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post #70171 of 93669
Business Notes
Harry Potter Inc: Warner Bros' $21B Empire
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - July 13th, 2011

With history's most successful movie franchise coming to an end with the Friday release of Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2, it's a good time to ask: How much loot was conjured up en masse? And the answer is startling. You can find about $21 billion by adding up gross sales the series has generated since 1998 from films, videos, video games, licensed merchandise, and books. (See detailed breakdown below.) Time Warner has already seen an estimated $1 billion in profit from the films and its work as custodian of a global entertainment brand. The tally should continue to grow, probably by a lot, with the release tomorrow of Warner Bros' Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 2 -- although Hollywood accounting has a way of making profits vanish. (Here's how the black magic worked for Harry Potter And The Order Of The Phoenix .)

Things have turned out so well that it's easy to forget what a huge risk Warner seemed to be taking more than a decade ago when it bought the Potter rights. The studio didn't know how the series would end. And J.K. Rowling, who wrote the series, was a wild card. Many wondered whether U.S. audiences would warm to the all-British movie cast that Rowling required. "The casting of the kids was the biggest place where it could have gone wrong," Warner Bros Pictures Group President Jeff Robinov tells me. Some Warner executives also chafed at Rowling's demands that there be no Potter-related fast food offerings and that Warner show restraint in product licensing. I can only say now to all the parents out there, if the action figures are horrible, just tell the kids that I said don't buy them. Sorry, Warners, Rowling told a 60 Minutes interview.

Virtually everybody agrees now that Rowling was right to keep the franchise faithful to her vision. And Warner was right to embrace that vision down to small details in licensed merchandise. We had a guideline that was perhaps frustrating to our colleagues in Consumer Products but has held well for us as a company which was to look to create artifacts, not souvenirs, DC Entertainment President Diane Nelson tells me. She oversaw the Potter franchise from the beginning. Marketing plans also adapted as fans became older and the Potter saga grew darker. We held on to fans as they aged in a way that's never been seen before, Nelson says to me.

Here's how all of the Potter business decisions have turned out so far:

Movies. The first seven films accounted for nearly $6.4 billion in ticket sales, with 68% of the total coming from overseas, according to Box Office Mojo. The only other franchise that comes close is James Bond: Its 23 films beat Potter if ticket prices are adjusted for inflation.

Home Video. Consumers have spent nearly $3.9 billion globally -- with 44% of that coming from the U.S. -- to buy 302 million videos of the first six Potter films, Warner says. IHS Screen Digest says that Warner probably collected about $1.5 billion just from domestic video sales, which would more than cover the studio's estimated $1.4 billion production budget for all eight films.

TV rights. Add $1 billion to the tally, with about half coming from the U.S. Although Disney passed on the film rights to Rowling's novels, ABC saw the light and bought most of the domestic broadcast and cable rights. Overseas broadcast partners include UK's Sky, France's TF1, Italy's Mediaset, Australia's Nine Network, Canada's CBC, and Mexico's Channel 5.

Video Games. Fans have spent about $1.5 billion buying 42 million Potter-related games.

Licensed merchandise. This may be the biggest annuity: Consumers have already spent more than $7 billion globally on Potter-related games, clothing, trading cards, candies and other goods - and continue to shell out an estimated $1 billion a year. The big question is whether spending will diminish now that the movie series has ended. Warner hopes to keep the business fresh by creating what it calls immersive environments. The film franchise is coming to an end, but the brand isn't, says Nelson. She says that the company will be big supporters of Rowling's new Pottermore Web site. The studio plans to turn London's Leavesden studio, where the Potter films were shot, into a tourist attraction. It has also been encouraged by the response to The Wizarding World Of Harry Potter at Universal's Islands of Adventure in Orlando. The theme park attraction opened last year, the result of a 10 year licensing deal NBCUniversal signed with Warner. More than that 7 million people have ridden the Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey ride, and the park reports that its attendance in the first quarter was up 68% vs the same period last year. Visitors to the destination's Hog's Head pub have bought more than 2 million Butterbeers.

Books. Readers have snapped up 450 million Potter books in 68 languages. Publishing company Scholastic says it has had 150 million books in print in the U.S. and has collected nearly $1.2 billion in revenue from the series from 1999 through 2010.

http://www.deadline.com/2011/07/harr...os-21b-empire/
post #70172 of 93669
Critic's Notes
Thursday Fare: Emmy Nods, 'Brother' Ouster
By Roger Catlin, Hartford Courant's 'TV Eye' Blog - July 14th, 2011

Up early? The Emmy nominations will be announced this morning on the morning "news" programs, "Today" (NBC, 7 a.m.), "Good Morning America"(ABC, 8 a.m.) and "CBS Morning News" (CBS, 8 a.m.), with the major nominees announced live from Hollywood about 8:30 a.m.

None of the network shows on tonight is expected to be on it, except for maybe "Glee" (Fox, 9 p.m.), seen in a rerun, or in the choreography of specific performances on "So You Think You Can Dance" (Fox, 8 p.m.).

But individual cast members on, say, "The Office" (NBC, 9 p.m.), "Parks and Recreation" (NBC, 8:30 p.m.) or "30 Rock" (NBC, 9:30 p.m.), all on in rerun tonight.

Of the reality shows that have taken hold this summer, things have been much more interesting than anyone had a right to expect for the first week of "Big Brother" (CBS, 9 p.m.). The veterans had every right to be cocky - they knew how to scheme, play the game and hang onto a banana (should a competition call for it).

But then their leading schemer Evil Dick up and quit abruptly for personal reasons, even before tonight's first eviction. The old-timers are rattled; the young ones don't know quite how to capitalize on it. Most wonder why he quit at all. Maybe he didn't want to hear Rachel's braying laugh all summer. Or the inane game they keep playing, Big Booty, which is ruining the season of "Big Brother After Dark" (Showtime2, midnight).

Chris Gorham plays opposite Becki Newton again, this time for "Love Bites" (NBC, 10 p.m.).

You know you're on "Extreme Chef" (Food, 10 p.m.) when you're dropped on a deserted island first.

Mr. C.K. has a rough show in Atlantic City on a new "Louie" (FX, 10:30 p.m.) and gets advice from an old pro, Joan Rivers.

A Southern-fried "Bachelorette" with the name of a movie and song, "Sweet Home Alabama" (CMT, 9 p.m.) has a belle from Alabama choosing from 20 good old boys, half from the country, half from the city. It accompanies a new episode of "Texas Women" (CMT, 10 p.m.).

Northern urban antidote to the above: "NY Ink" (TLC, 10 p.m.).

Catch up with "True Blood" (HBO, 8 p.m.) when the first three episodes of the fourth season run back to back.

Ed Helms guest stars on a new "Wilfred" (FX, 10 p.m.).

Public animosity toward Wall Street may have hurt the box office success of the sequel "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps" (HBO2, 8:30 p.m.).

The spotlight on Arabs in film on Turner Classic Movies continues with "Ali Baba Goes to Town" (8 p.m.), "Road to Morocco" (10 p.m.), "Abbott and Costello Meet the Mummy" (11:45 p.m.), "The Sad Sack" (2:30 a.m.) and "Bowery to Baghdad" (4:30 a.m.).

Baseball starts up again following the All Star break, with only a few games scheduled. One is Yankees at Blue Jays (YES, 7 p.m.).

* * * *

DAYTIME TALK

Regis and Kelly:
Daniel Radcliffe, Joss Stone
Gayle King: Jennifer Hudson, Dr. Susan Lipkins (rerun)
The View: Roseanne Barr, Li Bing Bing, Wendi Murdoch, S.E Cupp
The Talk: Tim Daly, Tracey Bregman, Peter Bergman
Ellen DeGeneres: Jeff Bridges, the Script (rerun)
Wendy Williams: Dennis Rodman, Lauren Conrad (rerun).


http://blogs.courant.com/roger_catli...ds-brothe.html
post #70173 of 93669
Emmy Notes
Emmy Nominations Announced
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com - July 14th, 2011

HBO's "Mildred Pierce" leads with 21 nominations in Thursdays 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards, followed by the AMC drama "Mad Men," a three-time best drama winner, with 19.

HBO's new entry "Boardwalk Empire" followed with 18, including one for best dramatic series.

Here's the list of nominees in the main categories. Here's the complete list of Emmy nominations.

Outstanding Drama Series:
Boardwalk Empire
Dexter
Friday Night Lights
Game of Thrones
The Good Wife
Mad Men

Outstanding Comedy Series:
Glee
Parks and Recreation
The Office
Modern Family
30 Rock
The Big Bang Theory

Lead Actress in a Drama Series:
Kathy Bates, Harry's Law
Connie Britton, Friday Night Lights
Mireille Enos, The Killing
Mariska Hargitay, Law and Order: SVU
Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife
Elisabeth Moss, Mad Men

Lead Actress in a Comedy Series:
Laura Linney, The Big C
Edie Falco, Nurse Jackie
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation
Melissa McCarthy, Mike & Molly
Martha Plimpton, Raising Hope
Tina Fey, 30 Rock

Lead Actor in a Drama Series:
Steve Buscemi, Boardwalk Empire
Michael C. Hall, Dexter
Kyle Chandler, Friday Night Lights
Hugh Laurie, House
Timothy Olyphant, Justified
Jon Hamm, Mad Men

Lead Actor In A Comedy Series:
Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory
Johnny Galecki, The Big Bang Theory
Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Louis C.K., Louie
Steve Carell, The Office
Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock

Miniseries/Made For Television Movie:
Cinema Verite, HBO
Downton Abbey, PBS
The Kennedys, ReelzChannel
Mildred Pierce, HBO
The Pillars Of The Earth, Starz
Too Big To Fail, HBO

Variety, Music Or Comedy Series:
The Colbert Report, Comedy Central
Conan, TBS
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart, Comedy Central
Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, NBC
Real Time With Bill Maher, HBO
Saturday Night Live, NBC

Variety, Music Or Comedy Special:
Bette Midler: The Showgirl Must Go On, HBO
Carrie Fisher In Wishful Drinking, HBO
The Kennedy Center Honors, CBS
Lady GaGa Presents The Monster Ball Tour: At Madison Square Garden, HBO
The Pee-Wee Herman Show On Broadway, HBO

Outstanding Reality Program:
Antiques Roadshow, PBS
Deadliest Catch, Discovery Channel
Hoarders, A&E
Kathy Griffin: My Life On The D-List, Bravo
MythBusters, Discovery Channel
Undercover Boss, CBS

Outstanding Reality, Competition:
The Amazing Race, CBS
Dancing With The Stars, ABC
So You Think You Can Dance, FOX
Top Chef, Bravo


http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/em...nnounced-29091
post #70174 of 93669
TV Sports
At the British Open, a new face for golf
The sport could sure use one after the fall of Tiger Woods
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - July 14th, 2011

Rory McIlroy is the favorite heading into today's British Open, coming off a dominant victory at the U.S. Open last month. He also seems to be the new favorite with the media, who have been looking for a new golf muse since Tiger Woods' sex scandal broke more than a year and a half ago.

Golf veterans such as Jack Nicklaus have cautioned against putting such oversized expectations on McIlroy, who teed off with the rest of the field this morning at 4 a.m. on ESPN.

They argue that it's unfair to think that McIlroy will show the same domination as Woods. But those warnings will likely fall on deaf ears, as the game really needs someone to step forward as the new face of golf after all Woods' woes.

The former world No. 1 is sitting out the British Open, just as he did the U.S. Open, to nurse his leg injuries. It's uncertain at this point whether Woods will be back for the year's last major, the PGA Championship.

In the meantime, McIlroy has without question become a media sensation. His pre-tournament press conference drew a huge crowd, and the 22-year-old has been featured in everything from Golf Magazine to the Los Angeles Times over the past month.

It's not yet clear whether viewers consider McIlroy the next big thing, but it will certainly become more evident looking at the ratings if he wins the Open.

The bar hasn't been set all that high.

Last year, the first year that the tournament aired exclusively on cable, the final round of the Open averaged an all-time-low 2.6 Nielsen household rating, down 33 percent from 2009, when it aired on ABC.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...e-for-golf.asp
post #70175 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Emmy Notes
Emmy Nominations Announced
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com - July 14th, 2011

The nominees have been announced for the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards.

Here's the list of nominees (to be updated later):

Outstanding Drama Series:
Boardwalk Empire
Dexter
Friday Night Lights
Game of Thrones
The Good Wife
Mad Men

Well, time for the annual Rite of Outrage at the Emmy noms. This year, the "how could those morons have left ____ out!" sentiment is led by the outrageous omissions of 'Treme' and 'Justified'. 'Breaking Bad' wasn't eligible this year (that's how long ago its last season was).

But 'Dexter' had a sub-par season and is only there because of past excellence, GoT was good but not great, and I don't watch 'The Good Wife' so I can't comment on that one.
post #70176 of 93669
I get Netflix through Comcast/TiVo, and my main bitch with Netflix streaming is the lack of closed captions (my wife is deaf). I therefore am limited to streaming foreign films with English subtitles. The new split fee structure will probably cause me to drop the streaming, and the lack of Dolby 5.1 has always been an irritation.
post #70177 of 93669
^^^ Your wife is lucky to have you... (looks at handle name)... then again, maybe not?
post #70178 of 93669
Emmy Notes
Emmy Nominations: By the Numbers
By Lindsay Powers, The Hollywood Reporter - July 14th, 2011

HBO dominated Emmy nominations Thursday morning with 105. CBS topped the networks with 50, compared to NBC, which scored 46, Fox with 42 and ABC with 40. The full count breakdown below:

HBO - 104
CBS - 50
NBC - 46
PBS - 43
FOX - 42
ABC - 40
AMC - 29
Showtime - 21
Comedy Central - 11
ReelzChannel - 10
Starz - 9
HISTORY - 7
Nickelodeon - 6
Cartoon Network - 6
FX Networks -6
Bravo - 5
Discovery Channel - 5
DirecTV - 4
Travel Channel - 4
Lifetime - 3
TCM - 3
OWN - 3
TNT - 3
TBS - 3
TV Land - 3
NBC.com - 2
BIO - 2
A&E - 2
ABC.com - 2
EPIX - 2
ESPN - 2
Animal Planet - 2
Disney Channel - 2
Sundance Channel - 2
JayLenosGarage.com - 1
MTV - 1
BBC America - 1
CW - 1
Syfy - 1
Disney XD - 1
TBS.com - 1
TeenNick - 1
thedailyshow.com - 1
Fox Movie Channel - 1
FOX.com - 1
FUSE - 1
USA - 1


http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...numbers-211280
post #70179 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldfart View Post

I get Netflix through Comcast/TiVo, and my main bitch with Netflix streaming is the lack of closed captions (my wife is deaf). I therefore am limited to streaming foreign films with English subtitles. The new split fee structure will probably cause me to drop the streaming, and the lack of Dolby 5.1 has always been an irritation.

Same here. Their intention is to drive people away from the DVDs and to the streaming option. It's cheaper for them. It's going to be just the opposite for us though. Captions is also a concern for us, plus the lack of movies and shows for streaming. Quality too. Not many are available in HD. Their SD programming looks like crap on our 126" screen. I think they made this move too soon... We'll be dropping our streaming option come Sept 1st.
post #70180 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by URFloorMatt View Post

Huh? All of my VOD content from HBO is HD.

Not where I live.

Quote:
One series... for late 2012.

Got to start somehwere. How long did it take HBO to have it's first series?

Quote:
Would be nice if they'd let other devices take advantage,

The point is you said it didn't exist AT ALL. I proved you wrong.

Quote:
Doesn't mean I have to like it.

Point is that you implied the extra fee for blu-ray was a Netflix only thing.

Quote:
Inception was the biggest blockbuster of the summer. The gap is not nearly that great for lesser titles, and it's even less once you factor in the "very long wait" that you'll have to wade through before it actually gets to you once it's released.

A) Lesser titles? OK how about Going the Distance. Netflix release date Dec 28th 2010. HBO July 14th 2011. 6 1/2 months

B) Ok so maybe with this new cash flow they buy more DVDs/blu-rays so the wait isn't as long. Yet you still complain. Running a business costs money. The sooner you get that point the better.

Quote:
But we didn't get any new content. All we got was a 60% rate hike.

Ok first the hike doesn't affect current customers until Sept 1st. Second it takes time to get new content. That content cost money. Netflix doesn't have the money until it gets it form the customers. which won't be until Sept 1st. geesh give them some frciken time. You CLEALY have never worked for yourself or ran a business. Because it shows. No offense, but it does.

Quote:
Service is not changing on Sept. 1. They're just raising rates at a pace that dwarfs even the cable companies. As I recall, this is the second rate hike of the year, though the last one in January was only $1.

You know customers that only use the DVD service are actually getting price REDUCTION but hey why bring that up and waste a good rant. Hey if $6 is going to kill you dump it and move on. How much money do you give your cable/satelite company each month for 99.999% crap and late night infomercials?
post #70181 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Blockbuster doesn't charge extra for Blu-ray.

Great I'll drive 65 miles to the nearest one to save the extra charge. In 3 years Blockbuster won't exist. The fact that DishNetwork bought it for a mere $320 mil tells you where it's headed.
post #70182 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by BCF68 View Post

Not where I live.

I don't think you could be more inconsistent knocking HBO for the failures of your cable company and then defending Netflix for only giving 1080p and DD5.1 to PS3 owners.
Quote:
Got to start somehwere. How long did it take HBO to have it's first series?

You seem to have missed the point. The "somewhere" they're starting is: more expensive than HBO. With one series. You think there's not going to be another price hike before House of Cards debuts? Given past practices, there will be at least two, at which point anyone who subscribes to both streaming and DVD will pay more for Netflix than for HBO. For one original series.
Quote:
The point is you said it didn't exist AT ALL. I proved you wrong.

Congratulations. Netflix is available on dozens of devices. I personally have six (Samsung Blu Ray, Xbox, Wii, 3DS, iPhone, laptop). None of them support either feature.
Quote:
Point is that you implied the extra fee for blu-ray was a Netflix only thing.

No, I didn't. I implied that it's a bull**** charge because it is. As someone else pointed out, Blockbuster does not surcharge for Blu Ray.
Quote:
B) Ok so maybe with this new cash flow they buy more DVDs/blu-rays so the wait isn't as long. Yet you still complain. Running a business costs money. The sooner you get that point the better.

Maybe they do, and that would be nice. But to the extent that past practice is predictive of future performance, I highly doubt that will be the case. As commentators have pointed out, the purpose of this effort is to more quickly kill the DVD business to prop up the bottom line.
Quote:
Ok first the hike doesn't affect current customers until Sept 1st. Second it takes time to get new content. That content cost money. Netflix doesn't have the money until it gets it form the customers. which won't be until Sept 1st. geesh give them some frciken time. You CLEALY have never worked for yourself or ran a business. Because it shows. No offense, but it does.

If your business model is, "I have to hike rates to afford new content" then either you're a terrible negotiator or your business model is unsustainable. Does HBO hike rates every month to facilitate new content on HBO? Of course not. Your point makes no sense.
Quote:
You know customers that only use the DVD service are actually getting price REDUCTION but hey why bring that up and waste a good rant. Hey if $6 is going to kill you dump it and move on. How much money do you give your cable/satelite company each month for 99.999% crap and late night infomercials?

Why bring that up when the DVD service suffers from everything I mentioned before? They should get a reduction because the quality of service has declined. Fewer Blu Ray titles, 4-week delays on releases, and very long waits for major releases.

Netflix has no interest in supporting its DVD enterprise any more. Many people have said that for some time and have complained about a decline in quality of service. I did not believe them until this week.
post #70183 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Blockbuster doesn't charge extra for Blu-ray.

My local grocery store rents Blu Rays and has at least a couple of copies of the latest releases. They don't charge extra for BR. Their rentals are only $2.49 for new releases. I have give them plenty of business.
post #70184 of 93669
Emmys Notes
Emmy Nominations are Announced
By Brian Stelter, The New York Times' 'Arts Beat' Blog - July 14th, 2011

Two new HBO dramas, “Boardwalk Empire” and “Game of Thrones,” will challenge the three-time winner “Mad Men” for the title of best drama in the 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards this year.

Emmy voters also nominated the outgoing DirecTV/NBC show “Friday Night Lights” for the best drama award for the first time. Showtime’s “Dexter” and CBS’s “The Good Wife” rounded out the nominees in that marquee category.

Joining the expected nominees in the best comedy category for the first time was “The Big Bang Theory,” a hugely popular CBS sitcom. It will challenge last year’s winner, ABC’s “Modern Family,” as well as Fox’s “Glee” and three NBC sitcoms, “The Office,” “30 Rock” and “Parks & Recreation.”

In a notable snub, Kyra Sedgwick, who won the best lead actress in a drama award for TNT’s “The Closer” last year, was not nominated.

Vying for the award instead will be Julianna Margulies of “The Good Wife,” Connie Britton of “Friday Night Lights,” and Elisabeth Moss of “Mad Men,” Mireille Enos of AMC’s “The Killing,” Kathy Bates of NBC’s “Harry’s Law,” and Mariska Hargitay of NBC’s “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.”

Bryan Cranston, who won the best lead actor in a drama award for three years in a row, was not nominated either, because “Breaking Bad” was ineligible this year. Vying for that award will be Kyle Chandler of “Friday Night Lights,” Jon Hamm of “Mad Men,” Steve Buscemi of “Boardwalk Empire,” Michael C. Hall of “Dexter,” Timothy Olyphant of FX’s “Justified,” and Hugh Laurie of Fox’s “House.”

“Mad Men,” an Emmy darling, picked up the most nominations of any single drama, 19, up from 17 last year.

It is a reflection of the waning influence of network television –and of the dearth of new hit shows this past season — that “The Good Wife” is the only purely network-distributed drama to be nominated. “Friday Night Lights” is distributed jointly by the satellite company DirecTV and NBC.

Similarly, Mr. Laurie of “House” is the only network representative in the lead actor in a drama category. Three of the six lead actress nominees, though, hail from the networks.

In the best comedy category, the recognition of the of the three-year-old “Big Bang” was a major victory for its producer, Chuck Lorre, as well as for its studio, Warner Brothers, which campaigned aggressively for the nomination.

In recent years the Emmys have favored single-camera comedies like “30 Rock” over multi-camera, laugh-track comedies like “Big Bang,” making the nomination this year all the more significant. A multi-camera comedy was last nominated in 2008, when “Two and a Half Men” was in contention.

Jim Parsons and Johnny Galecki of “Big Bang” were nominated in the lead actor in a comedy series, joining Matt LeBlanc of Showtime’s “Episodes,” Louis C.K. of FX’s “Louie,” Alec Baldwin of NBC’s “30 Rock,” and Steve Carell of NBC’s “The Office.” Mr. Carell has been nominated every year of “The Office,” but has never won; this is his last year on the show.

In the lead actress in a comedy series last year’s winner, Edie Falco of Showtime’s “Nurse Jackie,” was joined by Tina Fey of NBC’s “30 Rock,” Amy Poehler of NBC’s “Parks and Recreation,” Martha Plimpton of Fox’s “Raising Hope,” Melissa McCarthy of CBS’s “Mike & Molly,” and Laura Linney of Showtime’s “The Big C.”

Each of the parents on “Modern Family,” an ensemble series, was nominated as a supporting actor or actress — six in total — including Ed O’Neill, who plays the family patriarch and was not nominated last year.

Snubbed for the second time in the best comedy category was “Community,” a lower-rated but much-beloved NBC sitcom. Steven Levitan, the “Modern Family” co-creator, wrote on Twitter to the “Community” creator Dan Harmon, “You were robbed.”

Ms. McCarthy of CBS’s “Mike & Molly” and Joshua Jackson of Fox’s “Fringe” announced the nominees on television Thursday morning.

Fox will televise the Emmy Awards on Sept. 18. Jane Lynch, a star of “Glee,” will host the show.

For the 11th year in a row HBO received the most nominations of any network or cable channel, largely thanks to its mini-series and made-for-television movies. It got 104 nominations, up from 101 last year.

In the mini-series category, HBO’s “Mildred Pierce,” “Cinema Verite” and “Too Big To Fail” were joined by PBS’s “Downton Abbey,” ReelzChannel’s “The Kennedys” and Starz’s “The Pillars of the Earth.” “The Kennedys” was the subject of controversy last year, prompting the History Channel to cancel it in January and inspiring the much smaller ReelzChannel to pick it up.

Out of all the programs on television, “Mildred Pierce” was the most-nominated, with a total of 21.

The Emmy voters appeared to signal a changing of the guard in late night, as neither NBC’s “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” or CBS’s “The Late Show with David Letterman” were nominated in the outstanding variety, music or comedy category, nor for best writing. Instead, TBS’s “Conan” and NBC’s “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” joined the regulars, Comedy Central’s “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” and “The Colbert Report,” HBO’s “Real Time with Bill Maher,” and NBC’s “Saturday Night Live.”

Conan O’Brien, who moved to TBS from NBC last year, also picked up a writing nomination.

Members of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences select the nominees. Below is a list of nominees in the top categories. The complete list can be found here.

Bill Carter contributed reporting.

Comedy Series
The Big Bang Theory
Glee
Modern Family
The Office
Parks and Recreation
30 Rock

Drama Series
Boardwalk Empire
Dexter
Friday Night Lights
Game of Thrones
The Good Wife
Mad Men

Lead Actress in a Comedy
Laura Linney, The Big C
Edie Falco, Nurse Jackie
Amy Poehler, Parks and Recreation
Melissa McCarthy, Mike & Molly
Martha Plimpton, Raising Hope
Tina Fey, 30 Rock

Lead Actor in a Comedy
Matt LeBlanc, Episodes
Jim Parsons, The Big Bang Theory
Steve Carell, The Office
Johnny Galecki, The Big Bang Theory
Louis C.K., Louie
Alec Baldwin, 30 Rock

Lead Actor in a Drama
Steve Buscemi, Boardwalk Empire
Michael C. Hall, Dexter
Kyle Chandler, Friday Night Lights
Jon Hamm, Mad Men
Hugh Laurie, House
Timothy Olyphant, Justified

Lead Actress in a Drama
Elisabeth Moss, Mad Men
Connie Britton, Friday Night Lights
Mariska Hargitay, Law & Order: SVU
Mireille Enos, The Killing
Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife
Kathy Bates, Harry’s Law

Supporting Actor in a Comedy
Jon Cryer, Two and a Half Men
Chris Colfer, Glee
Jesse Tyler Ferguson, Modern Family
Ed O’Neill, Modern Family
Eric Stonestreet, Modern Family
Ty Burrell, Modern Family

Supporting Actor in a Drama
John Slattery, Mad Men
Andre Braugher, Men of a Certain Age
Walton Goggins, Justified
Peter Dinklage, Game of Thrones
Josh Charles, The Good Wife
Alan Cumming, The Good Wife

Supporting Actress in a Comedy
Jane Lynch, Glee
Betty White, Hot in Cleveland
Julie Bowen, Modern Family
Kristen Wiig, Saturday Night Live
Jane Krakowski, 30 Rock
Sofia Vergara, Modern Family

Supporting Actress in a Drama
Kelly Macdonald, Boardwalk Empire
Christina Hendricks, Mad Men
Michelle Forbes, The Killing
Archie Panjabi, The Good Wife
Margo Martindale, Justified

Mini-series or Made-for-Television Movie
Cinema Verite
Downton Abbey
The Kennedys
Mildred Pierce
The Pillars Of The Earth
Too Big To Fail

Variety, Music or Comedy Series
The Colbert Report
Conan
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart
Late Night With Jimmy Fallon
Real Time With Bill Maher
Saturday Night Live

Lead Actor in a Mini-Series or movie
Edgar Ramirez, Carlos
Greg Kinnear, The Kennedys
Barry Pepper, The Kennedys
Idris Elba, Luther
Laurence Fishburne, Thurgood
William Hurt, Too Big To Fail

Lead Actress in a Mini-Series or movie
Diane Lane, Cinema Verite
Elizabeth McGovern, Downton Abbey
Kate Winslet, Mildred Pierce
Taraji P. Henson, Taken From Me: The Tiffany Rubin Story
Jean Marsh, Upstairs Downstairs

Reality Program
Antiques Roadshow
Deadliest Catch
Hoarders
Kathy Griffin: My Life On The D-List
MythBusters
Undercover Boss

Reality Competition
The Amazing Race
American Idol
Dancing With The Stars
Project Runway
So You Think You Can Dance
Top Chef

Host of a Reality Program or Competition
Phil Keoghan, The Amazing Race
Ryan Seacrest, American Idol
Tom Bergeron, Dancing With The Stars
Cat Deeley, So You Think You Can
Jeff Probst, Survivor


http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/20...nnounced-2/?hp
post #70185 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTiVo View Post

Same here. Their intention is to drive people away from the DVDs and to the streaming option. It's cheaper for them. It's going to be just the opposite for us though. Captions is also a concern for us, plus the lack of movies and shows for streaming. Quality too. Not many are available in HD. Their SD programming looks like crap on our 126" screen. I think they made this move too soon... We'll be dropping our streaming option come Sept 1st.

Yep, same here. BD's look incredible on my new LG 55LHX. Streaming, not so much even though I stream thru a PS3 which I believe does 1080p. You'd think they'd look the same, but they don't.

So, as of 9/1, no more streaming for us; we don't use it that much anyway. We'll continue to make Netflix take the expensive way of servicing our household, and save a few bucks.
post #70186 of 93669
Critic's Notes
Evaluating This Year’s Emmy Nominees: The Pro and Con List
By Margaret Lyons, Joe Adalian, and Willa Paskin - New York Magazine's 'Vulture' Blog - July 14th, 2011

The Emmy nominees were just announced, and if this year's list isn't quite as refreshing as last year's, it's not too shabby. Sure, there were some oversights (Community! Ron Swanson!) but there were plenty of great calls as well (Friday Night Lights! Louis C.K!). This assortment of new contenders, old favorites, and Gwyneth Paltrow — Holly Holiday in the house! — makes for an interesting mix, but to assess just how interesting, and in what ways, we put the nominations to the old pro-con test, to see what they were made of. Relatively good stuff! Check it out.

Pro: Parks and Recreation got nominated for the first time!

Con: But somehow Ron Swanson was not! What does a man have to do: find rabbits who look like him?

Con: Community wasn't nominated, not once, not even in the technical categories.

Con: Meanwhile, in the Best Supporting Comedy Actor category, Modern Family's cast got four of the six nominations. They're great, but so is Nick Offerman. And Neil Patrick Harris. And Jason Segel.

Pro: That said, it does warm our heart to see Ed O'Neill, who was snubbed last year, recognized alongside his co-stars, and without having to enter the Best Actor category to do it.

Con: Look, if you're going to nominate actors for their work in The Killing, Joel Kinnaman, who plays the metaphysical, possibly nefarious homeboy Stephen Holder, is your boy, not the incessantly chewing Mirelle Enos and the incessantly crying Michelle Forbes, who both got nominations. (It doesn't look like The Killing's rapid critical descent hurt it with voters much.)

Pro: One show that was recognized in the right category: Rubicon, for its title sequence. More riveting than the show!

Pro: Jon Hamm, Elisabeth Moss, John Slattery, and Christina Hendricks all got nominated for Mad Men. Also, the wonderful "The Suitcase" episode was nominated in three different categories, including Writing. And, best of all, Randee Heller was nominated for her role as the late Miss Blankenship.

Con: Frank Darabont didn't get nominated for directing the amazing pilot for The Walking Dead. Even if Martin Scorsese has this category locked up for Boardwalk Empire, Darabont was robbed.

Pro: Emmy voters wisely avoided overhonoring Dead, keeping it out of the Series, Acting, and Writing categories. There were more worthy nominees.

Pro: Justified cleaned up, with nominations for Timothy Olyphant, Walton Goggins, Margo Martindale, and Jeremy Davies.

Con: No love for Sons of Anarchy. And Katey Segal gets robbed of a Best Actress nod by Kathy Bates in ... Harry's Law.

Con: Toni Collette was not nominated for United States of Tara, even though she won an Emmy for the role in 2009 and was nominated again last year. Kyra Sedgwick wasn't nominated even though she won last year. Neil Patrick Harris wasn't nominated this year, after four years in the running for Supporting Actor. And Lea Michele, also a nominee last year, wasn't nominated this year.

Pro: Meanwhile, Matthew Morrison and January Jones, both nominated last year, were not nominated this year. (We're not dissing you, Mr. Schue, you just haven't had anything to work with!)

Con: Gabriel Byrne, Amy Ryan, and Irrfan Khan all got snubbed for In Treatment.

Pro: Friday Night Lights finally — finally! — got nominated for Outstanding Drama. And Kyle Chandler and Connie Britton were both nominated again, too!

Pro: Louis C.K.!

Pro: Downton Abbey!

Pro: Katie Holmes did not get an Emmy nomination for her performance as Jackie Kennedy in Reelz' The Kennedys

Con: Greg Kinnear and Barry Pepper and Tom Wikinson were nominated. Nothing against these fine actors, but Kennedys was dreck. And yet it got ten Emmy nominations.

Pro: Conan O'Brien and Jimmy Fallon's shows both got nominated in the late-night category, while Jay Leno was once again snubbed.

Con: For the second consecutive year, David Letterman did not get an Emmy nomination. That just seems wrong.

Pro: Martha Plimpton and Cloris Leachman both getting nominated for Raising Hope, with Plimpton as lead actress and Leachman as a guest star.

Con: Men of a Certain Age only got one nomination, for Andre Braugher's portrayal of Owen.

Con: And Mr. Braugher and Archie Panjabi were the only two actors of color nominated in the eight major acting categories.

Pro: Futurama returned with original episodes last year and is once again nominated.

Con: But there was no love for Bob's Burgers.

Pro: Peter Dinklage got Game of Thrones' only acting nomination, but the series was also nominated for Outstanding Casting, Costumes, Directing for a Drama, Hairstyling, Opening Title Design, Non-Prosthetic Makeup, Prosthetic Makeup, Drama Series, Sound Editing, Visual Effects, Stunt Coordination, and Writing (for "Baelor").

Pro: Gwyneth Paltrow's Holly Holiday gets nominated as a Guest Actress in a Comedy for her turn on Glee. Some of you will argue this is a con, but please, go watch her belt out "Forget You," while you block out all her recommendations for organic, expensive, homemade, bowel-cleansing Cheerios or what have you. EGOT, look out.

Con: And speaking of Oscars, the debacle that was this year's James Franco–led Academy Awards somehow got nine Emmy nominations, including one for Best Direction.

Pro: Justin Timberlake snagged three Emmy nominations for his SNL work, including Hosting, co-writing his opening monologue, and co-writing the song "3-Way."

Con: Yet another reason for him to put off recording a new album.

Pro: 18, Con: 15: Solid, Emmys.

http://nymag.com/daily/entertainment..._and_cons.html
post #70187 of 93669
^^^ I got another big CON: no Emmy nominations for "Treme" in ANY categories. That is just wrong. Maybe HBO should rename the show "The Wire 2.0" so its chances of getting an Emmy nomination go from '0' to '0.0'
post #70188 of 93669
WEDNESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings - along with AdWeek Analyst Marc Berman's view of what they mean -- have been posted on his blog: http://pifeedback.com/eve/forums/a/t...51/m/984108283.
post #70189 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Business Notes
Harry Potter Inc: Warner Bros' $21B Empire
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - July 13th, 2011

Deathly Hallows 2 has now broken the record for advance ticket sales with $32 million and counting & its getting great reviews.

Be interesting to see if they can break The Dark Knights opening weekend record of $158.4 million.
post #70190 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by URFloorMatt View Post

Netflix has no interest in supporting its DVD enterprise any more. Many people have said that for some time and have complained about a decline in quality of service. I did not believe them until this week.

Good. Who cares. The sooner it dies the better. It's amazing how clueless people are. Do you know much it cost to send you just ONE dvd. Remember you have to send it back to. Oh and you get charged more for blu-ray because blu-ray discs cost more than DVDs. Next time you go to a wal-mart check out the price difference between DVD and blu-ray. You expect Netflix or any company to eat that cost?

Let's review.

A) I pay $8 a month for streaming only. Asking people like you to pay the SAME rate is not being "unfair" to you.

B) $8 for 1 DVD at a time. Now considering one could get AT LEAST 8 DVDs per month. Now do you think Netflix can ship you 8 DVDs a month for $8 and make a profit? That doesn't even count the other costs involved with shipping you the DVD beyond just the actual shipping costs. If Netflix cahrged based on actual shipping rates you'd be paying $30 a month or more for 1 DVD at a time.

I'm done arguing with you since it's clear you're ranting just to hear yourself rant and will not even consider anything logical presented to you. So congrats you just made my IGNORE list. So now you can argue with yourself. Enjoy your overpriced HBO.
post #70191 of 93669
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
CBS and NBC in a Wednesday tie for first
Average a 1.9 in 18-49s, with Fox right behind at 1.8
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - July 14th, 2011

Wednesdays are a lot more competitive with CBS's "Big Brother" now in the mix.

CBS and NBC tied for first last night, and Fox was just a tenth of a point behind, as the long-running CBS reality show made its Wednesday debut.

NBC and CBS both averaged a 1.9 adults 18-49 rating and a 6 share in primetime, according to Nielsen overnights, while Fox drew a 1.8/6.

NBC had the night's highest-rated show with "America's Got Talent" at 9 p.m. It averaged a 2.8, off 22 percent from last week. In fact, pretty much every show was down week-to-week.

"Brother" was the night's No. 2 show with a 2.6 at 8 p.m. Airing opposite "Brother" in its first hour, the 120-minute "So You Think You Can Dance" on Fox averaged a 1.8, down 25 percent from last week (though last week's rating was a bit higher than the program has been posting recently).

NBC's "Minute to Win It" and "Love in the Wild" also fell from last week.

Meanwhile, with CBS, NBC and Fox well ahead for the night, Univision finished in fourth place with a 1.2/4. ABC was fifth at 0.9/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.5/2 and the CW seventh at 0.3/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-one percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. CBS's "Brother" led with a 2.6, with Fox's "Dance" second with a 1.8. Univision's "Teresa" and NBC's "Minute to Win It" were tied for third with a 1.2 apiece. ABC's Charlie Brown repeat and a rerun of "The Middle" finished fifth with a 0.9 and 0.8, respectively. Telemundo's "Mi Corazon Insiste" placed sixth at 0.4 and the CW's "America's Next Top Model" repeat was seventh at 0.3.

At 9 p.m. NBC's "Talent" moved into first place with a 2.8. Fox's "Dance" was second with a 1.9, followed by CBS's "Criminal Minds" repeat in third at 1.5. Univision's "Triunfo del Amor" finished fourth with a 1.3, ABC's "Modern Family" and "Happy Endings" repeats were fifth with a 1.0, Telemundo's "Los Herederos del Monte" finished sixth with a 0.5, and another "Model" repeat on the CW was seventh at 0.3.

At 10 p.m. NBC's "Love in the Wild" placed first with a 1.7, followed by CBS's "CSI" repeat with a 1.5. Univision's "La Rosa de Guadalupe" was third with a 1.1, ABC's "Primetime" fourth with a 0.9, and Telemundo's "La Casa de al Lado" fifth with a 0.6.

Among households for the night, CBS led with a 4.6/8, followed by NBC second with a 4.4/7. Fox finished third with a 3.6/6, ABC was fourth with a 2.4/4, Univision was fifth with a 1.7/3, Telemundo was sixth with a 0.8/1, and the CW was seventh with a 0.6/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...-for-first.asp
post #70192 of 93669
Business Notes
Netflix Shares -3.6% At Midday As Consumer Anger Over Price Hike Grows
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - July 14th, 2011

It's shocking to see how badly Netflix appears to have underestimated the general confusion and anger that has followed the announcement on Tuesday that it's raising by 60% the price of its combo DVD-by-mail rental and video streaming service. More than 5,000 mostly furious customers responded to the Netflix blog post unveiling what BTIG analyst Richard Greenfield calls "perhaps the boldest single move in (Netflix) history." And Netflix shares are down about 3.6% in midday trading as Wall Street wonders whether the company raised prices enough to cover revenue it will lose from people who cancel the service. Lazard Capital Markets' Barton Crockett says that "few will pay the jarringly higher price" for the streaming and DVD combo plan and "most will move to (Netflix's) cheaper streaming-only" service. Netflix could lose some of its most profitable customers -- the ones who pay the monthly fee for DVD rentals but don't bother to order many discs. Merriman Capital's Eric Wold says he "would not be surprised" if many of those subscribers bailed on Netflix to rent DVDs from Redbox's $1-a-night kiosks. But Goldman Sachs' Ingrid Chung says Netflix will probably come out ahead: The company makes a much higher profit from streaming than it does from DVD rental, and "a very high number of subs would have to churn off to offset the pricing increase."

Whatever the case, the Street wants to hear Netflix answer tough questions about its strategy on July 25 when executives discuss quarterly earnings. It would be a big change if Netflix's price hike signals that it's giving up its effort to amass as many subscribers as possible -- including many cable customers who might cut the cord in favor of a cheaper video service. Netflix's subscriber base grew 63%, to 22.8 million, in the year that ended in March.

UPDATE: 12:00 PM PT: Rival Blockbuster has just pounced on Netflix's public relations problem, announcing that it is launching a nationwide promotion in which existing Netflix customers who switch to one of Blockbuster's two Total Access plans (1 disc at a time for $9.99 a month or 2 discs at a time for $14.99 a month) will receive a 30-day free trial. The company, which recently was purchased at a bankruptcy auction by Dish Network, said that besides a lower price it offers benefits Netflix doesn't: availability of many new releases 28 days before Netflix, unlimited in-store exchanges, video game rentals and no extra charge for Blu-ray movies. “Blockbuster quickly responded to the cries of Netflix customers,” Blockbuster president Michael Kelly said in the release announcing the promotion. “Blockbuster Total Access is Netflix ‘without the wait.’ The combination of DVDs by mail and unlimited in-store exchanges provides more than 100 million people living near Blockbuster stores immediate convenience and unparalleled choice.” The offer is good through Sept. 15; Netflix customers can go to Blockbuster's website to enroll or show a red Netflix envelope at a Blockbuster store.

http://www.deadline.com/2011/07/netf...ce-hike-grows/
post #70193 of 93669
I had cancelled netflix last month before this price increase, seems like an even better move now...
post #70194 of 93669
Critic's Notes
The Emmys Revert to (Bad) Form (Analysis)
By Tim Goodman, The Hollywood Reporter - July 14th, 2011

After a surprising string of years where the Emmys got it mostly right by rewarding quality -- instead of merely celebrating the familiar -- its voters reversed a few years of good will and embraced lameness for 2011.

A few nice surprises in the mix could not otherwise cover for nominations that screamed "I didn't watch a lot of television last season."

Perhaps the biggest surprise was making up for years of neglect and finally giving Friday Night Lights the credit it deserved as a drama series. It doesn't exactly wipe away the shame and embarrassment of ignoring The Wire for five seasons, but it helps. And yet, even that nomination -- which might rightly be called shocking -- couldn't mask the regrettable oversights in the same category.

No Justified. No Treme. No Sons of Anarchy. Those three are inexcusable. Who do you knock out? Easy -- Dexter, which is getting a little long in the tooth and The Good Wife, which has no business being in the discussion. Of course, business probably played a role in that nomination, since the broadcast networks would have cried foul. Yes, Mad Men is a slam dunk and HBO was rightly rewarded for two of its gems in Boardwalk Empire and Game of Thrones (both freshman series). But not including Justified or Treme at the very least looks suspect.

And if you want to dip a toe into the milk of embarrassment, just take the Treme snub a little further: Voters didn't see any lead or supporting actors in that bunch? Really? Because such a staggering oversight just screams "I have never seen one episode of this series." Is it on at the same time as The Good Wife or something? Hell, you didn't even toss Treme a bone with a music-related nomination. There's this place called New Orleans. You might want to check it out -- and open your ears when you're down there.

Not to get stuck on Treme here, but the elephant in the room by its lack of nominations (and here we're having an eerie flashback to The Wire) is race. All the lead actor nominations were white. The very deserving Andre Braugher got the nod in the supporting actor category for his work in Men Of A Certain Age. All of the lead actresses in a drama -- white. But at least your head-scratching adoration of The Good Wife (a good show, not a great one) dragged in Archie Panjabi with the net, giving another minority actor a nomination.

As for outstanding comedy, finally nominating Parks and Recreation was an outstanding, albeit late, idea. And yet, that can't overshadow two glaring faults here. First, Glee isn't a comedy. And, if it is, it's not nearly funny enough to be included here. Secondly, it's heartwarming that The Office got another nomination in the season where Steve Carell left, but -- too late now -- it didn't deserve it. See, rubber-stamping past nominees is an insidious problem with Emmy voters -- and just when it looks like complaining critics have helped eradicate that issue, it flares up wildly again this year.

While it would have been asking too much for FX's Louie to make it in this category (oh, but you sly voters covered your backsides with the Louie C.K. nomination as actor in a comedy) at the very least Community deserved a nod here and some fresh blood in the form of Raising Hope would have made this a very strong category. But no.

What other major snubs were there in this year's Emmys? Plenty.

How Emmy Rossum didn't get nominated for her knock-out performance in Showtime's Shameless is beyond belief. The same goes for both Wendell Pierce and Khandi Alexander from Treme.-- but then again, we've been over this egregious Treme thing enough, right? (Wrong.) And at the risk of taking these snubs a little too close to the heart, Emmy voters have their heads up their asses on the Katey Sagal (Sons of Anarchy) issue. Seriously, that's two seasons of shame at least. And the hard part here is trying not to tear down another actor's work in support of someone snubbed, but let's just say there was room. There was plenty of room.

And while some people, trying to read the tea leaves of "what Emmy usually does" (a ridiculous concept -- your failure shouldn't be creating trends that are so easily spotted) might argue that failed freshman series like FX's LIghts Out and Terriers shouldn't get attention at all, that's both regrettable and unfair. Consider the great work that Holt McCallany did as the lead on Lights Out (yes, we all love Hugh Laurie, but again --- really?) and there's a slot filled. Same goes for the exceptional work of Donal Logue and Michael Raymond-James on Terriers. Lastly, because this kind of blood-pressure tampering can do real harm, when Emmy voters were doing such a wonderful service of nominating Mireille Enos as lead actress for her work in The Killing, did they not look to her left on the screen? His name is Joel Kinnaman. He deserved a nomination. Also, look up Nick Offerman's comedy work. Yeah, it's that good. So you blew that, too.

* * * *

Let's take a little breather because there will be plenty of time for more grief -- applying failure analysis to the Emmys is almost a full-time job. So, what did voters get right? A lot, if not -- as noted at the top -- enough to cover the gaffes. But in fairness, here goes:

--Margo Martindale as supporting actress for her stellar work in Justified. And Timothy Olyphant (lead actor), Walton Goggins (supporting actor) and Jeremy Davies (special guest actor) all for their work on Justified. You know, the show that didn't get nominated for best drama (oh, right, forgot...).

--Friday Night Lights for best drama. And Kyle Chandler and Connie Britton for lead actors.

--Parks and Recreation for best comedy.

--Peter Dinklage for supporting actor (Game of Thrones).

--Martha Plimpton, Amy Poehler, lead actresses in a comedy (Raising Hope, Parks and Recreation).

--Not nominating Nurse Jackie, United States of Tara, The Big C and Weeds in the comedy category. Thank you. A lot of great work on those shows, but not a lot of funny work.

--Not rewarding The Killing for best drama. It was the right thing to do. Especially since you so badly blew the other three that deserved a nod.

See, Emmy voters didn't get it all wrong. But couldn't they have got more of it right? The Emmys were on something of a roll for a few years. Now? These nominations have the whole affair rolling backward down the hill (and, honestly, this column doesn't touch on all the outrage and injustice that are in -- or not in -- the lengthy list of nominations).

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...ad-form-211285
post #70195 of 93669
I never watch The Emmys are always find them the biggest joke.. Every year the same shows and stars get the nods and every year the ones who should win don't and vice versa ...
And always shows and stars who deserve to get noticed never do so why bother watching ?
post #70196 of 93669
TV Review
AMC's 'Breaking Bad' still brilliant in season 4
By Alan Sepinwall, HitFix.com - July 14th, 2011

As a fan, it's what you wait for: those moments when potential turns into production, when raw talent gets harnessed and put to consistent, brilliant use. The sportswriter Bill Simmons calls it The Leap, but the phenomenon exists just as much in the world of entertainment: think Prince with "Purple Rain," or Chris Rock with his "Bring the Pain" special, or season 4 of "Seinfeld."

The pantheon-level TV dramas for the most part haven't needed to make The Leap. You knew that "The Sopranos," "The Wire," "Deadwood" and "Mad Men" were special by halfway through their first seasons, sometimes just after their pilot episodes.

"Breaking Bad," though, took its time. Took its time and steadily improved. Started as a strange but fascinating little show carried largely by a career-redefining performance from former "Malcolm in the Middle" dad Bryan Cranston as a cancer-afflicted chemistry teacher turned aspiring meth lord. Got better as its truncated first season went along, then began to truly find itself in its second season.

Then came the third season, and the level of confidence the creative team (led by writer Vince Gilligan) had developed in that second year turned into full-blown, marvelous audacity. Anything they wanted to do, it seems, they did, and did brilliantly.

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
They introduced two larger-than-life Mexican assassins (known only as the Cousins) who were relentlessly pursuing Cranston's Walter White, then bumped them off midway through the season, and somehow the show got better without them. They played the moment where Walter confessed his criminal career to estranged wife Skyler (Anna Gunn) - a seismic event for the series, and one Walt had been dreading forever - as a joke, and the laughs came even as it became clear what a horror this was for Skyler. Just as Walt was starting to seem like a genuinely dangerous criminal, they turned him into a glorified clock-puncher, mass-producing his distinctive blue meth in a hi-tech lab for calculating distributor Gus Fring (Giancarlo Esposito), and Walt's prolonged emasculation only made the moment where he returned to his outlaw ways feel incredibly cathartic.


For goodness' sake, they devoted an entire episode late in the season to Walt and his sidekick Jesse (Aaron Paul)
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
trying to catch a fly that had invaded their lab -
and it was as riveting and moving an hour of television as aired anywhere that year.

That was their Leap year, the season when you just couldn't wait to see what these people were going to do next - couldn't wait to see "Breaking Bad," period.

It was the year when Paul rightly won an Emmy to go along with the three Cranston has on his shelf, when Gunn and Dean Norris (as Walt's DEA agent brother-in-law Hank) deserved to be nominated alongside them, when the show's brilliant director of photography Michael Slovis managed to consistently top his stunning desert compositions, when directors like Michelle MacLaren put together incredible time-capsule sequences like
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
the parking lot gunfight between Hank and the Cousins.


And if I've spent the last 500+ words talking about the third season of "Breaking Bad," rather than the fourth, which debuts Sunday night at 10 on AMC, it's for two reasons:

1) The third season ended on such an incredible cliffhanger,
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
with Walt and Jesse getting very far onto Gus Fring's bad side
, that I'm reluctant to say much about the three episodes I've seen for fear of giving anything away;

and

2) While some apparent Leaps turn out to just be career aberrations (Brady Anderson's 50-HR season, Elisabeth Shue in "Leaving Las Vegas"), "Breaking Bad" doesn't seem ready to step down from the pantheon level anytime soon.

At this stage of the series, Vince Gilligan and company have total command of their instrument. They know how great the show looks, they know how much their actors can give them, and they know just how much they can get away with.

There are times when the season premiere feels like an hour-long version of
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
that agonizing sequence in season three's "One Minute" where Hank is told the Cousins are coming for him sometime in the next 60 seconds.
It's an hour dominated by silence and waiting, and is so patient in pursuing its goals that I actually started giggling at one point when I realized just how committed the creative team was to making the audience hold its breath.

And then there are times in the later episodes where Walt almost feels like a supporting character on his own show, or at least just another member of a great ensemble - when we spend extra time with Skyler, or Hank's troubled wife Marie (Betsy Brandt), or Gus's right-hand man Mike (Jonathan Banks) - and it doesn't feel like we're getting cheated out of our rightful allotment of Cranston.

"Breaking Bad" is about the rot that takes place in Walt's soul as he goes deeper into the criminal world, but it's also about the corrosive effect he has on those around him.
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Spoiler  
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
He wrecked his marriage, turned Jesse from a casual dealer into a hardcore criminal and is responsible for Hank getting shot and paralyzed and so many deaths that I've lost count.
Magnificent as Cranston is, as riveting a character was Walt is, it's important to truly understand the people he's hurting, to feel the weight of his actions.

Perhaps the best glimpse into the effect Walter has on others comes in a look on the face of Mike in one of the early episodes. Since Banks joined the cast - one of three brilliant mid-series additions, along with Esposito as the implacably cool Gus and Bob Odenkirk as Walt and Jesse's shameless lawyer Saul Goodman - Mike has been presented as a tough customer who's seen it all and is fazed by exactly none of it. But there's a moment where he has a look on his face that screams, "What the hell just happened, and how did we get involved with this lunatic Walter White?" He is startled, and shaken, and for a brief moment not at all the ultimate professional who has an answer for every situation.

And in that moment of shock and horror, Mike has an expression that I imagine has been on the face of every "Breaking Bad" fan at some point or other - that feeling of "Did I really just see what I think I saw?" - only without the joy that we take in seeing this series performing at a high level that few dramas in the history of the medium have achieved.

BREAKING BAD
Season Four Premiere Sunday at 10PM ET/PT on AMC


http://www.hitfix.com/blogs/whats-al...nt-in-season-4
post #70197 of 93669
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Business Notes
Netflix Shares -3.6% At Midday As Consumer Anger Over Price Hike Grows
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - July 14th, 2011

It's shocking to see how badly Netflix appears to have underestimated the general confusion and anger that has followed the announcement on Tuesday that it's raising by 60% the price of its combo DVD-by-mail rental and video streaming service. More than 5,000 mostly furious customers responded to the Netflix blog post unveiling what BTIG analyst Richard Greenfield calls "perhaps the boldest single move in (Netflix) history." And Netflix shares are down about 3.6% in midday trading as Wall Street wonders whether the company raised prices enough to cover revenue it will lose from people who cancel the service. Lazard Capital Markets' Barton Crockett says that "few will pay the jarringly higher price" for the streaming and DVD combo plan and "most will move to (Netflix's) cheaper streaming-only" service. Netflix could lose some of its most profitable customers -- the ones who pay the monthly fee for DVD rentals but don't bother to order many discs. Merriman Capital's Eric Wold says he "would not be surprised" if many of those subscribers bailed on Netflix to rent DVDs from Redbox's $1-a-night kiosks. But Goldman Sachs' Ingrid Chung says Netflix will probably come out ahead: The company makes a much higher profit from streaming than it does from DVD rental, and "a very high number of subs would have to churn off to offset the pricing increase."

Whatever the case, the Street wants to hear Netflix answer tough questions about its strategy on July 25 when executives discuss quarterly earnings. It would be a big change if Netflix's price hike signals that it's giving up its effort to amass as many subscribers as possible -- including many cable customers who might cut the cord in favor of a cheaper video service. Netflix's subscriber base grew 63%, to 22.8 million, in the year that ended in March.

UPDATE: 12:00 PM PT: Rival Blockbuster has just pounced on Netflix's public relations problem, announcing that it is launching a nationwide promotion in which existing Netflix customers who switch to one of Blockbuster's two Total Access plans (1 disc at a time for $9.99 a month or 2 discs at a time for $14.99 a month) will receive a 30-day free trial. The company, which recently was purchased at a bankruptcy auction by Dish Network, said that besides a lower price it offers benefits Netflix doesn't: availability of many new releases 28 days before Netflix, unlimited in-store exchanges, video game rentals and no extra charge for Blu-ray movies. “Blockbuster quickly responded to the cries of Netflix customers,” Blockbuster president Michael Kelly said in the release announcing the promotion. “Blockbuster Total Access is Netflix ‘without the wait.’ The combination of DVDs by mail and unlimited in-store exchanges provides more than 100 million people living near Blockbuster stores immediate convenience and unparalleled choice.” The offer is good through Sept. 15; Netflix customers can go to Blockbuster's website to enroll or show a red Netflix envelope at a Blockbuster store.

http://www.deadline.com/2011/07/netf...ce-hike-grows/

The reason people are up in arms is because they keep seeing this 60% increase number. When in fact only one plan is seeing a 60% increase. The rest of the plans are seeing a much smaller increase or are seeing a decrease in price.. but the news outlets keep pushing that 60% number.
post #70198 of 93669
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Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

The reason people are up in arms is because they keep seeing this 60% increase number. When in fact only one plan is seeing a 60% increase. The rest of the plans are seeing a much smaller increase or are seeing a decrease in price.. but the news outlets keep pushing that 60% number.

If I keep my current streaming + 1 DVD/Blu-ray at a time plan my monthly bill will go up 50% from $11.99 to $17.98.
post #70199 of 93669
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Originally Posted by tomhunter8 View Post

If I keep my current streaming + 1 DVD/Blu-ray at a time plan my monthly bill will go up 50% from $11.99 to $17.98.

Same here and that's ridiculous. Where's the added value to go along with the increase?

We'll be dropping the streaming come Sept 1st. The catalog is very limited and the HD choices even more so.

They're trying to get rid of the DVD renters, but in our case, they're forcing us to drop the streaming. I think they're going to see more of that than they expected.
post #70200 of 93669
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Originally Posted by slowbiscuit View Post

All I can say is that I love sports, and pay TV is cheap for all the programming I get in return.

I am glad I'm not paying a fee every month to support all the crap on pay TV today. Since the NFL has shown its greed with the lockout situation I'm not worried about Monday Night Football anymore. Since all they care about is money they can do without mine.
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