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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2483

post #74461 of 93694
By jimo
Dec 6 2011 - 9:28am

ESPN has agreed to pay a 70 percent increase in fees to the NFL for an eight-year agreement to broadcast games, and early indications are the league will also be able to bump its CBS, NBC and Fox deals 60 percent--deals that likely will push pay-TV bills higher, increase cord cutting talk and discussions about offering sports programming as separate tiers.

The increasing costs of sports programming, specifically ESPN and other live events like the National Footbal League, are being passed directly to subscribers, many of whom are looking at their pay-TV bills and, increasingly, according to analysts, opting to shave their bills by reducing the depth of their subscriptions, or to drop them altogether.

Speaking at the USB investor conference in New York Monday, Gregory Maffei, chief executive of Liberty Media, likened the increase in sports programming costs to a "tax" on subscribers and said pay TV "has been the golden goose and what does it take to choke it? It's a scary proposition."

Pay-TV companies charge subscribers $4.69 per month for ESPN, which is carried on most basic tiers. Most other networks cost far less, an average of about 26 cents. The price for those channels has increased about 24 percent since 2006; the price for ESPN has risen some 42 percent over the same span, according to SNL Kagan.

The new deals with the NFL, meanwhile, would stretch through 2021 and bring some $6 billion annually to the league.

ESPN's deal to broadcast Monday Night Football alone will cost it $1.9 billion a year, and DirecTV (Nasdaq: DTV [3]) will pay $1 billion annually for its Sunday Ticket offering.

http://www.fierceiptv.com/print/node/4706
post #74462 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by rustycruiser View Post

I spend more time watching ESPN in one day than I do all of these channels combined in a whole year. Different strokes and all.


Just the opposite for me. ESPN is one of my least watched channels. I typically only watch it for the local NFL team and I could always watch that feed from a local station if they are playing on Monday night.
post #74463 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

Just the opposite for me. ESPN is one of my least watched channels.

I turned it on a couple of hours ago, just to see if anything had been happening with the winter baseball meetings yet, in the way of trades (they started yesterday, and my local team is expected to be doing some major salary dumping), and all it was was people spouting off a bunch of mostly useless, blathering drivel, at the top of their lungs, as if the other person with them, and the viewers at home, are all hard-of-hearing. I finally had to turn it off after a few minutes. And it appeared this was their normal, daytime fare.

I could never watch that kind of thing for hours at a time.
post #74464 of 93694
As much as I want ESPN on a separate tier, rest assured that your cable bill will continue going up faster than the rate of inflation no matter what happens. ESPN may be playing with fire by being so out of whack in terms of what they charge vs. other channels. But regardless of what "tier" they're on, I'm sure ESPN will continue to be a money printing machine for Disney/Hearst.
post #74465 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by LCDSpazz View Post

As much as I want ESPN on a separate tier, rest assured that your cable bill will continue going up faster than the rate of inflation no matter what happens. ESPN may be playing with fire by being so out of whack in terms of what they charge vs. other channels. But regardless of what "tier" they're on, I'm sure ESPN will continue to be a money printing machine for Disney/Hearst.

That may turn out to be true, but we'll never know until ESPN gets moved and at least then the cableco wouldn't be able to blame ESPN for the rate hikes.
post #74466 of 93694
Have to give some props to the cowboys here....

30,901,000 watched dolphins/cowboys on Thankgsiving making it the #1 most watched tv show of any show this entire fall season so far....woop woop.
post #74467 of 93694
I very infrequently watch ESPN, however, as little as I watch it, I don't watch the others at all.

Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpiontail60 View Post

I've been saying for a long time that ESPN will be the death of cable.

It is ridiculous that single channel costs more than all of these put together:

MTV
MTV2
MTV Jams
MTV Hits
mtvU
Tr3́s
VH1
VH1 Classic
VH1 Soul
CMT
CMT Pure Country
Logo
Palladia
Nickelodeon
Nick Jr.
TeenNick
Nicktoons
Comedy Central
TV Land
Spike
Epix
Epix 2
Blink!

Time for the cable providers to man up and boot ESPN and the other sports networks out if they don't want to continue hemorrhaging subscribers. Nothing is going to bring customers back until prices go down and nothing is going to drive prices down like telling Disney to **** off and take their ESPN out of the basic packages.
post #74468 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Speaking of car commercials....

what would happen if you walked into a car dealership & said that you werent interested in any of the cars but really just wanted to buy that big red bow that in all those commercials they always put on top of the car that the wife is getting for a christmas present....wonder if thats possible ?

& that always seems wierd to me.
Isnt a car like a family purchase ?
What if she doesnt like that type of car or the color or even its gps ?
Shouldnt those types of investments be talked about together beforehand ?

idk always seems wierd to me.

Those commercials are aimed @ the 1%'ers who have a big year end bonus coming , or Having a big budget that has a wad still in it & have to spend that wad before the end of the year .
It's well known fact that those shots work for the 1%'ers
" Got A Wad O' Cash Ya Gotta Spend BEFORE Years End ? Well get in here Buy a CAR " ....
post #74469 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGA$$TV View Post

I very infrequently watch ESPN, however, as little as I watch it, I don't watch the others at all.

Even I did. I watched a live race on ESPN earlier this year and that was once more than I watched those others, sigh....I'll never get rid of ESPN.
post #74470 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpiontail60 View Post

I've been saying for a long time that ESPN will be the death of cable.

It is ridiculous that single channel costs more than all of these put together:

MTV
MTV2
MTV Jams
MTV Hits
mtvU
Tr3́s
VH1
VH1 Classic
VH1 Soul
CMT
CMT Pure Country
Logo
Palladia
Nickelodeon
Nick Jr.
TeenNick
Nicktoons
Comedy Central
TV Land
Spike
Epix
Epix 2
Blink!

And I've watched ONE of the channels on your list for a total of about ONE hour. On the other hand, I watch ESPN daily. Can I opt to not subscribe to your listed channels instead? Why don't the cable companies tell ESPN that they will no longer subsidize ESPN's programming buying spree before ESPN bids $500 million for the Super Bowl?
post #74471 of 93694
I resent paying for the ESPN crap, crap I never watch, I also resent paying for lots of other crap channels too- but because of the "Business Model" I and all of us are stuck with it.

The only way to do anything about it is to clip the cable, but most won't do it. I could easily live without the alternate channels and be happy with OTA but other members of my family are not. The bulk of my viewing is OTA plus 3 or 4 cable/SAT channels like Comedy Central, TNT and USA, and very little SIFI. All that content is available a few months later on disk or streaming anyway.
post #74472 of 93694
Technology Notes
Verizon Planning Netflix Competitor For 2012 Debut
By Devin Coldewey, Techcrunch.com - December 6th, 2011

Cable TV and internet giant Verizon is planning a streaming media service similar to Netflix, according to a Reuters report. The service is in the planning stages and people close to the matter, but apparently not that close, described it to Reuters variously as limited in scope, focused on movies, and focused on children’s programming. While it can’t be all three, it probably will feature on-demand movies and premium show streams, presumably delivered with that signature Verizon style.

Details are in fact few, except that Verizon is talking with content producers at the moment and is possibly going to jump on the Epix library of movies currently licensed to Netflix but soon to be available to others. And it would be offered in places that are not served by their FiOS service. Beyond that, it’s more or less all speculation.

The natural question is, of course, what exactly can Verizon offer that could possibly tempt users away from Netflix or other streaming options? I don’t want to condemn a service that hasn’t even been born yet, but Verizon isn’t exactly a popular consumer brand, at least for this kind of thing. Want signal in remote areas? Everyone will tell you “Verizon.” Want to stream a movie? Not many would make that connection.

There’s also the consideration that Reed Hastings calls to attention: the fact that both Netflix and their most feared competitor, HBO Go, spend over a billion every year on content. And as he points out, HBO is licensing more and Netflix is producing more. They’re becoming vertically integrated content delivery companies. Verizon is a series of pipes — efficient pipes, to be sure, but they’re in an awkward position from which to start. The last thing most consumers remember from them content-wise is the abysmal VCast.

If anything it will probably resemble Comcast’s on-demand Xfinity service, which works fine but isn’t winning any beauty contests (or content contests). It has some content that you can access through it, and you can access that content. Nothing wrong with that. But I doubt anyone would say it has Netflix in its sights. And to be honest, I don’t think Verizon has Netflix in its sights either, as Reuters characterizes the service: they just can’t afford to be left behind and honestly want to test the water.

The plan is currently to roll out in 2012, but that is as specific as the sources could get, apparently. By that time, it must be noted, there will likely be some serious changes in the streaming TV world, and Netflix might have even gotten its groove back. More options is always better, but let’s hope Verizon’s effort is more than half baked.

http://techcrunch.com/2011/12/06/ver...or-2012-debut/
post #74473 of 93694
The only way Verizon could launch a viable competitor to Netflix is if they launched their FiOS TV product to ANYONE on ANY provider via the Internet.

I.E. a Cox subscriber in Arizona where there are no FiOS lines could subscribe to FiOS TV and view it via their Cox Internet connection.

The bandwidth is there - DOCSIS 3.0 is available to most cable subscribers and even AT&T's U-verse can reach speeds of 24 Mbps. There is not a single FiOS TV channel which uses more than 18 Mbps of bandwidth.

I'm having a hard time thinking of any cable provider which doesn't offer a tier that's 20 Mbps or faster in most of their markets. CableOne maybe? They are a remarkably ****** ISP located in places where nobody lives like Kansas. Everybody on this list has 20+ Mbps Internet tiers available.
http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=1058081
post #74474 of 93694
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
WEDNESDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are EDT. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - The Middle
8:30PM - Suburgatory
9PM - Modern Family
9:31PM - Happy Endings
10PM - Revenge
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Jane Fonda; Russell Brand; Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real perform)

CBS:
8PM - Survivor: South Pacific
9PM - Criminal Minds
10PM - CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Jessica Biel; comic Tom Dreesen; The Black Keys perform)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Musician Trace Adkins; comic Michael Palascak)

NBC:
8PM - Up All Night
8:30PM - Up All Night
(R - Sep. 14)
9PM - Harry's Law
10PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show with Jay Leno (Lea Michele; comic Adam Carolla; Neil Diamond performs)
12:37AM - Late Night with Jimmy Fallon (Zac Efron; Method Man; Coldplay performs)
1:36AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Director Nelson George; musician Tom Morello; Bear Hands perform) SD

FOX:
8PM - The X Factor (90 min., LIVE)
9:30PM - I Hate My Teenage Daughter

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Nature - Echo: An Elephant to Remember (R - Oct. 17, 2010)
9PM - NOVA: Darwin's Darkest Hour (120 min.)
(R - Oct. 6, 2009)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Una Familia con Suerte
9PM - La Fuerza del Destino
10PM - La Rosa de Guadalupe

THE CW:
8PM - America's Next Top Model: All-Stars
(R - Nov. 30)
9PM - America's Next Top Model: All-Stars (Season Finale)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Una Maid en Manhattan
9PM - Flor Salvaje
10PM - La Casa de al Lado

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Ralph Fiennes)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Dancer David Hallberg)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Director Michael Moore; Ellie Kemper; comic Sean Patton)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Whitney Cummings; comic Moshe Kasher; comic Arden Myrin; comic Gary Valentine)
post #74475 of 93694
TV Notes
Wednesday’s Highlights: 'Silent Witness' on TNT
By Los Angeles Times' 'Show Tracker' Blog - December 6th, 2011

[ALL TIMES LISTED ARE PACIFIC TIME]

ACCUSATION: Dermot Mulroney and Judd Hirsch in the new mystery “Silent Witness,” based on a novel by Richard North Patterson at 9 p.m. on TNT.

SERIES

The Middle:
Frankie decides to throw a Christmas Eve party in this holiday themed episode of family sitcom (8 p.m. ABC).

America’s Next Top Model: Jay Manuel, Tyra Banks, Andre Leon Tally and Nigel Barker pick the winner at the conclusion of the season finale (9 p.m. KTLA).

Modern Family: The family puts together a quick Christmas celebration when they realize they won’t be together on the actual day in this new episode (9 p.m. ABC).

Ghost Hunters: In this new holiday episode, “Christmas Spirit,” Jason Hawes and Grant Wilson hunt for their own ghosts of Christmas past (9 p.m. Syfy).

Happy Endings: Max (Adam Pally) agrees to dress up as Santa for Penny’s (Casey Wilson) charity event (9:30 p.m. ABC).

Law & Order: Special Victims Unit: The detectives find a missing 14-year-old working as a prostitute (10 p.m. NBC).

Top Chef: Texas: After a quick-fire challenge that requires the chefs to choose one of four sauces and create a dish with it, they must prepare their best steak dishes for a progressive four-course sit-down meal for 200 people at the annual Cattle Baron’s Ball (10 p.m. Bravo).

Psych: After a woman tells the SBPD she witnessed a murder in broad daylight, Shawn and Gus (James Roday, Dule Hill) are the only ones who believe her and decide to protect her by hiding her at a remote commune. Diora Baird and Diedrich Bader guest star in this new episode (10 p.m. USA).

MOVIES

A Christmas Carol:
George C. Scott plays Ebenezer Scrooge in this 1984 adaptation of the Charles Dickens’ classic. Edward Woodward and Angela Pleasence also star (8 and 10:30 p.m. AMC).

SPORTS

College basketball:
Arizona at Florida (4 p.m. ESPN); Colorado State at Duke (4 p.m. ESPN2); Georgia Tech at Georgia (4 p.m. FSN); Pepperdine at Northern Arizona (5:30 p.m. FS Prime); Xavier at Butler (6 p.m. ESPN); St. Bonaventure at Illinois (6 p.m. ESPN2).

Hockey: The Philadelphia Flyers visit the Buffalo Sabres (4:30 p.m. VS).


http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/show...ss-on-tnt.html
post #74476 of 93694
TV Notes
'Terra Nova' fights against extinction
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - December 6th, 2011

Are dinosaurs about to go extinct for a second time?

Fox's "Terra Nova," an expensive drama about a family that travels from the year 2149 to prehistoric times to try to save Earth, is fighting to survive past its freshman season. Because the show is costly and takes a long time to produce, Fox ordered only 13 episodes, the last of which will air on Dec. 19.

Now 20th Century Fox Television, the production studio that makes "Terra Nova" for the Fox network, is starting to lobby for a year two.

On the surface, the ratings for "Terra Nova" are not awful. It is averaging almost 10 million viewers in its Monday 8 p.m. time slot, and it is the No. 1 new drama among male viewers.

However, the pilot of "Terra Nova" alone cost about $15 million, and the show is one of the most expensive in history, so it may be hard Fox to justify a second year without higher ratings. The studio will likely try to make the argument that "Terra Nova" has done well in international sales, but that may not be enough to justify the financial risks of a second season.

Part of the challenge all along for "Terra Nova" was that it was trying to be a show that could appeal to families and kids in a time when the audience is very fragmented. A Monday night time slot probably didn't help it much. Sunday would have been a better fit for "Terra Nova," where it would have benefited from having NFL football as a lead-in and a better chance to grab families.

However, Fox has turned its Sunday night over to animation programming. "The Simpsons" and "Family Guy" still deliver, but a case could be made that the other shows Fox has tried that night ("The Cleveland Show," "Bob's Burgers" and "Alan Gregory") are just riding the coattails of those two shows.

Going forward, Fox executives may have to decide whether they need to rethink their Sunday strategy if they want to try big-tent shows such as "Terra Nova."

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/ente...sion-fox-.html
post #74477 of 93694
TV Review
'Pearl Harbor: 24 Hours After' (History)
When the Country Was Attacked, and There Were No TV Updates
By Neil Genzlinger, The New York Times - December 7th, 2011

A disastrous attack catches the United States by surprise, and in the hours that follow, the president and other leaders must make major decisions hindered by communication problems and a lack of clarity as to what exactly has occurred and whether more attacks are coming. What? Someone is still commemorating the 10th anniversary of Sept. 11?

No, the attack in question is the one of Dec. 7, 1941, and the History channel's examination of it on Wednesday night in Pearl Harbor: 24 Hours After provides some striking comparisons with the more recent event. One difference, though: In 2001, unlike 1941, the president probably did not have a cocaine nose-swab midway through the crisis, as is suggested here.

The program follows events hour by hour, and it's striking how slowly things unrolled, compared with Sept. 11, when television cameras brought the awful pictures to the world instantly. It was hours before President Franklin D. Roosevelt knew the full extent of the attack.

And yet he and others responded quickly in some regards. Roosevelt had dictated a draft of the Day of Infamy speech within four hours of the strike (though his crucial change from will live in world history to will live in infamy came a bit later).

All of Roosevelt's speechwriters were out of town that weekend, so he was left alone to draft what was going to be the most important speech of his presidency, says David Woolner of the Roosevelt Institute. More ignominiously, in that first day the president also set in motion the detention of Japanese-Americans.

Just as on Sept. 11, the chorus of outrage over how the country could have been caught so unprepared began almost immediately. And the political and military responses were muddied by the many unknowns: Was a full invasion of the West Coast coming? Was Germany involved?

The program finds the human moments in the big-picture timeline. One involves Roosevelt's sinuses, which were congested and causing him considerable discomfort. We're told that about four hours into the crisis, he spent more than an hour with his physician seeking relief, which at the time probably would have involved swabbing his nostrils with cocaine.

Another strong point of this interesting reconstruction is that it never forgets the men and women at Pearl Harbor. While focusing on the response of the nation's leadership, it quietly updates what was going on there: the men trapped inside the battleship Oklahoma when it capsized; the futile effort to treat burn victims who had jumped from their ships into flaming oil. Another 24-hour period in this war would come to be known as the longest day, but this one must have seemed pretty endless to all involved.

PEARL HARBOR: 24 HOURS AFTER
History, Wednesday night at 8, Eastern and Pacific times; 7, Central time.


http://tv.nytimes.com/2011/12/07/art...ref=television
post #74478 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Technology Notes
Verizon Planning Netflix Competitor For 2012 Debut
By Devin Coldewey, Techcrunch.com - December 6th, 2011

The natural question is, of course, what exactly can Verizon offer that could possibly tempt users away from Netflix or other streaming options?

Free access to wireless subscribers on any of their connected mobile devices. I wouldn't be surprised of it's aimed at their LTE user base as a feature to get more higher priced data plans sold.
post #74479 of 93694
Quote:


ESPN defends its prices, arguing that its valuable programming draws more cable subscribers. "ESPN is consistently ranked by cable operators as the most compelling and comprehensive driver of their businesses, offering more total value in a multiplatform world than any other basic cable network by far," a spokeswoman told the Journal. And, as of a year ago, 31 percent of people asked in a survey by Needham & Co. analyst Laura Martin said that they would not cut the cord without ESPN's offerings online.

If ESPN wasn't such a greedy monopoly thier prices wouldn't be so high. Thats because their paying billion dollar contracts for sports that have been on free broadcast television for over 40 years. Some of those are The BCS national championship game, other BCS games and bowl games, and Monday Night football. So now people who have pay TV are having to pay for what used to be free if they watch it or not. Its a disgrace for ESPN to do this especially when the economy is bad and so many people are hurting for money. Something needs to be done about this. I hope ESPN has it blow up in their face one day and they lose thier shirt. Hopefully more people will realize this and cut the cord to stop feeding the pig.
post #74480 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by scorpiontail60 View Post

I.E. a Cox subscriber in Arizona where there are no FiOS lines could subscribe to FiOS TV and view it via their Cox Internet connection.

And do you really think Cox would allow that? I don't think so. Cox wants you to subscribe to their pay TV service, not someone elses.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Free access to wireless subscribers on any of their connected mobile devices. I wouldn't be surprised of it's aimed at their LTE user base as a feature to get more higher priced data plans sold.

I think you're right. I think the future will be for Verizon (and others) to eventually offer TV over THEIR wireless systems.
post #74481 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt L View Post

I resent paying for the ESPN crap, crap I never watch, I also resent paying for lots of other crap channels too- but because of the "Business Model" I and all of us are stuck with it.

The only way to do anything about it is to clip the cable, but most won't do it. I could easily live without the alternate channels and be happy with OTA but other members of my family are not. The bulk of my viewing is OTA plus 3 or 4 cable/SAT channels like Comedy Central, TNT and USA, and very little SIFI. All that content is available a few months later on disk or streaming anyway.

If a person is not a sports fan, they should not have to pay for ESPN and all their other channels considering how much extra people have to pay. I fully expect all cable and satellite providers to eventually offer an all-inclusive sports package where a person can get all the ESPN channels, the Fox Sports Net channels, SPEED, NBC Sports, and the others. But I think that's as far as it will go, we'll never see a la carte programming.
post #74482 of 93694
Nielsen Notes (Broadcast)
Holiday cheer: Big Four are up in viewers
Adults 18-49 audience is up 2 percent for the new season
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - December 7th, 2011

The Big Four networks are heading into January with a chance to do something they have not done in more than a decade: Grow their collective audience.

Season to date, ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC's combined rating among adults 18-49 is up very slightly over last year.

If the networks can hold onto those gains through May, it would mark the first time since the 1999-2000 season that their ratings have grown year to year.

Eleven weeks into the season the Big Four together are averaging a 12.1 rating, according to Nielsen, up 2 percent over an 11.9 at this point last year.

The bulk of those gains have come from Fox, which is tied for first place with CBS this fall with a 3.4 rating, 13 percent better than the same point last year.

CBS is also up 3 percent. ABC is even to last year with a 2.8, good for third place.

NBC is the only network to see ratings declines, and even with all its woes, it's only down 7 percent, from a 2.8 to a 2.6.

Of course there are still five more months in this season, and there's no guarantee the networks will be able to hold their current ratings.

NBC will drop come February, once "Sunday Night Football" goes off the air, but those losses could be offset somewhat by Fox, which usually surges once "American Idol" returns in January.

ABC and CBS have been steady all fall, and both have at least one highly anticipated drama slated for midseason, though buzz doesn't always translate into ratings.

The last time Big Four ratings rose for the season, there was an obvious reason: The huge success of "Who Wants to be a Millionaire," the smash hit that lifted ABC by 8 percent over the previous season.

This year it's no one show that has pushed up ratings, though CBS's "2 Broke Girls," Fox's "New Girl" and ABC's "Once Upon a Time" are doing better than any of last year's new shows.

Instead it's strong ratings from the World Series and favorable comparisons to a weak fall 2010 that have led to the gains.

* * * *

In broadcast ratings for the week ended Dec. 4:

Among adults 18-49, Fox was first for the week with a 3.0 average rating and an 8 share, followed by NBC at 2.3/6, CBS at 2.2/6, ABC at 1.8/5, Univision at 1.4/4, Telemundo and CW at 0.6/2, ION and TeleFutura at 0.3/1 and Azteca and Estrella at 0.1/0.

Top five English-language Big Five shows (18-49s): Tie-1. Fox's "The OT" and NBC's "Sunday Night Football" 7.4; 3. CBS's "Victoria's Secret Fashion Show" 4.6; 4. NBC's "Football Night in America" 4.1; Tie-5. CBS's "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" and Fox's "The Simpsons" 4.0.

Top five English-language Big Five shows (total viewers): 1. Fox's "The OT" 19.39 million; 2. NBC's "Sunday Night Football" 18.90 million; 3. CBS's "NCIS" 13.37 million; 4. CBS's "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer" 12.64 million; 5. CBS's "60 Minutes" 11.88 million.

Top five time-shifted English-language Big Five shows (18-49s, by Live+SD versus Live+7 playback, week ended Nov. 20): 1. ABC's "Modern Family" 2.4 increase (up 42.9 percent); 2. Fox's "House" 1.6 increase (up 64.0 percent); 3. CBS's "The Big Bang Theory" 1.5 increase (up 28.3 percent); 4. CBS's "Two and a Half Men" 1.5 increase (up 27.8 percent); 5. Fox's "New Girl" 1.5 increase (up 42.9 percent).

Show on the rise: Fox's "The X Factor," Wednesday 8 p.m. The episode averaged a 3.7 among 18-49s, up 15 percent from the previous week's edition (which aired on Tuesday due to Thanksgiving).

Show on the decline: ABC's "You Deserve It," Monday 9 p.m. The limited-run game show posted a 1.4 in 18-49s, down 18 percent from a 1.7 the previous week.


http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...in-viewers.asp
post #74483 of 93694
Nielsen Notes (Cable)
Cable's big holiday attraction: Movies
Four Christmas-themed flicks make the week's top 30 shows
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - December 7th, 2011

On broadcast, it's the half-hour kids' holiday specials that have been putting up strong ratings the past two weeks.

On cable, it's not those short specials but rather the much longer holiday movies that are drawing the biggest audiences, and not everyone who's watching is a kid.

Four holiday movies made basic cable's top 30 among total viewers last week, the week ended Dec. 4, and they drew strong audiences among both adults and children.

Disney Channel's "Good Luck Charlie: It's Christmas" finished second for the week among total viewers, averaging 6.9 million Friday at 8 p.m., according to Nielsen.

It became the No. 1 live-action movie on cable this year, and it ranks No. 2 overall behind only August's animated "Phineas and Ferb: Across the 2nd Dimension."

In fact, a second airing of "Charlie" at 8:30 p.m. Sunday also made the weekly top 30, finishing 12th with 4.8 million viewers.

Disney sister network ABC Family also had a movie in the top 30, the live-action version of "How the Grinch Stole Christmas," which drew 3.85 million viewers Friday at 8 p.m. and placed 22nd for the week.

The biggest non-kids Christmas movie of the week was Hallmark's original "A Princess for Christmas," which drew 3.6 million viewers Saturday at 8 p.m. Of note, it actually outdrew the television debut of the wildly popular film "The Hangover" on TBS that same night.

Cable has become the place for holiday movies over the years.

While the broadcast networks happily clear their schedules for annual Christmas specials like "A Charlie Brown Christmas" and "Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer," movies simply don't do as well as broadcast as they once did and the networks are increasingly reluctant to air them.

And no wonder. The religious-themed original movie "Have a Little Faith," which premiered on ABC a week and a half ago, drew a mere 1.1 adults 18-49 rating, No. 63 for the week on broadcast.

* * * *

In cable ratings for the week ended Dec. 4:

Top five networks in primetime (18-49s): ESPN, TBS, ABC Family, USA, FX.

Top five networks in primetime (total viewers): ESPN, USA, Disney Channel, ABC Family, TBS.

Top five cable news networks in primetime (25-54): Fox News Channel, MSNBC, CNN, HLN, CNBC.

Top five cable news programs (total viewers): 1 Fox News Channel's "The O'Reilly Factor" (Wednesday, 8 p.m.); 2. Fox News Channel's "The O'Reilly Factor" (Monday, 8 p.m.); 3. Fox News Channel's "The O'Reilly Factor" (Thursday, 8 p.m.); 4. Fox News Channel's "Hannity" (Wednesday, 9 p.m.); 5. Fox News Channel's "The O'Reilly Factor" (Friday, 8 p.m.)

Top movie (18-49s): TBS's "The Hangover" (Sunday, 8 p.m.) 1.97 million.

Top sporting event (total viewers): ESPN's "Monday Night Football: Giants/Saints" (Monday, 8:30 p.m.) 14.43 million.

Shows making the top 10 among 18-34s, 18-49s and 25-54s: ESPN's "Monday Night Football: Giants/Saints" (Monday, 7:30 p.m.); FX's "Sons of Anarchy" (Tuesday, 10 p.m.); A&E's "Storage Wars" (Tuesday, 10:30 p.m.)

Show on the rise: FX's "American Horror Story" Wednesday, 10 p.m. The drama averaged 1.40 million viewers 18-34, No. 8 for the week in the demo and up 15 percent from 1.22 million the previous week.

Show on the decline: NFL Network's "NFL Football," Thursday, 8:30 p.m. A game between the Eagles and Seahawks averaged 5.95 million total viewers, down 44 percent from the 10.68 million the previous week's Thanksgiving night matchup between the Ravens and 49ers averaged.


http://www.medialifemagazine.com/art...on-Movies-.asp
post #74484 of 93694
Technology Notes
Netflix CEO Predicts Half Of TV Viewing From Web In 10 Years: UBS Confab
By Davie Lieberman, Deadline.com - December 6th, 2011

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings had the best line of the day at the UBS Annual Global Media and Communications Conference. Told that last year his company was the object of mystique, envy and fear at the confab, Hastings said: Now it's just pity. Well, yes considering that his company's stock has fallen 77% since mid-July, when Netflix boosted prices by 60% for consumers who wanted to continue to receive DVDs and stream videos. We had done so many difficult things that we became overconfident, Hastings says. Our big obsession for the year was, Let's not live and die by DVD.' But the change turned out to be a little too fast. We berate ourselves tremendously for that lack of insight. But his appearance at the UBS gathering was designed to demonstrate that Netflix is back on track and that its shares are worth buying again. For investors who believe that Web video is going to soar, we're the leading play on that thesis. As long as we don't shoot ourselves in the foot anymore, it's a great opportunity. He adds that there's no effective competitor for exactly what we do.

Hastings predicted that within the next 10 years about half of all TV viewing will come via the Internet. He says that TV manufacturers want you to live in their device. While about a third of TV sets sold today can connect directly to the Internet, in a few years most of the TVs sold will be smart TVs. It's a phenomenal revolution. The biggest loser will be broadcast TV, he says. It'll be declining like land-line telephony. To some degree we'll look at broadcast in 20 years as being like (telephone) party lines. And as broadband providers include more fiber optic lines in their networks, they'll be able to transmit Internet video at speeds of 1 gigabit per second. Peak Netflix viewing on a Saturday night could still fit through one fiber optic (line), he says. A gigabit is a tiny fraction of what's possible over fiber optic. Hastings says that providers shouldn't have to raise prices, or resort to usage-based pricing, to handle all of that Internet video traffic although they might try to do so. It would be unfortunate because it's not based on the costs, which are fixed, he says. Consumers also might balk. Time Warner Cable tried it a couple of years ago in Texas and backed down. I doubt it will happen.

Hastings identified HBO's digital service, HBO Go, as Netflix's biggest potential rival. HBO Go will become HBO. It's so much better than (conventional pay TV's) on-demand system. While he expects to see many other competitors, he notes that HBO and Netflix spend $1B-$2B a year on content. At this point, none of those guys have chosen to do that. Hastings says he's very, very excited about Netflix's upcoming original series House Of Cards. But he doesn't know whether Netflix will ramp up its spending on originals. If it's successful (then) we'll grow it. He says that there's a lot of artistic talent in the world and what we need is more money in the ecosystem that flows to content producers. And he says that Netflix doesn't have to grow by taking subscribers away from cable and satellite. We don't have sports or news or reality (shows). If you're tight on money you might cut HBO and use Netflix. But it's not a direct competitor because many people use both.

http://www.deadline.com/2011/12/netf...rs-ubs-confab/

* * * *

Technology Notes
Sony Exec Defends Combination Of Technology And Entertainment: UBS Confab

With 350M Sony networked devices including TV sets and PlayStation game consoles expected to be in the market over the next two years right now that integration has never made more sense, Sony Corp Of America CFO Rob Wiesenthal told investors at the UBS Annual Global Media and Communications Conference. The momentum is there and the capability is there. You want to maximize the value of all these assets by keeping them together.

He says that the company is approaching $1B in revenue this fiscal year from its PlayStation Network and Sony Entertainment Network. He's also optimistic about the recent Sony/ATV deal to pay $2.2B for EMI's music publishing operation which includes rights to 1.3M songs. The plan is still a little mysterious. We're coming up with a structure that we haven't disclosed yet to make music publishing a separate company. Still, he notes that music publishing rights are a critical element of any music business with revenues that can come from just about any show or device that plays tunes. He also says that he's encouraged by prospects for the overall music industry, even though it's just a shadow of its former self. He says that music video site VEVO is worth a fortune and adds that you'll see music companies incubate new services.

He notes that a lot of our business now is related to TV through shows such as The X Factor and America's Got Talent. In addition to crowing about music, Wiesenthal continued Sony's cheerleading for new video distribution strategies such as its sale of digital downloads of films including Bad Teacher and 30 Minutes Or Less prior to their release on DVD and Blu-ray.

http://www.deadline.com/2011/12/sony...nt-ubs-confab/
post #74485 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by MRM4 View Post

If a person is not a sports fan, they should not have to pay for ESPN and all their other channels considering how much extra people have to pay. I fully expect all cable and satellite providers to eventually offer an all-inclusive sports package where a person can get all the ESPN channels, the Fox Sports Net channels, SPEED, NBC Sports, and the others. But I think that's as far as it will go, we'll never see a la carte programming.

Well, the non-ESPN part already exists today with the family tiers that some providers have. I agree that we'll see more of that (lower-priced tiers that don't include sports), but the 'standard' digital packages will still have them because ESPN/ABC and the cableCos want it that way.
post #74486 of 93694
TV Sports
Terry Francona lands softly at ESPN
By Michael Hiestand, USA Today - December 7th, 2011

As the game outside the game, TV sports can provide quick comebacks for coaches who've taken some lumps. But Terry Francona just set some kind of record.

Francona, hyped as ESPN's newest star on Monday NightFootball before joining its MLB Winter Meetings coverage Tuesday, just months ago oversaw a historic Boston Red Sox meltdown.

But so much for having to sit and sulk. After leaving the team, he subbed for Tim McCarver on two Fox playoff games. After Bobby Valentine took the Red Sox job and created a plum ESPN opening, Francona seems to have seen the light many other former coaches and managers have bathed in when they realize they need to worry more about, say, their TV pancake makeup than whoever wins and loses: "I'll probably sleep better than Bobby."

Francona interviewed for the St. Louis managing job and talked to the Cubs but didn't pursue the team's managing job "by mutual agreement" that it wasn't "the appropriate time."

In TV sports now, it no longer matters whether ex-coaches see TV work as a holding pattern or long-term plan. Francona expects it will be nice to talk about baseball rather than "just desperately trying to win your game that night." While Fox, unlike ESPN, could have him work on postseason play he says Fox execs "were the first people he talked to" about a TV job ESPN will put him on games in Sunday primetime, when there's no other MLB action, and on lots of studio shows. Which makes him hard to forget in the baseball world.

Will he manage again? "Who knows? But I'm jumping in here with both feet." He won't second-guess managers because "you can't manage from the booth. In the dugout, you're privy to so many things that people outside the dugout aren't." And while managers "can talk until you're blue in the face, if a pitcher's ERA is high it won't matter." Now, he'll at least end up with plenty of sound bites.

CBS deal: CBS today announces its CBS Sports Network, which focuses on college sports, will add 27 Pro Bull Riding events annually in a deal that also puts eight events on CBS. But, says CBSSN president David Berson, "college sports remains the heart of our network."

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/colum...spn/51684260/1
post #74487 of 93694
TV Review
BBC America's 'State of Play' the best repeat you'll see all month
John Simm, Bill Nighy and Kelly Macdonald shine in 2003 journalism/political thriller
By Alan Sepinwall, HitFix.com - December 6th, 2011

In the late '90s, NBC launched an ad campaign to try to boost the image, and viewership numbers, for repeats, by boasting, "If you haven't seen it, it's new to you!" At the time, I soundly mocked the slogan, as was my moral obligation as a television critic.

Today, though, the idea seems much less bogus. We live in an age where there's more original programming - and good programming, at that - than even a professional TV watcher can ever hope to get to. And we live in an age where there are so many ways to see shows, past and present, that no one's limited solely to watching what's on right now. (Whenever you hear a bell ring, it means that someone is watching season 1 of "The Wire" for the first time on DVD.)

Wednesday night at 10, BBC America presents a good case in point by rerunning "State of Play," a miniseries from 2003 (it first aired in America in early 2004) about a group of newspaper reporters who get caught up in a wide-reaching political conspiracy.

Back in the day, "State of Play" was universally praised by critics on both sides of the pond, but I wasn't one of them, because for reasons I can't recall, I never got around to watching it. (Skimming The Star-Ledger's archives from the week it premiered in America suggests I was devoting a lot of time and mental energy to the first season of "The Apprentice," which means 2011 Alan has a whole lot to teach 2004 Alan.) For a long time, I kept the VHS screener BBC America had sent (this is how long ago it was), but never got around to it, despite the raves I kept hearing from friends and colleagues.

So when BBC America scheduled a repeat of the six episodes as part of its new Wednesday "Dramaville" line-up, I still hadn't seen it, and it was still new to me.

And I watched it - and it was every bit as bloody fantastic as I'd been promised so many years before.

The series stars a murder's row of British TV actors from the time; the cast is so loaded that a very young, baby-faced James McAvoy doesn't even get mentioned in the opening credits. (A similarly youthful Kelly Macdonald does, however.) John Simm, who would re-team with "State of Play" co-star Philip Glenister in the original "Life on Mars," plays Cal McCaffrey, hotshot reporter for one of London's biggest newspapers, and old friend to rising political star Stephen Collins (David Morrissey). When Collins' mistress dies in what appears to be a subway accident, Cal has access that the rest of the fourth estate would kill to get - especially once it becomes clear that there was no accident, and that the mistress' death connects to a huge conspiracy involving the government and a major energy conglomerate. And there's tension in every conversation Cal has with Stephen, and Stephen's wife Anne (Polly Walker), because they're usually looking at him as a friend and he's always looking at them as sources, even though he likes them.

Simm and Morrissey are both tremendous, as are Macdonald (now playing Mrs. Schroder on "Boardwalk Empire") and McAvoy as young reporters whose stories wind up tying in with what Cal is up to. But Bill Nighy walks away with the production as newspaper editor Cameron Foster, a very wise, very careful, very charming man who's always figuring out the angles as the story keeps changing and expanding. As with his more recent turn in PBS' "Page Eight," Nighy is brilliantly minimalist, rarely so much as raising his voice and yet saying so much with the tiniest little change in expression. (He is also, unsurprisingly, dryly hilarious when the occasion calls for it.)

Cameron, and the story in general, suggest a period that should be much older than eight years; it has more in common with the days of "All the President's Men" than what the world of journalism looks like today. The newspaper is flush, fully staffed and able to throw tens of thousands of dollars at what seems like a very sketchy story at first, and there are no hints of the massive cuts most papers would have to make shortly thereafter. (The 2009 movie version, with Russell Crowe as Cal and Ben Affleck as Stephen, had trouble compressing six hours of story into two, but it was recent enough to acknowledge the sweeping changes in the industry.)

"State of Play" was created by Paul Abbott, who wrote for and/or created "Cracker," "Shameless" and "Touching Evil" (all of which had their own US adaptations, to varying degrees of creative success), and directed by David Yates, who parlayed the gig into directing the last four Harry Potter films. It's a tour de force: gripping suspense, engaging mystery, unexpected bursts of dark comedy, and even some mournful romance, on top of how colorfully it captured the world of investigative journalism. (In one of the better exchanges, Cal tells a homicide cop that they have to work together to advance the story, and the irritated cop replies, "It's a case, not a story.") I know some quibbled with the ending at the time, suggesting Abbott came up with it at the last minute, but it works well enough with all the genius that came before that I'm fine with it.

As I sat through the six one-hour installments, I kept kicking myself for not popping the screener into my VCR back in 2004. Then I realized that, where I'm often jealous of people watching "Deadwood" or "The Shield" for the first time, for once I got to belatedly see a great piece of work through virgin eyes.

I hadn't seen it, so it was new to me. And it was fantastic. Better late than never.

STATE OF PLAY
Wednesday at 10 p.m. on BBC America


http://www.hitfix.com/blogs/whats-al...-see-all-month
post #74488 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRatPatrol View Post

And do you really think Cox would allow that? I don't think so. Cox wants you to subscribe to their pay TV service, not someone elses.

Since when does Cox have the right to tell their Internet subscribers which web sites they are allowed to visit?

Quote:
Originally Posted by MRM4 View Post

If a person is not a sports fan, they should not have to pay for ESPN and all their other channels considering how much extra people have to pay. I fully expect all cable and satellite providers to eventually offer an all-inclusive sports package where a person can get all the ESPN channels, the Fox Sports Net channels, SPEED, NBC Sports, and the others. But I think that's as far as it will go, we'll never see a la carte programming.

Doubt cable will ever even get to that point. It will be dead in a few years anyway. OTA + Internet access is all it will take to bring them down. It will happen. When is the question.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Technology Notes
Netflix CEO Predicts Half Of TV Viewing From Web In 10 Years: UBS Confab
By Davie Lieberman, Deadline.com - December 6th, 2011

...

” The biggest loser will be broadcast TV, he says. “It’ll be declining like land-line telephony. … To some degree we’ll look at broadcast in 20 years as being like (telephone) party lines.”

...

What happened to this company, that started out with such a great vision (streaming video)??? This comment shows a complete lack of insight and is just so wrong.

The biggest loser is CLEARLY cable and satellite companies. Especially satellite as cable companies will at least be able to complete the morph into data services provider. The delivery pipe and the content provider are no longer the same. People will continue to use and value the local and free live (as in, not "on-demand") content of broadcast TV. Content and "channels" distributed via the Internet will continue to be a source of supplemental content, but you are never going to get everyone out there to subscribe to pay tv or even internet access.
post #74489 of 93694
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRatPatrol View Post

And do you really think Cox would allow that? I don't think so. Cox wants you to subscribe to their pay TV service, not someone elses.

And that's where these companies don't get it it. If I'm using your for an ISP then that it's and be happy I CHOOSE to do that. If I want to get your TV or phone service I will. If I don't, I don't. Don't start forcing things on me. It not nay of Cox's concern what I do with their connection one I paid for it as long as I'm not doing anything illegal or violates their TOS( ie running a server ). If I choose to get DirecTv or Dish instead of Cox's TV offering should they be allowed to "punish" me for that or tell me I can't do that?
post #74490 of 93694
TUESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media INsight's Blog.
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