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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2661

post #79801 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by goldrich View Post

That's the main reason I RARELY watch ANY TV news on any network, especially the sliced, diced and edited news from the NBC outlets. With the internet, there is no need to watch them along with way too many promos and commercials.

To me, it's just the same only a different medium. I'm sure you have your favorite sites, so how is that any different from someone who has their favorite channels?

Quote:


Oh, plus I'm over 50, so broadcasters and advertising/marketing reps could care less about me anyway.

I'm over 65, so I'm even less appreciated about than you.
post #79802 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

To me, it's just the same only a different medium. I'm sure you have your favorite sites, so how is that any different from someone who has their favorite channels?



I'm over 65, so I'm even less appreciated about than you.


Oh... we appreciate you, We appreciate every viewer that likes a good, well told, informative news story. That's us at 60 MINUTES.
post #79803 of 93852
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET)

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos
(R - Jan. 8)
8PM - Secret Millionaire (Season Premiere)
9PM - Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition (Season Premiere)

CBS:
7PM - 60 Minutes
8PM - Dogs in the City
(R - May 30)
9PM - The Good Wife
(R - Oct. 16)
10PM - CSI: Miami
(R - Nov. 20)

NBC:
7PM - Dateline NBC
(R - Nov. 11)
8PM - Adele Live in London (Special)
9PM - 2012 Miss USA Competition (120 min., LIVE)

FOX:
7PM - American Dad
(R - Sep. 25)
7:30PM - The Cleveland Show
(R - Apr. 1)
8PM - The Simpsons
(R - Nov. 13)
8:30PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - May 15, 2011)
9PM - Family Guy
(R - Nov. 6)
9:30PM - American Dad
(R - Nov. 20)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Finding Your Roots With Henry Louis Gates, Jr.: Harry Connick, Jr. and Branford Marsalis (R - Mar. 25)
9PM - Great Performances - Tony Bennett: Duets II (90 min.)
(R - Jan. 27)
10:30PM - loopdiver: The Journey of a Dance
(R - Jul. 25, 2010)

UNIVISION:
7PM - La Familia P. Luche (Series Premiere)
8PM - Pequeños Gigantes (Season Premiere, 90 min.)
10:30PM - Un Refugio para el Amor: El Resumen (Special)

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Pa'Lante con Cristina
8PM - Movie: The Mummy Returns (2001)
post #79804 of 93852
TV Notes
Face the Nation': Have you heard of Ed Rendell's book?
By Hal Boedeker, Orlando Sentinel's 'TV Guy' Blog

The Sunday morning guest list:

Former Gov. Ed Rendell, D-Pa., has a book to sell, and it's called A Nation of Wusses. He will be part of a Face the Nation panel with Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison, R-Texas; Michael Gerson of The Washington Post; and Bob Shrum, former chief strategist to the 2004 Kerry-Edwards campaign. The CBS program airs at 10:30 a.m. on WKMG-Channel 6. Other guests include David Axelrod, senior strategist of the Obama Re-Election Campaign; Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee; David Sanger of The New York Times and author of Confront and Conceal; and Daniel Klaidman of Newsweek and author of Kill and Capture.

Former Sen. Bill Bradley, D-N.J., will be a guest on NBC's Meet the Press at 9 a.m. on WESH-Channel 2. Two governors discuss the presidential campaign: Gov. Deval Patrick, D-Mass., supports Barack Obama, and Gov. John Kasich, R-Ohio, backs Mitt Romney. The panel will be Mayor Kasim Reed, D-Atlanta; Kevin Madden, senior Romney adviser; Steve Schmidt, senior strategist for Sen. John McCain in 2008; and Neera Tanden, president of the Center for American Progress.

Paul Krugman of The New York Times will be a panelist on ABC's This Week at 11 a.m. on WFTV-Channel 9. Other panelists are George Will, Democratic political strategist Donna Brazile, Stephanie Cutter of the Obama campaign and Eric Fehrnstrom of the Romney campaign.

Ed Gillespie, senior adviser to the Romney campaign, is a guest on Fox News Sunday at 9 a.m. on WOFL-Channel 35. Obama will be represented by Steven Rattner, former lead adviser of the president's auto task force. The panel will be Juan Williams, David Brody of CBN News, A.B. Stoddard of The Hill and Chip Saltsman, former campaign manager for Mike Huckabee.

Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody's Analytics, talks to CNN's State of the Union at 9 a.m. Other guests are Gov. Bob McDonnell, R-Va.; Sen. Richard Lugar, R-Ind.; and Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va.

http://blogs.orlandosentinel.com/ent...ells-book.html
post #79805 of 93852
TV Notes
NBC's 'Whitney' getting new showrunner
By James Hibberd, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog

Another NBC series is getting a new showrunner. This season has seen top writer-producers exit on Smash, Community, The Office and now freshman comedy Whitney is making a big change.

Executive producer Betsy Thomas is stepping down from her post on the Whitney Cummings sitcom. Instead, Friends veteran Wil Calhoun will take the lead (who were you expecting, Dan Harmon?). Calhoun most recently worked on NBC's Kath & Kim, CBS' Gary Unmarried and Fox's I Hate My Teenage Daughter. Meanwhile Thomas has already landed another gig: She's moving over to serve as co-executive producer on NBC's upcoming comedy Guys With Kids.

Whitney wasn't exactly a ratings sensation on NBC this year and some were surprised when the show was renewed. But this fall Whitney will open a new comedy block for the network at 8 p.m. on Friday nights, leading into the return of Community.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/05/31/whitney-showrunner/

* * * *

TV Notes
Boss' season 2 trailer

Muscle rigidity, whole body tremors, it's an acute acceleration of the disease yup, TV's most feel-good drama is coming back. Starz' grim political drama Boss is returning for a second season with a new showrunner, Dee Johnson (The Good Wife), and several new co-stars, including Jonathan Groff (Glee).

Boss returns Aug. 17. Here's the first trailer [CLICK LINK BELOW]:

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/05/31/bo...first-trailer/
post #79806 of 93852
Technology/Legal Notes
TiVo Sued by Cisco Over DVR Patents
By Eriq Gardner, The Hollywood Reporter's 'TV Guy' Blog - Jun. 1, 2012

TiVo is involved in another big fight over DVR patents.

Cisco Systems has filed a lawsuit against the DVR pioneer that seeks to invalidate four of TiVo's patents and is asking for a declaratory judgment that its products are not infringing.

The plaintiff says in a lawsuit filed in California federal court that it is facing a threat from TiVo, which has resisted giving a license to reserve the possibility of a lawsuit. Cisco is a provider of DVRs to AT&T, Time Warner Cable and Verizon Communications, among others.

"Absent a declaration of invalidity and/or non-infringement, TiVo will continue to wrongfully allege that Cisco DVRs and Cisco's customers infringe the TiVo patents and thereby cause Cisco irreparable injury and damage," the Cisco lawsuit argues.

TiVo declined a request for comment.

The company has previously been involved in litigation with Microsoft, AT&T, Motorolla, Verizon and Dish. The lawsuits have yielded some big-dollar settlements including $500 million from Dish last month and $215 million from AT&T earlier in the year. The company's dispute with Microsoft also was recently resolved.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr...patents-332206
post #79807 of 93852
Critic's Notes
When Dallas' Was the Capital of America
By Heather Havrilesky, The New York Times' 'Riff' Column - Jun. 3, 2012

In the 1980s, there were two competing visions of wealth on TV: Dallas and Dynasty. People tend to lump the two nighttime soaps together, but aside from the characters' habit of resolving major conflicts in the swimming pool, the two shows couldn't be more different. Dynasty constructed a fantasy of domestic royalty and jet-setting escapism, offering a portrait of the rich as diamond-strewn, evening-gown-clad ghosts drifting from their private jets to their enormous mansions as servants rushed about carrying silver platters. Dallas, by contrast, stayed firmly rooted in middle-class American values, presenting a picture that was more Big Boy breakfast buffet than Breakfast at Tiffany's. With its cowboy hats and flocked wallpaper and Hatfields-versus-McCoys-style feuds, Dallas was as provincial and preglobal-economy as it gets. Even Southfork's décor, with its dark paneling, garish paintings and low ceilings, mirrored the claustrophobia of the country club: cramped, wall-to-wall carpeted spaces packed with small-minded people lugging their gigantic egos around behind them like overstuffed golf bags.

But Dallas was never designed to inspire so much as to haunt. Unlike the Carringtons, who were always dashing off to overseas business meetings or throwing glitzy events or calling their brokers to sell stock, the Ewings were slow-moving, repeated themselves often and had an unmatched tolerance for long, uncomfortable silences. They certainly didn't have glamorous problems: Sue Ellen was an alcoholic, Lucy popped pills and slept around, Jock was an overbearing patriarch and Bobby was a little brother with an inferiority complex. Although its characters may have been preoccupied by the oil business, Dallas was mostly about struggling to maintain your identity not to mention your sanity within the suffocating confines of the middle-American family. Those interminable scenes in the den at Southfork, in which the whole clan gathered to toss back drinks, their elbows always brushing past plants or nearly knocking over lamps, their bodies always shifting uncomfortably in their armchairs, captured the airless prison of dysfunctional kinship.

While Blake jetted off to Tokyo and Alexis intimidated Krystle with her (then-exotic) British accent, what most concerned the Ewings of Ewing Oil wasn't the relatively modern (and now shockingly common) goal of international success. The Ewings simply wanted to keep power within the Ewing family and to keep outsiders from infiltrating their ranks. (He's not our kind was a common refrain.) The most important discussions at Southfork centered on whether you were or weren't a real Ewing. Whether Bobby and J. R. were feeling affectionate or angry, they referred to their parents as Mama and Daddy. Anyone who would dare to insult Jock or Miss Ellie could expect a sock to the jaw. Defectors were reminded repeatedly that without their family identity, they were nothing. Despite our differences, Bobby, you're still a Ewing, Jock told Bobby through gritted teeth when Bobby tried to leave Southfork at the end of Season 3. We've only got each other. We've got to stick together.

From the first moments of TNT's Dallas remake (or continuation, because the show picks up 20-odd years after the original story left off), something is askew. It isn't just the sudden, verdant lushness of Southfork, which in the old days always had the flat, yellowing look of a place you would never want to get stuck. It isn't the bland, Abercrombie & Fitch-model prettiness of the show's young stars Jesse Metcalfe, Jordana Brewster and Josh Henderson that has nothing in common with the regular-folks charms of Patrick Duffy, the creepy-uncle appeal of Larry Hagman or the homecoming-court runner-up magnetism of Charlene Tilton. Where the big fish of Southfork once circled their small pond with the clumsy resignation of trapped creatures, this new generation of Ewings talks and moves with the slick efficiency of characters in a swashbuckling high-capitalist adventure directed by Michael Bay. When we witness J. R.'s son John Ross and his girlfriend, Elena, whooping it up over newly discovered oil, or we see Bobby's son Christopher chatting excitedly about the promise of methane drilling while pacing back and forth in his pristine office loft, the contrast becomes especially clear: These younger Ewings are all about action and entrepreneurship, about seizing the day and making a name for themselves in the wider world outside.

In fact, this extreme-makeover version of Dallas could take place anywhere on the globe; call the show London or Mumbai or Beijing, and you've got the same fit humans tapping away at their laptops and pumping their fists over the latest business deal. Aside from John Ross's cowboy hat and the occasional outdoor barbecue, this is just another gaggle of energetic, beautiful people with international ambitions and very little body hair, bedding and double-crossing one another to a generic twangy-guitar soundtrack. None of the claustrophobia or the character of the original series remains. No one in China cares what a Ewing is, after all. All that matters is the ability to reinvent yourself, over and over again, in accordance with the market's demands.

Maybe that old Ewing game of outsiders and insiders, of us against them, of loyalty and closed-minded allegiance, was too specific a product of the patriotism and white-man's-burden supremacy of Reagan's America to reproduce for the Facebook age. Because make no mistake, the megamansion fever dream of Dynasty may have spawned a whole generation of offspring aspirationally named Krystle and Alexis, but Dallas is the show that is most emblematic of its era. How else did a scoundrel as arrogant as J. R. Ewing wind up on the cover of Time magazine in 1980? J. R. wasn't even meant to be the lead character of Dallas, but when audiences were first treated to his smooth patriarchal condescension in 1978, they couldn't get enough. A far cry from the deeply conflicted protagonists of today's TV dramas Don Draper, Walter White, Tony Soprano J. R. was always smugly satisfied with his bad behavior. The show's writers may have flirted with J. R.'s suicide as the ultimate cliffhanger to round out the series in 1991, but self-destruction was never his thing; he was all about backslapping sadism. There was always something familiar about J. R., the way he couched his overconfidence and malice in the relaxed, folksy wisdom of the country boy. Even when he was outnumbered, he never felt outmatched, and the more power he had, the more sure he felt that power was his birthright. Or, as Ronald Reagan put it in his 1984 State of the Union address: We can be proud to say, We are first; we are the best; and we are so because we're free.'

This flavor of swagger isn't as common today, outside Kanye albums and certain self-promotional Twitter feeds. But it once represented a period-specific American grandiosity that felt synonymous with Texan pride. In the '80s and early '90s, plenty of us watching Dallas bought into this mythical vision of Texas as the heart of the country, the last frontier, a land of handsome cowboys galloping across the grassy ranchland, home of the freest and the bravest. Even the campaigns against littering (Don't Mess With Texas!) felt a little menacing, faintly mimicking America's cold-war foreign policy. Reagan tapped into this Lone Star love affair with his frequent allusions to the frontier spirit and near-constant appearances on horseback, waving and smiling like Roy Rogers. His Hollywood-friendly cowboy routine helped pave the way for the far less charismatic Texas oil millionaire George H. W. Bush, who made the best of his home address, despite the fact that he couldn't quite shake the Kennebunkport mud from his rubber galoshes.

In the past decade, though, the bloom came off Texas's yellow rose, as J. R.'s cartoon of provincial arrogance seemed to shove its way into the real world. Between Enron's spectacular flameout, Dick Cheney's South Texas shooting accident and George W. Bush's good-old-boy recklessness on an international stage, it seemed best to forget the Alamo. And this was all long before Rick Perry, the Texas governor, struggled to form simple sentences behind the Republican debate lectern.

Perhaps it's no surprise, then, that in the new Southfork, bourbon-fueled outbursts have been replaced by nonchalant wheeling and dealing. I'll need $75,000 for the driller, Elena tells Sue Ellen, who, like all of the other characters on the show, seems to strike up major business partnerships after a minimal exchange of pleasantries. (I'll have it transferred into your account today, Sue Ellen replies. Thank you, Sue Ellen. My pleasure.) Instead of settling the clashing obligations of family and business with poolside fisticuffs, today's Ewings consistently prioritize the entrepreneurial over the personal. Christopher offers Elena, a former girlfriend, a $20,000 check after they work together to make sure there's never any legal dispute about who owns what. And John Ross asks Elena, If I agree to go back in business with you, what about us? One step at a time, she replies, making it clear that money should always come before love. The assumption that extreme ambition and avarice are natural for young and old alike and that moneymaking schemes take precedence over all else looms over this story like a noxious cloud.

Maybe this is the version of Dallas that we deserve. Amid the swirl of news about the wobbly Facebook initial public offering and a $2 billion loss for JPMorgan Chase within just six weeks, TNT's fantastical tale of rich kids free to pursue their wildest, riskiest, most expensive dreams fits the current times just as well as the original Dallas fit Reagan's America.

So why do I feel a whiff of nostalgia for the stifling nightmares of Southfork, for Sue Ellen swilling liquor and slurring her words, for J. R. chuckling malevolently at his little brother? At least it was obvious that those characters were meant to echo our worst selves and that they would pay a price for their recklessness. When faced with the soulless, fast-moving ciphers of the new Dallas, I find it hard not to prefer trapped people with bad hair and big problems, knocking over lamps and spilling their drinks on the rug. They may have believed that they were first and best, but they never thought for a second that they were free.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/03/ma...ref=television
post #79808 of 93852
TV Review
'Longmire' is an unrushed law enforcement drama
Stars Robert Taylor as a Wyoming sheriff and Katee Sackhoff as his fresh-from-Philly-homicide deputy. Their chemistry is promising.
By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times - June 2, 2012

If the success of History's recent miniseries "Hatfields & McCoys" is any indication, it's still tough to beat a good tale from the frontier. Whether emanating from an iPhone or a 90-inch flat screen, there's something about hoofbeats stirring up mountainous mulch and men in big hats meting out justice that twangs the American heartstrings deep and true.

Though set in the modern west, A&E's new law enforcement drama "Longmire" (Sunday at 10 p.m.) hits many of the same notes. A place of flat plains edged with pine-crowded mountains, Absaroka County, Wyoming, still answers to its sheriff, one Walt Longmire (Robert Taylor). Where his forebears once spit tobacco, he picks up litter, but the watchful squint and laconic lyricism conspire to make him an American icon (never mind that Taylor is an Australian) and offer viewers a hero that should appeal equally to fans of Tom Selleck's Jesse Stone and Dennis Weaver's "McCloud."

It's a slow-moving show, to judge by the pilot; the camera, like the sheriff, takes pleasure in Big Sky country when it can and refuses to be rushed when surveying a crime scene or a witness. Fortunately, one of Longmire's deputies, Vic Moretti, is played to ponytailed perfection by Katee Sackhoff, which should bring the youngsters around for a look-see. We hear her before we see her, in a series of answering machine messages Longmire carries no cellphone as she tries to shake her boss out of bed and up the mountain where trouble is brewing among the sheep herds and hunters. Trouble that quickly becomes more serious than it first appears, involving a rogues gallery of local characters, including Longmire's best friend Henry Standing Bear (Lou Diamond Phillips), the hatefully ambitious deputy Branch (Bailey Chase) and an ongoing turf war between Longmire and police officials of the local reservation.

The mystery in the pilot is mildly interesting but plot is clearly not the point here. Based on the novels by Craig Johnson and written by John Coveny, "Longmire" is an evocation of place and character, a reminder that not every crime is committed in a big city and not every police force is run by homicide detectives and/or special-interest consultants, be they novelists, psychics, forensic anthropologists or assorted geeks. Six months out of Philadelphia homicide Vic serves as the citified acolyte to Longmire's prairie prophet the sheriff's first clue when he turns over the victim's body is that it belongs to someone he does not know, a rare thing in Absaroka County.

Where Longmire strides, Vic bounces, and though Sackhoff doesn't have quite enough to do in the pilot, the chemistry between the two will no doubt be the river running through the show. While anything can happen over time in a TV series, their relationship appears remarkably, and mercifully, free of sexual or even romantic tension, despite their being the two best-looking people in the county and probably the state. (No offense meant, citizens of Wyoming.)

The reasons Vic has ditched Philly for the Old West are not given in the pilot, which is promising for future episodes, and though she complains about the sheep and the snow and Longmire not respecting her talent, she seems happy enough to do her job and keep a sympathetic eye on her boss.

For Longmire is nursing that deep essential sorrow we too often demand of our heroes. His wife died the year before, and despite the pleas of his grown daughter Cady (Cassidy Freeman), he is loath to let her go.

How, and if, a man can heal his own heart is the question "Longmire" sets out to answer with steady tread and shoulders squared. It's an old-fashioned sort of show, working unapologetically toward wisdom rather than cleverness, attempting to depict its setting as neither romantic nor dismal, the local color rising as much from silence as words. No one banters in "Longmire"; they speak.

And when that doesn't work, they shoot.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...,4094393.story
post #79809 of 93852
TV Notes
No Retrial For Nicollette Sheridan Desperate Housewives' Case, Appeals Court Rules
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Jun. 2, 2012

The pending retrial of Nicollette Sheridan's Desperate Housewives wrongful dismissal case has been put on ice by the California Court of Appeals. In a ruling issued Friday the court said, it is further ordered that the retrial currently set for September 10 is hereby stayed pending further order of the court. The appeals court ruling seems to agree with defendant Touchstone Television Productions and ABC Studios that it is not wrongful termination under state law when a contract renewal is not exercised. However, Sheridan's lawyer Mark Baute points out the court order notes the case can be examined under Occupational Safety and Health Administration's labor code violations. Baute also says the court wants the wrongful termination claim more fully laid out and he will be filing those briefs soon. The temporary stay is designed to clarify and resolve those issues before the September trial starts, says Baute. Adam Levin, ABC's main lawyer in the case, did not respond to a request for comment. A hearing is set for August 9 for trial Judge Elizabeth Allen White to make her case for a retrial.

Sheridan's first case against Touchstone, ABC Studios, ABC Entertainment and Desperate Housewives' Executive Producer Marc Cherry ended in a mistrial on March 19 when the jury was deadlocked. Cherry was dismissed as a defendant before the end of the first trial and would not have been a defendant in any retrial. Sheridan has contended that her character was suddenly killed off in early 2009 because of complaints she made over an alleged head-hitting incident on the Desperate Housewives set with executive producer and series creator Cherry on Sept. 24, 2008. The three weeks of the first trial saw a parade of former ABC executives, such as former ABC Entertainment President Steve McPherson and former ABC Studios boss Mark Pedowitz, and both Sheridan and Cherry, among others, take the stand. Desperate Housewives aired its final episode on May 13, 2012.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/03/ma...ref=television
post #79810 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

CNN does the terrible thing of reporting news, while the others are just as interested if not more so in creating news. I notice it more and more, the big ratings go to the channels that seem to interject their opinion in the reporting and blur the line between news and opinion. of course that's just my opinion

that sounds about right - but I think they got slapped around pretty good [sued] during the Richard Jewell stuff and since have pulled all conjecture out of their reporting - at least that's how it seems to me. But I agree that it softens the blow of their message.
post #79811 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by mscottc View Post

Oh... we appreciate you, We appreciate every viewer that likes a good, well told, informative news story. That's us at 60 MINUTES.

I seem to remember sitting in our family's livng room in the late 60's one Sunday night when this new program called 60 minutes came on for the first time. At least that's what I remember. Did I get it right?
post #79812 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by javry View Post

I seem to remember sitting in our family's livng room in the late 60's one Sunday night when this new program called 60 minutes came on for the first time. At least that's what I remember. Did I get it right?

Partially right. Sixty Minutes did indeed start in 1968, however it originally premiered on Tuesday evenings and at 10pm on alternating weeks. It wasn't for a few years till the mid 70s that 60 found it's Sunday evening post football home. And from there the ratings skyrocketed.
post #79813 of 93852
I was going to quote 1968 but was afraid the year would be wrong. Well at least I got some of it right. That's one of my bigger memories. How the years have flown by.
post #79814 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

They're ALL biased. End of story.

You are correct. They are, one way or another. It is HOW they deal with their human bias in their reporting that I care about.

Certainly at the national level, it has become fashionable to show your bias in either direction, I don't care what organization you work for. Ratings are based on that these days. I don't think that is right. Call me old fashion. Cronkite was as liberal as Olbermann, but you never got that from his reporting. That is why he is remembered as a great journalist. My personal favorite was another liberal named Edward R. Murrow. Again, when it came to straight reporting, he kept his opinions to himself, but on news magazine shows like "See it Now", the forerunner of "60 Minutes", he did allow his bias to show through on occasion. His expose on Sen Joseph McCarthy in 1954 was the first time a bias was shown, (and gave CBS Chairman Bill Paley heart palpitations for months after) but then even Murrow was careful in using McCarthy's own words to tell the story, but still be fair how it was presented. That is the element that is missing today, fair presentation.

Personally, as someone who gets a paycheck from the "Fourth Estate", I don't partially like it. As Joe Friday used to say, "Just the facts, ma'am" is all I want from my news, local or national. I would rather see the news segments stay straight news. The option segments, knock yourself out on bias. Newspapers have had that line in the sand for hundreds of years until the last 10 or so and it worked well. TV has gone from hardly any bias to that is just about all there is. There needs to be a balance. There isn't.

IMO, CNN has tried to play it too straight with very little opinion and during prime mostly entertainment news (King/Morgan)and straight politics, while MSNBC has gone total bias in all segments, and FNC has gone ultra bias during the opinion segments (Primetime) and does allow a little bias thrown in the regular reporting segments throughout the day (Shep's throwdown on the bridge during Katrina being one that constantly keeps coming back). It looks to me that CNN is going to have to put in some kind of opinion programming to counter MSNBC and FNC if they want to have better ratings than what they have.

At the local level, most stations really do not want bias in the reporting. It hurts the bottom line too much. I was in a meeting the other day where it was once again reiterated that we report news, we don't create it or slant it. It has all to do with creditability in the community. You lose cred and you lose money. It is that simple.

Just my point of view.
post #79815 of 93852
Foxeng,
What you are saying seems to be true IMHO. Most old guard broadcast news does indeed try to be unbiased. The key word being "try." But all these news organization are made of human beings who do have beliefs, whether they be liberal, conservative or some other flavor, and one can't help but realize that they sneak into the work product on occasion. Like you, while not responsible for content, just the technology to help create and move that content, I have witnessed many instances that prove that the actual content creators do strive for facts and fairness. I've also been there when they've failed miserably. Yes, I helped put the 60 MINUTES II Bush, Texas Air National Guard story on the air.

I can not on any regular basis watch FOX or MSNBC. FOX because I cringe when I hear the thoughts expressed, MSNBC simply because, while I agree with most of the views expressed, I don't want to be spoon-fed what is basically sugar for me, I want real facts that make me understand there are two sides to every story. CNN on the other hand, just seems to keep repeating the same stuff over and over again, so that too is rarely viewed by me.

What I personally appreciate about both The CBS Evening News, and NBC Nightly News, both of which I TiVo, is that they both provide a very good 22 minute package of the day's news along with some other information. There is little redundancy in either broadcast, and I know both are products that are thought out over the day, or days leading up (for the softer stories), and not just slapped together as the broadcasts are on the air. They're not perfect, but they are perhaps the most efficient usage of my TV news viewing time. And again, I have faith that there is a strong effort to be a "just the facts" presentation.
post #79816 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

looks to me that CNN is going to have to put in some kind of opinion programming to counter MSNBC and FNC if they want to have better ratings than what they have.

I hope that doesn't happen. CNN fills a need - they're at least trying to play it down the middle. There has to be someplace where you can go to "Joe Friday" it: just the facts, ma'am.

I think the public in general regards CNN in that way, whether one personally believes it or not. Their ratings surge during crises periods when people just want to find out what's going on. I must confess that's the only time I watch it.

But then during the in-between periods, people want a little more entertainment, a little more showtime as foxeng mentions. That's okay; I'd rather have them there when I need them than have to rely on a filtered message when the real news happens. Sources of credible information are essential to the health of a democracy, and in this new internet age where misinformation can spread like wildfire it's important to have somebody who's at least trying to tell it like it really is.

CNN is still on the TV's out in the public arena for the most part, so people are still aware of it and still absent mindedly watch the commercials while they're waiting on their plane or their lunch or something. So I would think there's enough value in the brand to keep them on the air and their operations sufficiently funded. As long as they don't lose money, maybe that's enough. Let the ratings chips fall where they will and soldier on.
post #79817 of 93852
FRIDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media INsight's Blog.

SATURDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media INsight's Blog.
post #79818 of 93852
Obituary
Richard Dawson, Host of 'Family Feud,' Dies at 79
By Jane Kellogg, The Hollywood Reporter - Jun. 3, 2012

TV staple Richard Dawson, the Emmy Award-winning original host of Family Feud, as well as Hogan's Heroes' Corporal Peter Newkirk, died Saturday. He was 79.

“It is with a very heavy heart that I inform you that my father passed away this evening from complications due to esophageal cancer," the legendary TV comedian's son Gary posted to Facebook early Sunday morning. "He was surrounded by his family. He was an amazing talent, a loving husband, a great dad, and a doting grandfather. He will be missed but always remembered…”

The British actor died from complications related to esophageal cancer at Ronald Reagan Memorial hospital, according to his son.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...bituary-332426
post #79819 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Now, now, now. They're all guilty of that depending on your perspective. And, yes, I speak as a trained journalist (though I never went into news work). I learned from the best. And "the best" still shake their heads at the heavy slants we see, today. Including CNN. Read Bernard Goldberg, sometime.

More likely, in a medium of images, CNN chooses the wrong ones. I still say preference of news networks has less to do with bias and more to do with images. Pretty pictures, flashy graphics, conversational style done by attractive people. It wins every time. Local stations learned this a LONG time ago. CNN missed the memo. Sorry, but Wolf and Candy scare people. Shep and Megyn don't. For that matter, Robin Meade is easy on the eyes, but HLN gets the redheaded stepchild treatment. Otherwise, HLN would beat its sister station most of the day. They do a better job.

You can argue pretty people and production values. Sadly, it's style over substance when you're going for a mass audience. ...but let's not get a bias war going. They're ALL biased. End of story.

I'll counter your Wolf and Candy with Erin and Anderson. But I don't think that either Erin or AC are burning up the ratings charts. It just seems like CNN has been directionless in their programming for the last several years.
post #79820 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by URFloorMatt View Post

CNN has the best sets, I'd say. Hate the new graphics though. Loved the old minimalist look.

My problem with CNN is that the anchors are either completely disinterested in the story (because it is beyond banal, especially during the daytime hours) or speak to the viewer as if either he/she the anchor has only a first grade education or the viewer does.

Say what you will about Fox and MSNBC, but just about every anchor on either network believes that his show is the most important on television and his viewers the most informed, and treats them as such. CNN acts as if the only news consumption any of its viewers gets is from Access Hollywood or People magazine.

I would agree. FNC and MSNBC anchors seem to be more into their stories.
post #79821 of 93852
Commentary
Perspective: The tyranny of Puttnam's Law in American culture
Producer-turned-mogul David Puttnam's brief foray into upending the status quo shows that in Hollywood and elsewhere it doesn't pay to fail boldly, much to the detriment of the creative spirit.
By Neal Gabler, Los Angeles Times - June 3, 2012

When it comes to contemporary American culture, its slogan ought to be "same old same-old." Same old movies — one bombastic comic book adventure after another. Same old TV shows — one "Friends" clone after another, from "How I Met your Mother" to "Happy Endings" to "Whitney" to "Men at Work." Same old journalism. Same old politics. There are, of course, outliers and renegades, but there seem to be fewer of them nowadays, and they are just that: outliers. For all the obsession with the new and different, we seem to be living within déjÃ* vu.

If you are looking for an explanation for this cultural gravitational pull that drags everything to the predictable center, it may very well be what one might label "Puttnam's Law" after David Puttnam, the British film producer. Puttnam's Law should take its place alongside Murphy's Law (anything that can go wrong will go wrong), Parkinson's Law (work expands to fill the time available to complete it) and the Peter Principle (a person rises to the level of his or her incompetence) as a basic tenet of modern life. Indeed, if you understand Puttnam's Law, you will understand a great deal about the cultural poverty that surrounds us.

Puttnam was regarded by many as the savior of the British film industry in the early 1980s — he won the best picture Oscar for "Chariots of Fire" — when Columbia Pictures, then under the ownership ofCoca Cola Co., decided to tap him as its head of production in 1986. It was a bold move. Puttnam was known for making small prestige pictures, Hollywood for making bloated commercial ones. And Puttnam not only embraced the difference; he touted it. No sooner had he taken office than he issued a manifesto in which he excoriated the "tyranny of the box office" and the "lowest common denominator of public taste" to which Hollywood had so often pitched its films. To say he was a maverick would have been an understatement.

And so Puttnam roared through Hollywood. In short order, he attacked the talent agents who at the time virtually ran the entertainment industry, dismissed one of Columbia's prime producers, Ray Stark, and reviled stars who, he lamented, made exorbitant salaries that he felt extorted the studios. He even disdained making "Ghostbusters II," a surefire hit, albeit one at a steep cost. Instead, he announced a slate of 22 films at an average budget of $11 million — the sorts of films on which he had made his reputation — on the theory that no single movie could bankrupt the studio and that a few hits could greatly enrich it.

So what happened? Puttnam so threatened the status quo that barely a year after taking the job and before a single film from his slate was even released, he was unceremoniously forced out of the studio, though he would claim to have left of his own volition. He had made a lot more enemies in Hollywood than friends, but even so there was an inordinate amount of schadenfreude at his demise. The consensus was that Puttnam was an arrogant fool. If he had only kept his mouth shut and made the typical big-budget movies, he probably could have remained at the studio even if his movies bombed — his successor, Victor Kaufman, had made those sorts of movies at Tri-Star and still got the promotion — because everybody in Hollywood made those movies. Puttnam's crime was not in failing — but in failing by doing something no one else in Hollywood would have done.

Thus Puttnam's Law: It is more acceptable to fail in conventional ways than in unconventional ways. And its corollary: The reward for succeeding in unconventional ways is less than the risk of failing in unconventional ways. In short, you can screw up with impunity so long as you screw up like everybody else.

This is not only the iron law of the entertainment industry. It is the iron law of life. No one wants to be caught out on a limb for fear of having it sawed off behind him. Or put another way, there is safety in numbers even if there isn't necessarily wisdom. When Matthew Weiner wrote his"Mad Men"pilot and then went around pitching it, he was told repeatedly that it was unsalable because it was set in period and because its protagonist was unhappy and flawed, which is to say, it was unsalable because it wasn't like anything else on television.

(Of course "Mad Men" eventually did get made and is still a hit. At least AMC had the fortitude to break from the herd.)

When NBC decided to replace Jay Leno on "The Tonight Show," despite his high ratings, withConan O'Brien because everyone in television hungered after a younger demographic, no heads rolled even as the ratings were crashing. It was the acceptable move. But when NBC, trying to pacify Leno, then put him in the 10 o'clock slot, that was a crime because no other network would have done such a thing.

When New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick opted to go for a first down deep in his own territory two seasons ago in a critical game against the Indianapolis Colts rather than punt, as just about every other coach would have done, he suffered endless ridicule.

There is a scene in Alexandra Pelosi's documentary aboutGeorge W. Bush's 2000 presidential campaign, "Journeys With George," in which a reporter rises from his desk at the end of the day in a press room filled with other reporters and asks, "What is our story today?" In other words: What are they all going to be writing? One might think that reporters might strive to look for the odd angle or the unreported element — to separate themselves from the pack. You'd be wrong. That's Puttnam's Law.

Thus, even when you are wrong, you have the defense of working within the consensus. When you are wrong outside the consensus, you have no defense. You are on your own. That's Puttnam's Law again.

Puttnam's Law is also readily applicable to politics and economics. Woe betide the politician who proposes something new and different, which is why Mitt Romney is still peddling tax cuts, even though they demonstrably failed in the Bush administration, and why President Obama followed a war plan in Afghanistan that was essentially forged by consensus and that changed only when the consensus changed. Puttnam's Law also helps explain why Wall Street geniuses who should have known better pursued high-risk strategies that brought on the Great Recession and continue to pursue them, as JP Morgan recently showed. Everybody did it. The prudent ones were the outliers, and where are they now?

To be fair, America has long been in the grip of Puttnam's Law. Conformity is comfort. Early in the 19th century Tocqueville remarked, "I know of no country in which there is so little independence of mind and real freedom of discussion as in America." But the law operates with greater force now because the culture has become so status- and success-conscious at its upper echelons that there is more at stake by risking independence, and because mass culture itself intensifies the fear of being different. For all our vaunted individualism, majority not only rules in America; it rules with an iron hand.

It is often said of Hollywood that it is like high school with money, meaning there is the same childish fixation on status. But when it comes to peer pressure as well, that joke is sadly accurate about nearly every sector of respectable adult life. Most people prefer self-protection to the risk of being ostracized. As a result, we increasingly live in retreat from anything that is daring, exciting or different because what would the other kids think if we didn't all do what they were doing? So there is a monotony in American mainstream culture, an overwhelming sense of groupthink, for which there is no punishment save the awful damage it wreaks on our national imagination and on our sense of creative adventure.

And that's Puttnam's Law.

Gabler, author of "An Empire of Their Own: How the Jews Invented Hollywood," "Walt Disney: The Triumph of the American Imagination" and other books, is a senior fellow at the Norman Lear Center at USC. He is writing a biography of the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...0,672709.story
post #79822 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Obituary
Richard Dawson, Host of 'Family Feud,' Dies at 79
By Jane Kellogg, The Hollywood Reporter - Jun. 3, 2012

TV staple Richard Dawson, the Emmy Award-winning original host of Family Feud, as well as Hogan's Heroes' Corporal Peter Newkirk, died Saturday. He was 79.

16 years to the day after Ray Combs committed suicide.
post #79823 of 93852
TV Notes
They’re Pretty, Normal and in Wheelchairs
By Megan Angelo, The New York Times - Jun. 3, 2012

The first few moments of the pitch tape that landed on the desk of the Sundance Channel’s general manager last fall verged on mundane, in terms of reality TV: four women seated at an outdoor brunch table, breezily gabbing.

“I thought, ‘All right, they’re beautiful, but how is this right for us?’ ” said the executive, Sarah Barnett. “Then the camera pulled back, and I saw they were all in wheelchairs.”

Maybe Ms. Barnett should have seen the twist coming: the pitch, for the series “Push Girls,” which begins Monday at 10 p.m., had come from Gay Rosenthal, the producer whose résumé includes “Little People, Big World,” the TLC series about little and average-sized members of an Oregon family, and “Ruby,” the Style network show that followed a formerly 500-pound Georgia woman.

Ms. Rosenthal’s programs have never had trouble attracting attention, some of it critical. Reviewing “Little People” for The New York Times, Virginia Heffernan wrote, “We get to stare at unusual bodies while pretending to do something good for us.”

It may be impossible to turn a lens on a group with defined physical differences without being called exploitative. In any case, Ms. Rosenthal is used to this and used to dismissing it. “A lot of people are cynical and just go to that place,” she said. “Fine. Say that. It’s not true. It could be, but we’re telling the story with respect.”

The “Push Girls” story began when Ms. Rosenthal met Angela Rockwood, a model and actress in Los Angeles, for lunch. A mutual friend had introduced them; Ms. Rosenthal was eager to profile Ms. Rockwood’s romantic relationship.

“I was married to sort of a celebrity at the time,” said Ms. Rockwood, who has been a quadriplegic since a 2001 car accident. She and that celebrity, the actor Dustin Nguyen (“21 Jump Street”), have since separated. “Gay really wanted to focus on our love story,” Ms. Rockwood said. “But I kept bringing up the girls.”

“The girls” are Ms. Rockwood’s circle of pretty, ambitious, wheelchair-using girlfriends. “They’re my world of how I deal with my paralysis,” Ms. Rockwood said in a telephone interview. She persuaded Ms. Rosenthal to meet them at her home. The producer planned on a quick drop-by. “Five hours later I was still there,” she said. “They’re amazing. I knew: This is the show.”

“Push Girls” focuses on Ms. Rockwood and three other women Ms. Rosenthal met that night: Auti Angel, Tiphany Adams and Mia Schaikewitz. Of the four, all but Ms. Schaikewitz, who suffered a spinal rupture, were paralyzed in car accidents. All live in the Los Angeles area and work in various fields (including graphic design and dance, as in dancing professionally in a wheelchair). And all spend far more time on camera reflecting on love, work and motherhood than they do discussing life with a wheelchair. (A telling moment from the show: Ms. Rockwood cold-calls modeling agencies while using her knuckles and mouth to work the phone.) Which brings us back to the brunch table and the element that Ms. Rosenthal said she hoped would keep viewers engaged.

“In the beginning, sure, there’s a gawk factor,” Ms. Rosenthal said, recalling the reception for “Little People, Big World” upon its debut in 2006. “People wanted to know, ‘How do they drive?’ Now, it’s just about a great mom and dad raising kids. With ‘Push Girls’ it’s four girlfriends juggling dating and babies and careers. Their lives are interesting, with a dramatic twist.”

That angle — young women just trying to figure it all out — was ultimately what sold Ms. Barnett. “I never thought, ‘Oh, we need to make a show about disability,’ ” she said. Rather: “There are so many shows in the scripted world about female friendship that I feel are finally accurate. But I didn’t see many in the unscripted space.”

It’s worth noting that unlike the tense casts of, say, Bravo’s “Real Housewives” series, the women on “Push Girls” are genuinely friends, not acquaintances hurriedly bundled together before shooting began. Ms. Rockwood met Ms. Angel at a rehab facility just days after Ms. Rockwood’s accident. Three years later she encountered Ms. Schaikewitz in an acting class. Ms. Rockwood has known Ms. Adams for four years; Ms. Rockwood invited her to go with the group to a concert shortly after Ms. Adams moved to the area. “She never thought she would have BFFs in wheelchairs,” Ms. Rockwood said.

But Ms. Adams clearly warmed to the idea: she and Ms. Rockwood are now roommates. Acceptance and adaptation are the real themes running beneath the show’s mimosa-and-gossip scenes. So the process doesn’t look too easy, Ms. Rosenthal has worked in a fifth character: Chelsie Hill, 20, whose paralyzing injury occurred more recently than that of the main characters. As Ms. Barnett said, “She doesn’t want to identify as someone who’s always going to be in a chair.”

That puts Ms. Hill, to some degree, in contrast with the other stars. In a later episode, Ms. Barnett said, “the question of ‘if you could walk again, would you?’ comes up, and the answer is not a resounding yes.” Ms. Rockwood in particular sees positive transformation in her paralysis. “Before my accident I wasn’t comfortable with my body,” she said. “I was a gym rat. Now I can’t hold in my little belly, and I have these noodle arms, but I feel sexy.”

Not that she’s interested in sugarcoating the full experience. Especially as she continues to pursue modeling gigs, Ms. Rockwood has become well-versed in how uncomfortable people can be interacting with a disabled person, and specifically how paralysis can devastate women. “It’s a huge thing for a woman to be able to walk and sashay,” she said. “You see that light dim.”

But she’s confident that, with the help of Ms. Rosenthal, “Push Girls” can restore some of that brightness. “I love Gay,” said Ms. Rockwood, who said she had no concerns about appearing in the series. “She already understands the formula of things people are not used to seeing.”

Ms. Rosenthal is more concerned with the people on the other end of that equation — her disabled stars and potential disabled viewers. “It’s so important to them, this message that we can live our lives to the fullest and have a positive outlook,” she said. “They’ve been waiting for this.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/03/ar...levision<br />
post #79824 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

16 years to the day after Ray Combs committed suicide.

Wow!
post #79825 of 93852
Thread Starter 
10 Million Page Views ! ! !

At about 10:30 p.m..m. ET on Thursday, May 31, 2012, “Hot Off The Press” (including both its first and second incarnations) hit 10,000,000 page views.

Special kudos go to long-time – and prolific -- posters Dad1153, dcowboy7, doubleDAZ, keenan, DrDon and foxeng. In particular,Dad’s tireless efforts the past 19 months have kept the thread vibrant, relevant -- and continuing to grow in page views month after month.

So please keep stopping by, and please link to the thread on your social media accounts, too.

And thanks again to all of you for continuing to visit, comment and – as well as for (mostly!) -- keeping the level of our discussions on a civil and adult level.

As a reminder of how much things have changed over these past almost seven years, here is the link to the very first posts back in August of 2004:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=440744
post #79826 of 93852
Wow! That's fantastic! Congratulations to everyone who has ever posted here!
post #79827 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Sorry, but Wolf and Candy scare people. Shep and Megyn don't.

Professorial, grandfatherly Wolf scares people? I find that hard to believe. Candy - well, she's deeply cynical, intelligent, informative, and not the vaccuformed 'beauty' sort that TV seems to prefer. So, yes, I guess she could be scary to some.

Shep's always been a bit scary, but he has mellowed of late, actually expressing some opinions that Rupert probably doesn't like. But Megyn - she scares the p*ss out of me. Scary is her shtick. If I saw her on the street, I'd head the other way. If I saw her come into the building where I work, I'd call security, while watching her to see if she was packing a weapon. She is good looking, though.
post #79828 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

16 years to the day after Ray Combs committed suicide.

That's very peculiar. An unfortunate coincidence.
post #79829 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredfa View Post

10 Million Page Views ! ! !

At about 10:30 p.m..m. ET on Thursday, May 31, 2012, Hot Off The Press (including both its first and second incarnations) hit 10,000,000 page views.

Special kudos go to long-time - and prolific -- posters Dad1153, dcowboy7, doubleDAZ, keenan, DrDon and foxeng. In particular,Dad's tireless efforts the past 19 months have kept the thread vibrant, relevant -- and continuing to grow in page views month after month.

So please keep stopping by, and please link to the thread on your social media accounts, too.

And thanks again to all of you for continuing to visit, comment and - as well as for (mostly!) -- keeping the level of our discussions on a civil and adult level.

As a reminder of how much things have changed over these past almost seven years, here is the link to the very first posts back in August of 2004:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthread.php?t=440744

Congratulations and thanks to you Fred, for the idea and all your effort in turning it into the mega-topic it's become.
post #79830 of 93852
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Obituary
Richard Dawson, Host of 'Family Feud,' Dies at 79
By Jane Kellogg, The Hollywood Reporter - Jun. 3, 2012

TV staple Richard Dawson, the Emmy Award-winning original host of Family Feud, as well as Hogan's Heroes' Corporal Peter Newkirk, died Saturday. He was 79.

It is with a very heavy heart that I inform you that my father passed away this evening from complications due to esophageal cancer," the legendary TV comedian's son Gary posted to Facebook early Sunday morning. "He was surrounded by his family. He was an amazing talent, a loving husband, a great dad, and a doting grandfather. He will be missed but always remembered

The British actor died from complications related to esophageal cancer at Ronald Reagan Memorial hospital, according to his son.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...bituary-332426

RIP Richard Dawson. You will be missed.
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