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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2746

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TV Notes
FX Teams With Joel & Ethan Coen And Noah Hawley For Series Adaptation Of ‘Fargo’
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Sep. 24, 2012

EXCLUSIVE: Joel and Ethan Coen are bringing one of their signatures movies to television. FX has closed a deal to develop Fargo, an hourlong project loosely based on the Coen brothers’ 1996 comedic crime drama. The Coens will serve as executive producers on the project, which will be written/executive produced by The Unusuals and My Generation creator Noah Hawley. Warren Littlefield also will executive the project, which will be co-produced by MGM Television and FX Prods.

The Fargo movie starred Frances McDormand as a pregnant North Dakota police chief who follows the trail of two bumbling criminals (Steve Buscemi and Peter Stormare) hired by a car salesman (William H. Macy) to kidnap his wife. The indie earned seven Oscar nominations, winning two statuettes — for the Coen brothers’ script and McDormand’s performance. (The Coens won three more Oscars for No Country For Old Men.) The title belongs to MGM’s library, making the project part of MGM TV’s strategy to mine the company’s catalogs for properties suitable for series adaptations/remakes. The company has the Teen Wolf reboot on MTV and recently announced it was teaming with American Idol executive producer Nigel Lythgoe for Fame, a scripted series based on the 1980 MGM film and 1982 MGM TV series. MGM TV first attempted to adapt Fargo in 2003 with a pilot starring Edie Falco and directed by Kathy Bates, which was done without the Coen brothers’ participation.

CAA-repped Hawley was a writer on Fox’s dramedy Bones before going on to create two series for ABC, The Unusuals and My Generation. The latter also was an adaptation; it was based on a Swedish series. This broadcast development season, he teamed with producers Alex Kurtzman and Bob Orci for a high-concept drama revolving around a mysterious game. Hawley is writing/executive producing the project, which has a script commitment with penalty at ABC. Fargo reunites Hawley with Littlefield who executive produced My Generation. Both are with CAA; Hawley is additionally repped by Joel McKuin. The Coen brothers’ upcoming movies include caper comedy Gambit, which they wrote, and Inside Llewyn Davis, which they wrote and directed. They are with UTA.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/09/fx-teams-with-joel-ethan-coen-and-noah-hawley-for-series-adaptation-of-fargo/
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
TUESDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Dancing with the Stars (120 min., LIVE)
10PM - Private Practice (Season Premiere)
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (The couple most recently eliminated from "Dancing With the Stars"; Melanie Griffith; Kerry Washington; Alanis Morissette performs)

CBS
8PM - NCIS (Season Premiere)
9PM - NCIS: Los Angeles (Season Premiere)
10PM - Vegas (Series Premiere)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Kaley Cuoco; stupid human tricks; The Whigs perform)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Tom Selleck; June Diane Raphael)

NBC:
8PM - The Voice
9PM - Go On
9:30PM - The New Normal
10PM - Parenthod
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Ann Romney; Seth MacFarlane; Bettye LaVette performs)
12:37AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Jerry Seinfeld; Anthony Anderson; Zach Cregger; Jesse Bradford; Two Door Cinema Club performs)
1:37AM - Last Call With Carson Daly (TV host Chris Hayes; Regina Spektor performs; comic Rob Delaney)*

FOX:
8PM - New Girl (Season Premiere)
8:30PM - Ben and Kate (Series Premiere)
9PM - New Girl
9:30PM - The Mindy Project (Season Premiere)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Money and Medicine (2012)
9PM - Frontline: Dropout Nation (120 min.)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Ella Soy Eva
9PM - Abismo de Pasión
10PM - Amor Bravia

THE CW:
8PM - Hart of Dixie
(R - May 14)
9PM - The Next
(R - Sep. 20)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Rosa Diamante
9PM - Corazón Valiente
10PM - Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal
10:30PM - El Rostro de la Venganza

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (King Abdullah II of Jordan)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Boxer Claressa Shields)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Nathan Fillion; Bill Burr; musical guest Band of Horses)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Wyclef Jean; Mary Lynn Rajskub; Loni Love; Rob Delaney)


* No, you're not seeing things; "Last Call with Carson Daly" is actually airing a new episode for the first time in 4-5 months or so. It's a miracle. wink.gif
Edited by dad1153 - 9/24/12 at 9:49pm
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TV Notes
Willie Geist Joins 'Today' Show as Co-Host of 9 a.m. Hour
By Marisa Guthrie, The Hollywood Reporter - Sep. 24, 2012

Willie Geist, who has frequently filled in for Matt Lauer on NBC's Today, is expected to be named the permanent co-host of the 9 a.m. hour with Natalie Morales, Al Roker and Savannah Guthrie, The Hollywood Reporter confirms.

Geist will give up his early-morning MSNBC show Way Too Early, say sources. But he is expected to stay on Morning Joe in the show's early hours, likely 6-7 a.m.

NBC News declined comment, but an official announcement is expected this week. Geist's promotion comes months after Guthrie was promoted to co-host of the flagship 7-9 a.m. hours with Lauer.

Lauer, 54, is still in the early months of a long-term contract worth a reported $25 million annually. Geist has been filling in for Lauer for some time, but his new job as a permanent member of Today could put the 37-year-old in first position as Lauer’s heir apparent.

Geist joined MSNBC in 2005 as a producer for Tucker Carlson but quickly segued to Carlson's on-air foil. It is a role he also plays with Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski on Morning Joe. The buzzy MSNBC morning show has certainly raised Geist’s profile -- and led to his own show on the network. But a permanent place on Today, even at a time when the morning program is in a ratings dogfight with ABC’s Good Morning America, will help to further establish Geist outside the long shadows of Scarborough and Brzezinski.

He has written two humor books and maintains the satirical video blog ZeitGeist at MSNBC.com

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/willie-geist-joins-today-show-373553
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TV Review
'Vegas': Classic Western in 1960
By David Wiegand, San Francisco Chronicle - Sep. 24, 2012

The notion of setting a classic Western in Las Vegas may seem a little strange from a 21st century perspective, but in 1960, the year when the new CBS drama "Vegas" begins, it works. In fact, the early '60s were probably the last time it could have worked.

Co-created by Nick Pileggi ("Casino"), "Vegas" is the kind of show John Ford could have sunk his choppers into. It not only has a white-hat-wearing good guy in Dennis Quaid and a black-suited villain in Michael Chiklis, it also spins on that most American of themes: The civilizing, for better and worse, of the wilderness.

At the start of Tuesday's premiere episode, Ralph Lamb (Quaid) and his ranch hands are herding cattle to market when, all of a sudden, to quote Pynchon, "a screaming comes across the sky." It's a passenger plane, flying low to the ground and scattering the herd as it heads toward the Vegas airport.

In a shot, Lamb is galloping away toward the airport to suggest with his fists that planes could easily come in from the other side and allow him to get his stock to market on time.

His complaint to the airport manager is witnessed by the plane's most important passenger, Chicago mobster Vincent Savino (Chiklis), who intends to make sure that what happens in Vegas results in lots of greenbacks staying in his pockets.

The discovery of a young woman's body in the desert pulls Lamb off the ranch and into temporary duty as a sheriff's deputy, since the young woman is the niece of the governor and has been working at Savino's casino. The murder introduces a standard whodunit into the action, of course, but the show never strays far from either the black-hat/white-hat wariness between Lamb and Savino, or from the theme of civilization versus the wilderness.

With help from his brother, Jack (Jason O'Mara), and Jack's hormone-charged son, Dixon (Taylor Handley), Lamb not only solves the murder, but serves notice on a ram-paging motorcycle gang that there's a new sheriff in town ... well, not yet, but of course by the end of the first episode, Lamb is officially the new sheriff. Quaid's character is based on the real-life Ralph Lamb, who served as Las Vegas sheriff from 1961 to 1979.

The performances are good and appropriately low-key, for the most part. Quaid, who hasn't done episodic TV since the 1970s, is powerfully gruff and taciturn, the quintessence of the Western hero as a man of few words, but all of them perfectly chosen and often backed up by his fists or a rifle. Chiklis is equally fine as Savino, of course, bringing to the role the quiet intensity that made "The Shield" a TV great. Lamb and Savino have a few minor run-ins in the first show, but overall, we have a sense of a couple of junkyard dogs, circling each other until they find the right moment to pounce.

The show's verisimilitude is enhanced by a wealth of period costumes and details, and by the set, a convincing reconstruction north of Los Angeles of what the Las Vegas Strip looked like in 1960 - just a few neon lights away from the dusty Old West main street that it used to be.

Tuesday's episode could be a textbook example of how to make an effective pilot. It does what pilots have to do - tells us who's who and sets the plot and tone of the story - but does so in a way that doesn't feel like the writers were sitting there with a checklist.

Whether you see the seams or not, though, what matters is that it all works, and we'll keep watching, if only to see Quaid and Chiklis square off against each other week after week.

2.0.gif
VEGAS
10 p.m. Tuesday on CBS.


http://www.sfgate.com/tv/article/Vegas-review-Classic-Western-in-1960-3888278.php
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Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 25, 2012

NEW GIRL
Fox, 8:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
On the second night of the new fall TV season, there’s nothing new to get truly excited about, and even the good returning shows, by and large, are more acceptable than thrilling. That’s certainly the case here, as Zooey Deschanel’s sitcom, now starting its sophomore year, already feels more like an Old Girl. Another new episode is shown at 9 p.m. ET.

BEN AND KATE
Fox, 8:30 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
Sandwiched between fresh installments of New Girl, this new sitcom, from that show’s producers, starts out by introducing an unusual (for TV, that is) central dynamic: a grown sister and brother (played by Dakota Johnson and Nat Faxon), who actually get along. For our collective critical gang’s reaction, see our TVWW Fall TV Preview page. And for a full review, see Ed Bark’s Uncle Barky’s Bytes.

VEGAS
CBS, 10:00 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
Another new series premiere. This one’s a drama, with a good lineage, strong stars (Dennis Quaid and Michael Chiklis), and an intriguing premise: the building of Las Vegas in the 1960s. The premiere episode isn’t that captivating, but the leads maintain momentum, at least for now. For our collective critical gang’s reaction, see our TVWW Fall TV Preview page. And for a full review, see Ed Bark’s Uncle Barky’s Bytes.

PARENTHOOD
NBC, 10:00 p.m. ET

Ray Romano, as Hank, has been an instantly valuable asset to this already strong dramatic series – I hope the writers find a way to keep him around, with an increasingly central role. But if not, make sure to enjoy him while we have him. Between this series and Men of a Certain Age, he’s proven he can play drama just as well as comedy, and with just as much empathy and likability.

SONS OF ANARCHY
FX, 10:00 p.m. ET

So who’s the most dangerous faction running around in town right now? The Sons of Anarchy, just dispatched for a short prison stay? The other inmates out to kill them? The CIA informants and agents who may or may not have the Sons’ interests at heart? The ruthless new mob boss, played by Harold Parrineau? Or the wounded but not dead Clay (Ron Perlman), who’s down but by no means out? With this crew, and those options, no wonder this FX series is more popular than ever. And, so far this season, more violent.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
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Q&A
Chevy Chase: 'Community' Was A Big Mistake
By HuffingtonPost.uk.com - Sep. 23, 2012

Chevy Chase has had a new lease of life as Pierce Hawthorne on the set of Community, the Emmy Award-nominated comedy set in school attended by a lawyer whose education has been deemed void.

Here, the comedic natural behind hits such as National Vacation and Fletch, expounds on the art of ad-libbing, blowing money, making telly not film, who's funny these days... and what hanging out with Dan Aykroyd means...

Q: So here you are on set today, so Pierce must be back for season three?

CC:
No. I just love these guys. I'm just having such a good time, I am going to fight my way back in.

Q: Because we are here for the season two DVD release (in the UK), and it seemed like, during season two, there was a plan to have Pierce kicked out of the group!

CC:
Ostracized? Out of the show? Too old? I was kind of worried about that too. I had to actually ask when I looked at the last script. But then I started acting, which took all the humour out of it!

Q: As you are a comedy genius and writer yourself, is there much improvisation on this set?

CC:
Donald (Glover) likes to improvise. He's very funny when he does. The issue with a show that's 23, 24 minutes long is that you can't really get up and out of your light and start improvising, but words-wise you can, as long as you don't do it for too long, because then you're screwed later in editing, and putting it together. There are areas you can. Donald is very good, for instance, in taking something and in the same amount of time, making it funnier with his words. I am good at improvising in another kind of way - I'm very facial and whatnot - so there is a good amount of improv but it's all based on a very set storyline and idea, that Dan, who has never slept in his life, came up with.

Q: Some of my favourite episodes of season two have to be the paintball episodes. Did you enjoy them?

CC:
Well, I have to say that one of the things that bothers me about our show is that it is placed in that study room all the time, with the same light, the same colour - that's not interesting to see a lot. It's just joke after joke after joke around that table. It's hard to shoot it all the time in the same way, the same thing. So we did these other episodes, which shows depth, which showed colour, which showed movement. But it's a tough show to do because by necessity, it's in a school. We have a biology classroom, we have other classrooms, but sitting and making jokes is not an easy thing to write. The more movement the better, I think, personally. I think you can then get a little more differentiation of colour, of light and dark, etc. I don't necessarily mean a paintball one. But we do have those hallways where someone can get angry and chase someone.

Q: Your character on Community is a millionaire, is there anything you have ever blown a lot of money on?

CC:
Anything I have blown a lot of money on? Well, I have three daughters and a wife - that's four women, and I'm working on a sitcom, so you could say that I am just trying to stay alive!

Q: So have you blown it all? Is it all gone?

CC:
No, no. I did very well when I was younger and I am fine. But I have blown a lot of money on them, yeah. That's what it is there for.

Q: Why did you decide to do a TV show after doing so many movies?

CC:
It was a big mistake! I saw this pilot script, thought that it was funny, and I went into the room where they were casting and said, "I would love to play this guy." Then they mulled it over. Then they hired me and I just sort of hung around because I have three daughters and a wife, and I figured out I might as well make some bread, every week, so I can take care of them in the way they want. My wife has just been in the Antarctic, and Cuzco in Peru, and Lima, and Machu Picchu... she likes to travel. That was about a month of travelling, and that will take about a year of work.

Q: Do you enjoy doing TV?

CC:
Well, what else have I done, besides a lot of movies? I prefer movies because the money is better and certainly because you really know where you stand when you are making movies, and I have made a lot of them: 50 something, I don't know. The hours in this kind of show are not commensurate with the actual product.

The hours are hideous, and it's still a sitcom on television, which is probably the lowest form of television. That's my feeling about it. I think the reason I have stuck around is because I love these kids, the cast - they are very good. It's not like I am working with the great innovators of all time, but at the same time, they are my friends and I am out, and one of my daughters is out here, and wants to be in the business, so she is living with me. I will have some time off and I will be looking for a film, which I think will be my next thing, my next move.

Q: Do you approve of your daughter wanting to get into the business?

CC:
Approve? I am just happy that I have children. I don't care what they want to do! I will approve of anything she wants to do. I think to the extent to which she may have expected a nepotistic rearing, but she knew going in that that wasn't going to be the case. That I think she's going to learn on her own. Where I could help, I would, and I have on occasion, but for the most part, this is something she wants to explore, and she's young and that's fine with me.

Q: Is there anyone you haven't worked with yet that you would love to do a movie with?

CC:
Oh. Albert Brooks. I would love to do a movie with Albert Brooks; we're so different but I find him so funny, and I can be just as seemingly narcissistic as he comes off, the 'it's all about me' kind of thing. I think it would be a lot of fun. I don't know how or what type of movie or how that would go, but I always enjoy him because I think he's got a wide perspective on human behaviour that a lot of other comedians don't have, and quite frankly, there aren't too many comedians who make me laugh.

Q: Have you seen Louis CK? Do you think he's funny?

CC:
Yes, I've seen Louis CK. I wouldn't in any way make a degrading remark about Louis CK, but the question is do I think anyone is funny? And the answer is not too many people. He might fit right in there.

Q: Who does make you laugh? What were your comedy inspirations?

CC:
Who made me laugh when I was growing was Chaplin and the Marx Brothers, and then moving on, there were so many that I was a writer for for many years: I was a writer for the Smothers Brothers, Lily Tomlin, then I started on Saturday Night Live as the head writer, the first year we started it. So then I was in that, and that made me famous more as a performer. I must say that the funniest people I ever worked with were John Belushi and Gilda (Radner) and Dan Aykroyd, and that first cast.

Q: That was a long time ago.

CC:
Yes is it. Two of them have died, as you know, which is tragic, particularly in the case of Gilda, but there are still others that are around that are very funny. Those days are gone, but if you ask me who the funniest people I have worked with, I would have to say they were. Any good actor has to have a good sense of humour too, they have to be able to manipulate people.

Q: What do you think about the writing of SNL now?

CC:
Now? I don't watch it all that much.

Q: What about the writing for Community?

CC:
For this one? As I said, it's completely different. That kind of show that I wrote for, that style of show, which is a variety, comedy, sketch show, and the fact that it's live and late at night, allows you to do so much more than you can ever do in a sitcom. I don't know much about how I would change the situation comedy world, but it is exactly what it says: it's situation comedy, and the situation can get old, and sometimes the ones that are at the very top, which just have three people in them, The Big Bang Theory or whatever it is - it's three people, that's basically what the premise is, and we can do that day and night. None of that really interests me. What interests me is being alive and being with friends that I care about and being as creative as I can given circumstance.

Q: Do you have any regrets?

CC:
I have many. Don't you? If we didn't have regrets, we'd have nothing to look forward to.

Q: I try not to have regrets because I think, "I guess I had fun while I was doing that." But do you have any professional regrets: things you didn't do, or did do?

CC:
That's a hard thing to answer. I turned down Forrest Gump, I turned down American Gigolo, there are many films - like Ghostbusters - that I turned down... the first one I did was Foul Play with Goldie Hawn, but I turned down Animal House - I turned that down. So all those I regret only because they made huge amounts of money and I would be very wealthy, but I don't regret working with Goldie, I don't regret the projects that I did do. And at the time, I felt like I had lived Animal House, I had been to college and high school, and believe me, Animal House didn't come close to some of the things I was doing! That's the way I looked at it, rather than as an intelligent businessman. I'm not that way, I'm not very good about judging according to the pay.

Q: Do you have a favourite role in the past that you played?

CC:
I think Fletch, in the movies, is probably my favourite, because I was allowed to do whatever I just did. The director, who's no longer with us, Michael (Ritchie), allowed me to just go, and so I pretty much improvised throughout that movie, and that was the most fun I had, and that was most like me, because that's the way I am. Then I think the Vacation movies, because I can't think of anybody funnier to work with than Beverly D'Angelo. She is just brilliant and I love her dearly - we are still great, great friends, and I see her as much as I can manage. I don't think those were particularly great achievements in cinema, but they were what they were, and I had great fun.

Q: What do fans say to you? Do they still talk to you about Fletch?

CC:
People on the street? They just say, "Love you on Community!" So the fact that they know the show... I don't know much about ratings and TV and all that - I did mostly movies - that's terrific.

Q: Don't most people still quote Fletch and Caddyshack to you?

CC:
Yeah, but the fact they add Community to that is what I am trying to say. It used to be, "Oh, I loved Fletch," or, "I loved Vacation," or whatever, but now it's, "I love you on Community." Which means that they love Community.

Q: Is there an age where you are going to stop?

CC:
Right after this interview.

Q: You have talked a lot about your family, who are obviously very important to you, but what else do you like doing when you are not working?

CC:
I mean, of course my family is the most important thing to me, I think that should be the same for everyone. But I play jazz piano, and I think I will probably go to that next, stay with that a little more and maybe play a few more clubs; I have played Carnegie Hall a couple of times. I played drums early on, I've been a musician all my life, but I have put it way back in second place to what I do as a performer, but probably more as I get older, I will concentrate more on that between projects. I don't think you will see me doing any more of this kind of thing. I have done it, I can see what it is, and now it is time to find out what else I can do.

Q: Do you still hang out with Dan Aykroyd?

CC:
Well, the idea of 'hanging out' with Dan is... [] Any time I see him, we are 'hanging out'! He lives out here, and he is one of the most genial and lovely men in the world, and has a lovely wife, and he's fun and funny, and also very serious in a kind of a silly way. Some of his beliefs are just nuts.

Q: Like what?

CC:
Oh, he's majored in UFOs and ghosts and all kinds of stuff. On the other hand, when you get to know Dan, you know why.

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2012/09/22/interview-chevy-chase-community-dan-aykroyd_n_1906610.html?utm_hp_ref=tv&ir=TV
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Legal Notes
Robert Kirkman and artist Tony Moore settle 'Walking Dead' lawsuit
By Clark Collis, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Sep. 24, 2012

Walking Dead comic writer Robert Kirkman and artist Tony Moore, who worked on the early issues of the zombie title, have settled their respective lawsuits. In February, Moore filed suit against Kirkman seeking allegedly unpaid royalties from The Walking Dead and other properties and filed another suit in August seeking a determination that he is the co-author of the long-running zombie comic. In turn, Kirkman launched a counterclaim against Moore, alleging the artist had violated a confidentiality provision of their agreement and that he had in fact overpaid his onetime collaborator.

In a joint statement released today, Kirkman and Moore announced that they have “reached an amicable agreement in their respective lawsuits and all parties have settled the entire matter to everyone’s mutual satisfaction. Neither side will be discussing any details but will instead happily and productively spend their time focused on their own work and move on in their lives.”

http://news-briefs.ew.com/2012/09/24/robert-kirkman-walking-dead-lawsuit/
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Washington Notes
Court Thwarts Broadcasters' Bid to Block FCC Decision on Viewability Rule
By Doug Halonen, TheWrap.com - Sep. 24, 2012

A federal appeals court refused on Monday to block an FCC decision phasing out its so-called “viewability rule,” a regulation requiring cable operators to ensure that their customers have access to all local TV signals.

Millions of cable TV subscribers may have to buy or lease new converter boxes to continue watching some local stations in the wake of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit's refusal to intervene in an appeal of the FCC ruling.

As it stands, the viewability regulation is slated to expire December 12.

The regulation, which ensures that cable’s subscribers had access to smaller stations in their markets -- usually the independent, religious and foreign-language stations in their communities -- was originally supposed to be phased out in June.

But in the wake of a major lobbying effort by broadcasters, the FCC agreed to extend the regulation for six months -- through December 12.

Broadcasters, led by the National Association of Broadcasters, had appealed the ruling, and asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit to block the phase-out of the regulations, at least until after the court had considered the broadcast industry’s case.

But in a terse ruling Monday, the court, according to an NAB spokesperson, said the broadcasters hadn’t “satisfied the stringent requirements for a stay pending court review.”

Without the rule, cable’s analog TV subscribers will have to get digital-to-analog converter boxes to continue receiving the smaller station TV signals -- the so-called “must-carry” TV stations -- in their markets.

About 12.6 million cable households are still equipped with analog TV sets—out of a total of about 58 million cable subscribers. Unless those subscribers lease or buy digital-to-analog converter boxes from their cable operators, they will lose access to the must-carry signals after December 12.

In a statement to TheWrap, the NAB said it remained “concerned that the FCC decision has the potential to impose negative financial consequences on small local TV stations that are a source for minority, religious and independent program diversity across America.”

The National Cable and Telecommunications Association, which favored elimination of the rule, had no comment, according to a spokesman.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/column-post/court-thwarts-broadcasters-bid-block-fcc-decision-viewability-rule-57871
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Critic's Notes
PBS' Money & Medicine Examines Some Volatile Aspects of Health Care
By Tom Binkmoeller, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 25, 2012

A program called Money & Medicine, showing up less than two months ahead of a national election, could be suspect of pushing an agenda that is either for or against the Affordable Health Care Act (aka "Obamacare"). But this hour-long special is appearing Tuesday, Sept. 25 at 8 p.m. ET (check local listings) on PBS, where hidden/not-so-hidden agendas are as forbidden as infomercials.

Its examination of health-care accessibility and cost-containment is tinted neither red nor blue. And because it contains interviews with medical professionals, observers and participants who share no one common point of view, there's not a soapbox visible in a single shot in the program (though post-broadcast cries of pain from real or imagined gored oxen wouldn't be a surprise).

Inside of 60 minutes, it examines four somewhat volatile aspects of health care: end-of-life care; Caesarean-section childbirth; prostate cancer treatment; and diagnostic testing. It looks at spending versus results; interviews patients, family and care providers; and seeks out experts whose job it is to observe medical care.

There's a man who fought (and eventually sued) the hospital that, after 10 months and more than $5 million of intensive care for his mother, decided further extraordinary measures were useless. He calls that decision "a medical execution" delivered by "a death panel."

There's a professional whose research has shown aggressive prostate treatment often is unnecessary: "You have to remove about 15 prostates to prevent one prostate-cancer death." (An interesting point made in the program is autopsies of older individuals showed evidence of prostate cancer, though none of them died from it.)

There's the argument that the ever-increasing cost of diagnostic equipment and the first-choice reliance of some physicians to utilize them, needed or not, can be linked to a high number of radiation-related deaths annually.

And two money-related issues of high volatility are touched on when the statements, "you might sue me" and "I get paid more" are mentioned as sometime-motivators of physician actions.

PBS-style, the program raises questions and presents information, ideally giving viewers facts upon which they can base future decisions.

Producer-director Roger Weisberg said in a recent interview he doesn't think the program will ignite new partisan explosives. He has shown the program to Republican and Democratic lawmakers and the reaction he has seen is that both sides want to "slow growth and contain medical costs. Where they differ are in the remedies."

Following two years of production and access to all the people, and more, who appear in the program, Weisberg has decided what at least one remedy to the problem is: "I think that what needs to change is that patients need to confer with their primary-care physicians more to discuss the risks and benefits and trade-offs (of specialist-suggested procedures, tests and surgeries) and it will lead to less-aggressive care."

Weisberg thinks that when the person who "recommends the surgery is not the surgeon," the patient ends up benefitting more. "When patients make informed decisions, the consumption rates go way down." he said.

For those who are interested in even more depth in examination of the issues this program explores, there is a detailed and very comprehensive viewer guide available on Weisberg's company website.

Whichever way the national elections go, the challenge of improving the way health care is delivered will remain. That makes Money & Medicine an equally important source information before and after the November elections.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/post/MoneyandMedicine.aspx
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TV Review
Hitting the jackpot — sorta — in 'Vegas'
The '60s-set 'Vegas' is not perfect, but it has good prospects with its thematic dichotomies built around its hero (Dennis Quaid) and antihero (Michael Chiklis). Take the gamble.
By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times - Sep. 24, 2012

The Midcentury Effect that rippled outward from "Mad Men" and produced "Pan Am," "The Playboy Club" and "Magic City" has now tossed "Vegas" upon our shores. Premiering Tuesday on CBS, it is set in 1960 in the City sometimes called Sin, when men were men and women were showgirls and Las Vegas was still an expression — or an impression, perhaps — of the Wild West and not the fantastical, international theme park it has since become.

The series comes from Nicholas Pileggi — who cowrote the screenplays for Martin Scorsese's "Goodfellas" and "Casino," from his own books — with "Without a Trace" vet Greg Walker aboard to give it that TV shape and pace. It's not a perfect show, but to judge by its pilot, it has good bones and excellent prospects, with a cast that knows just how much fun it can have before it seems as if it is just having fun. Indeed, murder and mayhem notwithstanding, there's a lot of comedy in it.

What makes the series seem particularly viable is the way it balances its twin leads: rancher-turned-sheriff-but-still-a-rancher Ralph Lamb (Dennis Quaid) and fresh-to-town mob guy Vincent Savino (Michael Chiklis), who has come to take charge of the Savoy, an Atomic Age casino that has been leaking money.

Though one is "good" and one "bad," they are fundamentally alike. Neither stands on ceremony. Each in his own way in his own world is more concerned with justice than with rules — "I'm the law here, Mr. Savino, and I will decide who's breaking it," says Lamb — and each has a stake in keeping order, in discouraging cheats and hotheads. Each would also like to be left alone to take care of business.

Pileggi and Walker set up a host of charged thematic dichotomies around their hero and antihero: the future versus the past, the city versus the land, East versus West, the timeless against the transient, the (sort of) native contrasted with the (vaguely) foreign. (Italians in the desert! Eating spaghetti!) The typical midcentury story is one of Big Dreams at a Moment of Change, but "Vegas" doesn't reflexively side with the new.

What I've read about the historical Lamb — he's a real person — suggests that this screen version resembles the original only broadly. He was not, at least, the reluctant hero shown here, who takes what he assumes will be the temporary job of sheriff in exchange for a promise from the mayor to keep landing airliners away from his cattle. But we like our heroes reluctant (and outside the system); it keeps their righteousness on the right side of self-righteousness.

"That's a battle you're not going to win," says Carrie-Anne Moss' assistant DA, of Lamb's war with the planes. (Not all the women are showgirls, after all.).

"Who said it was about winning?" he replies.

Quaid, a handsomely weathered 58, looks good in his cowboy suit. A young old coot (youngish, anyway), he's acquired some of the gravitas another era's aging leading men brought to the postwar western — actors such as Randolph Scott, Joel McCrea and Jimmy Stewart, who, freed of their previous prettiness, could finally let a little dark side show.

Chiklis, who also wears his part well, is less crazy as a crook than he was in "The Shield" as a cop; his mobster has a temper, as all mobsters must, but if the show is going to last beyond a season on network television, he's going to want your affection too. As Lamb's deputized brother Jack, Jason O'Mara likewise seems more comfortable here than he did in "Terra Nova" or "Life on Mars"; I am glad for him, even relieved, in an almost proprietary way.

Not every moment works. A scene in which a motorcycle gang is corralled like cattle with police cars and pickup trucks plays as silly, and would be even if it actually happened. And the murder mystery that gets the story going is itself less than compelling — I was never moved to try to solve it on my own, nor did I ever really care who done it. But there is much else to see.

VEGAS
Where: CBS
When: 10 p.m. Tuesday


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-vegas-20120925,0,5347638.story
post #82361 of 93672
TV Reviews
'The Mindy Project' And 'Ben And Kate': A Mixed Verdict For Fox's New Comedies
By Maureen Ryan, HuffingtonPost.com - Sep. 24, 2012

As NBC attempts to go more big and broad with its comedies, other networks are attempting to swipe the audience that the peacock network once dominated.

As loved as "Community" and "Parks and Recreation" are, we know, at this point, that they're far from the cornerstones of NBC's future. As the network frantically attempts to move on, they're the boxes in the attic that don't even get put in the moving truck because nobody thinks they'll need them. (And, sad to say, "The Office" is the moldy leftovers they kind of forgot were in the fridge.)

ABC is already well on the path to domination in the aspirational single-camera comedy realm, with its Emmy-devouring "Modern Family" efficiently using the tools "The Office" made popular to make a comedy with very retro (and sometimes lazy) tendencies. "Modern Family" hasn't gotten any sharper with age, in fact, the opposite is the case, but tell that to ABC executives and Emmy voters, who will keep renewing it/voting for it until the sun burns out. Whatever your feelings about "Modern Family," though, you can't deny that in that show, "Suburgatory," "Happy Endings" and "The Middle," the network has a nice array of generally well-made comedies that don't quite pull in the viewership figures of CBS' more traditional fare, but still fit in quite nicely in with ABC's shiny, positive brand.

All the networks actually have pretty well-defined comedy brands at this point, with ABC's being upbeat and relationship-oriented, CBS' staid, efficient and unchallenging, and NBC -- well, NBC's most notable fall programs are "Animal Practice" and "Revolution," and if you think "Monkey Apocalypse" isn't going to be on the schedule next fall, you're dreaming.

Fox has obviously dominated the animation arena since dinosaurs roamed the earth, but it's looking to play some catch-up in the live-action comedy realm, and it laid a very solid foundation with "New Girl" (whose creator and executive producers I recently interviewed). This year, Fox returns to that basic premise -- young, attractive people figuring out adulthood as slightly clueless singletons -- with two new comedies, "Ben and Kate" (premieres on Tues., Sept. 25 at 8:30 p.m. ET) and "The Mindy Project" (premieres Tues., Sept. 25 at 9:30 p.m.).

Neither comedy is really there yet, but "Ben and Kate" is the more promising of the two, which is weird, given that "Mindy Project" is the first solo project of "Office" writer-actor Mindy Kaling. Both deserve more time to figure out what they want to do, but my patience for "Mindy" is far more scanty than I thought it would be.

As "New Girl" did, both comedies take tropes associated with women and play around with them. A term invented by AV Club critic Nathan Rabin, "manic pixie dream girl," fit "New Girl" so well that the show's marketing folks actually unselfconsciously adopted it to sell merchandise. Of course, "New Girl" wisely moved well beyond its lead characters "adorkable" qualities, but "Ben and Kate" almost entirely rests on a similarly conceit. The difference is, the manic pixie dream girl here is a boy.

"Ben and Kate" stars Dakota Johnson and Nat Faxon as siblings who depend on each other to an unusual degree. Kate, a single mom, is the responsible one, and every time her impulsive and emotional brother turns up, he generally wreaks havoc on Kate's life.

The pilot's job is to convince us to root for these crazy siblings to make their relationship work, and "Ben and Kate" more or less does that, despite a fair amount of flop sweat and manic energy. It's the kind of show that could well settle into a nice groove once it gets a few episodes in, especially given that all the performances are top notch, including those from Lucy Punch and Echo Kellum as friends of the title duo.

The job of "The Mindy Project" was to make me root for the fictional Mindy Lahiri or merely want to spend more time in her presence. It didn't get very far in either of those arenas, and I didn't find it very funny either.

Speaking of pop-culture tropes involving female characters, Mindy is obsessed with romantic comedies, and she's also an obstetrician-gynecologist, thus ensuring that "The Mindy Project" has double the usual number of opportunities to use the word "vagina." In an admirable show of restraint, "The Mindy Project" refrains from going there in the script, even though a scene involves Mindy delivering a baby from one.

In other ways, however, "The Mindy Project" goes way overboard. The show tells us repeatedly that Mindy loves romantic comedies, but offers us no indication that Mindy yearns for romantic love or a committed relationship. She seems quite happy to sleep with her hot, dumb British co-worker for kicks, and that's fine, but if that's her preference, why hit us over the head with the "When Harry Met Sally" references?

Actually, the cultural reference "Mindy Project" brings to mind is the tiresome '90s canard that tried to get a whole generation of professional women to believe that if they were single in their 30s, they might as well just give up because potential mates were rarer than left-handed unicorns. Romantic comedies are also a hugely problematic area; the classics are great because they generally feature two intriguing characters working through their differences, while the kind of moronic movies that Kate Hudson and Katherine Heigl usually star in are all about taking over-educated womenfolk down a few pegs. Romantic comedies are not all the same, but "Mindy" uses these references as a kind of shorthand that ends up making everything more muddled, not more resonant.

It's hard not to wonder if Kaling wanted to create a female anti-hero (which is a great idea) but stopped short because broadcast networks aren't especially interested in those, especially in the comedy arena. In any event, the lead character is so tonally mixed up that it's hard not to get whiplash from watching the pilot.

Perhaps Dr. Lahiri's self-absorption is meant to be funny, but given that "Mindy" also wants you to care about her aspirations, there's a big disjunction at the heart of the show. In one key "Mindy" scene [and you can skip the rest of the paragraph if you're anti-spoiler], a patient's worried child calls Mindy when she's out on a date with an unexceptional Wall Street guy (nicely played by Ed Helms). For a long time, Mindy refuses to take the call or leave her date, because for a woman to get a chance to go out a decent-looking guy with a real job is so rare, right? There's a weird stew of ideas about expectations, desire and anger roiling around in "Mindy," but as they're explored here, those ideas don't cohere into a show that's either funny or cogent.

Given its pedigree and its fine supporting cast (which includes Stephen Tobolowsky and Anna Camp), and the sparky relationship that Mindy has with Chris Messina's regular-guy doctor, I'll keep watching to see whether "The Mindy Project" grows out of its creaky "Women Are from Mars, Men Are from Venus" starting point. After all, I wasn't all that high on "New Girl," but that show turned into something pretty swell. Let's hope Fox's ongoing efforts to steal NBC's lunch money continues to yield worthwhile comedic dividends.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/maureen-ryan/the-mindy-project-review_b_1910288.html?utm_hp_ref=maureen-ryan
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TV Notes
Jonny Lee Miller takes Sherlock to NYC in 'Elementary'
By Maria Puente, USA Today - Sep. 24, 2012

If it's best to be British to play Sherlock Holmes, then British actor Jonny Lee Miller fits the bill for the new Holmes-in-New-York series, Elementary. But then, Miller might also become a Yank eventually.

He's already partway there: He's been living in the USA for seven years, mostly in Los Angeles, now in New York. Turning 40 in November, he is one of the growing cadre of British actors on American TV. He's the husband of an American, actress/model Michelle Hicks, and the father of an American, 4-year-old Buster. Even his first wife is an American, actress Angelina Jolie.

And these days, he's paying more attention to American politics, even though he can't vote in November.

"I really do feel a part of the country, especially in L.A.," he says in a phone interview from his New York set. He says President Obama's speeches struck resonant chords for him, with their paeans to immigrants who helped build America and calls to the obligations of citizenship.

"It's not something I rule out, but I have not gone down the citizenship road yet. It depends on how things work out," he says.

Meaning how things work out with Elementary, the crime-solving drama that premieres Thursday (CBS, 10 p.m. ET/PT). The show adapts an enduring-if-weird 19th-century character -- damaged-genius detective Holmes -- to a 21st-century New York police procedural. Lucy Liu plays an exasperated Dr. Joan Watson, hired to keep an eye on recovering drug addict Holmes in his work as an outside "consultant," helping the police with their inquiries, as they say in the U.K.

This is Miller's third try as the lead in an American TV series (Eli Stone in 2008, the quickly canceled Smith in 2006), building on a successful career in Britain in films and TV playing parts ranging from highbrow literary characters (poet Lord Byron and Jane Austen heroes) to heroin addicts and hackers (Trainspotting, Hackers).

Sherlock Holmes is both a literary character and a drug addict. He's also really, really smart and fast-talking. The umpteenth filmed interpretation of Holmes in the past 125 years, Elementary will examine the flaws in a character updated for a modern American context, Miller says.

"I find that quite enjoyable, trying to see the downsides of someone," he says. "(Holmes) really struggles with his genius and the darker sides of his personality, and that's what attracted me (to the role).

"I quite like our take in magnifying the addiction aspects," he adds. "(Holmes) speaks both languages, the language of the underworld and the language of the lawmen. People can relate to that."

But Miller is no Holmes, he says.

"Well, in certain aspects," he concedes. "(Holmes) is extremely observant. That's one thing we share. I've always been, since I was a little kid, and my son is quite observant, too. Attention to detail -- Sherlock certainly has that, and my memory is pretty good -- but not as good as his."

But like Holmes, he's thoroughly English in his vocabulary. "Bollocks," he shouts in one scene, which wouldn't pass muster with American broadcasting standards if most Americans knew what it meant. Miller jokingly promises to be on his "best behavior" in avoiding Trainspotting-style vocabulary that viewers could Google.

Meanwhile, he and his family are loving New York, which he says is "fantastic" and like London in that "it's on your doorstep all the time." He's lived there before, when he was appearing in a show on Broadway in 2009. And his wife is from New York.

"It's a really great city to have a young kid," he says. "I'm really excited to get to know it better. My wife was quite happy to come here, too. And hopefully we'll be able to stay. It's really a blessing to be able to stay together."

http://www.usatoday.com/life/people/story/2012/09/24/jonny-lee-miller-takes-sherlock-to-nyc-in-elementary/57837990/1
post #82363 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
Jonny Lee Miller takes Sherlock to NYC in 'Elementary'

Hack the planet!
post #82364 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
‘SNF’ scores another touchdown for NBC
NBC game averages a 14.3 metered-market household rating
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 24, 2012
Airing opposite the Primetime Emmy Awards last night, NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” put up very strong numbers with a rematch of last year’s AFC championship teams.

The Baltimore Ravens’ thrilling 31-30 victory over the New England Patriots averaged a 14.3 household rating from 8:30 p.m. to midnight, according to Nielsen metered-market ratings, up 8 percent over last year’s week-three game between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Indianapolis Colts.

It was easily the night’s No. 1 show and drew “SNF’s” best week-three rating since 2008.

In fact, it was the second-best primetime week-three rating for any game since 1997.

It continues the strong momentum for “SNF,” which aired its most-watched broadcast ever to start the season two weeks ago, when Peyton Manning made his debut with the Denver Broncos.

And it came on a night with strong competition from ABC’s Emmy Awards.

I heard the Emmys were nothing more than extension of the DNC.
post #82365 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Q&A
Chevy Chase: 'Community' Was A Big Mistake
By HuffingtonPost.uk.com - Sep. 23, 2012

Q: Do you enjoy doing TV?
CC:
Well, what else have I done, besides a lot of movies? I prefer movies because the money is better and certainly because you really know where you stand when you are making movies, and I have made a lot of them: 50 something, I don't know. The hours in this kind of show are not commensurate with the actual product.
The hours are hideous, and it's still a sitcom on television, which is probably the lowest form of television. That's my feeling about it. I think the reason I have stuck around is because I love these kids, the cast - they are very good. It's not like I am working with the great innovators of all time, but at the same time, they are my friends and I am out, and one of my daughters is out here, and wants to be in the business, so she is living with me. I will have some time off and I will be looking for a film, which I think will be my next thing, my next move.

That answer sums up every reason that people think Chevy is a dick.

Sitcoms are the lowest form of television? Guess he doesn't watch much television.

Prefers movies because the money is better? Yeah, because all of his movies really stack up against the likes of Deadwood. Maybe if he didn't focus entirely on what the best pay deal is he might be in roles that make him more respected as an actor and not a fading comedian.

Loved the backhanded putdown in there too. The cast are his friends and good performers. But not that good.
post #82366 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

ABC needs to rebrand this show as "mostly Live." The start of the show was recorded earlier. Many of the interviews were recorded earlier, including the fan interview piece.
It is obvious as to why the interviews had to be recorded before the show started, since the stars had to get into the theater before show start time.
Your local newscast is "Live", but most of the video, interviews and other elements were recorded earlier that day.

Live refers to the program, not necessarily the amount of content occurring live.

Saturday Night Live has plenty of recorded segments in it.
post #82367 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

That answer sums up every reason that people think Chevy is a dick.

Just as revealing I thought was his idea of improvisation. I'll rewrite - "I have no real verbal skills, but I'm a great improviser because I mug for the camera and do pratfalls and stuff."
post #82368 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by fjames View Post

Just as revealing I thought was his idea of improvisation. I'll rewrite - "I have no real verbal skills, but I'm a great improviser because I mug for the camera and do pratfalls and stuff."

When I read that his idea of improv was facial expressions, I just thought "Isn't that just, you know, acting?"
post #82369 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

That answer sums up every reason that people think Chevy is a dick.
Sitcoms are the lowest form of television? Guess he doesn't watch much television.
Prefers movies because the money is better? Yeah, because all of his movies really stack up against the likes of Deadwood. Maybe if he didn't focus entirely on what the best pay deal is he might be in roles that make him more respected as an actor and not a fading comedian.
Loved the backhanded putdown in there too. The cast are his friends and good performers. But not that good.

I guess you haven’t seen many interviews with Chevy. You have to take a lot of what he says tongue-in-cheek. You should also know the printed word doesn’t always translate what takes place during an interview.

Watch this to get an idea. If you read this instead of seeing it, you would probably call him a dick. And be wrong about it.

post #82370 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aliens View Post

I guess you haven’t seen many interviews with Chevy. You have to take a lot of what he says tongue-in-cheek. You should also know the printed word doesn’t always translate what takes place during an interview.

I've seen and read plenty of interviews (including that video) and he always acts differently when he's one-on-one with an interviewer than the few occasions he assembles with the cast. It's not the first time he's made comments like that and the production history of Community alone is enough to see how he doesn't fit in and apparently doesn't want to. Unless he's being paid to of course.

You can follow the same pattern all the way through his career.
post #82371 of 93672
MONDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #82372 of 93672
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
NBC wins first night of the new TV season
Averages a 4.0 in 18-49s, paced by a 4.2 from 'The Voice'
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 25, 2012

NBC won the opening night of the new TV season, becoming the only network to see year-to-year growth.

Led by “The Voice,” the night’s No. 1 show, NBC averaged a 4.0 adults 18-49 rating and 10 share in primetime, according to Nielsen overnights, up 122 percent over last year’s comparable fourth-place showing with the since-canceled “The Sing Off” and “The Playboy Club.”

NBC’s new drama “Revolution” maintained last week’s momentum, averaging a 3.5 at 10 p.m., a very good number for the late hour, and finishing first in its timeslot.

It was down 15 percent from last week’s 4.1 premiere, the strongest drama bow in three years. It did have a smaller lead-in than last week, with “Voice” sliding from a 4.7 to a 4.2 last night.

“Voice” clearly cut into the other networks’ ratings on the night. ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars: All Stars,” competing directly with “Voice” from 8 to 10 p.m., slid 30 percent from last fall’s 4.0 in its debut to a 2.8 last night.

CBS’s entire lineup was down more than 50 percent against last year’s admittedly inflated numbers, when Ashton Kutcher’s debut as Charlie Sheen’s replacement on “Two and a Half Men” drew astronomical ratings and boosted the network to a 5.8/14 average on the night.

Last night CBS fell to a 2.7/7, finishing second to NBC, with some disappointing results. The 10 p.m. drama “Hawaii Five-0” plunged 44 percent, from a 3.5 to a series-low 1.9, apparently hurt by competition from “Revolution” and the weaker lead-in.

“2 Broke Girls,” which took over the 9 p.m. timeslot from “Men,” scored a solid 3.7, down from its 4.2 average last season but finishing as the night’s No. 2 show.

But CBS may have a problem at 8:30 p.m., where the new sitcom “Partners” averaged just a 2.4, losing a full point from lead-in “How I Met Your Mother.”

On Fox, “Bones” nearly matched last week’s premiere with a 2.2 at 8 p.m., down 4 percent. Lead-out “The Mob Doctor” may be on the way out, though. It managed a mere 1.3 at 9 p.m. in its second week, down from last week’s 1.5 for its series debut.

With NBC well out ahead for the night and CBS in second, ABC finished third at 2.6/7, Fox fourth at 1.7/5, Univision fifth at 1.5/4, Telemundo sixth at 0.5/1 and CW seventh at 0.2/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-five percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. NBC led with a 3.8 for "Voice," followed by CBS with a 2.9 for "Mother" (3.4) and "Partners" (2.4). ABC was third with a 2.6 for "Stars," Fox fourth with a 2.2 for "Bones," Univision fifth with a 1.7 for "Por Ella Soy Eva," Telemundo sixth with a 0.4 for "Rosa Diamante" and CW seventh with a 0.3 for "The L.A. Complex."

NBC was first again at 9 p.m. with a 4.7 for more "Voice," while CBS remained second with a 3.4 for "Girls" (3.7) and "Mike & Molly" (3.0). ABC was third with a 2.8 for more "Stars," Univision fourth with a 1.6 for "Abismo de Pasion," Fox fifth with a 1.3 for "Doctor," Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for "Corazon Valiente" and CW seventh with a 0.2 for more "L.A. Complex."

At 10 p.m. NBC was first with a 3.5 for "Revolution," with ABC second with a 2.5 for "Castle." CBS was third with a 1.9 for "Hawaii," Univision fourth with a 1.3 for "Amor Bravio" and Telemundo fifth with a 0.7 for "Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal" (0.9) and "El Rostro de la Venganza" (0.5).

ABC led the night among households with an 8.8 average overnight rating and a 13 share. NBC was second at 6.8/10, CBS third at 5.3/8, Fox fourth at 3.4/5, Univision fifth at 2.0/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.7/1 and CW seventh at 0.4/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/nbc-wins-first-night-of-the-new-tv-season/
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TV Notes
USA’s ‘Royal Pains’, ‘White Collar’ & ‘Covert Affairs’ Renewed
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Sep. 25, 2012

Three days into the astronomical fall, USA Network has made the first renewal decision on its summer series, picking up additional seasons of established performers Royal Pains, White Collar and Covert Affairs. For Royal Pains, the pickup is for 26 episodes across two additional seasons, the show’s fifth and sixth. White Collar and Covert Affairs have each received a 16-episode renewal for a fifth and fourth season, respectively. “In an increasingly competitive landscape, these series got new season pickups the old-fashioned way – they earned it,” said USA co-presidents Chris McCumber and Jeff Wachtel. The move comes as USA wrapped a seventh consecutive summer as the No. 1 cable network across all key demos.

Following a 13-epispde freshman season, in Years 2 and 3 Royal Pains aired 16- to 18-episode seasons in two batches, one in the summer and one in the winter. Because of the show’s premise — it takes place during the summer season in the Hamptons — there are not enough warm days to film the entire longer seasons, forcing the show to film stunt episodes shot in warmer location that often feel disjointed and disrupt the flow of the medical series, like Hank and Evan’s trip to Florida or Mark’s to Cuba. This year, the series aired 14 episodes in the summer that will be followed by a two-hour holiday movie to air December 16.

Of the remaining USA series, veteran Burn Notice and Suits also are expected to get the nod for renewal, Common Law is not, while Fairly Legal and Necessary Roughness continue to be question marks as is Political Animals, which may stick to its original form as a one-time limited series. Royal Pains and Covert Affairs are from Universal Cable Prods; White Collar from Fox TV Studios. Veteran Psych is on a different schedule; it did not air in the summer and is not up for renewal yet.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/09/usas-royal-pains-white-collar-covert-affairs-renewed/

* * * *

TV Notes
NBC’s ‘The Voice’ Renewed For Fourth And Fifth Cycles, Will Return Next Fall

On the heels of a strong start of its first fall edition, NBC‘s reality series The Voice has been renewed for a fourth and fifth cycle. The fourth-season pickup for next spring is a formality as The Voice was already on the NBC midseason schedule presented to advertisers in May, and the network recently set a celebrity coaching team for it. But the early pickup of a fifth season to air in fall 2013 represents a vote of confidence for the unscripted series and indicates that the network is sticking with the current setup of two Voice cycles a season.

As recently announced, Christina Aguilera and Cee Lo Green will take Season 4 off, with Usher and Shakira taking their spots alongside original coaches Adam Levine and Blake Shelton. “With the addition of Usher and Shakira as rotating coaches to join Christina, , Adam and Blake in the next cycle, we know that this incredibly addictive program will remain even more relevant as we move forward through this exciting season,” NBC chairman Bob Greenblatt said. “My hat is off to John de Mol, Mark Burnett, and everyone who produces this classy and highly entertaining show for us.” In its first fall installment, The Voice is averaging a 4.5 rating through its first two Mondays in adults 18-49 and a 4.3 on its opening two Tuesdays. The Voice hails from Burnett’s One Three, Talpa Media USA and Warner Horizon Television. The series is created by de Mol, who executive produces with Burnett, Audrey Morrissey, Stijn Bakkers and Lee Metzger.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/09/nbcs-the-voice-renewed-for-fourth-fifth-cycles/
post #82374 of 93672
TV Notes
Dog The Bounty Hunter Gets New Show 'DOG' On CMT
By HuffingtonPost.com - Sep. 25, 2012

"Dog The Bounty Hunter" may be no more, but CMT has a new home for everyone's favorite Dog, Duane Chapman.

CMT has officially ordered 10 episodes of of the unscripted "DOG," set to focus on Dog and Beth Chapman’s "journey into the American heartland" as they work to aid other bail bondsmen and bounty hunters in their day-to-day struggles to catch fugitives.

"This series is a game changer for CMT,” Jayson Dinsmore, EVP of Development and Programming at CMT, said. “We were aggressive in our pursuit of a show featuring Dog and Beth, one of the most bankable teams in television history. We couldn't be happier to partner with Electus and Dog and Beth as they move forward on the next chapter.”

"DOG" is slated for a spring/summer 2013 premiere date.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/25/dog-the-bounty-hunter-new-show-cmt_n_1913801.html?utm_hp_ref=tv
post #82375 of 93672
TV Notes
Did AMC leak 'Walking Dead' season 4 renewal?
By James Hibberd, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Sep. 25, 2012

Did AMC renew The Walking Dead? The network’s website posted a contest for viewers to win a trip to the set of the zombie hit’s fourth season — even though no such season has been announced and the third has yet to premiere. The contest is causing some to think the show’s officially renewed. [CLICK LINK BELOW TO SEE PHOTO]

If the show was renewed, it wouldn’t be the first time AMC was scooped by its website. Last year an online ad for the second season DVD outraged fans by revealing a key character’s death before the episode had aired. But an AMC spokesperson confirms: The Walking Dead is not renewed.

Though, of course, it eventually will be. The drama’s second season finale delivered a record-setting 9 million viewers. AMC’s Dead may be walking, but it ain’t going anywhere. The show returns Oct. 14, and we expect an official renewal will follow sometime shortly thereafter. Now go donate some blood or something…

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/09/25/amc-walking-dead-season-4/
post #82376 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Your local newscast is "Live", but most of the video, interviews and other elements were recorded earlier that day.

True. But viewers know that newspieces are recorded.

The problem with this show is that they are trying to pass off the whole show as being live. The really live segments even go so far as to "throw" it to a taped segment. No where at the beginning of the show to they put up some text saying "some segments pre-recorded." They do that with new Jimmy Kimmel shows by putting up "Recorded earlier."

I'll have to look at the closing credits to see if there is a disclaimer. Nope, no disclaimer. I don't have the beginning, so I can't check that, but do not remember there being one.
post #82377 of 93672
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
WEDNESDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - The Middle (Season Premiere, 60 min.)
9PM - Modern Family (Season Premiere)
9:31PM - The Neighbors (Series Premiere)
10:00PM - Revenge (Season Preview)
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Keanu Reeves; Ginnifer Goodwin; Hot Chip performs)

CBS:
8PM - Survivor: Philippines
9PM - Criminal Minds (Season Premiere)
10PM - C.S.I.: Crime Scene Investigation (Season Premiere)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (British Prime Minister David Cameron; Jonny Lee Miller; Mumford & Sons perform)
12:37AM - Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Jim Parsons; Dispatch performs)

NBC:
8PM - Animal Practice (Time Slot Premiere)
8:30PM - Guys with Kids
9PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (Season Premiere, 120 min.)
* * * *
12:05AM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Kirstie Alley; Mike "The Situation" Sorrentino; Richie Sambora performs)
1:07AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Ricky Gervais; Scott Speedman; Little Big Town performs)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Musician Billy Corgan; Andrew Bird performs; director Giles Walker)

FOX:
8PM - The X Factor (120 min.)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Nature: The Animal House (R - Nov. 2)
8PM - NOVA: Making Stuff: Making Stuff Cleaner
(R - Feb. 2, 2011)
8PM - NOVA: Making Stuff: Making Stuff Smarter
(R - Feb. 9, 2011)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Ella Soy Eva
9PM - Abismo de Pasión
10PM - Amor Bravio

THE CW:
8PM - Oh Sit!
9PM - Supernatural
(R - May 18)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Rosa Diamante
9PM - Corazón Valiente
10PM - Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal
10:30PM - El Rostro de la Venganza

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Olivia Wilde)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Author Jim Holt)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Joseph Gordon-Levitt; Emily Deschanel; comedian Jamie Lee)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Penny Marshall; Jeff Wild; Heather McDonald; Ross Mathews)

Edited by dad1153 - 9/26/12 at 4:07pm
post #82378 of 93672
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 26, 2012

THE MIDDLE
ABC, 8:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
ABC’s Modern Family gets all the glory – and just scooped up lots more, at the Emmys – but this other Wednesday night ABC comedy is almost as delightful, and deserves as large an audience. Season 4 begins tonight, catching us up on what the heck the Hecks did this summer. Including, for one of the Heck children, summer school.

MODERN FAMILY
ABC, 8:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
This wonderful series just won four more Emmys, for direction, supporting actor (Eric Stonestreet), supporting actress (Julie Bowen), and the big one as Outstanding Comedy. And though Louie is more ambitious and unpredictable, it’s hard to argue against the sheer talent and comedy on display in this ABC comedy. And all you have to do is endure one of the new series trying so hard to be Modern Family this year, and you’ll appreciate the original article that much more.

C.S.I.: CRIME SCENE INVESTIGATION
CBS, 10:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
Last year, Ted Danson came aboard to keep the long-running franchise running, and Marg Helgenberger left partway through the season. So this season is a more stable one for this series, beginning with story lines that make many of the investigations quite personal.

TOP CHEF MASTERS
Bravo, 10:00 p.m. ET
SEASON FINALE:
And another chef is crowned, as Season 4 ends. And these are Top Chef Masters, so bragging rights count for a lot.

SOUTH PARK
Comedy Central, 10:00 p.m. ET
SERIES RETURN:
I have no idea whether this is a new season, a midseason premiere, or what. All I know – and all that matters – is that there’s a fresh South Park tonight, so tune in.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #82379 of 93672
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

True. But viewers know that newspieces are recorded.
The problem with this show is that they are trying to pass off the whole show as being live. The really live segments even go so far as to "throw" it to a taped segment. No where at the beginning of the show to they put up some text saying "some segments pre-recorded." They do that with new Jimmy Kimmel shows by putting up "Recorded earlier."
I'll have to look at the closing credits to see if there is a disclaimer. Nope, no disclaimer. I don't have the beginning, so I can't check that, but do not remember there being one.
If you want to split hairs, nothing is live. Thanks to profanity delays and A/D conversions, everything you see is a good 10 seconds after it happened if not more. Kimmel has to have "Recorded Earlier" on the screen since the title of the show contains the word "Live" and the show is now taped earlier in the evening. Since none of the other late talk shows have "Live" in their name, that banner isn't required.
post #82380 of 93672
TV Reviews
Animals or aliens? In 2 new comedies, it’s all about the human connection
By Glenn Garvin, Miami Herald - Sep. 25, 2012

You know that old show business saying, never work with dogs or space aliens. A couple of new sitcoms debuting Wednesday defy the conventional wisdom with mixed results.

NBC’s Animal Practice (8 p.m. Wednesdays) sounds insufferably cute: a romantic comedy set in a veterinary hospital, where you can alternate kissy-face stuff with kittens pushing around balls of yarn until even vegans are plunging forks into their eyes. Stunningly, that’s not the case. Instead, it’s more like M*A*S*H* for the four-legged, a subversive and perversely funny workplace comedy.

In place of Trapper John, we have Dr. George Coleman (played by Justin Kirk, who just finished eight years as Mary-Louise Parker’s crackpot brother-in-law on Weeds). Coleman’s contrast view of animals and humans is summed up pretty well by his reaction when one of his patients, a python, starts strangling a nurse: He runs to get his cellphone to snap a picture.

That puts him at odds with the Hot Lips Houlihan of Animal Practice, administrator Dorothy Crane (JoAnna Garcia Swisher, Better with You), who takes a dim view of Coleman’s use of the animals to pick up girls or win bets. Acting as bookie on the latter is the scene stealer of Animal Practice, a hilariously venal Capuchin monkey known as Dr. Rizzo, doubtless a homage to Dustin Hoffman’s hustle-a-minute character in Midnight Cowboy.

The rest of the two-legged cast, including Tyler Labine of Reaper and Bobby Lee of the Harold & Kumar movies, brings considerable comic chops to Animal Practice as well. And how are you not going to love a show in which the patients include a penguin with acute gastrointestinal distress and the cast runs down the hallways shouting things like “Bengal tiger giving birth!”?

The Neighbors, one of only two new sitcoms in ABC’s fall lineup (9:30 p.m. Wednesday), has moments like that, too, but not nearly enough of them. Lenny Venito and Jami Gertz star as a married couple moving into a suburban subdivision who discover their new neighborhood is entirely populated by aliens, and not the kind who walked across the border from Mexico.

But, happily, also not the kind usually played by Sigourney Weaver. Despite their addled efforts to imitate Earthlings, which include obsessively listening to old Ink Spots records and naming their kids things like Dick Butkus and Reggie Jackson, the only really yucky thing about the space visitors is their occasional reversion to their original form (looking a bit like Dr. Seuss’ Grinch), which includes an explosion of green slimy stuff.

In short, The Neighbors closely resembles the old Conehead sketches from the early days of Saturday Night Live. And it’s not without laughs, especially when the exuberantly funny Gertz, one of the most underrated comedians of her TV generation, is on screen. But there’s a reason the Coneheads did well as a skit and not as a movie. The joke is already showing signs of wearing thin by the end of the first episode. Land Shark, anybody?

http://www.deadline.com/2012/09/boss-rebounds-haven-up-in-return/
Edited by dad1153 - 9/26/12 at 4:29pm
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