or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › New JVC 1080p, HDMI 1.3a, 120hz due in Sep
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

New JVC 1080p, HDMI 1.3a, 120hz due in Sep

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
The top-of-the-line 898 series, slated to ship this September, will feature 1,080p resolution, HDMI 1.3a input and 120Hz image processing to minimize motion blurring. Screen sizes will include 42W inches (tentatively priced at a $2,699 suggested retail) and 47W inches ($3,299). The 120Hz models will add about a $500 price premium to 60Hz 1,080p models.
post #2 of 25
Nmlobo...where did you get this information from? I've been waiting for an annoucement from JVC on their 2007 LCD TV's. Thanks for the heads up.
post #3 of 25
post #4 of 25
Thanks.
post #5 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nmlobo View Post

The top-of-the-line 898 series, slated to ship this September, will feature 1,080p resolution, HDMI 1.3a input and 120Hz image processing to minimize motion blurring. Screen sizes will include 42W inches (tentatively priced at a $2,699 suggested retail) and 47W inches ($3,299). The 120Hz models will add about a $500 price premium to 60Hz 1,080p models.

Any word on a 52 or 57 inch screen???
Thanks, Ken
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nmlobo View Post

The top-of-the-line 898 series, slated to ship this September, will feature 1,080p resolution, HDMI 1.3a input and 120Hz image processing to minimize motion blurring. Screen sizes will include 42W inches (tentatively priced at a $2,699 suggested retail) and 47W inches ($3,299). The 120Hz models will add about a $500 price premium to 60Hz 1,080p models.

Nothing over 50" is a humoungous blunder.
post #7 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by PowerUp View Post

Any word on a 52 or 57 inch screen???
Thanks, Ken

47" is the largest LCD size, that I know of, from JVC. I suspect JVC is 'playing' to the masses. The majority of flat panels sold in 2006 were 32" . The next most popular size was 42". This includes all LCD and all Plasma sales. A couple of articles I read stated that the 40-42 models will be the high sellers in 2007.

Toshiba will have 1080p 42-, 46-, 52- and 57-inch models. Hitachi will have 32- and 37-inch LCDs with the 120Hz. I believe that Sharp and Samsung will have 57" panels. Only time will tell if not having 50"+ sets is a blunder for JVC.

50" sets were 4th on the list of best sellers. It appears the greatest perportion of the public wanted (last year) the smaller set to replace the old CRT in their family room. Not everyone is a AV enthusiast. They just want a television.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nmlobo View Post

Not everyone is a AV enthusiast. They just want a television.

This seems to be overconclusion. There is steep price difference for bigger panels.
post #9 of 25
Hopefully dynamic contrast at least in 10000:1 range.(new 120Hz toshibas have been rumored to only have 6000:1) There will be good competion(as allways) in pricing since new samsungs(only 60Hz for now) have quite aggressive pricing and one dealer says you can get 42" 1080p pana plasma for 2k in summer.
post #10 of 25
But do these new JVC's accept 1080p?

Seriously, the 120Hz refresh rate is wasted unless the HDTV can accept a 1080p/24 signal (120 is divisible by 24) to achieve as seamless a chain between source (probably a Blu-ray or HD-DVD player) and display. Too bad for JVC that I've already moved on and got me a 47" Olevia 747i LCD, couldn't wait. Nmlobo, do I take it you're about to dump your faithful LT-40FH96 TV that has served you so well for the past two years and upgrade to JVC's latest model?
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

But do these new JVC's accept 1080p?

Seriously, the 120Hz refresh rate is wasted unless the HDTV can accept a 1080p/24 signal (120 is divisible by 24) to achieve as seamless a chain between source (probably a Blu-ray or HD-DVD player) and display. Too bad for JVC that I've already moved on and got me a 47" Olevia 747i LCD, couldn't wait. Nmlobo, do I take it you're about to dump your faithful LT-40FH96 TV that has served you so well for the past two years and upgrade to JVC's latest model?

Nope!!! My FH96 serves me well. I am more than happy with what I currently own.

BTW dad1153 I don't know if the new sets will accept 1080p inputs but you should know already that with inverse telecine 1080p/24 material can be put back together from a 1080i/60. 1080i has never been an issue for movies.

A CNet reviewer stated "1080i and 1080p sources on a 1080p HDTV, and after the following test, I feel even more confident that 1080p output capability is overrated." http://reviews.cnet.com/4531-10921_7-6542126.html

Another reviewer wrote: "The truth is this: The Toshiba HD-DVD player outputs 1080i, and the Samsung Blu-ray player outputs both 1080i and 1080p. What they fail to mention is that it makes absolutely no difference which transmission format you usefeeding 1080i or 1080p into your projector or HDTV will give you the exact same picture. " http://www.projectorcentral.com/blu-ray_2.htm
post #12 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Raitzi View Post

Hopefully dynamic contrast at least in 10000:1 range.(new 120Hz toshibas have been rumored to only have 6000:1) There will be good competion(as allways) in pricing since new samsungs(only 60Hz for now) have quite aggressive pricing and one dealer says you can get 42" 1080p pana plasma for 2k in summer.

You should read this thread before you go ga-ga over contrast ratios. http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=814530
post #13 of 25
Quote:


Seriously, the 120Hz refresh rate is wasted unless the HDTV can accept a 1080p/24 signal (120 is divisible by 24) to achieve as seamless a chain between source (probably a Blu-ray or HD-DVD player) and display. Too bad for JVC that I've already moved on and got me a 47" Olevia 747i LCD, couldn't wait. Nmlobo, do I take it you're about to dump your faithful LT-40FH96 TV that has served you so well for the past two years and upgrade to JVC's latest model?

As Nmlobo mentions above, 24p input is unnecessary to eliminate cadence-based judder, so long as the display has video processing that correctly performs inverse telecine. For newer posters that may not understand, inverse telecine is the process by which a display reconstructs the original 24p source from a 1080i60 or 1080p60 input. Done right, it's a lossless process.

Once that 24p source is obtained from the 1080i60 signal with inverse telecine, a 120Hz display can multiply each frame by five (5x24=120) to eliminate cadence-based judder.

Processors like the Silicon Optix Realta can correctly and reliably reconstruct the 1080p24 source from a 1080i60 input. That said, with the poor video processing found in most 2006 displays, you won't get reliable inverse telecine. Since most manufacturers want to stick with low-end video processors -- the equivalent of integrated 3D graphics in PCs -- actual 24p input on a 120Hz panel (5x24) is probably the easiest and most cost-effective way to eliminate cadence-based judder on Blu-ray. Of course, 24p input capability does nothing to eliminate cadence-based judder on broadcast and cable programming. For that, you need a display with video processing that correctly performs inverse telecine.
post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfdtv View Post

Of course, 24p input capability does nothing to eliminate cadence-based judder on broadcast and cable programming. For that, you need a display with video processing that correctly performs inverse telecine.

To your knowledge, are there any displays, either LCD or plasma, which actually do this? Is this what Pioneer claims their displays do?
post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jvernon View Post

To your knowledge, are there any displays, either LCD or plasma, which actually do this? Is this what Pioneer claims their displays do?

Several sets correctly perform inverse telecine (3:2 pull down). Hitachi, JVC, and Pioneer all passed recent testing. Some other sets pass as well. The links below identify test results from some selected sets (LCD and Plasma).

http://www.hometheatermag.com/hookmeup/1106hook/

http://hdguru.com/?p=17
post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nmlobo View Post

Several sets correctly perform inverse telecine (3:2 pull down). Hitachi, JVC, and Pioneer all passed recent testing. Some other sets pass as well. The links below identify test results from some selected sets (LCD and Plasma).

http://www.hometheatermag.com/hookmeup/1106hook/

http://hdguru.com/?p=17

I'm hoping someone will come up with a better test for this functionality.

Sending a constant 1080p24 video stream in 1080i format is a little different from what we have in the real world with broadcast and cable. On broadcast and cable, we have frequent commercial breaks where the source content (cadence) often switches between video and film. I think a better test would measure the "speed' and reliability at which a display can switch between video deinterlace and film (IVTC) modes.
post #17 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bfdtv View Post

I'm hoping someone will come up with a better test for this functionality.

Sending a constant 1080p24 video stream in 1080i format is a little different from what we have in the real world with broadcast and cable. On broadcast and cable, we have frequent commercial breaks where the source content (cadence) often switches between video and film. I think a better test would measure the "speed' and reliability at which a display can switch between video deinterlace and film (IVTC) modes.

Partially agree with you. I believe the deinterlacing and 3:2 tests are valid. I agree that knowing how quickly or slowly a processor switches is also valid. However, just knowing the switching speed would not be of much benefit if the other functions engaged but did not work properly.

I believe we have wandered away from the thread topic. I guess I will have to take some blame, it seems I'm the OP. LOL!!!
post #18 of 25
Who does JVC get their panels from?
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wtr_wkr View Post

Who does JVC get their panels from?

Samsung
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nmlobo View Post

Samsung

Don't think so... Samsung doesn't make 47" panels.
post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Perhaps it is a new panel . . note the set will not be on the streets for another six months. I assumed it would be Samsung as they made all previous JVC 32",40", and 46" LCD panels.
post #22 of 25
Samsung's motherglass size doesn't allow 47" panels to be easily made. I would be highly surprised if they started making 47" panels.
post #23 of 25
Do they have a new facility or line that will take Cornings current (new) 8th gen glass? That yields 47".
post #24 of 25
Thread Starter 
It appears that S-LCD, the fab plant for Samsung and Sony has jumped ship and they, along with JVC, will buy their 8th gen glass from L.G. Phillips. These panels are slights larger than the Samsung panels. The larger panels support 32, 47, and 55" cuts. http://displaydaily.com/2006/04/12/s...ith-lgphilips/
post #25 of 25
Nmlobo, thanks for the info. Looks like three 8th gen "standards": Sharp, optimized for 52"&65", Sammy, doing 46"&52" and, the winners: S-LCD & LPL going with 47"&55". AUO & CMO are TBD.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: LCD Flat Panel Displays
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › LCD Flat Panel Displays › New JVC 1080p, HDMI 1.3a, 120hz due in Sep