANY concerns that the arms might bend?

No, I have the thing, there is no way that mount will bend under a 120lb load. Perhaps he has seen some cheap, small, lcd articulating arm bend, but I doubt he has seen a VMDD26 or similar mount bend.
post #39 of 134
What about on a 181 pound load? I'm going to get the Phillips 63" TV and its 181lbs.
Do you think the Sanus VMDD26 mount will hold this? (its rated at 175lbs)
post #40 of 134
Well, I am not an authority on the Sanus design ... It can support more than the specified weight, but you have to figure in dead and live loads. I am sure they have done this already. You can call them, they have 800 customer support and ask. What I will say is that a 63" panel to fully rotate would need to extend even further from the wall than the VMDD (and for that matter any other articulating mount) permits.
post #41 of 134
Just thought I would mention that the forum thread was talking about an older version of the omnimount the:

Omni Mount Plasma CL

NOT the newer UCL-X
post #42 of 134
hey all good info.

I too am looking at the omni and sanus. here is my setup. The plasma (50) inch will be against the wall in the corner. When we want to watch the tv, we will pull it out a bit and slide it into the corner so it is almost center on the the corner.

here is what is important to me other then holding power. I would like black. how far it sits fully against the wall is important since the way it will be on the wall you will be able to see behind it.

Finally how it comes out. I have just enough room on either side for the set. It seems to me that some of these mounts do not retract evenly on both sides.

sorry to ramble, just an area i need help in. thanks.
post #43 of 134
there is absolutely no issues with the Omnimount UCL-X, and it is by far one of the best if not the best mounts out there, bar none! I've done three installs with them, and I personally use one as well: my own Pio Elite 1130, a 6070, an 1540, and a fujitsu 60".

Save yourself the headache, and get this guy. Just make sure you are thoroughly attached to the wall. For example, I used Hurricane Tapcon screws, into cinder blocks.....literally, I hung from that thing and it didn't flinch.

post #44 of 134
My house was built in like 1968. Do i need to worry about the studs? I can get some good stong bolts, but i have heard people complain about the exisiting studs not being good enough.
post #45 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris98007 View Post

My house was built in like 1968. Do i need to worry about the studs? I can get some good stong bolts, but i have heard people complain about the exisiting studs not being good enough.

If you are going squarely into wood studs (assuming the construction was done in an acceptable way), you can use the lag screws that come with the mounts. Otherwise, a 5/16 or 3/8 lag screw 2.5-3" long is sufficient. The only exception are if your sheetrock is thicker than normal (or more layers, etc). Either of the mounts you mentioned would be fine. I personally use the Sanus, but others use the omnimount. Once installed and locked down, the Sanus can pull-out and rotate, but it does not have travel in the X or Y planes. Somebody can confirm if the Omnimount is the same, but I believe that it is.
post #46 of 134
thanks for the info.

The only thing that has not been answered is how they pull out. I know the omni pulls straight out and goes back straight. Does the sanus and others go directly in and out? Or does it go to one side?
post #47 of 134
Sanus goes to one side, but you can slide it across the wall bracket so that it's property centered.

I like the Sanus better, because when it's flat against the wall it's thinner then all the other mounts. The Omnimount is extremely thick when pressed against the wall. I think the sanus mounts are only 2" to 4" thick, vs 6" for a lot of other mounts. If you add in the width of the plasma you get something that's sticking out over 8" from your wall.
post #48 of 134
ok so i have seen the omni in action and understand how it goes back. Explain to me a little more how the sanus goes back? I think i kind of understand what you are saying on how it goes to one side, but not sure what you mean centering it.
post #49 of 134
Regarding the Omni:

I am a stress analyst and the strength of fasteners is far more than you would probably expect. The potential problem is the fastener pulling out from the stud. This is due to the cantilever setup. If it is installed properly it should be OK though and if it is close to the wall definately no problems. SOmeone mentioned small screws attached to the TV. At this point, there is relatively little load since you will not generate a large moment like you do a the wall. These screws will see predominantly shear only. It is probably about 20X stronger than you would need.

And the other thing is the deflection. If you look at the setup it acts like a truss and you get the stiffness from the geometry and design. It really doesnt need to be steel, I bet this thing doesnt move at all from the structural members. It it did, it would be due to the joint slippage, but this would not be a safety concern. Really steel is overkill and would not be my first choice. Aluminum is perfect for this type of thing.

Lastly, costco sells them....if there was a problem I bet they would have yanked them.
post #50 of 134
FYI, I just installed my 52" Sony XBR4 with the Omnimount UCL-X. Installation was a breeze, though the latest version of the installation manual is a bit sparse (I found a more detailed older version online). This latest hardware design seems quite robust. I suspect the aforementioned problems with tilt/roll screws breaking was due to OVERTIGHTENING them. The mount is so well balanced, that the adjustment screws need only be SLIGHTLY tightened to hold the position. Of note, some of the decorative plastic bracket covers arrived cracked, and when I called Omnimount they told me they'd immediately ship out replacements at no cost. IMHO, this mount gets a hearty thumbs up.
post #51 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by russwong View Post

Sanus goes to one side, but you can slide it across the wall bracket so that it's property centered.

If you are referring to the VMDD26 I believe you are incorrect. The VMDD26 has dual arms that come straight out from the mounting bracket.
post #52 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by russwong View Post

Sanus goes to one side, but you can slide it across the wall bracket so that it's property centered.

I like the Sanus better, because when it's flat against the wall it's thinner then all the other mounts. The Omnimount is extremely thick when pressed against the wall. I think the sanus mounts are only 2" to 4" thick, vs 6" for a lot of other mounts. If you add in the width of the plasma you get something that's sticking out over 8" from your wall.

I am unhappy with my mount below. What is the thinnest mount possible? I want the panel against the wall if possible:


post #53 of 134
Has anyone use the wall mounts from monoprice.com??? If so, what has your experience been with them???

Price is good, but is the quality there???
post #54 of 134
is there any that are less than 6 inches from the wall when pushed back? 3 inches would be better or less.
post #55 of 134
The Sanus VMAA26 mount protrudes slightly less than 3.5" when pushed back against the wall.
post #56 of 134
sorry, should have been more specific. for a 63 inch sammy plasma
post #57 of 134
Then check out the Sanus VMDD26 - same distance from wall when flat.

Details here.
post #58 of 134
I need to mount a 58" Panasonic (TH-58PE75U). Anyone have experience or opinions on the Mustang mount available through Costco (Item # 189605)?

Better price ($249), extends further, and carries more weight than the Peerless or Sanus mounts sold by Costco. I don't care that it doesn't fold up as tightly to the wall as the others because I'm mounting in a corner.

There's more information on Mustang at mustangav.com

Here's a link to the mount at Costco: costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11206938&whse=BC&Ne=4000000&eCat=BC|79&N=4008255&Mo=20&No=4&Nr=P_CatalogName:BC&cat=22121&Ns=P_Price|1||P_SignDesc1&lang=en-US&Sp=C&topnav=
post #59 of 134
Quote:
Originally Posted by frankp94022 View Post

Better price ($249), extends further, and carries more weight than the Peerless or Sanus mounts sold by Costco. I don't care that it doesn't fold up as tightly to the wall as the others because I'm mounting in a corner.

I haven't seen this mount mentioned often on this or other sites, so there may not be too many using it. Having said that, it is probably not available at the costco store so you have to pay shipping on 50+ lbs and tax in most places.

So .... it is probably still less than the alternative I'll mention in just a moment, but the alternative has been used by so many people, is highly rated, and probably not going to be much more expensive (probably less than twenty). Consider the Omnimount UCL-XP from amazon, free ship, ridiculously low price (at least right now), and probably no tax.
post #60 of 134
How strong are these articulating mounts in the extended position?

I have a built-in TV nook which is 24" deep and 41" wide. I bought the 46" Samsung LNT-4669F which is about 45" wide. The TV nook has a stone surround so I cannot widen it and relocating the TV would be a logistical nightmare. Anyway, I'm considering an articulating mount like the Peerless PLA50. Since I will install the mount from the rear of the TV nook, it will be permanently extended. The mount is rated to hold 150 lbs. The LNT-4669F is about 55 lbs without the stand. So, the mount seems more than strong enough to support the TV. However, I'm concerned about the mount being permanently extended that somehow the weight of the TV would wear down the arm over time and fail.

Do any of you use these mounts in a permanently extended configuration? Thanks.
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