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Pearl Lamp SUDDEN dimming - Page 3

post #61 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by JHouse View Post

I'm working on it. Keep the bulb.

Well, let me know what you conclude after you read the article. It is very detailed, too bad I could not post it here due to its large size.
post #62 of 90
Thread Starter 
Have any of us called Sony about this?

We may all need to start.... this could be much more significant then the occasional outlier case.

Hmmm, is there an actual estimated bulb life published anywhere in Sony's literature?
post #63 of 90
Put my new lamp in last night, and Whoa Nellie... so bright I had to wear shades. In fact, it was so bright and crisp, I did not need to put the lamp setting on high anymore... which makes me wonder if there wasn't something wrong with the bulb from the get-go. I also engaged the auto iris for the first time through a whole movie... I was always having problems noticing what I thought was excessive dimming in dark scenes... now, I honestly can not notice the effect of the auto iris. The high lamp setting now seems to wash out details... and the low setting is still very bright.

The old bulb had the same damage effects seen on the other lamps in this thread: glass "pipe" in the center had melted and tilted downward, a large glass "bubble or growth" appeared where the glass pipe and reflective surface meet, the bubble had discoloration, and there were signs of heat damage on some of the electrodes.

I haven't seen any differences between the construction of the bulbs, but the old one has so much disfiguration, it's hard to tell.

I am setting this new lamp to low, running the "high altitude" fan setting, enjoying the bright picture, and hoping for a better lamp life.
post #64 of 90
My first bulb in my Studio Experience 20HD went just after 500 hours as well. That UHP bulb has got to have some design flaws but my guess is that it's related to the number of ignitions performed on it. I wouldn't be suprised if the bulb lasted the stated number of hours if one were left on. Unfortunately I haven't had my projector set up in quite a while due to moving and I'm finishing my new basement. I can't want to get that nice big bright picture back up.

Thanks for the research JHouse and keep us posted.
post #65 of 90
I'm a new Pearl owner, and actually, new to front projection period. I'm confused by people saying the bulbs will last longer if they don't turn the projector on and off so often - fewer "ignitions". I think I can rationalize that, but what is confusing me ... is the nature of my game. Oh, pardon the borrowed quote from a somewhat popular Rolling Stones song. What confuses me is how to keep it running all day. Unless this is a setup option, I thought the Pearl will shut down if no signal is detected after a certain number of minutes. And actually, I thought shutting it down when we're not watching it was/is a good idea.

Thanks, this forum is always most helpful.
Bill
post #66 of 90
You can disable the auto shutdown in the menu.
post #67 of 90
I'd lost a lot of brightness from my Ruby lamp and it developed a bad flicker, I then switched to high altitude mode and the lamp seemed to get better (flicker mostly gone and brightness stablised). Since I don't like the extra noise I now only bother with the high altitude mode for startup and shutdown (manually switch it off during the movie), that seems to be a good compromise. I must have done another 400-500 hours since it started to go.
post #68 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by storman View Post

I'm a new Pearl owner, and actually, new to front projection period. I'm confused by people saying the bulbs will last longer if they don't turn the projector on and off so often - fewer "ignitions". I think I can rationalize that, but what is confusing me ... is the nature of my game. Oh, pardon the borrowed quote from a somewhat popular Rolling Stones song. What confuses me is how to keep it running all day. Unless this is a setup option, I thought the Pearl will shut down if no signal is detected after a certain number of minutes. And actually, I thought shutting it down when we're not watching it was/is a good idea.

What you don't want to do is strike it often in a short period of time - if you can avoid it.
I personally wouldn't leave the pj running all day, but if I started to watch something , and then was called away to do something for an hour and planned to watch more after I'd finished that other task, then in that case I would just leave it running.
If I didn't expect to be using it for 3 hours or more, then I'd just shut it off and turn it back on when the time came.

Generally the best advice is to let the lamp cool down completely before you ever re-strike it. Thats why I would give it a couple of hours just to be safe.

Worst thing you can do is to cut the power before the lamp has had a chance to cool (with the fan running)- Even worse than that, is if you did have a sudden power loss and the pj cut out, would be to start it right back up again. Or even just start it back up right after you've turned it off.

Generally- it would be better to strike it once a day and let it run for 6 hours straight, than to strike it twice and only let it run 2 hours each time. The striking is what wears the bulb more, not so much the use itself.
post #69 of 90
The lamp in my Pearl suddenly dimmed after only 274 hours. There is a slight greenish cast to fleshtones. Filter is not dirty, any ideas ?

Bought it from AVS in mid-October '06 so warranty is over.

All lamp sources out of stock. AVS is pointing me to Sony direct. MSRP $369, ouch.
post #70 of 90
I recently reached 900 hours and my bulb looks like it's pretty much done. With tax and shipping, it's over $400 from Sony, about 50% more than I thought it would cost me to replace the bulb.

It does seem odd, I lost maybe 30% brightness right at 500 hours, switched to high lamp then lost another 30% right at 900 hours. In between, the picture was consistent brightness-wise.
post #71 of 90
Ok, guys, this is for informational purposes only the law on some of these points varies by state, but you may find it is worth a consult, and don’t be afraid to show this to your lawyer, because he might not be thinking along these lines. However, I don't represent you as a lawyer by providing you this information. And I’m certainly not trying to get you to sue AVS, they don’t deserve it. I think the manufacturers are the bad guys. But if they dumps this post, I will understand.

Although, lawsuits are an expensive proposition which are usually best left to large disputes, there are exceptions for cases like this. Most states have a version of the Model Deceptive Trade Practices Act. That law was created so you could sue over a toaster and motivate a lawyer to do it. They do that by allowing you to recover attorneys’ fees. Most state DTPA (as it's known) statutes/laws have a "laundry list" of violations, one of which usually has to do with having important (material) information withheld from you in order to make a sale. Surely if we many of us found out that we had to spend about $400 every 3 or 4 months to maintain the advertised lumen level, we might decide to sit closer to a large flat panel instead (though I know many wouldn’t).

Nevertheless, that provision is important because a lot of the projector manufacturers, and THE bulb manufacturer typically don’t provide hour projections in their literature. (They don’t want to get themselves in trouble, because they know what’s going to happen and that some of us will get mad about it when we figure it out.)

You have three targets (and although they are all probably out of state, the amount in controversy will be small enough to keep it in state court for simplicity). The targets are: Philips (who brags big-time on the bulb hours in their general literature-but never along with any sale), your projector manufacturer and your retailer. Some of the manufacturers and retailers provide lumen ratings and some also provide bulb life estimates. Those two representations are almost always MISrepresentations, and the kind that will support a DTPA claim. And if they don’t make any such representations, they have still hidden the ball on bulb brightness characteristics and life. Wouldn’t you have love to have known that you were going to immediately start losing brightness, and after only one quarter of the typically advertised bulb life you would be at 50% of the lumens so that you simply couldn’t rely on the advertised lumen levels and you needed to do your calculations for you set-up completely differently (probably buy a different screen material or size, maybe a shorter throw (before you built all that stuff in), get a brighter projector or just forget it and go flat panel)? It certainly would have been news to me. Your lawyer and you can decide whether to sue one, two or all three of the targets, depending on how much confidence, money and time the lawyer has. They are pretty much all on the hook, but the retailer and the projector manufacturer probably have simpler cases to win.

Now for the real strategy required to motivate a lawyer. You can’t settle early, at least for peanuts. That possibility will make sure your lawyer won’t want to bother, so you need to get that straight with your lawyer right up front. You have to commit to go all the way. Your lawyer will be charging you an outrageous hourly fee. He doesn’t have to actually collect it as you go, and that fee will be the basis on which you and he “prove up” and collect attorneys fees in court, even though your contract with the attorney says that he is prosecuting the case on a “contingent fee” of 40% of the total recovery, to be paid only if and when there is a recovery, and the attorney advances all the expenses of litigation as part of the deal. In this way any payment to the lawyer will be at the end, and only if you win. But you have to have a pretty sharp trial lawyer who isn’t afraid of the courthouse. And you have to be willing to stick it out until the other side finally figures out they are going to lose big (or they have already lost big). The key here is that you may get a jury to award you the money you will have to spend over the (short) life of the projector, or some other trivial damages, perhaps a grand or two at most, BUT your attorney’s bill might well be between $35,000 and $70,000 as established by his large hourly rate. And guess what? Those attorneys fees are awarded as your money and not his, you just have to pay him the 40% plus expenses.

Are you doing the math? You might make $15,000 to $30,000 out of the suit. The lawyer will make twice that, and that is what motivates him. It’s a swearing match between you (who have been keeping track of your bulbs performance) and a big company who is keeping dirty little secrets to make sales. It’s a good case.

So if you are mad enough, or interested in getting even, or interested in a legislatively encouraged windfall, talk to a local lawyer. The guy you’re looking for will not be a big shot. All that guy’s cases need to be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars at a minimum. You need to find a lawyer who will be interested in a good chance at a fee of $40,000. There are plenty of those around. This is pretty simple law, and the cases don’t require that much in the way of expenses.

PDF the website where you bought the projector if it contains representations of lumens and bulb life. And keep any brochure or advertising materials or manuals with such information directly from the manufacturer.

If you are charmed and inspired (rather than uncomfortable or offended) when you first interview your lawyer, he will probably have the same effect on the jury, assuming he is willing to try cases. Ask him/her about how many cases he has tried to verdict. Some “litigators” like to try cases, and some just can’t make themselves do it at all. If you get the latter, your opponent will know it, and your case will go nowhere.
post #72 of 90
New bulb works great, need sunglasses now.

I would like to measure the brightness once a month and keep a log as it dims over time. Subjective measurement is no good, the falloff is too gradual.

Who makes a decent meter ? I have seen the thread before but can't seem to find it now that I need it.
post #73 of 90
From alot of recommendations I hear the CA813 light meter is the cheapest and most accurate. Will run you around $150
post #74 of 90
Thanks I got the CA813 today.

Has anybody tracked their lamp over time and posted the results yet ?
post #75 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by tm22721 View Post

Thanks I got the CA813 today.

Has anybody tracked their lamp over time and posted the results yet ?

Try this thread:
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=849703
post #76 of 90
Well, after 1050 hours (I guess I'm one of the lucky ones), my lamp dimmed considerably, and now it's somewhat unwatchable. Even my older son (6 years old) asked me why it was so dim.

I haven't taken out the lamp yet due to the projector still being on the wall. Hope to pick up a new lamp soon.

BTW, this was in high lamp mode and only powered on at maximum once per day. No brown outs or black outs when it was powered on.
post #77 of 90
Greetings,

My Pearl has 800 hours on the second lamp (installed in April) with the original kept as a spare (577 hours). While it has dimmed the image is certainly very watchable. Knock on wood, I hope to get at least 1,000 hours from this one. The unit has always been run in low lamp mode.


Regards,
post #78 of 90
I guess I must have gotten lucky. My Pearl now has almost 1400 hours on the original bulb. The image has certainly dimmed a bit in the last 14 months, but the image is definitely watchable (still wows me); within the last week I've watched LOTR and the Matrix...both movies with very dark scenes and exceptional shadow detail. The Pearl has handled these movies amazingly.
BTW, I'm watching on a 1.3 gain screen at 100in diagonally. My pearl has always been in high altitude mode with the lamp on low.
I guess I should start looking for a replacement lamp soon, as I will be hitting 1500 hours within a month. Where's the best place to find this lamp? Thanks in advance, and I hope everybody is as lucky with their second lamp as I've been with my first.
post #79 of 90
I hate to bump this, but no need to start a brand new thread. I just hit a little over 1200 hrs and I guess i'm going to join the club. Picture is dreadfully unwatchable with a green cast to everything and no color. Will have to run over to NYC tomorrow and pick up a new bulb.

I think this will be my last Sony product. My old Epson TW100 lasted 3000 hrs and more with no problems.
post #80 of 90
These various projector brands seem to differ substantially in how well they treat their bulbs. My Sanyo must be hard on them. I just blew another one, after just a few hundred hours. Very irritating.
post #81 of 90
JHouse, are your bulbs literally blowing? Do they cause any harm to the projector if they do blow?
post #82 of 90
Thread Starter 
I'm coming up on 1000 hrs on my second VPL-VW50 bulb.

My intention had been to run it on low brightness for the first 750 hours or so, and then crank it up to high to compensate as brightness dropped off. However I inadvertantly had set in on high for a good portion of the initial ~600 hours. I then went to low. I've just kicked it back up to high, and I am noticing gradual dimming.

While I haven't had the sudden lamp failure I had with te first one, I can't imagine getting much more than 1250-1500 hours out of this one.

Any best deals on the lamps for these things anywhere?
post #83 of 90
It will be very interesting to see if the new VW-40 & 60 experience the same problem since all three PJ's use the LMP-H200 lamp.
post #84 of 90
dumb question, but where in the menu is the option to change the lamp mode?

is that not an option when you are using one of the preset picture modes, like cinema?

oh wait, that was two dumb questions.

thank you.
post #85 of 90
Thread Starter 
Well, it just happened again. Catastrophic dimming at about 1000 hours.



(Aham, it's buried in the menu under "Dynamic Black" or some such silly place. You can change it even when using the presets, but if you switch to another preset it will toggle it back.)
post #86 of 90
^^^^ oh man, that is a bummer to hear.

thanks for the 4-1-1. i am just diving into tweaking the black pearl after two weeks of using the basic cinema pro settings. just been having to much fun watching movies!

later.
post #87 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by aham23 View Post

^^^^ oh man, that is a bummer to hear.

thanks for the 4-1-1. i am just diving into tweaking the black pearl after two weeks of using the basic cinema pro settings. just been having to much fun watching movies!

later.

and you should have fun and enjoy yourself. the Pearl is still a great machine.
post #88 of 90
I paid a renowned bulb expert to figure out the problem I was having. His opinion was that the bulb was being overheated. The extent of the overheating depends on both the design of the projector, as well as maintenance and set-up/positioning with regard to ventilation. Some projectors tend to eat bulbs, which I attribute to a design problem. They work great right up until they overheat the bulb and kill the internal geometry of the bulb components. We are just going to be living with this until quality LED light engines become more affordable. Hopefully that will be soon as projector prices for lamp units seem to be dropping like a rock. I saw the add for that new 2800 lumen 1080p home theater unit priced at what, $600? That's only about $300 more than the cost of the bulb for a projector that at one time might have brought $10,000.
post #89 of 90
JHouse, Is the OEM Sony replacement bulb still the bulb to get? Or has there been a 3rd party replacement bulb that has improvements over the Sony OEM? thanks
post #90 of 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by img eL View Post

JHouse, Is the OEM Sony replacement bulb still the bulb to get? Or has there been a 3rd party replacement bulb that has improvements over the Sony OEM? thanks

3rd party lamps are usually a step down, not a step up.
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