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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2748

post #82411 of 93656
Technology Notes
B&N heats up tablet market with Nook HD
By Edward C. Baig, USA Today - Sep. 26, 2012

NEW YORK -- Joining an increasingly crowded tablet market, Barnes & Noble today unveiled two tablets coming this fall that are lighter both on your wallet and in your hands.

The Nook HD starts at $199 for a model with a 7-inch screen and 8 gigabytes of storage; $249 for 16 GB. The Google Nexus 7 tablet and the Amazon Kindle Fire HD also sport 7-inch screens. Apple is rumored to have plans to introduce a mini version of its iPad.

Barnes & Noble's 9-inch Nook HD+ device will go head-to-head with Amazon's 8.9-inch Kindle Fire HD and edge near the 10-inch iPad.

But the larger Nook HD+ models are cheaper than their rivals, priced at $269 and $349 for 16 GB and 32 GB of storage, respectively. The larger-screen Kindle Fire starts at $299 for 32 GB; the newest iPad starts at $499 for 16 GB. Barnes & Noble will be phasing out its older Nook Color and Nook Tablet.

The freshest Nooks come on the heels of a separate announcement from Barnes & Noble of a new Nook Video movie-and-TV rental and purchase service that is coming this fall. Titles are promised from HBO, Sony, Starz, Disney and Warner Bros.

Movies will be stored in the Nook Cloud. Users will be able to integrate compatible physical Blu-rays and DVDs with their digital-video collections. You'll be able to watch across Nook devices and apps, and through third-party applications.

The 7-inch Nook HD weighs a shade more than 11 ounces, is less wide and about 20% lighter than the Kindle Fire HD. The Nook HD+ weighs a little more than 18 ounces, roughly 5 ounces lighter than the iPad. Both Nooks have lovely high-resolution screens and impressive graphics.

Neither new Nook has a camera. (There's a front-facing camera on the Fire HD, and front and rear cameras on the iPad.) "At some point, you have to make hard choices," Barnes & Noble CEO William Lynch said in an interview. "We didn't see a use case for cameras. We decided to invest in screens and make the price point accessible."

On the content side, Barnes & Noble says it now offers more than 3 million books, including nearly 3,500 English-language interactive books for kids, and a stable of more than 100 magazines with a new visual table of contents feature that reveals thumbnails of the entire periodical.

Barnes & Noble has more than 10,000 apps. But that's a blip compared with what Apple offers for iPad.

http://www.usatoday.com/tech/story/2012/09/26/bn-heats-up-tablet-market-with-nook-hd/57843222/1
post #82412 of 93656
TV Review
ABC's 'Last Resort' is the fall's best new drama
Andre Braugher plus Shawn Ryan plus nukes equals thrills
By Alan Sepinwall, HitFix.com - Sep. 26, 2012

In the first episode of ABC's exciting new drama series "Last Resort" (8 p.m. Thursday), Navy submarine captain Marcus Chaplin refuses a sketchy order to nuke Pakistan, evades an attack by his own countryman, and takes over an island in French Polynesia, threatening America and the rest of the world with his boat's nuclear arsenal if they don't leave him alone.

This is, to put it mildly, a messy situation — one where the stakes and players and rules seem to be constantly shifting, and where Marcus and his executive officer Sam Kendal have to keep making things up as they go.

It's also a messy premise for a weekly television show. There's no formula for a series like "Last Resort," which combines a bunch of elements that you don't ordinarily see together — part Tom Clancy thriller, part "Lord of the Flies"/"Lost," part psychological drama, among other pieces — in a way that doesn't suggest a clear structure for how stories will be told each week, or how on Earth this fragile situation can be maintained for the seasons on end required of a successful TV show.

But "Last Resort" (it debuts tomorrow night at 8) has two men involved who give me hope. One is Andre Braugher, who plays Marcus Chaplin, and is among the best, most convincing actors we have — the kind of magnificent talker(*) who could tell you the moon is made of delicious green cheese and leave you looking for a rocket and a really big grater. When Marcus swears to Sam (played by Scott Speedman) that he'll get them out of this catastrophe, I believe him.

(*) Braugher's signature role remains "Homicide" cop Frank Pembleton, who once described his skills at interrogation as "an act of salesmanship — as silver-tongued and thieving as ever moved used cars, Florida swampland, or Bibles. But what I am selling is a long prison term, to a client who has no genuine use for the product." Marcus Chaplin is not Frank Pembleton, but they share a similar verbal gift.

The other is Shawn Ryan, who co-created the series with screenwriter Karl Gajdusek ("Trespass"). Ryan was the mind behind "The Shield," one of the all-time champions of crafting storylines that seemed impossible to sustain — its pilot, after all, concluded with one of its cop main characters shooting the other in the head — but which kept on convincingly, beautifully going and going and going.

The "Last Resort" pilot episode is far and away the best I watched for this fall season. There are some bumps in the next two episodes, but also some very promising signs that, coupled with the talent involved, has me wanting to believe there is a great series here, and not just a great pilot that the series can't possibly live up to.

Of course, the pilot has Martin Campbell — not only one of the best action directors alive ("Casino Royale"), but the director of the quintessential "Homicide" episode "Three Men and Adena" — behind the camera. He gives the thriller scenes an added zip, and he makes all the disparate pieces — the submarine, the island, and scenes on the homefront involving Sam's wife Christine (Jessy Schram) and weapons contractor Kylie Sinclair (Autumn Reeser) — feel like one cohesive whole. The pilot has to cover more story ground in an hour than I would like — if networks still consistently made two-hour drama pilots, this would be an ideal candidate — but the writing, direction, and performances by Braugher, Speedman, Robert Patrick (as chief of the boat Joseph Prosser) and Australian actor Daniel Lissing (as James King, a Navy SEAL traveling on the Colorado at the time of the Pakistan incident) make it work. And even if the rest of the pilot was a catastrophe, it would be worth it simply for Braugher's delivery of the speech where Marcus tells the world the new rules and his intentions towards anyone who tries to break them.

The next two episodes were directed by Kevin Hooks and Michael Offer, who each have experience with action (Hooks did "Passenger 57"), but who don't have Campbell's facility with it (nor the budget he had to work with on the pilot), and there are more rough patches in the later episodes, particularly the Hooks-directed second installment, where the actors seem to be moving at half-speed in several sequences meant to be thrilling. The island/mainland split also becomes starker in that episode, and while the actors deliver certain corny lines in the pilot with enough conviction to get by, they're clunkier in week two. James spends much of his time on the island getting drunk and trying to stay out of everything, until rookie officer Grace Shepard, played by Daisy Betts, tells him, "One of these days, you're going to have to decide what you believe in." (Braugher can get away with a line like that. Betts — the weakest link in the cast in the early going — can't.)

The third episode smartly confines most of the tense material to the sub itself, as it's an accepted part of the genre that actors standing on a set tensing themselves for depth charge explosions will always seem exciting. And in a storyline involving local crimelord Julian (Sahr Ngaujah), the show seems to acknowledge that a premise this complicated will not allow for the kind of neat, tidy and safe resolutions we're used to from network TV. And the tension remains believably, fascinatingly high between the members of the crew who are 100 percent loyal to Marcus and those who don't understand what they're doing disobeying orders and conquering a tropical island.

What Marcus is doing should probably not work long-term. But if "Last Resort" wants to be around a while, it's going to have to find a way. There are enough good signs in these early episodes to suggest it's possible.

http://www.hitfix.com/whats-alan-watching/review-abcs-last-resort-is-the-falls-best-new-drama
post #82413 of 93656
TV Review
Elementary (CBS)
By Tim Goodman, The Hollywood Reporter

There was every reason to believe that a disaster was in the making when CBS decided to do an American version of Sherlock Holmes, especially after the modern-day British Sherlock had been so acclaimed. And yet -- super-simple deduction -- there also was every reason to believe that the franchise would be perfect on CBS, home to television’s best procedurals.

A worrisome idea became a wonderful idea after CBS sent out the pilot of Elementary, one of the most promising dramas this fall season. It’s different enough from Sherlock, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, despite also using a modern-day setting. The obvious difference is making Watson female — in this case, casting Lucy Liu as Joan Watson. But even more important, CBS let Brit actor Jonny Lee Miller keep his accent and created a convincing backstory for him that keeps him damaged but no less brilliant at what he does.

Miller is superb and compelling as Sherlock, sent to New York City by his father after falling out of favor as a consultant for Scotland Yard and also needing a stint in rehab.

When he arrives in New York, Holmes is disappointed to see that his father has hired a “sober companion” to watch over him. That would be Watson, who suffers the torment of Holmes’ fast and stinging barbs about being a baby-sitter, etc. Although Watson has the resolve to do the “sober companion” job, she can’t control Holmes when he’s drawn in to work for the NYPD, at the authorization of Capt. Tobias Gregson (Aidan Quinn), who had worked with Holmes on a case with Scotland Yard and believes highly in his skills as an investigator (if not as a well-balanced man with manners, which neurotic and cocky Holmes could never be).

Liu’s calm mannerisms play well with Holmes’ more outlandish stunts, and instead of screaming and going into hysterics about his behavior, she demands access to his process and respect in the relationship. That’s a lot more difficult to pull off because the chemistry between the two is hard-earned (and should be), and there’s no inkling of any of it being sexual. In fact, the producers have gone out of their way to thankfully confirm Elementary won’t be a will-they-or-won’t-they situation. They won’t, period, no matter how much eventual tension there might be.

That’s an excellent decision because it makes Elementary focus not just on what CBS does best -- hourlong procedurals in which a mystery is solved and the execution of it is done with minimum cliche -- but also on the character-driven aspect of the show. Now that’s what’s going to make Elementary eventually become an excellent drama.

Holmes is the perfect character. He’s a name brand but he can be played as damaged, as opposed to a perfect hero. And Miller’s force as an actor wrings everything out of the script. He’s someone you want to watch in a role that’s tailor-made to the whodunit procedural.

Liu looks to be giving Miller plenty of room in the pilot but also makes clear that her character is not going to be lost. And that’s essential because the interplay between Holmes and Watson really is what drives the Arthur Conan Doyle stories. Toss in Quinn, and you’ve got a trifecta of accomplished actors giving a real boost to a respected franchise. Hopefully future episodes will get into Holmes’ darker flaws, particularly his addiction.

Along the way, Elementary should prove rather conclusively that it’s a solid cousin to Sherlock and will give fans of the character more chances to see him solve crimes. In the end, that’s all anyone wants.

ELEMENTARY
Airdate: 10 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 27 (CBS)
The Bottom Line: Jonny Lee Miller is a superb Sherlock in what should be yet another hit crime procedural for CBS.


http://www.hollywoodreporter.com//review/elementary-review-jonny-lee-miller-lucy-liu-371289
post #82414 of 93656
Quote:

I'm excited for this upcoming season, but sad it will be the last. This is an excellent show.
post #82415 of 93656
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
THURSDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Last Resort (Series Premiere)
9PM - Grey's Anatomy (Season Premiere)
10:02PM - Scandal (Season Premiere)
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Selena Gomez; Lenny Venito; Tony Bennett performs)

CBS:
8PM - The Big Bang Theory (Season Premiere)
8:31PM - Two and a Half Men (Season Premiere)
9:01PM - Person of Interest (Season Premiere)
10:01PM - Elementary (Series Premiere)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Jimmy Fallon; Neil Young; Lupe Fiasco performs)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Anne Heche; Jennifer Carpenter)

NBC:
8PM - SNL Weekend Update (Special, LIVE)
8:30PM - Up All Night
9PM - The Office
9:31PM - Parks and Recreation
10PM - Rock Center with Brian Williams (Season Premiere)
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Liam Neeson; comic Lisa Lampanelli; The Gaslight Anthem performs)
12:37AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Sofía Vergara; Damian Lewis; TV host Jeff Mauro)
1:37AM - Last Call With Carson Daly (Author Diana Nyad; Chairlift performs; "Samsara.'')

FOX:
8PM - The X-Factor
9PM - Glee

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Live From Lincoln Center - The Philharmonic Opening Gala With Itzhak Perlman (90 min., LIVE)
9:30PM - Architect Michael Graves: A Grand Tour
(R - Mar. 22)
10PM - POV: El Velador (The Night Watchman)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Ella Soy Eva
9PM - Abismo de Pasión
10PM - Amor Bravio

THE CW:
8PM - The Vampire Diaries
(R - May 10)
9PM - The Next (LIVE)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Rosa Diamante
9PM - Corazón Valiente
10PM - Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal
10:30PM - El Rostro de la Venganza

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Athlete Amar'e Stoudemire)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report ("Breaking Bad" Creator Vince Gilligan)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Jake Gyllenhaal; Karen Gillan; musical guest The Chevin)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Kristin Chenoweth; Brody Stevens; Sarah Colonna; Brad Wollack)
post #82416 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

I see plenty of news shows "throwing" to taped pieces - and taped pieces throwing back as if it's all live.

I don't watch these news shows and actually would expect it happening.
Quote:
I'm not sure why this particular case bothers you so much when there have been far, far worse examples in the past and will also be in the future.

The fact that it is supposed to be Live before the Emmy live event.
post #82417 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

No kidding. To me, "live" means covering a live event. If you have to shift a few interviews just to catch celebs while you can, that's still a live event. If the piece was recorded last Tuesday, then it's not. Nobody argues that the NFL is a live show, but half the time we're watching replays or viewing a sideline interview that actually happened while they were in commercial. The event or program as a whole was happening as the coverage was. That, to me, and for legal purposes, is live..

Events like the pre-Emmy show should be forthcoming and have a disclaimer.

I don't watch football, so I do not know how they present those "during the break" interviews.

I do watch the Little League World Series via a method not meant for normal home viewers. I get to see the stuff that is done before they go live, as well as what happens during breaks. So, I see what they use after they come back. In many situations, the replay would be prefaced. Overall, it seems to me that they are pretty forthcoming as to what looks as live as not being live.
post #82418 of 93656
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Sep. 27, 2012

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE PRIME-TIME ELECTION SPECIAL
NBC, 8:00 p.m. ET

This weekend didn’t provide the sort of headlines that lead to obvious political sketches – but with the first presidential debate only one week away, I suspect that might provide fodder for a lengthy sketch on tonight’s second of two prime-time SNL specials. Jason Sudeikis continues his role as Mitt Romney, and Jay Pharaoh takes over as the SNL impersonator for Barack Obama.

THE BIG BANG THEORY
CBS, 8:00 p.m. ET
SEASON PREMIERE:
As Season 6 begins, Howard (Simon Helberg) is both a newlywed and a rocket man, continuing his orbital experience on the International Space Station. And back on Earth, worlds are colliding – specifically, with all three of the earthbound male buddies experiencing significant problems with their female significant others.

LAST RESORT
ABC, 8:00 p.m. ET
SERIES PREMIERE:
Andre Braugher, one of my favorite TV actors, gets a new series lead – and a strong one – as a submarine commander who ends up questioning orders, and for good reason. The premise, and tonight’s pilot, are strong enough to warrant a visit. For other reactions to this new series, see our 2012 TVWW Fall TV Preview page – and for more lengthy reviews, see Gerald Jordan’s Crossing Jordan and Ed Bark’s Uncle Barky’s Bytes.

LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: “OPENING GALA OF THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC”
PBS, 8:00 p.m. ET

You don’t have to buy a ticket to Lincoln Center, or even get dressed up, to enjoy the season’s opening gala, featuring Itzhak Perlman performing a varied evening of violin pieces. Among them: segments from the John Williams score Perlman performed for the Steven Spielberg movie Schindler’s List. In addition to Williams, other composers on the bill include Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakoff, and Massenet. Check local listings.

LOUIE
FX, 10:30 p.m. ET
SEASON FINALE:
Louis C.K. not only won an Emmy Sunday night for writing this series, but appeared as a presenter with Amy Poehler. I mention that because Poehler is one of the guest stars on tonight’s Louie season finale, so there are two more reasons to watch: see an Emmy winner, and see an Amy winner.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #82419 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Review
CBS' "Elementary" imagines a contemporary Sherlock Holmes
The only nagging thing about this fun procedural was that, whenever Sherlock Holmes is introduced to anyone, nobody gives him that "really??" look. It's as if nobody on the planet has ever heard that name, before. You'd think the response would be, "Ha ha, no, seriously, what is your name?"
post #82420 of 93656
I get to eat a little crow on "Neighbors." Looks like it'll finish as the #2 show from last night. I'm sure that's all "Modern Family" lead-in. Can't wait to see how it does NEXT week.
post #82421 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

I don't watch these news shows and actually would expect it happening.
The fact that it is supposed to be Live before the Emmy live event.
You must understand that what you want is impossible. It simply cannot happen.

They can't have celebrities lining up like cattle to stand in front of a camera in hopes they might say something even close to intelligent - then expect everyone outside to get into the theater, get seated in the proper spots and be ready for a live show immediately after. The logistics simply don't allow for it.

It's simply never, ever going to hapen the way you want it to.
post #82422 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

I get to eat a little crow on "Neighbors." Looks like it'll finish as the #2 show from last night. I'm sure that's all "Modern Family" lead-in. Can't wait to see how it does NEXT week.

Yea due to the huge leadin its rating will never be hideous but the decision to cancel will come from how much retention it loses week after week from that leadin.

They could air "the paint drying show" after the super bowl & it will still pull a 15 but that doesnt mean its a hit.
post #82423 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Yea due to the huge leadin its rating will never be hideous but the decision to cancel will come from how much retention it loses week after week from that leadin.
They could air "the paint drying show" after the super bowl & it will still pull a 15 but that doesnt mean its a hit.
Rachael, my newsgirl, says she watched MF and just left it on.. got about halfway through "Neighbors" and couldn't take it anymore. Just turned it off.
post #82424 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post


The only nagging thing about this fun procedural was that, whenever Sherlock Holmes is introduced to anyone, nobody gives him that "really??" look. It's as if nobody on the planet has ever heard that name, before. You'd think the response would be, "Ha ha, no, seriously, what is your name?"


Wouldn't that be dependent on the premise?  Does the show world presume he is simply a modern version/update of the original/fictional character or does it present him as the original character but drawn in a modern world?  I can nit pick with the best on shows with reality issues, like Revolution, but this doesn't sound that bad unless the premise is clear.

post #82425 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by flint350 View Post


Wouldn't that be dependent on the premise?  Does the show world presume he is simply a modern version/update of the original/fictional character or does it present him as the original character but drawn in a modern world?  I can nit pick with the best on shows with reality issues, like Revolution, but this doesn't sound that bad unless the premise is clear.
Modern update as if the character never existed. And that's the premise. And I realize the integrity of the premise necessitates this. Still just feels funny in an otherwise great show. I mean, even if you buy into the first-existence premise, at least a reaction to an unusual name such as "Sherlock" wouldn't be out of the ordinary. But the characters he meets all behave as if "Sherlock" is as common as "Bill." So far, at least.
post #82426 of 93656
WEDNESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #82427 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Modern update as if the character never existed. And that's the premise. And I realize the integrity of the premise necessitates this. Still just feels funny in an otherwise great show. I mean, even if you buy into the first-existence premise, at least a reaction to an unusual name such as "Sherlock" wouldn't be out of the ordinary. But the characters he meets all behave as if "Sherlock" is as common as "Bill." So far, at least.
I'm surprised they didn't make the Shelock Holmes character a woman (instead of the Watson character) and call her "Shirley". But then, everyone would say, "you can't be serious..." wink.gif
post #82428 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

I'm surprised they didn't make the Shelock Holmes character a woman (instead of the Watson character) and call her "Shirley". But then, everyone would say, "you can't be serious..." wink.gif

Okay, that was funny. biggrin.gif
post #82429 of 93656
Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Okay, that was funny. biggrin.gif
biggrin.gif Captain Oveur: Joey, do you like movies about gladiators?
post #82430 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Rachael, my newsgirl, says she watched MF and just left it on.. got about halfway through "Neighbors" and couldn't take it anymore. Just turned it off.

We watched it. But I can tell you we won't be watching it any more. The premise is interesting. But the jokes are too obvious and it just has a weird vibe. It won't be the first show cancelled, but it will be one of the first 4 or 5 to get canned.
post #82431 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

You must understand that what you want is impossible. It simply cannot happen.

You seemed to have missed what I was asking for. Truth in packaging. They can record interviews ahead of time and play them later, all that is needed for the "truth in packaging" is a disclaimer that says "some portions pre-recorded" either at the start or during the closing credits.
post #82432 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

You seemed to have missed what I was asking for. Truth in packaging. They can record interviews ahead of time and play them later, all that is needed for the "truth in packaging" is a disclaimer that says "some portions pre-recorded" either at the start or during the closing credits.
Well, you'e not going to get that.

Recorded elements within a live show happen all the time. That's true of every awards show, Saturday Night Live and even the New Year's Eve celebration shows. Even certain segments of parades that are done live are recorded. If you've ever watched golf on TV, you'll know they often show holes that take place while they're showing another golfer.

Back before video tape, live was all live. There was no other way to do it.

Now, we can record things in advance that make it easier to get things in the show that aren't practical to do live - and even delay the whole broadcast completely. The end result is, the show itself was live and they aren't going to differentiate between the recorded portions. Frankly, if they did put up an indicator, there would be 10 people complaining about the font here instead of one person complaining about the lack of it.

Sorry the recorded stuff in a live show bothers you without an identifier, but I really don't think many other people other than you know or care.
post #82433 of 93656
post #82434 of 93656
There have been live shows where I've seen the disclaime: portions pre-recorded.

It is done and it should be done.

As for your gold reference, I do not watch golf, but have run across it. When they show pieces from other holes, they do not try and make it out has happening "now". In many cases other hole coverage is live. Maybe the disclaimer should say: some segments recorded earlier. Putting that in the closing credits would be perfect.

The car sequence with the Modern Family actor was really wrong, especially when they tried to pull of that his car was arriving during the show. Who knows when those car sequences were recorded. His car arrived before the show started.

It is the blatant lying to the viewing audience that really got my goat. OK, maybe it is just pulling the wool over their eyes, but you get the point.

What the public didn't see was the interview with Ginnifer Goodwin (Once Upon a Time) that was aborted and restarted because he said that she was from the new series. And no, I don't have a recording of it to put up on YouTube. I should do that next year. Capture the whole feed and put up the outtakes. biggrin.gif Normally there are a few. I only remember the one this year.
post #82435 of 93656
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

You seemed to have missed what I was asking for. Truth in packaging. They can record interviews ahead of time and play them later, all that is needed for the "truth in packaging" is a disclaimer that says "some portions pre-recorded" either at the start or during the closing credits.
Well, you'e not going to get that.

Recorded elements within a live show happen all the time. That's true of every awards show, Saturday Night Live and even the New Year's Eve celebration shows. Even certain segments of parades that are done live are recorded. If you've ever watched golf on TV, you'll know they often show holes that take place while they're showing another golfer.

Yeah I love it when they switch to shown some unknown who is 10 strokes behind and say something like "...Jerry Hacker with a 50 foot eagle putt on #15." SURPRISE! He makes it every time!
post #82436 of 93656
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
‘Modern Family’ debuts to fall’s best rating
ABC comedy averages a 5.5 in adults 18-49
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Sep. 27, 2012

ABC’s “Modern Family” remains the king of Wednesday night, though Fox grabbed the primetime crown.

Last night “Family” premiered to the biggest rating so far this season for any show, averaging a 5.5 in adults 18-49 at 9 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights.

That was off 8 percent from a 6.0 for last year’s premiere, but it was easily the highest-rated show of the week thus far and was up 34 percent over last May’s finale.

“Family” also lifted lead-out “The Neighbors,” a new sitcom that aired at 9:30, to a solid 3.3 debut.

ABC aired a rerun of “Revenge” at 10 p.m., which pulled down its nightly average. The network is waiting until next month to premiere the new show “Nashville,” because it would have been preempted next Wednesday for the presidential debate.

That allowed Fox to win the night with a 3.3 for “The X Factor,” which fell 6 percent from last week’s episode.

Earlier in the night, ABC’s “The Middle” returned with a 2.8 for an hour-long episode at 8 p.m., falling from a 3.1 last year but its best rating since January.

NBC’s sitcoms fared poorly at 8, with “Animal Practice” managing a mere 1.4 and “Guys with Kids” drawing a 1.6.

At 9 p.m., a two-hour episode of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” drew a 2.1, its best rating since last November, though down from last season’s premiere.

CBS’s lineup drew solid numbers, though it, too, was down from last year. “Survivor” averaged a 3.0, off 6 percent from last week’s premiere.

“Criminal Minds” at 9 p.m. was the night’s No. 4 show overall with a 3.1 rating, though decreasing 24 percent from last year’s premiere. And “CSI” at 10 put up its lowest-ever season debut rating, a 2.5, but it won the timeslot easily.

Fox led the night among 18-49s with a 3.3 average overnight rating and a 9 share. ABC was second at 2.9/8, CBS third at 2.8/8, NBC fourth at 1.9/5, Univision fifth at 1.5/4, Telemundo sixth at 0.5/1 and CW seventh at 0.3/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-five percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. Fox was first with a 3.1 for "Factor," followed by CBS with a 3.0 for "Survivor." ABC was third with a 2.8 for "Middle," Univision fourth with a 1.6 for "Por Ella Soy Eva," and NBC fifth with a 1.5 for "Practice" (1.4) and "Guys" (1.6). The CW and Telemundo tied for sixth at 0.4, CW for the recently renewed "Oh Sit!" and Telemundo for "Rosa Diamante."

ABC took the lead at 9 p.m. with a 4.4 for "Family" (5.5) and "Neighbors" (3.3), while Fox was second with a 3.6 for more "Factor." CBS was third with a 3.1 for "Minds," NBC fourth with a 2.0 for "SVU," Univision fifth with a 1.6 for "Abismo de Pasion," Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for "Corazon Valiente" and CW seventh with a 0.3 for a repeat of "Supernatural."

At 10 p.m. CBS was first with a 2.5 for "CSI," with NBC second with a 2.2 for more "SVU." ABC was third with a 1.6 for a "Revenge" recap episode, Univision fourth with a 1.3 for "Amor Bravio" and Telemundo fifth with a 0.6 for "Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal" (0.8) and "El Rostro de la Venganza" (0.4).

Among households, CBS was first for the night with a 6.7 average overnight rating and an 11 share. Fox was second at 5.7/9, ABC third at 5.4/9, NBC fourth at 4.3/7, Univision fifth at 1.9/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.7/1 and CW seventh at 0.5/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/modern-family-debuts-to-falls-best-rating/
post #82437 of 93656
TV Review
Showtime's 'Homeland' is unmissable TV
By Robert Bianco, USA Today - Sep. 27, 2012

If you think Homeland only had one good story to tell, think again.

Anyone who watched the Emmys knows this gloriously suspenseful spy series had a great first season -- making history as Showtime's first best-series winner while adding Emmys for stars Claire Danes and Damian Lewis, an extremely rare triple play. The good news is that Sunday's premiere, written by the show's Emmy-winning creators Alex Gansa and Howard Gordon, starts its new season as brilliantly as it ended the last one.

That's quite an accomplishment, considering how good last season's finale was. And it comes as an incredibly welcome relief, considering that finale would have left lesser writers with nowhere to go. Thankfully Gansa and Gordon, who loosely adapted Homeland from an Israeli hit, are a long way from lesser writers.

We return to a brief moment of domestic bliss. Former CIA agent Carrie Mathison (Danes) is teaching and gardening as she recovers from electroshock therapy. Her nemesis, soldier-turned-reluctant-terrorist Nicholas Brody (Lewis) is now a congressman and a potential vice-presidential candidate -- much to the delight of his incredibly beautiful wife (Morena Baccarin, an incredibly beautiful and very fine actor).

Obviously, peace cannot last. When a new crisis erupts in the Middle East, Saul (Mandy Patinkin, every bit as good as Danes said he was in her acceptance speech) turns to Carrie for help. As for Brody, his hopes that he could leave his past behind are destroyed when he's told the terrorist who recruited him has a new job for him -- leaving a now less-assured Brody even more conflicted than he was last year.

Over the next two weeks, Homeland plants its plot points and pulls its twists expertly, but as with every show at this level, the real joy is in the characters. It's the pleased-with-herself look Carrie flashes when she's back in the game, and her despair when she explains how Brody's case destroyed her confidence. It's the conflict between Brody's faltering convictions and his desire for a normal family life -- along with the prospects of power being offered by the current vice-president (the always wonderful Jamey Sheridan in what promises to be an expanded role).

And, obviously, it's the marriage of great writing and great acting that extends throughout the cast and that allows us to root for and against Carrie and Brody at the same time. Yet despite its depth and ambition, this is one great drama that never becomes cumbersome -- it never feels like a chore imposed upon us by the God of High TV Art.

Don't even think about missing it.

'HOMELAND'
Showtime, Sunday, 10 ET/PT
★★★★ (out of four)


http://www.usatoday.com/life/tv/story/2012/09/27/showtimes-homeland-is-unmissable-tv/57849018/1
post #82438 of 93656
TV Review
Made in Jersey (CBS)
By Brian Lowry, Variety - Sep. 26, 2012

Equal parts "Working Girl" and "My Cousin Vinny," "Made in Jersey" seems like a reliable if not particularly exciting next-door neighbor -- the meat in CBS' "CSI: New York"/"Blue Bloods" Friday-night crime sandwich. Modest in its ambitions, the series has the advantage of being anchored by a charming newcomer in Janet Montgomery, cast as what amounts to another resourceful underdog. The timeslot virtually caps the show's upside (especially in demographic terms), but based on Montgomery's appeal alone, "Jersey" might please enough folks to win its case.

Part of a big boisterous working-class Italian family, Montgomery's Martina Garretti is introduced via unpleasant run-ins with first a motorist and then a soap dispenser. One demonstrates her take-no-guff Jersey attitude, and the other shows how fast she thinks on her feet, while offering a good excuse to strip her down to her bra.

A snooty corporate law firm has hired Martina, where some of the Ivy League-educated litigators look down their perfectly WASP-ish noses at her. Fortunately, Martina's glint of promise has a better effect on the senior partner (Kyle McLachlan), who gives her a chance to get involved, almost immediately, with a high-profile murder case, defending a young woman accused of killing her college professor.

CBS is often so anal about adhering to its procedural approach that even its pilots plunge right into circling chalk outlines while being miserly about spooning out character details -- such as Martina's mom (Donna Murphy), who's awfully proud her little girl escaped the sort of manicurist gig held down by her other daughter (Erin Cummings).

Created by Dana Calvo (full disclosure: A former colleague at the Los Angeles Times) and overseen by Kevin Falls (also responsible for TNT's legal franchise "Franklin & Bash"), "Made in Jersey" looks reasonably polished, without doing much to plant its hook particularly deep. Mostly, the show's commercial prospects hinge somewhat appropriately on a scenario much like the one Martina faces -- namely, whether an older crowd (here watching "Blue Bloods") decides to give this attractive underdog a chance.

If nothing else, the series should firmly place British import Montgomery, after smaller parts on "Human Target" and "Entourage," on Hollywood's radar. And for as long as it lasts, at least "Jersey" provides a more admirable image of the Garden State than some of its better-known TV progeny.

MADE IN JERSEY
CBS, Fri. Sept. 28, 9 p.m.


http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117948427
post #82439 of 93656
TV Notes
'Sons of Anarchy' Actor Johnny Lewis Dead After Allegedly Killing Landlord
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Sep. 27, 2012

"Sons of Anarchy" actor Jonathan "Johnny" Lewis, who played Kip "Half Sack" Epps, is dead after allegedly killing an 81-year-old woman in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, police told TheWrap.

Lewis, who left the show after the 2009 season, died after falling from a roof in the neighborhood following the alleged murder, a Los Angeles Police Department spokesman said.

Police believe that Lewis, 29, was renting a room from the victim, Catherine Davis.

Davis was murdered at her home at approximately 10:40 a.m. Wednesday, according to police. Officers responded to the scene after receiving a call reporting a screaming woman.

Police are still investigating the incident.

In addition to his stint on "Sons of Anarchy," Lewis' roles included a part in the 2010 film "The Runaways" and in the series "Boston Legal."

According to TMZ, Lewis had been released from Los Angeles County Jail just days before his death, and was facing several criminal cases. He also had recently been in rehab, the site reported. Law enforcement sources told TMZ that he might have been on PCP or meth at the time of Wednesday night's incident. A source also told the Los Angeles Times that detectives believe Lewis may have been on the designer hallucinogen "smiles," which was linked to the death of two North Dakota teens this summer.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/sons-anarchy-actor-johnny-lewis-dead-after-allegedly-murdering-landlord-58261
post #82440 of 93656
Technology/Business Notes
Dish Said to Be in Talks With Viacom About Internet TV
By Edmund Lee, Alex Sherman and Mark Milian, Bloomberg.com - Sep. 27, 2012

Dish Network Corp. is talking to networks such as Viacom Inc.’s MTV about offering their channels over the Internet, a service that could shift the economics of the pay-TV industry, five people familiar with the plan said.

In addition to Viacom, the negotiations involve the Spanish-language broadcaster Univision Communications Inc. and Scripps Networks Interactive Inc., owner of the Food Network and HGTV, said the people, who asked not to be named because the talks are private. The companies would offer an online product known as an over-the-top service, charging a lower price for a smaller bundle of channels viewable on a computer or tablet.

Dish’s service would change the dynamics of the pay- television business, breaking up the bundles that force customers to pay for channels they don’t watch. It also gives Dish a way to avoid its biggest programming expense: sports. Walt Disney Co.’s ESPN gets as much as $5.13 each month for every cable and satellite subscriber, compared with the industry’s average of 26 cents, according to SNL Kagan.

“That’s when you could start seeing a few cracks in the ecosystem,” said Alan Gould, a media analyst at Evercore Partners LLC in New York. “The addition of an over-the-top service would be significant.”

Live Television

The effort would mark the biggest attempt to create an online service with live cable channels, a break from the approach taken by Netflix Inc. and Hulu LLC. For Dish, the move would decrease its reliance on its satellite-TV service, which ranks second to DirecTV in U.S. customers. It also gives it a way to undercut pay-TV competitors on price.

Dish rose 1.8 percent to $30.97 at the close in New York. The shares have gained 8.7 percent this year.

Cable networks, meanwhile, have been reluctant to break up their suite of channels and sell them a la carte because it would lower the amount of available advertising inventory. Viacom and other cable networks typically sell ads at a lower rate than the big broadcast networks such as CBS Corp., so they rely on volume.

Viacom would be willing to sell smaller bundles of its networks, which also include Nickelodeon and Comedy Central, at a higher rate per channel than it does for its full complement of programming, according to two executives familiar with the situation.

Bob Toevs, a spokesman for Englewood, Colorado-based Dish, declined to comment. Mark Jafar, a spokesman for New York-based Viacom, also declined to comment, as did Mark Kroeger at Scripps and Matt Biscuiti at Univision.

Unwanted Option?

A central question is whether consumers want smaller bundles that lack sports programming. Several pay-TV operators, including Dish and Time Warner Cable Inc., already offer cheaper packages that don’t include sports. Those offerings aren’t very popular, said Amy Phillips, a spokeswoman for ESPN, the biggest cable sports network. “History shows that very few households subscribe,” she said.

Dish offers a $20-per-month satellite package without ESPN, though it also lacks other top channels such as MTV and HGTV. Cable and satellite companies have agreements with ESPN that require the video distributors to include the sports network in their most popular tier of TV service.

Charging Less

Dish Chairman Charlie Ergen, who co-founded the company, has said there will be a day when a pay-TV operator chooses not to include sports in order to charge $10 to $20 per month less than competitors.

“My mom doesn’t watch sports,” Ergen said during a conference call last month. “I’ve got neighbors who don’t want sports. I’ve got friends who go to the bars or the neighbors’ house to watch sports.”

Dish’s plan would go beyond the constraints of the so- called TV Everywhere initiative, already adopted by most of the major networks. Programmers such as CNN and HBO, both owned by Time Warner Inc., offer the option to people who already pay for television, letting them watch those same channels on their phones, tablets and personal computers.

Time Warner Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bewkes has said it wouldn’t make sense to sell HBO directly to the 6 percent of homes in the U.S. who don’t have cable or satellite service.

“There are some of those people that if you sign them up, they would die the next day -- these are people that are old,” he said at an investor conference last week.

Cord Cutters

Still, some younger people are abandoning conventional cable TV in favor of Internet services. Dish wants to reach consumers around 18 to 28 who would rather pay $20 a month for a smaller package of channels to watch on computers or mobile devices, CEO Joseph Clayton said in an interview this month.

The challenge is getting a “critical mass” of companies to give online rights to live shows, Clayton said. Negotiations bog down because programmers aren’t willing to sell Dish the rights for a low enough price to make a service viable, he said. Dish’s satellite customers paid an average of about $78 a month in the second quarter.

Netflix and Hulu, two of the biggest providers of TV and movie content over the Internet, don’t carry live programming, which is considered valuable to advertisers because viewers are less likely to skip commercials.

One hurdle to an Internet-only service, according to programmers: Nielsen doesn’t measure online video the same way it does with television. That makes it harder to track how many people are watching and sell advertising based on that audience.

Online Audiences

Nielsen can measure online viewing audiences provided that programmers broadcast the same ads online as they do on television, said Brian Fuhrer, a senior vice president at the ratings company. Websites such as Hulu, which sells different ads during the shows it streams, would require special coding for Nielsen to count.

Dish would be competing with Aereo Inc., a startup backed by Barry Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp that lets users watch some live television over the Internet for a fixed monthly fee.

The broadcast networks, including News Corp.’s Fox and CBS, sued the company in March for what they consider the illegal retransmissions of their broadcast signals. The networks normally receive fees from television distributors such as Dish. New York-area cable provider Cablevision Systems Corp. filed a brief in support of the broadcasters last week.

Broadcast Networks

Dish and Aereo don’t expect to get separate Internet rights from the major broadcast channels -- Fox, CBS, NBC and ABC -- according to two people familiar with the negotiations. Fox, CBS and NBC also are suing Dish over its AutoHop Ad-Skipper, which allows Dish customers to instantly bypass commercials for network shows the day after they’re first aired. Dish has filed its own lawsuit against all four networks.

Aereo, based in New York, is in talks with a number of cable networks, including Viacom, to get rights to an older library of shows, similar to what’s available on Netflix, according to two executives with knowledge of the discussions. Aereo would pay for that content, unlike what it does with the broadcast channels’ programming, according to the people.

Aereo CEO Chet Kanojia said at an investor conference last week that additional content would be packaged a la carte or in “micropackages” for an additional $2 or $4 a month. The company plans to pair the broadcast networks with independent cable channels and new Internet-only products from network companies to give customers streaming movies, news and sports.

Aereo charges $8 a month plus tax for its standard service, which is only available in New York City. Kanojia said he plans to expand Aereo to as many as 15 markets before the end of 2013.

Dish already delivers an online service called DishWorld to overseas audiences, who watch it using set-top boxes from Roku Inc. Anthony Wood, CEO of Saratoga, California-based Roku, said he has been approached by several media companies looking to offer over-the-top services and expects to see some blossom in the U.S. soon.

“We will see that in the next year,” he said.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-09-27/dish-said-to-be-in-talks-with-viacom-about-internet-tv.html
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