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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2745

post #82321 of 93688
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Edited by dad1153 - 9/30/12 at 9:04pm
post #82322 of 93688
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 24, 2012

SESAME STREET
PBS, Check Local Listings
SEASON PREMIERE:
Season 43 of Sesame Street begins with the introduction of a new recurring segment: Elmo the Musical, the replacement or Elmo’s World that has Elmo imagining how to make math seem musical. And Elmo’s not the only one displaying an imagination: Other sketches on Sesame Street this season include – ready? – Birdwalk Empire and Upside Downton Abbey. Gotta love it.

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER
CBS, 8:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
We pick up the new season just where we ended the old one, with the surprise, or at least surprising, wedding of Barney and Robin.

PARTNERS
CBS, 8:30 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
I’m not totally sold on this sitcom, by any means, but former Ugly Betty player Michael Urie sparkles with the confidence and radiance of a true TV star. For our critics’ takes on this new series, see out TVWW Fall Preview Page – and for a full review, see Ed Bark’s Uncle Barky’s Bytes.

AMERICAN MASTERS: "THE DAY CARL SANDBURG DIED"
PBS, 10:00 p.m. ET

Paul Bonesteel’s biographical film relies heavily upon Carl Sandburg’s own words, as he spoke them, to shape this study of the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet, and it’s all the better for its liberal use of interviews, recorded readings and songbook selections. For more on the documentary, see Tom Brinkmoeller's Raised on MTM. Check local listings.

CASTLE
ABC, 10:01 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
Castle and Beckett are now an item. What that means, as this new season begins, is exactly what we’re all about to find out.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #82323 of 93688
Emmy Notes
2012 Primetime Emmys Winners’ List
‘Modern Family’, ‘Homeland’, ‘Game Change’, Kevin Costner, Julianne Moore, ‘Daily Show’, Claire Danes, Damian Lewis
By the Deadline.com Team - Sep. 23, 2012

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Comedy Series
Eric Stonestreet
as Cameron Tucker
Modern Family

ABC; Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television

Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series
Louis C.K.
, Written by
Louie, “Pregnant”

FX Networks; Pig Newton, Inc. in association with FX Productions

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Comedy Series
Julie Bowen
as Claire Dunphy
Modern Family

ABC; Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television

Outstanding Directing For A Comedy Series
Steven Levitan
, Director
Modern Family, “Baby On Board”

ABC; Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television
Steven Levitan, Director

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series
Jon Cryer
as Alan Harper
Two And A Half Men

CBS; Chuck Lorre Productions Inc., The Tannenbaum Company in association with Warner Bros. Television

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Comedy Series
Julia Louis-Dreyfus
as Selina Meyer
Veep

HBO; Dundee Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

Outstanding Reality-Competition Program
The Amazing Race

CBS; World Race Productions Inc.
Bertram van Munster, Executive Producer
Elise Doganieri, Executive Producer
Jerry Bruckheimer, Executive Producer
Jonathan Littman, Executive Producer
Mark Vertullo, Executive Producer
Dan Coffie, Co-Executive Producer
Giselle Parets, Co-Executive Producer
Phil Keoghan, Co-Executive Producer
Michael Norton, Supervising Producer
Matt Schmidt, Supervising Producer
Patrick Cariaga, Supervising Producer
Michael Miller, Supervising Producer
Darren Bunkley, Senior Producer
Chad Baron, Senior Producer
Neil Jahss, Senior Producer

Outstanding Host For A Reality Or Reality-Competition Program
Tom Bergeron
, Host
Dancing With The Stars

ABC; BBC Worldwide Productions

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Drama Series
Aaron Paul
as Jesse Pinkman
Breaking Bad

AMC; Sony Pictures Television

Outstanding Writing for a Drama Series
Alex Gansa, Written by
Howard Gordon, Written by
Gideon Raff, Written by
Homeland, pilot

Showtime; Showtime Presents, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21

Outstanding Supporting Actress In A Drama Series
Maggie Smith as Violet
, Dowager Countess of Grantham
Downton Abbey

PBS; A Carnival / Masterpiece Co-Production

Outstanding Directing For A Drama Series
Tim Van Patten
, Director
Boardwalk Empire, “To The Lost”

HBO; Leverage, Closest to the Hole Productions, Sikelia Productions and Cold Front Productions in association with HBO Entertainment

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Drama Series
Damian Lewis
as Nicholas Brody
Homeland

Showtime; Showtime Presents, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Drama Series
Claire Danes
as Carrie Mathison
Homeland

Showtime; Showtime Presents, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21

Outstanding Writing For A Variety Special
Louis C.K.
, Written by
Louis C.K. Live At The Beacon Theatre

FX Networks; Pig Newton, Inc. in association with FX Productions

Outstanding Directing For A Variety Special
Glenn Weiss
, Director
65th Annual Tony Awards

CBS; White Cherry Entertainment in association with Tony Award Productions

Outstanding Variety Series
The Daily Show With Jon Stewart

Comedy Central; Central Productions, LLC
Jon Stewart, Executive Producer/Host
Rory Albanese, Executive Producer
Kahane Cooperman, Co-Executive Producer
Steve Bodow, Co-Executive Producer
Jennifer Flanz, Co-Executive Producer
Adam Lowitt, Co-Executive Producer
Jim Margolis, Co-Executive Producer
Pamela DePace, Supervising Producer
Hillary Kun, Supervising Producer
Timothy Greenberg, Supervising Producer
Stuart Miller, Supervising Producer
Jill Katz, Producer

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or A Movie
Jessica Lange
as Constance Langdon
American Horror Story

FX Networks; Twentieth Century Fox Television

Outstanding Supporting Actor In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Tom Berenger
as Jim Vance
Hatfields & McCoys

HISTORY; Thinkfactory Media in association with History

Outstanding Writing For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Dramatic Special
Danny Strong
, Written by
Game Change

HBO; Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

Outstanding Lead Actress In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Julianne Moore
as Sarah Palin
Game Change

HBO • Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

Outstanding Directing For A Miniseries, Movie Or A Dramatic Special
Jay Roach
, Director
Game Change

HBO; Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films

Outstanding Lead Actor In A Miniseries Or A Movie
Kevin Costner
as ‘Devil’ Anse Hatfield
Hatfields & McCoys

HISTORY • Thinkfactory Media in association with History

Outstanding Miniseries or Movie
Game Change

HBO • Playtone and Everyman Pictures in association with HBO Films
Tom Hanks, Executive Producer
Gary Goetzman, Executive Producer
Jay Roach, Executive Producer
Danny Strong, Co-Executive Producer
Steven Shareshian, Co-Executive Producer
Amy Sayres, Produced By

Outstanding Drama Series
Homeland

Showtime; Showtime Presents, Teakwood Lane Productions, Cherry Pie Productions, Keshet, Fox 21
Alex Gansa, Executive Producer
Howard Gordon, Executive Producer
Michael Cuesta, Executive Producer
Gideon Raff, Executive Producer
Avi Nir, Executive Producer
Ran Tellem, Executive Producer
Chip Johannessen, Co-Executive Producer
Alexander Cary, Co-Executive Producer
Michael Klick, Produced By

Outstanding Comedy Series
Modern Family

ABC; Levitan-Lloyd Productions in association with Twentieth Century Fox Television
Steven Levitan, Executive Producer
Christopher Lloyd, Executive Producer
Danny Zuker, Executive Producer
Dan O’Shannon, Executive Producer
Bill Wrubel, Executive Producer
Paul Corrigan, Executive Producer
Brad Walsh, Executive Producer
Jeff Morton, Co-Executive Producer
Jeffery Richman, Co-Executive Producer
Abraham Higginbotham, Co-Executive Producer
Cindy Chupack, Co-Executive Producer
Chris Smirnoff, Producer


http://www.deadline.com/2012/09/2012-primetime-emmys-winners-list/
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Critic's Notes
'Homeland' and 'Modern Family' dominate — one surprisingly, one not
It was a night of unexpected drama winners and repeaters everywhere else
By Alan Sepinwall, HitFix.com Team - Sep. 23, 2012

I always say that the easiest way to win an Emmy is to have already won an Emmy, and the 2012 Emmy Awards seemed to be going out of their way to prove me right. Twenty-five awards were handed out over the three-hour ceremony, and only eight of them went to people or shows that hadn't won an Emmy before. The first seven in a row went to past winners, and eight of the first nine.

It got to the point where, when "The Daily Show" won its tenth consecutive Emmy as the best variety, music or comedy series, presenter Ricky Gervais moaned, "Not again," and Jon Stewart ended his acceptance speech by saying, "Years from now, when the Earth is just a burning husk and aliens come to visit, they will find a box of these, and they will know just how predictable these (bleeping) things are."

But it was a night when one of the genres honored had some real surprises to offer. "Modern Family" may have predictably won every award for which it was nominated, but very few people(*) were picking Showtime's "Homeland" to dominate the drama categories. "Homeland" won not only for Claire Danes' performance — the safest bet of the night after a "Modern Family" win for Outstanding Comedy Series — but Damian Lewis beat out Bryan Cranston, Jon Hamm and the rest of the heavyweights in the drama lead acting category, the "Homeland" pilot script beat out three different "Mad Men" episodes for best drama writing, and "Homeland" became the first show to beat "Mad Men" for Outstanding Drama Series, a category the AMC drama had won for the first four years of its existence. (Had the streak continued this year, "Mad Men" would have passed "Hill Street Blues," "L.A. Law' and "The West Wing" for the most wins ever in the category.)

(*) Credit where it's due: Fienberg (who live-blogged the whole show) was one of those people, in that he predicted "Homeland" for both writing and drama series, and said Lewis had a shot to win if "Homeland" was a juggernaut.

On a night when Emmy director Glenn Weiss ruthlessly had the orchestra play over any winner whose speech ran long — including his own, when he won for directing the Tony Awards — "Homeland" showrunner Alex Gansa began his drama series acceptance speech by saying, "I don't know when they're going to cut me off, but this is the biggest night of my career. I'm going to keep talking until they do. I want to start by congratulating Showtime on its first best series Emmy ever."

Danes was a mortal lock to win for her work as bipolar CIA analyst Carrie Mathison. As liberated prisoner of war Nicholas Brody, Lewis had the less flashy part — he had to keep us guessing on whether Brody had been turned in captivity — but was just as impressive in his own way. I had hoped that if anyone was going to break "Breaking Bad" star Bryan Cranston's own seemingly unstoppable Emmy streak, it would be Jon Hamm from "Mad Men" — who, like his co-stars, has yet to win an Emmy for acting on the show(**) — but I can't complain about Lewis, who's been doing tremendous work on television dating back to his lead performance in HBO's "Band of Brothers."

(**) Technically, a "Mad Men" actor did win an Emmy, but it was Danny Strong, who played copywriter Danny Siegel in the show's fourth season and won here for writing the script to HBO's Sarah Palin film "Game Change." Maybe Hamm or Christina Hendricks need to get into writing, too?

Many categories had results where you could say, "yeah, but…" In the drama supporting actor category, for instance, I wanted to see Giancarlo Esposito win in his first and only shot for playing iconic "Breaking Bad" villain Gus Fring, but I can't object to his co-star Aaron Paul (who won this award the last time he was eligible two years ago) getting another trophy for what's consistently one of the best performances on television. Or I wanted "Breaking Bad" creator Vince Gilligan to win for directing last season's insane final episode, but Tim Van Patten's Emmy-winning work on the "Boardwalk Empire" season 2 finale was great, too.

As for the "Homeland" drama series win, I would rank its debut season third behind "Breaking Bad" season 4 and "Mad Men" season 5, but there's no denying that it was a thrilling, excellently-crafted year of TV, and one that obviously struck a chord with Emmy voters. (The voters have honored "Breaking Bad" actors, but seem reluctant to embrace the series as a whole, in the same way they keep not recognizing the "Mad Men" cast.)

Things were less exciting on the comedy side of things — at least if you agree with me that "Modern Family" had a very uneven season that too frequently settled for repeating the same character quirks over and over again. In particular, I felt the show ruined Cam, who had once been my favorite character, by asking Eric Stonestreet to play the same overly sensitive/dramatic note again and again and again; that Stonestreet won his second Emmy in three tries suggests things will not change this season. Julie Bowen beat out co-star Sofia Vergara for the second year in a row, co-creator Steven Levitan won for directing the season finale, and when the show won its third Outstanding Comedy Series trophy in a row, Levitan said everyone on the show considers themselves "Lucky not only to have jobs in these challenging times, but to have jobs we love with people we love."

Julia Louis-Dreyfus won an Emmy for her third different comedy series, this time for "Veep" (after "Seinfeld" and "The New Adventures of Old Christine"), and while she's excellent in that role, Amy Poehler should have won for her work on "Parks and Recreation." (And for the second year in a row, Poehler got the biggest laughs with a pre-planned comedy bit, this time pretending to switch her acceptance speech with Louis-Drefys while giving her a congratulatory hug.) Jon Cryer won the comedy lead actor award after getting promoted out of the supporting category (where he had previously won) thanks to a strong submission episode where his character has a heart attack — once again illustrating how strange it is to honor someone we've watched for an entire season of television on the basis of a single episode.

"Something has clearly gone terribly wrong," Cryer said, self-deprecating. "I am stunned. I did not actually win this. This did not happen."

Louis C.K. (who had shared an Emmy as a member of "The Chris Rock Show" writing staff in the '90s) won the comedy writing award for his work on FX's "Louie" (and another award for writing his Internet comedy special "Live at the Beacon Theater"). On the one hand, the episode he submitted (the season 2 premiere, "Pregnant") was easily the weakest of the five scripts in the category, and the award is allegedly for a single script. On the other hand, season 2 of "Louie" was an incredible achievement, and one that warranted recognition.

After the "Homeland" rout, the most surprising aspect of the night — and only modestly surprising, at best, given the subject matter and HBO's track record in these categories — was the success HBO had with "Game Change," which also won for Julianne Moore's performance as Palin, Jay Roach's direction, and the Outstanding Miniseries or Movie award. The movies/minis categories seemed to be a showdown between the old-fashioned success of History's "Hatfields & McCoys" and the modern excesses of FX's "American Horror Story," but those projects instead only won for their former movie star castmembers: Jessica Lange from "American Horror Story" and Kevin Costner and Tom Berenger (who seemed most surprised of all the nominees to get played off by the band) for "Hatfields."

Some other Emmy thoughts:

* Jimmy Kimmel had an uneven first turn as host. He wasn't as vicious as he often is in this kind of self-congratulatory setting — every year he rips ABC (and the other networks) to shreds at the network's upfront presentation to advertisers — but he got off some good lines and sketches, and he didn't disappear from the show in a way that some hosts do as the night moves along.

* Speaking of comedy bits that worked, hands up, everyone who wants AMC — or any network, for that matter — to greenlight "The Breaking Bad Show," with Mr. White and Jesse committing murder on their way to the fishing hole.

* The telecast got around the issue of whether to end the In Memoriam clip reel with Andy Griffith or Dick Clark by having Ron Howard deliver a separate tribute to his TV dad Griffith before leading into the clips. (Where I got the biggest chills from that great "M*A*S*H" clip where Harry Morgan as Colonel Potter toasts his dead comrades: "I drink to your memories. I loved you fellas, one and all." Clark was the bigger/more important star, but that would have been an awfully perfect note to end the clip package on.)

* Unless my brain just shut off at some point, the only category where we saw extended clips of the nominated performances was for drama lead actress. Odd planning, that; my guess is the show started to run ahead of schedule for a few minutes, then caught back up again.

http://www.hitfix.com/whats-alan-watching/emmys-2012-homeland-and-modern-family-dominate-one-surprisingly-one-not
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Critic's Notes
Cable Television Casts Shadow Over Networks
By Alessandra Stanley, The New York Times - Sep. 24, 2012

Tom Hanks, accepting an Emmy for the HBO movie “Game Change,” said that television is “better than ever.” When Damian Lewis won the best actor Emmy for “Homeland,” on Showtime, he dubbed this era “the golden age of TV.” They must have meant non-broadcast television.

Sunday’s Emmy Awards show on ABC was like a cable eclipse of the networks.

It was a little surprising that “Homeland” overcame the juggernaut that is “Mad Men,” which had been named best drama four times in a row. But while it’s rare for a new series to win so many top awards in its first season, it’s not really a shock that “Mad Men’s” winning streak finally ended.

As Jon Stewart put it so bluntly after he won — again — Emmy awards are too often “predictable” (his adjective was bleeped).

“Mad Men” didn’t win a fifth year in a row, possibly because that would have set a record unmatched by even “The West Wing,” “Hill Street Blues” or “L.A. Law,” which in their heydays won four each. The ABC sitcom “Modern Family,” on the other hand, won again for best comedy, and that wasn’t a record, it was just repetitive.

Breaking precedent is hard enough for academy voters, and breaking a record almost impossible.

The academy was obliged to include cable shows years ago, mostly because “The Sopranos,” on HBO, made it impossible to ignore them.

And it was inevitable that a cable show would win. This year, for the first time, not a single network show was nominated in the best drama category. That omission was so painful that networks went into denial. A montage of clips of the year in drama included shows not nominated for a best drama Emmy, including “NCIS” and “Grey’s Anatomy.”

The M.C., Jimmy Kimmel, couldn’t help joking about the network shutout, saying the choice sent a “clear message.” He paused and added, “and the message is: ‘show us your boobs.’”

In fact, ABC came close in a taped opening skit. Lena Dunham is famously unembarrassed to show herself undressed, not always flatteringly, on her HBO show, “Girls.” Pretending to be caught off-guard backstage, Ms. Dunham sat in a bathroom stall, naked, eating an entire birthday cake (her vital parts were blurred).

As awards show go, this one was low-energy, more than it needed to be. ABC wanted to showcase Mr. Kimmel, whose late-night show is moving earlier, to the 11:30 slot, against David Letterman and Jay Leno. But Mr. Kimmel seemed to mistake himself for Bob Hope. There were far too many Kimmel-centric skits breaking up the evening, including a tedious one in which he blamed his parents for his disappointment over not winning an Emmy, and had them stagily ejected from the room.

Mr. Kimmel also did a mock-memorial reel to himself, a pre-posthumous tribute that seemed to spoof the actual memorial reel for the recently dead, which included Whitney Houston and Dick Clark and was set to the weepy song “The Way We Were.”

But there were few miscues or bloopers, and the pace was mostly steady. After the writers of “Homeland” spoke a little too long, triggering the musical hook, Claire Danes took it upon herself to speed through her acceptance speech for best actress, sounding more like a spokeswoman hawking an exercise gadget on late-night television than an actress overwhelmed by the surprise honor.

Networks usually have a monopoly on comedy shows — there are so many sitcoms — but even that advantage was threatened. The comedian Louis C.K. won two Emmys, both for work he did on cable. Julia Louis-Dreyfus won the Emmy for best actress in a comedy, “Veep,” a new HBO series, beating out Tina Fey and Amy Poehler (and Ms. Dunham).

Perhaps inevitably, Maggie Smith won best supporting actress for her part as an imperious dowager on the PBS series “Downton Abbey.” That swoony evocation of English upper-class privilege didn’t win many other awards, but the show’s many nominations gave Mr. Kimmel an opening for a political joke. He said the series’s manor setting “really gives you a sense what it was like growing up in Mitt Romney’s house.”

It’s an election year, so that kind of aside was to be expected. So was the selection of “Game Change,” an HBO film about the 2008 presidential election. Julianne Moore won best actress in a movie or mini-series for playing John McCain’s running mate. Holding the award, wearing a bright yellow dress and a smile, Ms. Moore said she felt “validated” because, “Sarah Palin gave me a big thumbs down.”

It wasn’t an exciting night and there were only mild surprises, but the success of “Homeland” was a welcome one.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/24/arts/television/cable-television-rules-the-emmys.html?_r=0
post #82326 of 93688
TV Review
‘Partners’: Yawntime companions
By Hank Stuever, Washington Post

“Will & Grace” makers David Kohan and Max Mutchnick return to lighthearted, quasi-socially progressive sitcom familiarity with a story loosely based on their own lifelong bromance — where one man is straight and the other’s gay. Joe (“Numb3rs’s” David Krumholtz, the straight one) and Louis (“Ugly Betty’s” Michael Urie, the gay one) own an architecture and design firm together and have been pals since they were bar-mitzvah nerds.

The message here — after a trip through CBS’s rinse cycle — is that such friendships are possible. Louis, whom Urie unfortunately plays as a grating, self-absorbed flibbertigibbet (faintly reminiscent of Jack from “Will & Grace”), meddles in the tentative romance between Joe and his soon-to-be fiancee (“One Tree Hill’s” Sophia Bush) and then must scramble around to patch it up. Brandon Routh (“Superman,” once) plays Louis’s hunky-dopey domestic partner.

Kohan and Mutchnick haven’t moved forward or backward since their “Will & Grace” days, which is perhaps why the show feels old before its time. They even added a Rosario-like stereotype in the pilot for batting practice — this time a chesty, fiery Latina secretary (Tracy Vilar), whose decolletage Louis bizarrely enjoys nuzzling in time of stress. The tepid laughs here are already in need of a jolt, as “Partners” cries out for its Karen.

●“Partners” (Premieres at 8:30 p.m. on CBS)
Grade: C+


http://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/tv/partners-yawntime-companions/2012/09/13/ae6d31fe-fd0f-11e1-a31e-804fccb658f9_story.html
post #82327 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

This is why I hope physical media doesn't go away. Sure, formats might change, but as long as I have a player for a copy of a movie or TV show I purchased on physical media, I can watch it whenever I want.
The thing is, as streaming rights get more expensive as time goes by, we're going to see more stuff appear and disappear from services without warning. You go to watch a movie, and suddenly it's unavailable to view. Some stuff may disappear indefinitely - or even permanently.
As long as my ability to view something depends on a streaming provider's willingness to pony up the fees for it, I'm sticking with physical media and leaving streaming to someone else.
Granted, the stuff listed in the article is no big loss, but plenty of other stuff has disappeared when contracts have run out. I ended up buying the entire "Avatar: The Last Airbender" series on DVD after it disappeared from Netflix streaming several years ago (back when I used have streaming access). Honestly, it's a great show I was happy to buy, but I simply refuse to rely on the cloud for my entertainment when the stuff might disappear in a puff of smoke.

This has always been the case with streaming content, it is nothing new. I've been using VUDU for close to five years now. And content always comes and goes depending on who has the rights to stream it at any given time.
post #82328 of 93688
I'll take physical media over streaming any day. I don't want to see a situation where someone has a service you pay for the privelege to watch certain TV Shows or Movies, then one day you logon to watch a show, and get a message saying the show has been deleted because they didn't secure the "Rights". mad.gif With Physical Media you still have a copy, and they can have that after they pry my cold, dead hands from around it. biggrin.gif
post #82329 of 93688
Tech/Business Notes
TiVo To Collect $250M After Settling Patent Infringement Suit Against Verizon
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - Sep. 24, 2012

TiVo shares were up about 10% in pre-market trading immediately following the announcement. The deal ends a bitter legal fight that began in 2009 and was scheduled to go to trial on October 1. It ensures that Verizon FiOS customers can continue to use the company supplied DVRs, which are manufactured by Cisco. In addition, the companies say that they’re looking at arrangements to collaborate — including by offering TiVo users content from the planned Redbox Instant By Verizon streaming video service. TiVo will collect about $100M “as consideration for past damages,” and recognize some of that in the current quarter, it says in an SEC filing. The settlement also resolves Verizon’s counter-suit against TiVo.

The companies say that they’ve “entered into a cross license of their respective patent portfolios in the advanced television field.” The resolution continues TiVo’s string of victories in suits it has lobbed against DVR providers including Dish Network, Microsoft, and AT&T. TiVo still has suits pending against Motorola, Cisco, and Time Warner Cable. The DVR pioneer says that it owns the rights to several processes that users take for granted including the ability to watch one show while recording another. CEO Tom Rogers told analysts last month that although earnings would be hurt in the short run by TiVo’s “significant investment” for the court battles, “we believe it is vital to protect our innovation, and we are confident that the return on investment will continue to be substantial over time.”

Here’s the release:

ALVISO, CA– TiVo Inc. (NASDAQ: TIVO) announced today that it has settled its pending patent litigation with Verizon Communications Inc. and that the companies have entered into a mutual patent licensing arrangement. Under the terms of the settlement, Verizon will provide TiVo total compensation worth at least $250.4 million. The payments from Verizon to TiVo shall be comprised of a $100 million initial cash payment followed by recurring quarterly payments totaling an additional $150.4 million through July 2018. If the companies pursue certain commercial initiatives prior to December 21, 2012, up to $29.4 million of the payments made by Verizon would be subject to a credit of an equal amount. In addition to the guaranteed compensation, Verizon will also pay monthly license fees through July 2018 for each Verizon DVR subscriber in excess of certain pre-determined levels.

In addition to the cash payments described above, Verizon and TiVo are exploring, among other things, future distribution of Internet video services developed through Verizon’s joint venture with Redbox by making content distributed via that service part of the diverse selection of linear and broadband-delivered content accessible to users of TiVo’s retail DVR products.

As part of the settlement, TiVo and Verizon agreed to dismiss all pending litigation between the companies with prejudice. The parties also entered into a cross license of their respective patent portfolios in the advanced television field.

“We are pleased to reach an agreement with Verizon which underscores the significant value our distribution partners derive from TiVo’s technological innovations and our shareholders derive from our investments in protecting TiVo’s intellectual property,” said Tom Rogers, CEO and President of TiVo. “We also look forward to working together on a variety of future opportunities as we continue to expand the content choices available to TiVo subscribers. As with prior settlements, we also benefit by being able to operate our business under license from Verizon and by avoiding future legal expenses that we would have incurred during and after trial. Furthermore, we believe this settlement positions us well with respect to future enforceability of our patents.”


http://www.deadline.com/2012/09/tivo-verizon-settle-patent-suit/
Edited by dad1153 - 9/24/12 at 8:59am
post #82330 of 93688
TV Notes
’2 Broke Girls,’ and 1 new timeslot
CBS moves last season's No. 1 new show to 9 p.m.
By Loisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 24, 2012

Last season “2 Broke Girls” was the top-rated new show among adults 18-49 and became a key link in CBS’s strong Monday night lineup.

It did so well, in fact, that it got a huge promotion. Tonight “Girls” takes over the 9 p.m. anchor slot where “Two and a Half Men” and “Everybody Loves Raymond” dominated the past decade.

CBS believes that “Girls” is capable of drawing similarly strong numbers.

While the stereotype of CBS shows is that they appeal to the armchair set because of the network’s older median age and strength among total viewers, “Girls” is one of the most risqué shows on broadcast right now, offering just as many sex and race jokes as “Men.”

The sitcom follows a pair of waitresses, one a former rich girl, the other a poor smart-ass, who band together to launch a cupcake company. They have no money and spend much of their time attempting harebrained schemes to raise the capital they need, hence the title.

CBS is quite high on the show. It is making a risky move by switching “Men,” which tied “Modern Family” and “The Big Bang Theory” as the No. 1 scripted series on broadcast last season, to Thursdays and sliding “Girls” into the Monday anchor slot.

The network could have let “Girls” mature and grow its audience in its 8:30 p.m. slot for one more year before making the move.

But “Men’s” ratings flagged at the end of last season, and the network is taking care of another problem spot on its schedule, Thursdays at 8:30 p.m., by relocating “Men” there.

It’s doubtful that “Girls” will match “Men’s” 5.0 adults 18-49 Nielsen average last season. But it could improve on last year’s 4.2 average now that it’s in a later timeslot.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/2-broke-girls-and-1-new-timeslot/

P.S.: Technically CBS moved "2 Broke Girls" to Mondays at 9 p.m. (and "Two and a Half Men" to Thursdays at 8:30 p.m.) a while back in the middle of summer repeats to get viewers used to the change. That's why I didn't list tonight's "2 Broke Girls" as a 'time slot premiere,' it's been there for a while.
post #82331 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

I'm one of those WHO have had the guts to "Cut the Cord". I missed my sports at first, but I found substitutes, such as High School Games. For Championships such as Bowl Games, there's a Sports Pub less than half a mile from me I can go to to watch the game. Six Bucks for a glass of Beer is a heck of a lot cheaper than paying $129.00 a month to watch it at home (and tastier too!). biggrin.gif

Your bar must really like you sitting there for four hours and sipping on one beer! smile.gif
post #82332 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGA$$TV View Post

Your bar must really like you sitting there for four hours and sipping on one beer! smile.gif

They do not object at all. I drink the beer nice and Slooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooow! biggrin.gif
post #82333 of 93688
Having in a past life worked in the restaurant business for 15 years, I would say they very much object, especially the server/bartender that is having their table tied up for four hours with little to no revenue.
post #82334 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

I had the guts to cut the cord also. But I get plenty of free programming and sports OTA. I watch 12 hours of college football in HD on Saturday and 12 hours of the NFL in HD on Sunday. For Monday Night Football I can listen to it on the radio (on 870am WWL from New Orleans) or go to a sports bar. I went to a sports bar on the first night of Monday Night Football and watched the doubleheader. All it costed was $10 for dinner.

Ooooh listen on radio....is it right next to your 8 track player ?

"Hey ma, im goin down the cellar to throw some coal in the furnace....we dont want the youngins to freeze another toe off again tonite".
post #82335 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingpcgeek View Post

Having in a past life worked in the restaurant business for 15 years, I would say they very much object, especially the server/bartender that is having their table tied up for four hours with little to no revenue.

Of course they do. Especially if they're busy. The servers are also concerned about making more money from tips, naturally.


Edited by Rammitinski - 9/24/12 at 2:32pm
post #82336 of 93688
Here's a Story problem for all of you.

In the year so far, Borntocoast took three trips to the Sports Pub, spending $18.00 for three Beers (Including Tips). smile.gif

Nine Month's of Pay-TV costs $1,161.00 eek.gif

How many DVD Box Sets can he pick up at Uncle Wally's Bargain Bin with the money he saved by not subscribing to a Pay-TV Service? biggrin.gif
post #82337 of 93688

Well, as long as you're aware of those things. That's mainly what we're getting at.

post #82338 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Ooooh listen on radio....is it right next to your 8 track player ?
"Hey ma, im goin down the cellar to throw some coal in the furnace....we dont want the youngins to freeze anunnecessaryother toe off again tonite".
That's not funny. redface.gif What's important for one person may be totally unimportant for someone else. Why make negative comments regarding his choice?
post #82339 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

Here's a Story problem for all of you.
In the year so far, Borntocoast took three trips to the Sports Pub, spending $18.00 for three Beers (Including Tips). smile.gif
Nine Month's of Pay-TV costs $1,161.00 eek.gif
How many DVD Box Sets can he pick up at Uncle Wally's Bargain Bin with the money he saved by not subscribing to a Pay-TV Service? biggrin.gif

DVD....what kinda new fangled thang is that ? sounds like an underwear name.

"Hey ma, when you get to Walmart tomorrow pick me up a package of them things...i reckin need a new pair for october."
post #82340 of 93688
I see people on this board and others grouse about High Pay-TV Fees, Shoddy Programming, Commercials and On-Screen Advertising. mad.gif I've actually done something about it. I've told the One-Percenters who own these companies what they can do with them. rolleyes.gif I'm not saying I've achieved perfection, but I have a system, and IT WORKS!!! biggrin.gif
post #82341 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

I see people on this board and others grouse about High Pay-TV Fees, Shoddy Programming, Commercials and On-Screen Advertising. mad.gif I've actually done something about it. I've told the One-Percenters who own these companies what they can do with them. rolleyes.gif I'm not saying I've achieved perfection, but I have a system, and IT WORKS!!! biggrin.gif
But, you'll have to admit what works for you likely wouldn't work for the other 99.999999% of the TV watching public. I'll admit I've drunk too much of the TV Kool-Aid to cut the cord now. My brother-in-law did the same thing as you and when he showed me the "wealth" of channels he could get OTA and through his Roku Box, I just smiled and said, "That's pretty cool." What I was really doing was gagging because probably half of my viewing (or more) comes from "cable" TV channels. Sure, if I wanted to wait I could get most of them some form of media later on, but I don't want to wait.

As for sports, I sure couldn't get the Big Ten Network through a Roku Box or on Netflix. I'm not a sports fanatic, but I love Big Ten football and basketball as well as most forms of motor racing.

And, as for watching any kind of game or sporting event at a bar or similar establishment, well that's just not my thing. The last game I intentionally went to a bar to watch was when some friends and I saw the Indiana Hoosiers win the NCAA basketball championship in 1981. And, I vowed never to do that again because I want to hear the commentary as well as watch the game. Also, the beer at home is cheaper. cool.gif
post #82342 of 93688
Critic's Notes
'Homeland' saves the day at Emmy Awards
Showtime's critical hit dominates the major drama categories. Jimmy Kimmel valiantly attempts to keep the show from being a total snooze.
By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Team - Sep. 24, 2012

There is a God, and apparently she is a voting member of the television academy.

Despite overwhelming consensus that the dramatic portion of the 64th Primetime Emmys would an intra-AMC face-off between "Breaking Bad" and perennial favorite "Mad Men," Showtime's politically and narratively ambitious "Homeland" dominated the competition, winning for drama, actress, actor and writing.

The wins were not just well-deserved, they saved the broadcast from being a complete and utter bore. Maybe it was the heat — 94 degrees on the red carpet outside the Nokia Theatre — or the equally suffocating effect of "Modern Family's" dominance of the comedy categories but the first half of Sunday night's show was surprisingly snoozy, filled with repeat winners who seemed chosen off some collective "We Predict the Emmys" sheet and only occasionally enlivened by host Jimmy Kimmel's deadpan wit.

Which may also have had something to do with the initially enervating air of what is usually the second most entertaining awards show (for sheer energy, it's hard to beat the Tonys.) Enlisting some of the top female nominees, including Kathy Bates, Lena Dunham, Connie Britton and Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Kimmel opened with a pre-taped sketch that had him hiding in the women's dressing room with a face full of Botox and a heart full of fear. Even with the pixilated image of Dunham eating cake in the nude and Bates punching through a door, it fell a little flat.

Kimmel did better with his opening monologue, acknowledging the election year with observations that "Downton Abbey" allowed viewers to "know what its like to grow up in Mitt Romney's household" and that President Obama shouldn't be watching "Homeland" "for the same reason Charlie Sheen shouldn't watch 'Breaking Bad.'"

He kept things moving with a few equally amusing one-liners — if you want to know what it's like at the Nokia during commercial time "imagine all your favorite TV stars looking at their phones and not talking to each other," a few lively presenters (can Amy Poehler just host next year?) and several funny enough pre-taped sketches. But there was no getting away from the fact that while familiarity may not always breed contempt, it's difficult to deny the boredom that comes from watching the same people win awards they have won in previous years.

Even if "Modern Family's" Steven Levitan won this year for directing instead of writing (the writing award went to Louis C.K. who also won for writing for a variety show) it doesn't help much in the dramatic tension department. Jon Cryer's second win for best actor in a comedy was a bit of a shock even to him, but by the time Julia Louis-Dreyfus picked up her third Emmy, we were just grateful that least it was for a different show than her previous statues. Also, she did a fabulous gag with Poehler, pretending to have swapped acceptance speeches, and her voice did seem to be shaking with honest emotion. No matter what you think of "Veep," it's hard not to love Louis-Dreyfus.

In fact, she may have marked the turning point for the show The cast of "The Big Bang Theory" did what may be the funniest introduction of the obligatory CPAs involved in the voting process. By the time "Breaking Bad's" Aaron Paul gave a spirited and touching acceptance speech for his second best supporting actor win — "Vince Gilligan, thank you so much for not killing me off" — everyone in the audience had apparently rehydrated sufficiently, one way or the other, to lift the energy of the room and the show.

Best presenter award is a tie between Tina Fey for pretending not to be able to read the prompter without her famous glasses and Aziz Ansari for feigning a British accent because it made him seem like a more serious actor. Best joke that probably isn't really a joke: Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon tackling Jon Stewart on his way to pick up the annual Emmy for "The Daily Show," which at this point even Stewart finds ridiculous. As for "Hatfields & McCoys'" Tom Berenger, whose acceptance speech for best supporting actor in a movie or mini-series included references to rabid raccoons, aligning planets and garden gnomes, well, there are performances for which no single award can suffice.

Which is something that the cast of "Mad Men" might want to keep in mind this week. Although the latest was inarguably the best season since the show's first, the show walked away from what many thought would be its record-breaking year empty-handed, making them a four-time drama winner with no Emmys in acting categories.

But by the time that reality sunk in, "Homeland" was basking in newbie success and HBO's take on the 2008 election "Game Change" had rounded out the political nature of the drama wins. Everyone was so giddy with the prospect of dinner and the cool evening air, that no one seemed to care when the "Modern Family" creators got cut off halfway through their acceptance speech for outstanding comedy.

"Do you want to stay here for another hour," said Kimmel, taking a firm line. No, and for better or worse, we had heard that speech before.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/emmys/la-et-st-emmys-2012-review-20120924,0,4787380.story
post #82343 of 93688
Washington Notes
FCC to Back Away From a Majority of Its Indecency Complaints
By Doug Halonen, TheWrap.com - Sep. 24, 2012

The Federal Communications Commission is scaling back -- in a major way --its enforcement of indecency complaints.

Chairman Julius Genachowski has ordered agency staffers to refocus enforcement efforts to target only the most explicit of the more than 1.5 million pending complaints, a spokesman for the agency told TheWrap on Monday.

The decision was in response to the Department of Justice’s dropping Friday of a lawsuit complaining of indecency in a 2003 Fox broadcast of its reality show “Married by America,” which included scenes featuring suggested -- but pixilated -- nudity.

“In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision in Fox v. FCC, the commission is reviewing its indecency enforcement policy to ensure the agency carries out Congress’s directive in a manner consistent with vital First Amendment principles,” Genachowski said in a statement to TheWrap.

In the interim, Genachowski added that he has directed the agency to “focus its resources on the strongest cases that involve egregious indecency violations. We also will continue to reduce the backlog of pending indecency complaints.”

Genachowski’s effort to tone down the agency’s crackdown on off-color TV programming also followed landmark indecency actions by the Supreme Court this summer.

In one of the cases, the high court refused to review a lower-court decision that threw out the FCC’s $550,000 fine for CBS over Janet Jackson’s “wardrobe malfunction” during the network’s live coverage of the 2004 Super Bowl.

In a separate case, the Supreme Court on June 21 ruled that FCC indecency sanctions against Fox and ABC were improper, on grounds that the networks had not received fair notice that fleeting indecencies could be subject to sanctions.

In the “Married by America” case, the FCC originally fined 169 of Fox’s owned stations and affiliates a total of $1.18 million. The agency later reduced the scope of the fine to 13 Fox TV stations and affiliates, hitting each with fines of $7,000 apiece, for a total of $91,000.

“Fox’s view has consistently been that the FCC’s fine had no foundation within the law, and we are grateful that the DOJ and FCC have now dropped the case,” said Fox in a statement.

“We think the FCC should vacate the fines and refund the stations that paid the fines,” an individual at Fox familiar with the situation told The Wrap.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/column-post/fcc-back-away-majority-its-indecency-complaints-57766
post #82344 of 93688
SUNDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog[
post #82345 of 93688
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
‘SNF’ scores another touchdown for NBC
NBC game averages a 14.3 metered-market household rating
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 24, 2012

Airing opposite the Primetime Emmy Awards last night, NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” put up very strong numbers with a rematch of last year’s AFC championship teams.

The Baltimore Ravens’ thrilling 31-30 victory over the New England Patriots averaged a 14.3 household rating from 8:30 p.m. to midnight, according to Nielsen metered-market ratings, up 8 percent over last year’s week-three game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Indianapolis Colts.

It was easily the night’s No. 1 show and drew “SNF’s” best week-three rating since 2008.

In fact, it was the second-best primetime week-three rating for any game since 1997.

It continues the strong momentum for “SNF,” which aired its most-watched broadcast ever to start the season two weeks ago, when Peyton Manning made his debut with the Denver Broncos.

And it came on a night with strong competition from ABC’s Emmy Awards.

Overnight ratings do not reflect time zone adjustments or actual program data, so ABC has ordered time-adjusted fast nationals from Nielsen for the awards show. Those will be out later today, and Media Life will post them as soon as they’re released.

NBC was first for the night among 18-49s with a 6.4 average overnight rating and a 17 share. CBS was second at 3.0/8, ABC third at 2.9/8, Fox fourth at 1.5/4, Univision fifth at 1.0/3 and Telemundo sixth at 0.4/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-five percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

Also, ratings for ABC's Emmys and NBC's NFL coverage are approximate as fast nationals measure timeslot and not actual program data.

At 7 p.m. CBS finished first with a 7.0 for NFL overrun, followed by NBC with a 2.5 for "Football Night in America." ABC was third with a 1.6 for "Emmys Red Carpet Live," Fox fourth with a 1.2 for repeats of "American Dad" and "The Cleveland Show," Univision fifth with a 0.6 for "Aqui y Ahora" and Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for the end of a Mexican league soccer match.

NBC took the lead at 8 p.m. with a 7.2 for NFL pregame and "Sunday Night Football," while ABC moved to second with a 3.6 for the Emmys. CBS was third with a 7.1 for football and the start of "60 Minutes," Fox fourth with a 1.5 for repeats of "The Simpsons" and "Bob's Burgers," Univision fifth with a 1.2 for "Mira Quien Baila" and Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for "Yo Me Llamo."

At 9 p.m. NBC led with an 8.4 for football, with ABC second with a 3.7 for the Emmys. Fox was third with a 1.9 for reruns of "Family Guy," Univision fourth with a 1.2 for "Baila," CBS fifth with a 1.0 for the end of"60 Minutes" and the start of "Person of Interest," and Telemundo sixth with a 0.3 for more "Llamo."

NBC was first again at 10 p.m. with a 7.7 for football, followed by ABC with a 2.8 for the Emmys. CBS was third with a 1.0 for the end of "Interest" and start of "The Mentalist," Univision fourth with a 0.9 for "Sal y Pimienta" and Telemundo fifth with a 0.3 for "Operación Repo."

Among households, NBC averaged a 9.7 overnight rating and 15 share for the night, with CBS at 7.3/11, ABC at 6.8/11 and Fox at 2.0/3. Household ratings for the Spanish-language networks weren't immediately available.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/sunday-night-football-scores-another-touchdown/
post #82346 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Ooooh listen on radio....is it right next to your 8 track player ?
"Hey ma, im goin down the cellar to throw some coal in the furnace....we dont want the youngins to freeze another toe off again tonite".

My receiver is a Kenwood Dolby Prologic surround sound receiver with four 15 inch Pioneer speakers, a Kenwood subwoofer, a Bose center channel speaker, and two surround sound speakers. I also get ESPN radio and Fox Sports radio on it for Mike and Mike in the morning and other talk shows.

Like I said in my other post I get 24 hours of football in HD for free on the weekend. Since football is the only sport I watch I could care less about what is on sports channels the other 8 months out of the year. The $4,000 I've saved for not having pay TV over the last 4 years works for me.
post #82347 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
‘SNF’ scores another touchdown for NBC
NBC game averages a 14.3 metered-market household rating
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 24, 2012
Airing opposite the Primetime Emmy Awards last night, NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” put up very strong numbers with a rematch of last year’s AFC championship teams.

The Baltimore Ravens’ thrilling 31-30 victory over the New England Patriots averaged a 14.3 household rating from 8:30 p.m. to midnight, according to Nielsen metered-market ratings, up 8 percent over last year’s week-three game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Indianapolis Colts.

It was easily the night’s No. 1 show and drew “SNF’s” best week-three rating since 2008.

In fact, it was the second-best primetime week-three rating for any game since 1997.

It continues the strong momentum for “SNF,” which aired its most-watched broadcast ever to start the season two weeks ago, when Peyton Manning made his debut with the Denver Broncos.

And it came on a night with strong competition from ABC’s Emmy Awards.


http://www.medialifemagazine.com/sunday-night-football-scores-another-touchdown/

Sunday Night Football is definately the new Monday Night football. It has better matchups and higher ratings.
post #82348 of 93688
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoilerJim View Post

But, you'll have to admit what works for you likely wouldn't work for the other 99.999999% of the TV watching public.

Its worked for 400,000 people.
Quote:
People Are Cutting the Cable Cord. The pay-TV industry lost about 400,000 subscribers in the second quarter, the latest sign that cord-cutting may be under way.


http://live.wsj.com/video/more-people-are-cutting-the-cable-cord/CAC8362D-534B-40CB-AC29-8379604EF9FB.html#!CAC8362D-534B-40CB-AC29-8379604EF9FB
post #82349 of 93688
TV Reviews
‘The Mindy Project’ and ‘Ben and Kate,’ New Fox Series
Demolition Derbies for Lovelorn
By Alessandra Stanley, The New York Times - Sep. 24, 2012

True love may be everlasting, but it’s not very funny.

That’s why romantic comedy concentrates on the pursuit of happiness, not its fulfillment.

Television comedies usually have to keep would-be lovers apart — or in tumult — for as long as possible. Last season the NBC series “Parks and Recreation” separated Leslie and Ben with a conflict of interest; in the premiere of the fifth season on Thursday, they were divided by the Pawnee-Washington distance.

This fall there is a new wave of single women searching for Mr. Right, or even Mr. He’ll Do, most notably Mindy Kaling (“The Office”), who is the creator and star of “The Mindy Project,” which begins on Tuesday on Fox at 9:30 p.m. ET. Ms. Kaling plays Mindy Lahiri, an obstetrician in her early 30s who can’t go on a date without tripping all over herself.

On Fox the same night (8:30 p.m. ET), the heroine of “Ben and Kate” is also looking for love, only she stumbles over intrusive family members. Kate (Dakota Johnson) is a single mother and bartender who got pregnant in college and hasn’t been with a man since her 5-year-old, Maddie (Maggie Elizabeth Jones), was born. Child care gets in the way of man hunting, but mostly Kate has to mind her goofy man-child older brother, Ben (Nat Faxon), a disaster magnet.

One woman can’t meet a decent guy in a hospital crawling with doctors; the other can’t find one even in a pub-crawl. It must be global warming: as the icecaps melt and crops wither, so do all the single available men.

The pilot of “The Mindy Project” isn’t quite as funny as Ms. Kaling is at her best, but it has some amusing moments and a lot of promise.

Mindy is a romantic-comedy addict who, as a child, would watch movies like “When Harry Met Sally” over and over, reciting the dialogue along with the characters. As an adult, she views her life as a Sandra Bullock movie.

Actually, the series seems heavily inspired by “Bridget Jones’s Diary,” but there’s nothing wrong with that. Like so many chick-lit instant classics, that novel-turned-movie was based on “Pride and Prejudice.” It’s a given that everyone steals from Jane Austen and then gets ripped off in turn — plagiarizing it forward.

Mindy has Bridget Jones’s bad judgment and flair for faux pas. After one particularly embarrassing drunken episode at an ex-boyfriend’s wedding, she vows to clean up her act and find a proper boyfriend, then keeps hooking up with Jeremy, the handsome English doctor who is a shameless flirt and womanizer.

Mindy assures her disapproving best friend, Gwen (Anna Camp), that Jeremy isn’t all bad.

“I think he is Hugh Grant in ‘About a Boy,’ ” Mindy says.

“I think he is Hugh Grant in real life,” Gwen replies.

And like Bridget Jones, Mindy isn’t very disciplined about her weight. A fellow doctor tells her that the best thing she could do to look good on a date is “lose 15 pounds.”

The heroine of “Ben and Kate” has no such worries. Kate is a beauty, slim and blond with glowing skin (Ms. Johnson’s parents are Don Johnson and Melanie Griffith), yet she lacks opportunity and most of all confidence.

One of her first dates in years is interrupted by her brother, a well-intended meddler who drags in trouble the way toddlers track in mud after the rain. Meanwhile, at work, Kate’s sexy friend and co-worker, B J (Lucy Punch), coolly gives her more adult, even X-rated, advice. B J treats Maddie in almost the same manner, oblivious to the fact that her friend’s daughter is 5, not 25.

Maybe because the world has wearied of helicopter parents who coddle and dote on their offspring, comedy shows are increasingly mining the humor of adults’ treating adorable children callously and even with contempt. (That certainly seems to be the ethos behind the TLC reality show “Here Comes Honey Boo Boo,” a look at a child pageant star who is so scary and riveting she has turned Honey Boo Boo into a national punch line: this 7-year-old is the new Snooki.)

The British Ms. Punch, who is very funny playing B J as a younger version of Patsy in “Absolutely Fabulous” (homage, not copyright infringement), treats the adorable little Maddie like a slightly irritating and slow-witted adult. Even Ben treats his niece like a contemporary who needs to loosen up.

The same joke is played out on “The Mindy Project.” Gwen also has a fetching young daughter. When the child tries to speak, Mindy tells her that she is “boring.”

“Ben and Kate” has charm, but the brother-sister dynamic has built-in limitations. It’s hard to see how the series can sustain such a binding premise. “The Mindy Project” has a looser structure and more room to grow, and best of all an appealing comedy star in the lead.

Of the two heroines, Mindy has a better chance of winning at romantic comedy, though not, of course, at true romance.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/25/arts/television/the-mindy-project-and-ben-and-kate-new-fox-series.html?ref=television&_moc.semityn.www
post #82350 of 93688
TV Sports
Fox's Pereira lone winner in NFL officiating saga
By Michael Hiestand, USA Today - Sep. 24, 2012

There's only one winner with the NFL's sorry faux officiating: Fox's Mike Pereira.

Pereira, who used to oversee NFL officiating before Fox put him on-air in a groundbreaking TV role, laughed at that assertion in a Sunday phone interview. But he suggests it's occurred to him, as he juggled his Fox appearances Sunday with prolific tweeting, that there is an upside to being the one national TV expert on NFL officiating at a time it is the sports world's hottest topic. "I really want this (lockout) to end," Pereira says. "But do I?"

As he watched the replacement officials on Sunday, he didn't see progress. "No, I don't think they are getting better each week. But I don't think you should expect that. The rules are so complicated."

Pereira says neither Fox nor the NFL has put any restrictions on his commentary -- "nobody has told to say anything or not say anything." But he says he's not always sure what to say: "I'm not sure how refs arrive at rulings when they aren't using NFL rules."

On Sunday, the substitute refs came in for more of what has become an increasingly strident on-air pounding from the networks that, collectively, pay billions to carry NFL games. "They're killing the tempo and flow of the game," CBS' Shannon Sharpe says. "The integrity of the game is hurting right now, period. Somebody is going to get hurt," says ESPN's Keyshawn Johnson. "When you see players from the NFL talking about the integrity of the game, that's a problem -- it needs to get solved now," says Fox's Howie Long. "There is a great deal of disrespect from the players to the referees and we've never had this before," says ESPN's Cris Carter.

Fox's Jay Glazer reports the refs and the league are now talking to each other -- "it's progress" -- and Pereira is sticking to his original prediction that the lockout will end by the NFL's Week 4. "The officials care about this as much as the league -- and they don't like what they're seeing."

Doctor, give me the news: Like when Fox added Pereira to create a new type of NFL analyst, CBS added physician Dr. Neal ElAttrache to its NFL studio show Sunday. Prognosis: Promising.

Definitely different. Like when the surgeon, who has operated on NFL star Tom Brady and NBA star Blake Griffin, talked about ankle sprains. Wielding a model of ankle bones, ElAttrache talked about "the lower ligaments of the outer bones of the ankle to the keystone bone of the ankle" and "the fibula and tibia."

CBS' Boomer Esiason chimed in with a more traditional TV comment: "I'm not sure about all that stuff, all I know is it hurts like heck."

On Peyton Manning's recovery, ElAttrache discussed "the small nerve fibers that control the fine-tuned, neuromuscular coordination for accurate throwing have to heal." That was a contrast to, say, Bradshaw's take on Manning on Fox: "His arm is fine."

ElAttrache, by phone Sunday, says there is at least one topic he won't discuss -- his treatment of specific players. "I take care a lot of these players. I wouldn't be able to go into a specific athlete's treatment or prognosis. I don't want them, or any players coming to me, to think of me as a 'media doctor.'"

CBS Sports chairman Sean McManus says he approved of ElAttrache's on-air work Sunday: "He avoided speculation and stuck to explaining and analyzing injuries."

Irish still draw: In recent seasons, Notre Dame football seemed increasing not-ready-for-prime time. But this brand name can still matter: Notre Dame's 13-6 win over Michigan, despite airing opposite other marquee matchups in Saturday prime time, drew the weekend's highest college football overnight rating. That win, which moved the Irish from 15th to 11th in the USA TODAY Coaches Poll, gave NBC a 4.0 overnight, which translates into 4% of households in the 56 urban markets measured for overnights. That's up 48% from last year's comparable coverage -- ND vs. Michigan State -- and up 54% from the Notre's Dame's one prime-time home game -- vs. USC -- last year.

NBC topped other prime-time games involving top teams. ABC's Clemson-Florida St. drew a 3.2 overnight, down 20% from comparable coverage of a LSU-West Virginia game last year, and a 1.7 overnight for Kansas St.-Oklahoma on Fox, which is in its first season of regular-season college football.

Star power: NBC's Saturday coverage of golf's Tour Championship drew a 2.2 overnight rating -- up 100% from last year. When you see golf ratings jump like that, you pretty much know the explanation: Tiger Woods (and Rory McIlroy) didn't play in the event last year.

Clip 'n save: CBS rookie Jason La Canfora, whose arrival has improved the network's NFL studio show, says the Minnesota Vikings are to "host multiple games in London while their stadium is being constructed." Sheesh. Lucky players.

Spice rack: Apparently, you don't want to be (even a former) Pittsburgh Steeler in Baltimore. NBC's Hines Ward, in Baltimore for NBC's prime time New England-Baltimore game, posted on Facebook Sunday about the various Ravens fans who politely explained they hate him. Checking into his hotel, he says the woman at the front desk said, "Thank you for staying with us today Mr. Ward, and by the way, I HATE you." Ward, understandably, says he was hesitant to order room service. ... Fox's NFL Sunday studio show Sunday replayed the Saturday Night Live clip of actor Jay Pharoah playing Michael Strahan, the Fox analyst who's doing double-duty by co-hosting ABC's daytime "Live! With Kelly and Michael." The Strahan character in the skit, says "I can't believe how easy this job is. I can't believe I got bashed in the head for 15 years when this was a job." Said the real Strahan, in the Fox studio: "I say that about this show, too."

Worth more yak: CBS college football studio analysts Tony Barnhart and Spencer Tillman raise something that more TV talking heads should chew over -- whether college ball, like the NFL, should put out injury reports. Barnhart notes the ACC does it, "and the world has not come to an end.... This is not about protecting the kids. This is about protecting the coach. The coaches mislead and lie." Tillman counters that coming clean about injuries "doesn't benefit anyone except... the folks who are laying a sawbuck or two on the game." Sorry Spencer, Tony is right.

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/columnist/hiestand-tv/story/2012/09/24/fox-rules-analyst-pereira-lone-winner-in-nfl-replacement-officials-saga/57834462/1
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