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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 99

post #2941 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

Keep those votes coming folks.

And for you new visitors to the thread, how about letting me know how you found out about "Hot Off The Press"?

Hi! I've been following HOTP for quite a while but it moves so fast that by the time I have a witty retort or comment, it 3 pages past and no one would notice it. I gravitate towards HTPC, TVs, and DVRs.

Unlike you, I never watch anything live. I record everything, auto strip the commercials, and don't even have to FF: the commercials are not even there. I can live with bugs and logos but 6 minutes of show followed by 4 minutes of commercials drives me nuts.

I'm an advertiser's nightmare: someone with the hardware and skills to avoid them.
I don't watch reruns either. I have some beautifull HD backups of "Heroes".
post #2942 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathRay View Post

why would four out of 10 choose to watch the ads of a recorded program?

Because many commercials are interesting in one way or another. Not only do I watch them, I record them on my DVR and play them back at later times.

I also almost never pass up a trailer. They are trying to sell stuff to me, It doesn't hurt me to spend a minute or two watching a commercial here or there.
post #2943 of 93656
Thread Starter 
TV Notebook
Emmy's new class?
Creators of the season's freshman achievers talk on how to score top marks with audiences -- and keep them .
By Deborah Netburn Los Angeles Times Staff Writer May 30, 2007

IN A television season that largely saw shows with unlikely premises ("Knights of Prosperity," "The Nine") fail to deliver on their promise of originality, that saw Aaron Sorkin's highly touted "Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip" turn out to be a big buzz kill, a few gleaming gems emerged.

This handful of shows excited and inspired audiences; they dared to be different and succeeded on some level some became instant fodder for Internet chatter, while others are perhaps ratings challenged but have a loyal and slowly growing fan base. Will any of it be enough for an Emmy nod?

ABC's "Ugly Betty" proved that comedy can handle an hourlong format even when the heroine is only an emotional swan. "Heroes" showed us what the future of the prime-time serial might look like no lingering unsolved mysteries, just a bunch of good cliffhangers.

"Dexter" did the unthinkable by giving us a serial killer to root for and "Brothers & Sisters" updated the "thirtysomething" model for the new century.

And finally, the tragic dignity of "Friday Night Lights" showed us that HBO isn't the only home for critically acclaimed televised storytelling, even if viewers aren't yet swarming to it.

Here's what the creators of these outstanding freshman shows of the 2006-07 season had to say about how they stood out, and what they need to do to keep their audiences interested and moving forward.

"Ugly Betty"
The wonderful crazy whirlwind

SILVIO HORTA is the creator of "Ugly Betty," easily one of the most buzzed-about new shows of last season, but you wouldn't know it from talking to him.

"It honestly didn't hit me until after the Golden Globes that people were really loving the show," he said. "You work so incredibly hard and live in this bubble. You see the numbers but it doesn't really impact your reality until something big happens. I felt like Sally Field at the Oscars. It was shocking to me."

But who wouldn't fall in love with this bouncy show about a hard-working ugly duckling who enters the world of fashion magazines and, one full season in, still hasn't had a swanlike transformation?

"She's a fashion disaster," said "Ugly Betty" star America Ferrera of her character, "but she has the heart and intelligence to really succeed in business. And instead of the people around her changing her, she changes them."

"There is something so simple about it," Horta said. "Betty is the core. You can't help but root for her and everything else is like a soufflé this gay, wonderful world that's fun to write for."

Horta created this particular "Ugly Betty," but he did not create the concept. The show is a remake of the Colombian telenovela "Yo Soy Betty la Fea" (which Horta watched with his mother while growing up in Miami). NBC actually started developing an American version of the show five years ago originally as a sitcom. Then ABC got hold of it, Salma Hayek got involved and it was re-imagined as an hourlong comedy-drama.

Horta has some concerns as "Ugly Betty" moves into its second season though. "It's scary," he said. "Season 2 is sort of make or break time of whether a show has legs." And for a show with so many twists and turns, "Ugly Betty" has the potential to be twisted out of its successful shape.

"It challenges us," said Horta. "How do you move the show forward and step this thing out in a way that doesn't feel like a different show but is still progressing the show?"

"Friday Night Lights"
The free spirit

"FRIDAY NIGHT LIGHTS" is a show ostensibly about football but not really at all. "I think we've been able to do a show that talks about so many basic important things family, faith, marriage, adolescence," show runner Jason Kadims said. "The subject matter is the town. It's never been about football."

Peter Berg, who created "Friday Night Lights" just two years after directing a film of the same name, said he never had a master plan for the show, except to allow for a loose structure both on set and in the finished product. "We were interested in making a show that is not as producer- or writer-dominated as television often is," he said. "David Milch, David Kelly and Aaron Sorkin have done great jobs, but we don't have anybody on board with that much singular talent so we have to divvy it up."

On the set of "Friday Night Lights," actors are encouraged to improvise. Directors are not treated as hired hands and writers are told to focus less on climactic events and more on smaller human moments. Everybody has a stake in the outcome and a sense of creative freedom prevails.

That freedom extends to exploring some very sad stuff in the lives of the ever-expanding cast of characters who live in a small Texas town. "I think we've done a very good job of capturing the emotional brutality we experience in life," Berg said. "It's something we try to move away from but we keep coming back to it."

Berg is aware that darkness in the show can sometimes seem overwhelming. "I've seen a couple of episodes in rough cut and commented that we've really outdone ourselves in terms of depression this week," he said. "But life is tough."

And he doesn't think that's what's stopping viewers from tuning in. "I think the biggest thing we need is a new time slot," he said. "I would say almost anything but 8 o'clock against a Top 3 show."

(Berg's wish has since been fulfilled. During the television upfronts presentations, NBC announced that "Friday Night Lights" would get a new time slot: Friday nights at 10.)

"Dexter"
Smooth ride for a serial killer

PRODUCING partners John Goldwyn and Sara Colleton have a history of successfully developing books into films, but "Dexter" was their first venture into television. Happily for them they encountered a classic case of beginner's luck.

Colleton found the book "Darkly Dreaming Dexter" by John Lindsay and immediately saw potential to do a detective-cop genre piece with a dark and unexpected twist: The hero is a serial killer who doles out vigilante justice.

She and Goldwyn developed a script and sent it to Bob Greenblatt, an executive at Showtime who had wanted to work with them. He loved it and suggested Michael C. Hall for the part of Dexter. The casting worked, the pilot got made and picked up. The show quickly garnered critical acclaim and those all-important Nielson ratings improved over every episode.

"As we got deeper into the world of television, we realized how lucky we were," said Goldwyn.

But the success of "Dexter" has less to do with luck and more to do with Hall. "He is so appealing and so captured by the role that he captures the audience," said "Dexter" show runner Clyde Phillips. "You can't take your eyes off him."

"He walks such a tight-wire act every week in terms of getting the character so pitch perfectly," said Colleton. "I've never seen a false move from him in all the dailies we've watched."

Last season the show explored questions of character who is Dexter, where did he come from? In its second season, the producers say Dexter will have time to ponder the big questions of life. (They were purposefully vague. "There will be a big issue but we are under lock and key!" said Colleton).

And now it is time for the writers and creators to mimic Hall's dazzling tightrope act.

" 'Dexter' set the bar very high for the audience, and the audience expects a lot from the show," said Goodwyn. "As long as they remain fascinated and engaged in his pursuits, our audience will remain loyal."

http://theenvelope.latimes.com/award...home-headlines
post #2944 of 93656
Quote:


"Dexter"
Smooth ride for a serial killer

PRODUCING partners John Goldwyn and Sara Colleton have a history of successfully developing books into films, but "Dexter" was their first venture into television. Happily for them they encountered a classic case of beginner's luck.

Colleton found the book "Darkly Dreaming Dexter" by John Lindsay and immediately saw potential to do a detective-cop genre piece with a dark and unexpected twist: The hero is a serial killer who doles out vigilante justice.

She and Goldwyn developed a script and sent it to Bob Greenblatt, an executive at Showtime who had wanted to work with them. He loved it and suggested Michael C. Hall for the part of Dexter. The casting worked, the pilot got made and picked up. The show quickly garnered critical acclaim and those all-important Nielson ratings improved over every episode.

"As we got deeper into the world of television, we realized how lucky we were," said Goldwyn.

But the success of "Dexter" has less to do with luck and more to do with Hall. "He is so appealing and so captured by the role that he captures the audience," said "Dexter" show runner Clyde Phillips. "You can't take your eyes off him."

"He walks such a tight-wire act every week in terms of getting the character so pitch perfectly," said Colleton. "I've never seen a false move from him in all the dailies we've watched."

Last season the show explored questions of character who is Dexter, where did he come from? In its second season, the producers say Dexter will have time to ponder the big questions of life. (They were purposefully vague. "There will be a big issue but we are under lock and key!" said Colleton).

And now it is time for the writers and creators to mimic Hall's dazzling tightrope act.

" 'Dexter' set the bar very high for the audience, and the audience expects a lot from the show," said Goodwyn. "As long as they remain fascinated and engaged in his pursuits, our audience will remain loyal."

http://theenvelope.latimes.com/awar...-home-headline

Bring it on already....lol
post #2945 of 93656
Thread Starter 
Critic's Notebook
Chatting with Zach Quinto
By Rob Owen Pittsburgh Post-Gazette TV Editor in his blog Tuned In

If you missed it Monday when we posted my podcast interview with Zach Quinto, the villainous Sylar on NBC's "Heroes," you can listen by clicking on the link http://www.post-gazette.com/podcast/...n_20070528.mp3

Quinto, a Pittsburgh native, was in town to visit family and took time to visit the Post-Gazette for the interview, the first Tuned In Podcast as part of the paper's Pittsburgh: Hear and Now audiocasts.

In the podcast, Quinto discusses his role as Sylar, his future on the hit series and a possible future role in the next "Star Trek" movie.

http://www.post-gazette.com/tv/tunedin/
post #2946 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by RussTC3 View Post

Because many commercials are interesting in one way or another. Not only do I watch them, I record them on my DVR and play them back at later times.

I also almost never pass up a trailer. They are trying to sell stuff to me, It doesn't hurt me to spend a minute or two watching a commercial here or there.

oh wait, are you saying that because a lot of industry folkers read this thread? and you don't want them to catch on?

oh yeah, now that i think about i watch the ads too!

those geico caveman ads are totally hilarious (no spoilers please I still have the latest two waiting for me on my dvr). they should make a show out of those ads!

can we vote on our top 3 ads please?

1. that annoying yoplait commercial with those annoying chicks sitting around being annoying

2. those annoying AT&T (nee cingular) ads where the calls get dropped and one annoying person thinks the other annoying person is implying something because of their silence

3. donald trump
post #2947 of 93656
Thread Starter 
In that case, just quite the comment or story you want to discuss and give us your thoughts. Don't worry that a topic was posted a few pages ago -- we almost always come back again.

And a good, intelligent discussion -- along with contributions from as many people as possible -- makes the thread stronger.

And I guess I should have made myself more clear: I almost never watch anything live. Even if it is a show I am dying to see, I'll always start 20 minutes late so I can zip through the commercial/promo breaks.

I wouldn't know how to exist any more without my DVRs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by zaphod7501 View Post

Hi! I've been following HOTP for quite a while but it moves so fast that by the time I have a witty retort or comment, it 3 pages past and no one would notice it. I gravitate towards HTPC, TVs, and DVRs.

Unlike you, I never watch anything live. I record everything, auto strip the commercials, and don't even have to FF: the commercials are not even there. I can live with bugs and logos but 6 minutes of show followed by 4 minutes of commercials drives me nuts.

I'm an advertiser's nightmare: someone with the hardware and skills to avoid them.
I don't watch reruns either. I have some beautifull HD backups of "Heroes".
post #2948 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeathRay View Post

oh wait, are you saying that because a lot of industry folkers read this thread? and you don't want them to catch on?

No, I was being quite serious. I've said as much in the past on this thread as well (multiple times in fact).

It's definitely apparent I'm rare, because no one else seems to watch commercials anymore.
post #2949 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by RussTC3 View Post

No, I was being quite serious. I've said as much in the past on this thread as well (multiple times in fact).

It's definitely apparent I'm rare, because no one else seems to watch commercials anymore.

Yes indeed.. you are definitely rare. I try my best to avoid commercials at all times. Sometimes that can be impossible.
post #2950 of 93656
Thread Starter 
Passings
Shirl Conway, 90
Actress starred in CBS drama 'Nurses'
By Variety Staff

Actress Shirl Conway, known for her role on 1960s series "The Nurses," died May 7 in Shelton, Wash. She was 90.

Born in Franklinville, N.Y., Conway attended the U. of Michigan and started out as a John Robert Powers model, appearing on the cover of Redbook Magazine. She also sang in nightclubs.

On Broadway, she appeared in Eddie Cantor's "Banjo Eyes"; with Carol Channing in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes"; originated the role of Ruth Winters in "Plain and Fancy"; and toured as "Auntie Mame" in the U.S. and Australia in the late 1950s.

She appeared in the films "Helter Skelter" and "You Can't Fool an Irishman" for moving into television. On TV, Conway appeared in "Route 66," "The Defenders," "Joe & Mabel" and Sid Caesar's "Caesar's Hour."

From 1962-65 she starred as head nurse Liz Thorpe on the CBS Primetime drama "The Nurses," receiving an Emmy nomination for her role.

Moving to western Washington in 1972, she continued to appear on stage with the Seattle Repertory in the 1970s.

She founded the Harstine Island Theater Club where she wrote, directed, produced and starred in productions into her 80s.

She is survived by a daughter, 5 step-grandchildren and 6 step-great grandchildren.

http://www.variety.com/index.asp?lay...&categoryid=14
post #2951 of 93656
Thread Starter 
If you were wondering where the Nielsen ratings are -- they are usually released on Tuesdays -- the Memorial Day Holiday pushed the release back until Wednesday this week.

They'll be here mid afternoon Wednesday ET.
post #2952 of 93656
Thread Starter 
TV Notebook
Ratings-Poor NBC Ousts Programming Chief Reilly
By John Maynard Washington Post Staff Writer Wednesday, May 30, 2007

Less than a week after concluding one of its least watched seasons ever, fourth-place NBC fired entertainment president Kevin Reilly, the network announced yesterday.

The network will replace him with two co-chairmen: Ben Silverman, an independent producer behind NBC's "The Office" and "The Biggest Loser" and ABC's "Ugly Betty"; and NBC West Coast President Marc Graboff, who has been with the network since 2000.

"Obviously one of our major goals is to turn around NBC's prime-time ratings performance, and I am confident that both Ben and Marc will lead us on that road," NBC Universal President Jeff Zucker said yesterday in a conference call with reporters.

Silverman, 36, and Graboff, 51, will report to Zucker.

The announcement came three months after Reilly, who came to NBC in 2004 from the FX cable network, signed a "multi-year" deal with the network to remain as president.

Zucker characterized Reilly's dismissal yesterday as a "mutual decision" and "amicable." He added: "Kevin brought us a number of fine programs and his legacy will be well intact."

NBC finished fourth among the networks this year in total viewers and in key demographics for advertisers, including 18- to 49-year-olds. In that age group, the network had its worst showing since the advent of the Nielsen "people meter" ratings system in 1987. (All Nielsen data, it should be noted, is subject to a small margin of error that varies according to sample size and the number of viewers tuned to a particular program.)

NBC had no Top 10 shows this season. Besides the network's fall telecast of "Sunday Night Football," which finished No. 13 for the season with 16.5 million viewers, the network's only hits were the game show "Deal or No Deal" (15 million viewers) and "Heroes" (14.4 million) -- shows that Reilly brought to the network.

This month NBC announced its new fall schedule, bringing back many of its critically acclaimed but low-rated series, such as "30 Rock," "My Name Is Earl" and "Friday Night Lights."

"We got the class -- we need the mass," Reilly told critics during the annual network presentations this month in New York. NBC's new schedule has no scripted series at 8 p.m. except on Thursday, and includes no new sitcoms for the first time in nearly 30 years.

Said Zucker: "The reaction to our fall schedule remains incredibly strong."

NBC unveiled five new shows for the fall, including a remake of "The Bionic Woman" and a drama series about a time-traveling newspaper reporter.

Zucker said the timing of Reilly's departure had "nothing to do" with the announcement of the new schedule, but rather was a result of Silverman's availability to leave his production company Reveille, which he founded in 2002.

Of Silverman, Zucker said: "He was looking to do something different with his production company and his career, and that made me realize that this is a guy who I had talked to about coming to NBC . . . and the timing had never been right. I acted quickly to see if this might be the right time for him."

Silverman, who's produced other shows for NBC Universal cable channels, including USA Network's "Nashville Star" and Bravo's "Blow Out," said the new position is "a dream job for me. This is what I've always wanted to do."

As for division of labor between the co-chairmen, Graboff said yesterday that he will be "the point person on the business and financial and operational, administrative-type things like I have always been. Ben will be the point person on creative and programming and scheduling and marketing."

When asked during the conference call what would happen if the two chairmen deadlocked on a decision, Zucker quipped: "Tie goes to me."

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...902184_pf.html
post #2953 of 93656
When I first got a DVR I skipped ads completely but I felt I was missing out on hearing about new movies and funny ads I would hear others talk about. Now I use the 30 second skip and give each ad about 1/2 a second to grab my attention.

The last funny ad I can recall is the t-mobile "Secret Lovers" ad and some of the Alltel ads were funny too.

I find many ads insultingly stupid, and I hate most of the car ads like the one where the guy uses his imagination (I guess?) to pick up is friend and dump him in the river. I sometimes think these ads are actually targeted to children. Maybe someone did some market research and found that children have a lot of sway in their parents vehicle decisions. I do find it funny when they spend a whole ad touting the cup holders and radio as the major selling points.
post #2954 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

I am not taking either side here, but it seems to me she is the classic power mad, "I am ALWAYS right" diva/bully. Do it my way or I quit. And don't ever hit back when I trash you, because that's not fair.

Thank you and thank you again.

That couldn't have been stated any better. Every time I want to "rant" back to one of our fellow posters on your tread, you just keep finding a way to hit the nail on the head.
post #2955 of 93656
Fredfa, not sure if I missed it or not (I was on vacation for a week) but have you posted and reviews or links, etc about the new show starting this fall Amsterdam or whatever it is called about the detective that can't die. The previews playing on Fox look really good.
post #2956 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by vonzoog View Post

Thank you and thank you again.

That couldn't have been stated any better. Every time I want to "rant" back to one of our fellow posters on your tread, you just keep finding a way to hit the nail on the head.

Guess that explains why she has a 29% approval rating. News is saying lower than Bush. (Is that possible?)
post #2957 of 93656
But, unlike Bush, Rosie O'Donnell has no power to actually do something that affects the lives of millions of people (for better or worse). She's an entertainer with a strong opinion, period, and last time I checked that was still legal and not frowned upon by the Constitution. Her approval rating means nothing other than she may not get another platform by a big media corporation and she'll have to live off her millions (poor thing! ). The approval rating of a Commander in Chief on the other hand is a reflection of his/her performance on the job. Big difference.
post #2958 of 93656
Me:

1: LOST
2: Friday Night Lights
3: Supernatural

GF:

1: Friday Night Lights
2: LOST
3: 24
post #2959 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

Sorry it took so long, Michael, but now there is word.

TV Notebook
ABC to give another run to "Kyle XY"
By Hal Boedeker Orlando Sentinel Television Critic in his TV Guy blog May 29, 2007

"Kyle XY," the saga of a mysterious guy without a belly button, will receive another run on ABC this summer.

The series begins its second season at 8 p.m. June 11 on ABC Family. If you miss the episodes there, you can look to ABC, which will air them starting at 8 p.m. June 15.

Matt Dallas plays the title character.

http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/ent..._give_ano.html

Thanks, Fred, for remembering. We love this show. It's much better on ABC in hi-def, though. Hopefully ABC will find a way to air all episodes. We don't watch too much low-def, and would hate to resort to ABC Family to finish it. (didn't I read somewhere that Family would be launching a hi-def channel this year?)
post #2960 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

TV Notebook
MyNetworkTV to bank on reality for fall
By Hal Boedeker Orlando Sentinel Television Critic in his TV Guy blog May 29, 2007

Will any of those shows be in HD?
post #2961 of 93656
1- House
2- 2 1/2 Man
3- NBC Sunday Night Football
post #2962 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

On the set of "Friday Night Lights," actors are encouraged to improvise. Directors are not treated as hired hands and writers are told to focus less on climactic events and more on smaller human moments. Everybody has a stake in the outcome and a sense of creative freedom prevails.

That freedom extends to exploring some very sad stuff in the lives of the ever-expanding cast of characters who live in a small Texas town. "I think we've done a very good job of capturing the emotional brutality we experience in life," Berg said. "It's something we try to move away from but we keep coming back to it."

I finally got around to watching the episode I recorded. The first 30 minutes was riddled with video problems, but I kept with it, and I'm glad I did. It's one of the better shows I've seen on network TV this season. What really stuck out for me were the "smaller human moments," the otherwise average conversations that happen in real life on a daily basis that somehow came across as extraordinary on television. The show just has a certain sincerity about it that I haven't seen elsewhere this season. I only saw 30 minutes of the episode, yet I'm hooked now.

I'll be watching for the rest of the summer and into the fall for sure.
post #2963 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

The approval rating of a Commander in Chief on the other hand is a reflection of his/her performance on the job. Big difference.

Well, it's really just a fickle society's current opinion based on a lot of things, many of which have nothing to do with actual performance (or the lack thereof). History generally tells a better story of just how performance was, good or bad.
post #2964 of 93656
Thread Starter 
It is called "New Amsterdam" and is (for now) in the 8 PM ET/PT Tuesday slot -- before "House".

I don't think there have been any reviews as such, but there have been a few comments about the show. I wouldn't take any of them that seriously because shows tends to change, sometimes quite a lot, between the upfronts and the beginning of the season.

A year ago at this time "Studio 60 On The Sunset Strip" was accepted as the major hit of the coming season based on its pilot, and "Brothers & Sisters" was such a mess the cast was shuffled and the pilot reshot. So you never know this early.

Networks usually ask TV critics NOT to review programs based on the upfront version of the pilot simply for that reason.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WilliamR View Post

Fredfa, not sure if I missed it or not (I was on vacation for a week) but have you posted and reviews or links, etc about the new show starting this fall Amsterdam or whatever it is called about the detective that can't die. The previews playing on Fox look really good.
post #2965 of 93656
Thread Starter 
OK, this exchange clearly shows another reason I stayed out of the Rosie story.

Unless we can keep politics out of this, Dad and Dave, let's let it the discussion of Rosie O'Donnell drop.

TV can be divisive enough. There are plenty of websites that encourage political debate and are far better equipped to deal with it than I am.

I am not picking on you, Dave, or you Dad, I am just trying to nip this in the bud.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

Well, it's really just a fickle society's current opinion based on a lot of things, many of which have nothing to do with actual performance (or the lack thereof). History generally tells a better story of just how performance was, good or bad.
post #2966 of 93656
Thread Starter 
TV Notebook
Jenna Fischer feeling better after big fall
By William Keck USA TODAY May 30, 2007

Jenna Fischer, who plays lovable receptionist Pam on NBC's The Office, is in pain. A lot of pain. But she wants her fans to know that she is on the mend after breaking four bones in her back in a nasty fall May 14 at an NBC party.

"I had a rough night last night," Fischer says from the Central Park-area hotel where she has been recuperating. "I'm mostly off the meds, but I did take some last night because sleeping is probably the most uncomfortable thing right now. I just can't get comfortable."

Two weeks ago, Fischer, 33, came to New York to speak with advertisers about NBC's fall lineup. She was looking forward to letting loose with her co-stars. "It's one of my favorite parts of the year. My (summer) vacation starts then. I was ready for a lovely break no pun intended."

At around 11 p.m., one of The Office's writers encouraged her to hit the dance floor at the trendy Buddakan club. "I was going to do one dance and then get out of there," Fischer says. "The dance floor was down a long set of marble stairs. I linked arms with my friend and just missed a step. All I know is I was suddenly not on the ground anymore. My legs flipped out from underneath me, and while I was in the air, I had the thought, 'This isn't going to end well.' "

It didn't. Fischer landed hard on the stairs. The pain, she says, "was consuming and immediate. I've never felt anything like it. I was horribly nauseous and dizzy."

After being taken to a private area in the club, she lifted the back of her shirt. "It was bleeding and very swollen, so I said, 'I want an ambulance and I want to go to the hospital.' "

At her side almost immediately was co-star Angela Kinsey, who plays Angela on the show. "She was with me for over 24 hours taking care of me," Fischer says.

X-rays at St. Vincent's Hospital revealed that she had fractured four transverse vertebrae in her back and tore a ligament in her elbow. "The doctor said, 'The good news is, you have no spinal cord damage,' " Fischer recalls.

Fischer was released from the hospital the next day, and her husband, writer/director James Gunn, flew in from Los Angeles to take care of her. "I couldn't get in and out of bed myself," she says. "I couldn't walk very well. I needed constant supervision."

In another week, she should be able to travel home to Los Angeles.

She has received well-wishes from all her Office co-stars. Steve Carell (Michael) sent flowers with a funny note. John Krasinski (Jim) wrote a "lovely e-mail." Rainn Wilson (Dwight) placed a call to her room. But it was an NBC doc who really impressed her. "Zach Braff (Scrubs) was at the party when I fell. And bless his heart, the next day he sent a big tray of cupcakes to my hotel. In those first few days, all my husband and I did for pleasure was watch a Larry Sanders DVD and eat those cupcakes."

To regain her mobility, Fischer has been taking daily half-hour walks in Central Park. "My mobility," she says, "is limited only by my pain. I'm almost at the point where I can bend over. I really have a desire to wash my feet."

The most recent news: "My back doctor said it will be about 12 weeks until I'm fully recovered."

By that time she will be shooting The Office, which concluded the season with her character being asked out on a date (finally!) by Jim. "I'm assuming the writers aren't going to break my heart," Fischer says.

Fischer is grateful that her accident happened just three days after wrapping the film Walk Hard, a raunchy comedy in which she stars with John C. Reilly as warped versions of Johnny and June Carter Cash.

"We meet through our singin', then fall in love but have a very tumultuous road," Fischer says in a Southern twang.

She won't be singing any songs, though.

"I have to wear a lot of skimpy outfits for this movie, so I had to get in great shape. I trained very hard, so I had to give the singing up."

There is one possible silver lining to her unfortunate misstep. Six weeks ago, she started playing the guitar and since her fall has been writing a country song about her pain.

Says Fischer with a giggle: "Now I just have to get someone else to sing it."

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/...-fischer_N.htm
post #2967 of 93656
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Last year MNTV loudly proclaimed it was the first all-HD network. No such claims this year.

Which is a long-winded way of saying I don't know, Alan.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AlanSaysYo View Post

Will any of those shows be in HD?
post #2968 of 93656
Thread Starter 
TV Review
Hidden Palms
Been there, done that
The creator of the '90s hit 'Dawson's Creek' is back
By Andrew Lyons in MediaLifeMagazine.com May 30, 2007

Nine years ago, Kevin Williamson made a splash with Dawson's Creek, a new kind of teen drama, one in which the young characters had the self-awareness and verbal dexterity of middle-aged philosophy professors.

It was a hit for the WB. More than that, it was a pop culture sensation.

Williamson displayed a knack for creating teenage characters who were hyper-evolved intellectually, if not emotionally. The concept was original, and for a few years it seemed every network was looking to develop similar series about attractive, talky teens. Creek spawned the likes of Gilmore Girls, Veronica Mars, The O.C. and countless less-memorable copycats.

Williamson is back, this time with "Hidden Palms, another teen-centric drama set in a clubby Palm Springs community. The formula is largely the same: young, pretty, ultra-verbal human pinballs bouncing off one another in endless romantic permutations.

What is new is a mystery component, clearly a nod to the recent popularity of serialized dramas.

But there's a big problem. Williamson hasn't changed much in the four years since Creek left the air, but television has. Uber-snarky, pop culture-soaked characters are no longer the rage. Even the worthiest Creek descendants (Mars, Gilmore) have been cancelled.

Someone should have explained all this to Williamson. No one did, and that becomes clear in tonight's premiere episode of "Palms," airing at 8 on the CW.

Once again we find him splashing about in vocabulous teen angst but this time it's a puddle, not the deep pool of a decade ago, and that puddle is fast evaporating.

Beyond that, there's just not much logic to "Palms."

We watch as the protagonist, Johnny (Taylor Handley, The O.C.), joins in a late-night golf course sprinkler dance with a random hot girl wearing only a nightie. But there's no dramatic logic to explain what led up to the sprinkler dance, and the effect is that the whole incident comes off as ridiculous. Then the next day Johnny and the very same nightie girl engage in a totally unbelievable conversation that touches on God, evolution and Will Ferrell movies.

Trust me, it's not as clever as it sounds.

Johnny has just moved to Palm Springs after a stint in rehab. His mom (Gail O'Grady, NYPD Blue) wants a new start after Johnny's dad commits suicide.

Johnny quickly meets his neighbors, who are all conveniently quirky, mysterious or both.

Among them: Cliff (Michael Cassidy, The O.C.) whom we learn isn't as charming as he first appears after he kicks a dog (seriously). There's also Cliff's cougar of a mom, Tess (Sharon Lawrence, NYPD Blue), and Greta (Amanda Heard, Alpha Dog), our nightie girl.

Liza (newcomer Ellary Porterfield) is the nerdy neighbor who has turned her garage into a test tube-filled laboratory. That's because she's so nerdy, get it? Of course, she cleans up real nice when she wants to get Johnny's attention.

The mystery element involves a guy named Eddie, who previously lived in Johnny's house and who died under suspicious circumstances.

But none of these characters come off as originals but rather as cribs from Creek or one of its offspring.

And the actors aren't nearly as good. In retrospect, the Creek cast seemed like the Royal Shakespeare Company when compared to the Palms cast. They made Williamson's language work.

This crowd doesn't come close. Handley and Heard are particularly unconvincing. At times they seem not to understand their own dialogue.

And it's just sad to see former NYPD Blue castmates O'Grady and Lawrence so thoroughly wasted.

But ultimately the failure of Hidden Palms may be more fundamental than the bad acting, weak dialogue or the cheap tactic of using wall-to-wall songs as a substitute for creating real emotional moments.

That failure is one of time. This show's time may simply have passed. What felt sharp and fresh in 1998 now comes across as self-conscious and worn out. Hidden Palms isn't just bad. It's tired.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art..._done_that.asp
post #2969 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

OK, this exchange clearly shows another reason I stayed out of the Rosie story.

Unless we can keep politics out of this, Dad and Dave, let's let it the discussion of Rosie O'Donnell drop.

TV can be divisive enough. There are plenty of websites that encourage political debate and are far better equipped to deal with it than I am.

I am not picking on you, Dave, or you Dad, I am just trying to nip this in the bud.

Sure you are, but that's okay.

No political statement intended, but enough said and I'll defer to your esteem leadership.
post #2970 of 93656
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Thanks.
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