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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2760

post #82771 of 93667
TV Notes
NBC’s ‘Next Caller’ Not Going Forward
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com

EXCLUSIVE: NBC has pulled the plug on midseason comedy series Next Caller. The network in May had given the Dane Cook-starring project a six-episode order. After filming four of them, I hear network brass had decided that creatively the series was not going in the direction they had hoped for. Production on the series, produced by Lionsgate TV and Universal TV, has stopped, and the produced episodes won’t air.

Created and executive produced by Stephen Falk, Next Caller stars Cook as a foul-mouthed satellite radio DJ forced to share the mic with a chipper NPR feminist (Collette Wolfe). Jeffrey Tambor, Joy Osmanski and Wolé Parks co-star. NBC recently gave two of its freshman comedy series, Go On and The New Normal, full-season pickups, while fellow freshmen Guys With Kids and especially Animal Practice, have been struggling.

The network has two other comedy series on tap for midseason, 1600 Penn and Save Me.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/10/next-caller-cancelled-nbc-series/
post #82772 of 93667
Is Dane Cook still popular? A sitcom might have been a good idea when he was riding high on his super finger media hype years ago. I barely knew he was still working until I saw this news update.
post #82773 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Is Dane Cook still popular? A sitcom might have been a good idea when he was riding high on his super finger media hype years ago. I barely knew he was still working until I saw this news update.

His 15 minutes of fame coincided perfectly with the amount of time for it took his comedy to get old.
post #82774 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

So what. It is the cableco's responsibility to provide what you pay for. If they screw up and give you extra, it is their mistake. No one has ever been prosecuted for tuning in channels they didn't order via their legally connected cable. Nor will they ever. If an installer catches that the trap is missing, they'll just install the trap and be done with it.
It would be no different than D* or Dish enabling HBO on your STB, even though you didn't order it. It is their own damn fault.

I'm not trying to pass myself off as some sort of saint here, I'm just stating my standards for my own behavior. I don't always live up to them, but when I don't, I don't try to rationalize it away with all kinds of nonesense like blaiming the victim.
post #82775 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Those that watch the ClearQAM HD local affiliates even though they're only paying for HSI - AND BRAG ABOUT IT. Once again, it's those that do things illegally that are making things more difficult for those that take the legal route.

Technically not illegal. It is up to the cableco to disable the ability to tune in the QAM channels if the subscriber only buys internet. When the cableco feeds the signal into your dwelling, it is yours to watch.

When you go out and connect your dwelling to the cable system, without paying for anything, then it is illegal.

In Phoenix, the installer tends to forget a lot to install the trap. My daughter has gotten the QAM channels and has lost the QAM channels.

Connecting ANYTHING - internal or external - to a cable wire to obtain unpaid for services is illegal. Encryption is the cable company's way of saying "Steal THIS sucker", and without a truck roll.
post #82776 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

If I had parked the car on your property and left the keys in it, I sort of gave you permission drive it. To take away that permission is to remove the keys, and/or lock the car. Yes, it i a very gray area when it comes to vehicles. Just don't leave a car in my driveway and not remove the keys, or lock it.

When the cableco does a connection to your house, they are responsible for what is provided on that cable. If they forget to trap out the clear QAM channels, it is their problem.

If, you go out and remove the trap, then it is theft.

I suggest you read the HSI user agreement. Cox's says in part: "You will not connect any equipment, other than equipment authorized by Cox, to the cable modem outlet." My read on this is: if you put a splitter into the cable HSI line and connect your TV, you're in violation. If you signed up for HSI and TV service and later cancelled the TV service, you are not in violation if they failed to disconnect your TV from the cable line.
post #82777 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

They don't here, it is a higher price for internet if you don't have TV, it's basically the same price. You get the locals(clear QAM) with an internet only connection, but it costs 10 to 15 more dollars if you don't include at least basic Cable TV service, if you pay the extra $10 or 15 for cable tv you get the $10 or 15 dollar less internet cost.

To me that type of bundling should be illegal. Its artificially inflating their numbers by in essence forcing you to take "basic cable" just to get some perceived savings on broadband internet.
post #82778 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

I suggest you read the HSI user agreement. Cox's says in part: "You will not connect any equipment, other than equipment authorized by Cox, to the cable modem outlet." My read on this is: if you put a splitter into the cable HSI line and connect your TV, you're in violation. If you signed up for HSI and TV service and later cancelled the TV service, you are not in violation if they failed to disconnect your TV from the cable line.

Ah, but if you atart out only getting internet, TVs are authorized to be connected to the outlet. The sentence is extremely vague and does not list a when they can, or can't be connected.

Like I said, no one has been prosecuted and never will.

No need to encrypt. Just train the techs to put in the traps. Simple enough, and cheaper.

Comcast will end up spending the money tp do the encryption though.
post #82779 of 93667
Cablecos don't want to maintain traps (with good reason) to counter theft, and with encryption of everything they'll get to charge you more money for extra TVs. It's a win-win for them all around.

For us, not so much, but is perfectly understandable when you can leave your post at the FCC for a much more lucrative one at Comcast.
post #82780 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

I suggest you read the HSI user agreement. Cox's says in part: "You will not connect any equipment, other than equipment authorized by Cox, to the cable modem outlet." My read on this is: if you put a splitter into the cable HSI line and connect your TV, you're in violation. If you signed up for HSI and TV service and later cancelled the TV service, you are not in violation if they failed to disconnect your TV from the cable line.

A number of my TVs have internet connections - those would be "authorized equipment" for internet service.

Everyone has their own line. I'll head back into the grocery store if they forgot to charge me for something, but I'll drink a soda out of the mini bar at night and replace it with an identical (but cheaper) soda from the vending machine the next day.

But I'm not going to avoid tuning my TV to channel 232.001 because the cable company is parking a channel there that they don't want me to see. That may be a result of watching scrambled pay channels as a kid and feeling no responsibility to send a nickle to the cable company when a boob was visible between the squiggly lines for a few frames.
post #82781 of 93667
Obituary
Gary Collins, Actor and Miss America Pageant Host, Dies at 74
By Seth Abramovitch, The Hollywood Reporter - Oct. 13, 2012

Gary Collins, an actor-turned-TV host who was a familiar face throughout the 1970s and 1980s, has died early Saturday in Biloxi, Miss. He was 74.

Born in Venice, Ca., to a waitress mother, Collins enlisted in the U.S. Army and was stationed in Europe, where he got his showbiz start as a performer for the Armed Forces Network.

He came back to Hollywood and got TV acting work in shows like 1965's The Wackiest Ship in the Army and 1972's The Sixth Sense, in which he starred as parapsychologist Dr. Michael Roberts. He also starred in Born Free, the 1974 TV series based on the film of the same name about wildlife conservationist George Adamson.

Collins built a busy career as a TV and film actor -- he even appeared in 1970's disaster classic Airport -- but audiences put the name to the face once he started hosting a series of light-news programs -- shows like Hour Magazine, which ran from 1980 to 1988, and the ABC talker The Home Show, which he hosted from 1989 to 1994. He was also the host of the Miss America Pageant from 1982 to 1990.

Collins moved to Mississippi, the home of wife Mary Ann Mobley in 2011, and in recent years had gotten into several scuffles with the law. In 2011, he was arrested and fined for leaving a Biloxi restaurant without paying his bill, and he was convicted on separate DUI cases in California in 2007 and 2009.

Collins is survived by his wife and their daughter, Marcy Clancy Collins, as well as by his two children Guy William and Melissa with first wife Susan Peterson.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/gary-collins-actor-miss-america-378823
post #82782 of 93667
Spoilers for previous and the new season of "The Walking Dead" in this review.

TV Review
'Walking Dead' : Fresh meat for the hungry hordes
The undead, not to mention fans, are voracious. Nutrition seems to be on the way as the season introduces a baby, sword-wielding Michonne and mysterious Governor.
By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times - Oct. 12, 2012

The trouble with zombies is that after a while they get boring. They do not scheme, they do not regret, they do not engage (mercifully) in any form of seduction.

They just lurch around moaning, trying to eat whatever human flesh crosses their path. Putrefaction may continue — the elements are notoriously unkind to the undead — but even that gets old; fans soon develop the sort of imperturbable gag reflex that allows the "Bones" team to do its job.

Which is why stories about a zombie apocalypse, such as AMC's "The Walking Dead," are not really about zombies; they're about survival and human nature and the rise of a new social order under extreme duress. Balancing all these things is a very tricky business, especially when your original executive producer leaves amid reported budget cuts.

In Season 2 of "The Walking Dead," the writers reacted to Frank Darabont's departure by focusing on character development. They sent their scrappy band o' survivors to an idyllic, relatively zombie-free farm and had them work through a lot of personal issues, including the love triangle between team leader Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln), his wife, Lori (Sarah Wayne Callies), and Shane (Jon Bernthal), whose slide into sociopathology reminded us that a pulse does not prevent a person from becoming a monster.

Many fans complained of pacing issues (i.e. too much yakking, not enough hacking), but then Rick finally killed Shane, new show runner Glen Mazzara released the slavering hordes and everyone was cast out of Eden.

If early episodes are any indication, Season 3 will provide a glorious payoff for those EST-ian weeks down on the farm. The action opens months later, which we see almost immediately from the size of Lori's pregnant belly and, more important, the air of grim resignation that has fallen over the troops.

Finally discovering the prison we saw on the horizon in the finale (it's not clear what took them so long), Rick and friends set about taking out the zombies "living" there with a methodical ferocity that makes slaughter look like factory work. Because that is what it has become.

Any thought that the plague will run its course or that the walkers will die of starvation is gone; killing zombies is just part of life, like scavenging for food and keeping the water supply uncontaminated. Love and hope may still bloom, but the only sense of humor left on the planet appears to belong to Daryl (Norman Reedus), whose job seems to be preserving these important parts of humanity in the same way Irish monks preserved writing during the Dark Ages.

Meanwhile, in another part of the forest (sorry, but geography, like time, gets a little blurry in "Walking Dead" land), Andrea (Laurie Holden), who got left behind at the farm, has been rescued by the Japanese-sword-wielding, chained-zombie-dragging Michonne (Danai Gurira), one of the graphic novel series' most beloved characters, who promises to be the alpha female many of the show's fans (OK, me) have been waiting for.

Their journey marks the first real narrative fork in this road, offering a peek at the larger post-plague universe. More important, it takes some of the emotional burden off the shoulders of Rick and Company, whose lives have become increasingly claustrophobic (they're setting up house in a jail, after all).

Though it's difficult to beat the imminent arrival of a baby in zombie-land for added tension and sentimental contrast, the much-anticipated appearance of Michonne and, in Episode 3, of David Morrissey as the Governor will give us a whole other cast of characters to worry about and a new existential plane to do that worrying on.

The theme of any good post-apocalyptic tale comes down to the definition of survival. As in, it's relative. For what, to paraphrase Matthew, does it profit a man to survive a land chock-full of zombies if in doing so he forfeits his own soul?

'THE WALKING DEAD'
Where: AMC
When: 9 p.m. Sunday


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-black-family-tv-20121013,0,2120013,full.story
post #82783 of 93667
TV Notes
These Comics Will Play the Race Card
By Megan Angelo, The New York Times - Oct. 14, 2012

Keegan-Michael Key recently stumbled on a YouTube tribute to a sketch from “Key & Peele,” the Comedy Central show he created and stars in with Jordan Peele (Wednesdays at 10:30 PM), he needed a minute to figure out what he was seeing.

The short ostensibly recreated, shot for shot, “Das Negros,” a sketch from the show’s first season. In it, the actor Ty Burrell (“Modern Family”) plays a gullible Nazi who banters with Mr. Key and Mr. Peele about hunting down African-Americans, unaware that he is speaking to two such people because they’ve slapped on some white face powder.

Though the tribute on YouTube was poorly lighted, Mr. Key could just make out how two teenage girls, one white and one Asian, were playing his and Mr. Peele’s original roles. “They put brown makeup all over their face, then white makeup over the brown makeup,” he said. “And you can tell these kids weren’t thinking racist. They weren’t thinking blackface. They just loved the scene.”

The image might make other performers uneasy, but of the dozens of online tributes inspired by the show that he has seen, “that video makes me the happiest,” Mr. Key said. He and Mr. Peele don’t treat social issues with kid gloves. And with “Key & Peele” now in its second season, they have created a sketch show that sends up race, class and culture while holding the attention of a young, diverse demographic.

“Jordan and I are biracial,” Mr. Key told the premiere audience (before seguing into a bit about lying), and that has been a pervasive part of the show’s identity.

“It was, ‘Here’s the frame, folks,’ ” Mr. Key explained from Los Angeles in a recent phone interview.

The acknowledgment also served as a starting-line gunshot; it gave the pair — Mr. Key is 41, tall and lanky with a gleaming bald head, and Mr. Peele is 33, scruffy and usually bespectacled off-camera — license to skewer black and white characters alike. They met while acting on the Fox sketch series “MADtv” but had never written together before “Key & Peele,” and the show has given a home to ideas they had been setting aside for years, believing they would never work on a network.

Season 1’s gallery of characters included a jailed Lil Wayne (writing in The New York Times, Jason Zinoman called it “the driest sendup of hip-hop bravado since Black Sheep’s hilarious, satirical song ‘U Mean I’m Not’ ”); a biracial man urged by his date to tap into his black side; and a Tea Party spokesman who happens to be African-American. Perhaps the first season’s most notable sketch was “Auction Block,” in which two slaves become more and more insecure as plantation owners choose not to bid on them. “What can he pick? A cotton plant is like this tall!” Mr. Key’s character exclaims when another slave is sold before he is.

Such topics are rarely broached without backlash, and “Key & Peele” certainly experienced that. On Salon.com, the headline of a review by Kartina Richardson called the show an “edgeless, postracial lie.”

“We set off some people’s politically correct sensors,” Mr. Peele said, but he added that furthering the conversation is going to anger some people.

Viewers weren’t put off, however. The premiere was Comedy Central’s biggest series debut in years, drawing 2.1 million viewers and dominating the young male demographic. “I think the network was thinking, ‘Fingers crossed, this could reawaken the “Chappelle’s Show” audience,’ ” Mr. Peele said. “But in our audiences, we see every single race, every single age, sitting together.”

Comedy Central’s head of original programming and production, Kent Alterman, said he always expected the show’s appeal to extend beyond the so-called urban demographic. “I mean, look, there is an underserving of the African-American audience, and I really like that they explore racial issues,” he said by phone.

Equally admiring of the pair’s race-inspired comedic scrutiny: the white actors who have appeared as guests in some of their potentially diciest works. In an e-mail, Mr. Burrell — who met Mr. Key when both were graduate students at Penn State — said he had no qualms about playing the Nazi in the “Das Negros” sketch. “Keegan has always been the funniest, most positive person I and many others know,” he said. “Those guys are just so heady, I really didn’t have any doubts.”

Mark Moses (“Mad Men,” “Desperate Housewives”), who stepped in to play a Civil War re-enactor in a Season 2 bit, faced a trickier task. “I had to say the ‘n word,’ which is verboten,” he said by phone. “I did think a little bit about how that was going to turn out.” But Mr. Moses, who became familiar with re-enactments while shooting the movie “Gettysburg,” decided that the practice was worth skewering because “it’s offensive to certain people.” (Mr. Key and Mr. Peele are uninvited re-enactors, playing slaves.) Besides, Mr. Moses said: “My kids said, ‘You gotta do it.’ I think there’s an aspect of this show young people find refreshing because they’ve grown up in such an oppressively politically correct environment.”

Still, prejudices past and present are not the only things Mr. Peele and Mr. Key tap for material. “We encourage them to aim in every direction,” Mr. Alterman said. But their sketch poking fun at judges’ self-serious speeches on TV cooking contests is not likely to raise bloggers’ eyebrows as much as a sketch about white people trying to be cool with black people. And equally overlooked is another aspect of their success: the show thrives in a tough time for the form. Sketch series are a tough sell; they often swing too far from mainstream comedy, and their inherent quick changes mean audiences have no characters that hook them. The host segments in each “Key & Peele” episode, which put the pair in front of viewers as themselves, were intended to combat that restlessness.

“Key & Peele” episodes are shot far ahead of their broadcast date, so current events are off the table. They combat that disadvantage by being ruthlessly selective. The 67 sketches that will make the show this season were plucked from 300 written by the hosts and their staff of nine. And the early taping has its advantages: While “Saturday Night Live” scrambles to riff on President Obama’s doings, Mr. Key and Mr. Peele invented Luther, the spitting-mad alter ego of the president and his cool demeanor. This season they imagined Mr. Obama in college, telling stoners that getting a variety of women to their party was “imperative.”

That sketch — which showcases Mr. Peele’s strong Obama impression — nods to a slight shift for “Key & Peele” in Season 2. “The silly factor has been raised,” Mr. Key said. “I think it’s a worthwhile endeavor to challenge young people intellectually, but sometimes we feel the need to write a sketch with farts in it.”

Mr. Peele added that racial material will appear with less frequency. “Part of that is because we’ve gotten out a lot of what we had to say,” he said.

That will probably lead to decreased criticism, too, a prospect that sounds good to Mr. Key and Mr. Peele — not because they can’t take it, but because they would love more people of any color to enjoy their hard work. “We’re all humans,” Mr. Key said, “so can you please just watch the scene and laugh?”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/14/arts/television/key-peele-on-comedy-central-starts-second-season.html?ref=television
post #82784 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

I suggest you read the HSI user agreement. Cox's says in part: "You will not connect any equipment, other than equipment authorized by Cox, to the cable modem outlet." My read on this is: if you put a splitter into the cable HSI line and connect your TV, you're in violation. If you signed up for HSI and TV service and later cancelled the TV service, you are not in violation if they failed to disconnect your TV from the cable line.

Ah, but if you atart out only getting internet, TVs are authorized to be connected to the outlet. The sentence is extremely vague and does not list a when they can, or can't be connected.

1) The above is part of the HSI agreement. It's what you agree to when you only sign up for HSI. Where does it say "if you atart [sic] out only getting internet, TVs are authorized to be connected to the outlet" ?
The sentence is not vague. It says you cannot connect unauthorized equipment. Period.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

No need to encrypt. Just train the techs to put in the traps. Simple enough, and cheaper.

Comcast will end up spending the money tp [sic] do the encryption though.

I fail to see how rolling a truck and adding more equipment is cheaper than "throwing a switch" at the headend.
post #82785 of 93667
TV Notes
Agent Phil Coulson will return in Joss Whedon's 'S.H.I.E.L.D.' spin-off
By Darren Franich, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Oct. 13, 2012

Joss Whedon’s upcoming Avengers spin-off TV series focuses on the Marvel universe’s dominant superspy operation S.H.I.E.L.D. Appropriately, the show has been shrouded in secrecy, barring the occasional promise from Whedon that the show would run alongside Marvel’s cinematic universe but with less of a superhero focus. But earlier today at New York Comic-Con, Marvel officially announced that a member of the Avengers cast would be making an appearance on the show…despite the fact that, well, the character didn’t seem to have much of a future after Avengers. Clark Gregg’s Agent Phil Coulson appeared to die in the movie — oh, spoiler alert, blah blah, it’s the third highest-grossing movie ever — but rumors have persisted that Coulson would reappear in some form.

The Marvel TV panel at NYCC made the news official. Gregg appeared onstage, nominally to talk about his role on the animated series Ultimate Spider-Man. But then attendees were treated to a video showing Whedon and Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige, proclaiming that Coulson would return in the series (currently titled Marvel’s S.H.I.E.L.D.) According to Comic Book Resources, Whedon and Feige made it clear that Coulson wouldn’t just be appearing in some kind of flashback/Obi-Wan role: Feige said, “There was never going to be a S.H.I.E.L.D.‘ show without Agent Phil Coulson!” while Whedon added “He’s headlining the S.H.I.E.L.D. show and always was.”

News about Coulson’s return retroactively lessens the impact of the closing act of Avengers — and it also confirms that characters stay dead in Marvel’s onscreen universe about as often as in the comic book universe. (Read: Never.) However, speaking as a longtime Phil Coulson fan, it’s exciting to hear that Gregg will be participating in the S.H.I.E.L.D. project, if only because he’s the rare actor involved in the Marvelverse who genuinely seems to dig comic books. (Not only that: He digs Jim Starlin. Swoon!)

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/10/13/phil-coulson-clark-gregg-shield/
post #82786 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by CPanther95 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

I suggest you read the HSI user agreement. Cox's says in part: "You will not connect any equipment, other than equipment authorized by Cox, to the cable modem outlet." My read on this is: if you put a splitter into the cable HSI line and connect your TV, you're in violation. If you signed up for HSI and TV service and later cancelled the TV service, you are not in violation if they failed to disconnect your TV from the cable line.

A number of my TVs have internet connections - those would be "authorized equipment" for internet service.

Not having - or even seeing - an internet capable TV, I don't know how they connect to the HSI. It could be that it must be connected only by the HSI company. The User Agreement I quoted was over a year old. Perhaps there is an updated version that deals with Internet capable TVs. My BD player connects to the HSI via Ethernet cable.
post #82787 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Not having - or even seeing - an internet capable TV, I don't know how they connect to the HSI. It could be that it must be connected only by the HSI company. The User Agreement I quoted was over a year old. Perhaps there is an updated version that deals with Internet capable TVs. My BD player connects to the HSI via Ethernet cable.

Every TV I've bought in the last 3 years has had internet features.
post #82788 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Not having - or even seeing - an internet capable TV, I don't know how they connect to the HSI. It could be that it must be connected only by the HSI company. The User Agreement I quoted was over a year old. Perhaps there is an updated version that deals with Internet capable TVs. My BD player connects to the HSI via Ethernet cable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CPanther95 View Post

Every TV I've bought in the last 3 years has had internet features.

Yep, and it's very simple to hook up. Simply hard wire an ethernet from a router to the TV or do it wirelessly.....
post #82789 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

1) The above is part of the HSI agreement. It's what you agree to when you only sign up for HSI. Where does it say "if you atart [sic] out only getting internet, TVs are authorized to be connected to the outlet" ?

Is that same sentence in the agreements for other services? My hunch is that it is the same clause for all services. Which means it is vague. Lawyers love vague clauses.

But, like I said, I know of not one person who has be prosecuted for hooking up a TV and watching unscrambled QAM channels.
post #82790 of 93667
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrvideo View Post

Lawyers love vague clauses.
..only the ones they write.

When they're someone else's, they like them right down to the letter so they can find a way to get around the rules with something not specifically covered.
post #82791 of 93667
SATURDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog

TBS beats all broadcast networks with Game 1 of Yankees-Tigers ALCS Series.
post #82792 of 93667
TV Notes
Millions Watch as Felix Baumgartner Makes Record-Breaking Space Jump
By Jane Kellogg, The Hollywood Reporter - Oct. 14, 2012

It's a record-breaking day for Felix Baumgartner and the world: Not only did the professional Austrian daredevil break the 62-year-old record for a freefall from the highest starting point ever, 128,000 feet (more than 24 miles) on Sunday, Baumgartner, 43, had a record-setting 8 million-plus viewers tuned in online to the live event coverage on YouTube.

Millions were tuned in throughout the hours-long event, but the YouTube stream jumped up to more than 8 million viewers as Felix made his leap and broke the sound barrier, topping out at a record-setting 833.9 miles per hour. (The speed of sound is 761.207 miles per hour.) "On the step I felt that the whole world is watching," Baumgartner said after he reached Earth. "I said, I wish they would see what I see. It was amazing."

The YouTube livestream was running about a minute behind the Discovery Channel's live television coverage in the US. But the reason Baumgartner's amazing space jump was able to draw in so many online viewers is two-fold: One, the feat was only being aired on the Discovery Channel in the US, while any previous contenders for the most-watched live web video were usually broadcast worldwide on basic television, which more people have access to. And two, the previous livestream events were broadcast online through several digital streaming providers, effectively splitting their numbers up. Other web livestream record holders include the 2011 royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, which reached 2 million unique visitors on livestream.com and 3 million simultaneous viewers on Akamai, in addition to several other outlets. Before that, President Barack Obama set a record in 2009 during his inauguration as the 44th president of the United States (peaking at more than 7 million active simultaneous streams, according to Akamai).

In the meantime, as he waits for the official results to come in, Baumgartner is more focused on the other records he hopes to have set today: the fastest freefall (an unprecedented Mach 1), the longest sustained freefall, and the highest ascent in a manned balloon. The previous highest, farthest, and longest freefall was made by retired US Air Force Col. Joe Kittinger, whose 1960 leap from a helium envelope set a record at the time with an altitude of 102,800 feet (31.3km). None of the new marks set by Baumgartner can be classed as "official" until approved by the Federation Aeronautique Internationale.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/millions-watch-as-felix-baumgartner-378859
post #82793 of 93667
TV Notes
NBC Buying ‘Alice In Wonderland’ Sequel Project From ‘CSI’ Creator Anthony Zuiker
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com

EXCLUSIVE: From Las Vegas’ underbelly to Wonderland. NBC is finalizing a deal for Wonderland, a drama set in the world of Lewis Carroll’s Alice In Wonderland that will be executive produced by CSI creator Anthony Zuiker. The project, which will be written by feature scribe Whit Anderson, stems from Zuiker’s overall deal with ABC Studios, which has him partnering with studio-based Brillstein Entertainment Partners on development. Wonderland is set years after the events in the book and centers on Alice and a new character, Clara. Seven years ago, Clara’s life took an unexplained turn for the worse, and a mysterious stranger tells her there may be an explanation after all… an explanation that lies in the fantastical world of Wonderland. To revive her dreams and get her life back on track, Clara must wage war against Wonderland’s reigning Queen, the woman we once knew as Alice. “Whit Anderson is a true visionary,” Zuiker said. “Her reimagining of Alice In Wonderland blew us away and we are very excited to bring this to television.”

Wonderland will be produced by ABC Studios, Brillstein and Zuiker’s Dare To Pass banner. Zuiker and Anderson, both repped by CAA, will executive produce with Brillstein’s president of TV JoAnn Alfano and Zuiker’s long-time manager, Brillstein’s Margaret Riley. Dare To Pass president Matt Weinberg also is expected to produce.

The Alice In Wonderland concept is popular this season. The CW has in development Wunderland, a contemporary reimagining of Alice In Wonderland from McG and Chad Hodge. And Lionsgate TV is prepping a pitch after acquiring this summer Zenescope’s Wonderland graphic novels, a modern retelling of Carroll’s novel from the point of view of Alice’s daughter. ABC, of course, has elements from Alice In Wonderland featured in its fairytale drama Once Upon A Time, which is likely the reason the ABC Studios-produced Wonderland sold to an outside network.

This is Anderson’s second stab at rebooting a popular fantasy/supernatural franchise. In 2010, she was tapped to write a new Buffy The Vampire Slayer movie. For Zuiker and Dare To Pass, this would be the second sale this season, along with soap Taboo at ABC with writer Sara Goodman. Zuiker’s digital film, Cybergeddon, launched recently on Yahoo.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/10/alice-in-wonderland-sequel-nbc-drama-anthony-zuiker-csi/
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TV Notes
RuPaul will crown an all-star queen in new season of ‘Drag Race’
By Don Kaplan, New York Daily News - Oct. 13, 2012

RuPaul says the new all-star season of his hit show is no drag.

On the latest cycle of “RuPaul’s Drag Race” the famed cross-dressing drama queen called back a collection of his viewer’s favorite glamazons — all of whom got the boot on previous seasons of the cable show.

“These are kids who didn’t make it to the finish line and now we’re giving them another chance to redeem themselves — and they are very hungry,” he said. “They understand that their legacies are at stake.”

On the show — a televised explosion of feathers, sequins and stilettos — RuPaul has the final word in judging and eliminations, but also offers guidance to contestants on a variety of challenges.

This season, a field of 12 drag queens from the first four seasons of “Drag” will compete for a $100,000 prize. They will be progressively eliminated until only one remains as the winner.

The contestants are Pandora Boxx, Tammie Brown, Nina Flowers, Jujubee, Mimi Imfurst, Manila Luzon, Alexis Mateo, Chad Michaels, Raven, Latrice Royale, Shannel and Yara Sofia Vie.

“These are the ‘all stars,’ ” Ru said.

“They know exactly what they’re doing — what we do is see if they can roll with the punches. It’s an analogy for life, actually. You have have to be able to multitask.”

Past challenges have included drag queens trying to create outfits made of curtains (though some just ended up fighting over the materials); lip-syncing to RuPaul music and strutting down a runway.

Ru just calls the new season, which airs on Logo and starts on Oct. 22, “a dream come true.”

He’s dedicated the first episode to former contestant Sahara Davenport (real name: Antoine Ashley, 27), who died suddenly last month.

“She was a young kid with a heart condition,” Ru noted. “It was so tragic.”

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/rupaul-crown-all-star-draggin-lady-article-1.1182075
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Q&A
'Community' show runners don't expect fans to call them 'daddy'
By Yvonne Villareal, Los Angeles Times

Moses Port and David Guarascio are a few hundred feet away from the "Community" sound stage at Paramount Studios in Los Angeles on a recent morning. With production starting later in the afternoon, they have managed to find time to ponder something other than the Greendale Community College universe.

Will they be carving pumpkins this year as Halloween approaches?

It's hard to say. The duo have a bigger beast to carve. Following the exit of "Community" creator Dan Harmon as the comedy's show runner, Port and Guarascio were enlisted as the show's new co-show-runners and executive producers.

The pair, who previously served as executive producers on "Just Shoot Me" and the short-lived "Aliens in America," most recently served as consulting producers on ABC's"Happy Endings."

Show Tracker spoke to Port and Guarascio late last week about taking the helm of the show. And we kind of wished we could have foreshadowed what was to come: The series was poised to return Oct. 19 on a new night -- but as of Monday, that start date has been delayed, with no firm alternative in place. Though we were unable to get their thoughts on the delay, Port and Guarascio did elaborate on the daunting task they are faced with, fan perception and Dean Pelton on a chariot (?!).

If you could give me an analogy of what it’s like coming into all of this, what would it be?
David Guarascio:
I think when Sony first approached us about coming to take this job, we were really reluctant, actually, because we are huge fans of the show. And it was just sort of a daunting idea. I think once we sort of thought about it and looked at the show as this unbelievable magic garden where all the seeds have been planted and nurtured over the last three years and there are all these people here who have helped take care — from returning writers and the cast and executive producers and directors, all of that stuff — it was like, you know what, it might be fun to come in and help take care of this garden because as a comedy writer you just don’t get to do shows like this. It’s so rare where you get to break all these different rules of what is comedy storytelling. And we sort of realized we might not have another chance like this so let’s do it. So … the magic garden — there’s your analogy. I also have a sandbox analogy. Or a magic sandbox analogy.

Moses Port: We should look into changing our business cards so that our titles are listed as “Magic Gardeners.” We’re not EPs, we’re Magic Gardeners.

From the time it was announced you guys would be running the show to the writing of the first episode, are you guys just pulling all-nighters studying each episode or hoping for osmosis?
MP:
We’d seen episodes before, but then it’s like you start to watch it with a different eye. We watched every episode, like, two or three times.

DG: And we thought, holy … this is complicated. It was a re-immersion with the show, looking at it from a new perspective and, also, I think our first thing was letting the cast know, letting the returning writers know, letting the returning production staff know that we were leaning on them first and foremost. We have no interest in changing the tone of the show, the sensibility of the show or taking it in a new direction. We wanted to continue to grow and evolve the way any show would from being on the air year to year. It was just about letting people know that, “Hey, we are not here to make this anything other than the ‘Community’ you have known and grown to love in the past three years. Help us keep doing that.’ Certainly when you create your own thing, you know what you've envisioned. This is different so we had to approach it differently. It was a lot of listening. A lot of listening to what everyone who's worked on the show thought about it — particularly the writers. How they came up with certain stories, what stories they didn’t do and why, why they made choices here and there. It was a lot of leaning back and taking in and absorbing as much as possible.

MP: Even the method by which they break the stories, we’ve tried to keep all of it the same.

In re-watching it and looking at it from a different perspective, what went through your heads? This show has a very unique sensibility and so many people watch it closely — they watch it two or three times for fun, not work like you.
DG:
I think the intimidating part was how ambitious this show is. But all of that reinforced the idea of how – normally, you aren’t required to do this job and think about it the way this show thinks about itself. And, so, that seemed like fun. That seemed challenging.

On this show, when we met new writers, they’d be like, "I love this show. It’s my favorite thing on television. Please hire me." It’s just nice. This show has had a lot of turnover on the writing staff and brought in a lot of fresh blood of people who love what it’s been doing — which is so important to how it’s been able to grow from year to year. There’s that first moment when we were thinking of the first episode, talking about it for a couple of days and stumbling on how we wanted to approach it and the like-mindedness in the room — there was like electricity in the air. The very ambitious show that we had been watching and re-watching, it’s like we realized, "Hey, it can be done!" We could do it. There is something that is distinctively a "Community" episode that we could all work together to create.

Talk about what we’re going to see from the first episode. There’s some acknowledgment of the passing of the baton, yes?
DG:
This show has done such a great job in that meta way of being aware of itself and what’s going on in the outside world. Season 4 for us is about change and it fits in very organically to what it means to be in college for four years — you’re such in a bubble when you’re in the middle of college, and not everyone is on the four-year plan. Some people are working and taking fewer classes, some people are like Jeff Winger [Joel McHale] and trying to get out of there as fast as they can. But there is something about that senior year when you feel that that little bubble is changing and there’s nothing you can do about it. The characters are going through that and, at the same time, it helps us talk about the larger change that was going on with the show and what that means and the way those things are sort of inevitable to some degree and the way they could be scary when it’s something that you care about. But also the way it doesn’t have to spell "The End" either.

You guys aren't on Twitter, but this show has a very ardent and vocal fan base so you're undoubtedly familiar with their concerns — what’s your reaction?
DG:
What we have is a lot of people already on the show who have a great dialogue with the fans and I think we just sort of felt to try and step in and start doing that without having earned it yet just felt weird, to be honest with you.

MP: There’s also a part of this job that you just kind of have to tune out and just get down to the business of working on the show. There’s a lot of voices out there saying a lot of things and if you listen to it all, it can become overwhelming. We have producers on the show who have a direct dialogue with fans and that’s continued. In terms of our job, we’re just sticking to the business of making stories.

DG: And we are very much invested in letting the people who really love the show — because they are the reason the show is back for a fourth year — of letting them know that all the goals are the same and I think the cast and the returning writers are just a much better voice for expressing the opinion than we would be because fans might be like, "Why would I trust you two? You just got there!" The writers who have been deeply invested and are very protective of the show and the cast is very protective of the show and their characters — it’s just a more honest source. You can’t say we’re making Dan Harmon episodes — Dan isn’t here. But you can say we’re still making “Community” episodes. It’s a huge loss for the show not to have Dan, yes. But the good news is that there are a lot of people whose passion and creativity have been informing what the show is over the last few years and a lot of them are still here, particularly the cast.

MP: It’s a little like being stepfathers. We’re not asking the fans to call us "daddy" right now. But we’re going to be as loving and protective as we can so the family can continue.

Has there been any communication with Dan Harmon?
DG:
We emailed back and forth just a little bit at the very beginning when it happened. It was really just a gracious, "Look, we hope we do right by you." And he very graciously said something to the effect that he’s rooting for us and wished us luck. I think for him the easiest thing was to just sort of step back from the blackjack table. What you have is just so much public information on what’s gone on over the years at our disposal and there’s a lot of people involved with the show that have been as close as you can be to Dan’s brain without being Dan — so that’s been really the most important part of the transition creatively.

MP: I mean, look, Dan won’t be taking a pass at these episodes. They won’t be Dan Harmon episodes.

DG: In some ways, you almost don’t give Dan enough credit if you think it’s just like switching a lightswitch off. He’s done so much work to get the show to where it is to think that it could die that quickly.

The show lost its creator. It’s moving to Fridays. It’s a show that’s been on the bubble year after year. Coming into this, do you almost feel like you’re the captains of a sinking ship?
DG:
I don’t feel like we’re captains of a sinking ship, although we’re very aware of all the factors that you’ve mentioned. You never know what’s going to happen. If this is the end, we’re going out lighting the ship on fire as we go down because that’s the way we do things here. At the same time, the real lesson is somehow this show manages to always come back because there’s just enough people who watch in the traditional way. The amount of people who watch on their DVR and their computer is very important to us. And maybe this is just something I’m telling myself to sleep at night. We just don’t think it’s going to be the end. But if it is, we want to send the show off the way it deserves. There is no morbidity about it.

MP: There’s no doubt the show has always been ratings-challenged. I think we just looked at it as, "Wow, it’s a chance to make 13 episodes of the show." Just to do that, honestly, is cool. The idea that we get to write for these characters and tell these stories — if it’s 13, if it’s four, if it’s six — I think it was just exciting to get to do that for a period of time, however long that may be.

And the conversations with Sony [which produces the show] and NBC about what they expected from you?
DG:
Um, well, when they first said Dan Harmon wasn’t coming back, we were like, "Um, are you sure you want to do that?" The conversations have been sort of minimal in the sense that there is something about the show — Dan has sort of tunneled through the mountain. We do the show the way it’s done here. We just sort of said to them that if we’re doing this, we’re going into it wanting to do the show that’s been on the air for three years. We’re not coming in trying to turn it into anything it’s not. That would be a bad business decision if that’s what they wanted. And it would also be a bummer to turn this show into something it isn’t — although, we know that expectation is out there. And we may be playing with that idea slightly in our first episode.

We had a couple of creative conversations early where we were pitching them some episodes and they were like, "Whoa! Whoa! Whoa! This sounds like a lot like the weird show we used to do" and we were like, "Yeah, that’s the show we’re still doing." We butt heads a little bit, but that’s just part of the process. Ultimately, we got to a place where they understood where we were coming from and so we’re going to get to keep doing the show in the same tone that it’s always had.

MP: Yeah, I mean, I don’t think anyone was of the opinion of, "OK, now it’s going to be a top 10 show." I think, in truth, when Dan was gone and we were hired on, there was a moment of, "Ok, what can the show be?" And I think everyone has kind of come around to the point of, look, the most important thing is this group of rabid fans that have kept this show afloat, it needs to speak to them first and foremost. Hopefully, other people will come along, maybe we’ll get some more promotion and more people will enjoy it. But it still has to be the show that had all these fans feverishly excited every time a new episode aired.

And what about the cast?
DG:
I think they had their own anxieties, understandably so. Every actor, ultimately, is the one who is out there, is the one being judged. We told them we’d be relying on them more than they’re probably used to — if a scene isn’t feeling right for your character, tell us. If this story line doesn’t fit with the tone of the show, tell us. We may not agree every time, but we’re going to a lot.

Have you found already that there have been many instances where they feel something doesn’t fit their character or the tone of the show?
DG:
Yes, actually. And it’s been an important part of the process. And that’s another way the show has changed where, I mean, we weren’t here, but I think Dan had a way of where he knew what it was or what he wanted exactly and we can’t pretend to do that because we didn’t create it and we haven’t been running it for the last three years. So there is a collective mind to it a little more than there has been before. I think it’s allowing us to take those characters to some new places because of how they’ve given their characters life over the last few years.

MP: But at some point you have to make the switch from, "What would Dan do?" to "Well, what do we want it to be?"

How much does pleasing the fans affect that decision-making?
DG:
I think there is a small segment of fandom for the show that is like, "This show is dead to me now. It just can’t possibly be the same." We’re not going to win over that segment of the population. But by and large most people love the show and want it to work and they’re rooting for it. MP: That first group of people, Dan could literally ghost write every episode and they would still be like, “I hate it.”

Tease a little of what we’re going to be seeing this season. We’re getting a look at Pierce’s mansion …
DG:
For Halloween, we’re going to be in Pierce’s mansion. In sort of staying on the theme of change and things evolving, some relationships will take a new turn romantically and that has a ripple effect on the group. The notion that you actually have to start thinking of what’s going to happen when this college experience is done — what it’s going to mean for each person personally. And what is it going to mean for the group. That is the most important thing to us — how will they grow if they don’t have a Spanish class to study for around that study room table.

Something that has been threaded through in the previous two seasons is Jeff’s relationship with his dad and so he’s going to find him and meet him — when that’s been such a big part of your psyche for 30 years, what are you like after that? So there’s a lot of built up things where we could sort of naturally define the evolution of these characters.

Is there a scene or moment of the new season that stands out and that you think fans will find particularly in keeping with the show's personality?
DG:
There’s a moment in the first episode where Dean Pelton (Jim Rash) comes out on the chariot pulled by two buff men dressed as unicorns. That was really a moment where I turned to someone and was like, "Only here. Only here." That was a moment where I got a "Community" boner.

MP: There’s a great moment in "Inspector Spacetime Convention" where you actually get to see the American version and it’s pretty awesome. It’s worth it.

Are you guys excited or nervous that fans will soon finally watch the first episode that was under your care?
DG:
Both. I’m excited because I think these episodes are coming out great. I think a lot of people will be happy. And nervous because some people won't be. It’s inevitable. You have to put your head in the sand about certain things. If you listen to all the chatter, you’ll never get out of bed in the morning.
MP: Yes, we're looking forward to getting over that hump.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-new-community-show-runners-dan-harmon-20121008,0,6853897.story
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TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
MONDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Dancing with the Stars: All-Stars (120 min., LIVE)
10:01PM - Castle
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Aziz Ansari; TV personalities Alana "Honey Boo Boo" Thompson and June "Mama'' Shannon; Josh Turner performs)

CBS:
8PM - How I Met Your Mother
8:30PM - Partners
9PM - 2 Broke Girls
9:30PM - Mike and Molly
10PM - Hawaii Five-0
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Kaley Cuoco; stupid human tricks; The Whigs perform)
(R - Sep. 25)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Jeff Goldblum; Sarah Paulson)

NBC:
8PM - The Voice (120 min.)
10PM - Revolution
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Ben Affleck; Octavia Spencer; Neon Trees perform)
(R - Oct. 4)
12:37AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Daniel Craig; Archie Panjabi; medium Theresa Caputo; Animal Collective performs)
(R - Oct. 4)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Author Diana Nyad; Chairlift performs; "Samsara")
(R - Sep. 27)

FOX:
7:30PM - MLB Baseball: St. Louis Cardinals at San Francisco Giants, Game 2

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Antiques Roadshow: Milwaukee, WI (R - Nov. 5, 2007)
9PM - Market Warriors
10PM - Standing Bear's Footsteps

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Ella Soy Eva
9PM - Abismo de Pasión
10PM - Amor Bravio

THE CW:
8PM - 90210
9PM - Gossip Girl

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Rosa Diamante
9PM - Corazón Valiente
10PM - Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal
10:30PM - El Rostro de la Venganza

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Author J.K. Rowlins)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Author Evan Thomas)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Cheryl Hines; Michael Kiwanuka)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Jennifer Aniston; Heather McDonald; Loni Love; Ross Mathews)
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Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Oct. 15, 2012

2012 MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL PLAYOFFS
Fox, 8:00 p.m. ET

This year’s postseason games, in both the National and American Leagues, have been anything but dull – and that went for last night’s Game 1 in this National League Championship Series, which was an explosive battle of both occasional firepower and ferocious pitching and defense., and was exciting down to the last pitch. The St. Louis Cardinals held off the San Francisco 49ers to emerge victoriously, but tonight is another day.

HOW I MET YOUR MOTHER
CBS, 8:00 p.m. ET

With Marshall and Lily’s parenthood approaching, the couple (Alyson Hannigan, Jason Segel) decides to select which of their best friends will be deemed the godparent. The best way to decide? Apparently, a game-show-style competition.

OPEN WATER
IFC, 8:00 p.m. ET

This harrowing 2003 low-budget movie, loosely based on an actual aquatic account, takes us along as a young vacationing couple, on a scuba-diving excursion in open waters, is accidentally left behind, to cope with the abandonment, the elements – and the sharks.

ALPHAS
SyFy, 8:00 p.m. ET

Including tonight’s new installment, there are only two episodes of Alphas left this season – and both of them will feature Summer Glau in her recurring role as Skylar, an alpha with a particular affinity for and connection with technology. I wish she would visit me… and help me connect my laptop to my SmartTV.

VANITY FAIR
Flix, 10:00 p.m. ET

Reese Witherspoon stars as Becky Sharp in this 2004 adaptation of the Thackeray novel – but watch, this time, for the actress playing Amelia Sedley. She’s Romola Garai (pictured), who later carried her own impressive period piece, the recent TV miniseries The Crimson Petal and the White.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
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TV Review
‘Emily Owens, M.D.,’ so like high school
Imagine 'Grey's Anatomy' for an audience that doesn't like blood
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine - Oct. 12, 2012

"Grey's Anatomy" takes the character of a young female doctor who is competent at work but an emotional and romantic wreck and makes her the focal point of a drama. "The Mindy Project" takes the same character type and makes her the focal point of a comedy.

The CW's new series "Emily Owens, M.D." splits the difference. Its title character's emotional neediness and immaturity leads her into various comical situations, but the medical crises are played for the standard suspense and melodrama. A little voice-over at the end sums up the hour's lessons.

The show is therefore closer to "Grey's Anatomy" — in fact, it's probably too close for viewers who have grown tired of that show. For those who still enjoy the romance on "Grey's" but would prefer to avoid its occasional bloody crises, however, "Emily Owens" might hit the sweet spot.

In the premiere, airing next Tuesday, Oct. 16, at 9 p.m., Emily (Mamie Gummer) is starting her first day as an intern at a Denver hospital. Among her fellow newbies are Will (Justin Hartley), her med school friend and secret crush; Cassandra (Aja Naomi King), her high school nemesis; and Tyra (Kelly McCreary), a friendly but manipulative woman whose father (Harry Lennix) is the hospital's chief resident.

In an amusing speech, Tyra explains that the hospital is just like high school: The jocks are now orthopedic surgeons, the mean girls are in plastic surgery, the stoners are anesthesiologists, and so on.

Still mentally stuck in high school, Emily is convinced that Cassandra has hidden her pager. Inspired by a 12-year-old girl who keeps fainting around her own crush, Emily tries to work up the courage to tell Will how she feels. Meanwhile, Tyra, who is gay, persuades her to feel out a nurse who seems to be interested in Tyra. Immediately the word goes out that Emily is a lesbian.

In voice-over, we hear Emily's thoughts, which are usually self-deprecating or panicky. The comic potential of this device isn't realized.

The medical subplots are standard issue. Besides the fainting girl, there's a woman with Alzheimer's whose daughter has gone missing and another woman who will likely die from cancer and who has to decide whether to undergo treatment.

Emily has chosen this particular hospital because she wanted to work with Dr. Bandari (Necar Zadegan), a famous surgeon who, to continue the high school analogies, is like a mean teacher. Emily gets support from a resident named Micah (Michael Rady), who might turn out to be a better romantic prospect than Will.

Emily's comic self-doubt may remind viewers of an earlier young professional woman, Ally McBeal, minus the hallucinations. Ally provoked a 1998 Time magazine cover story asking if feminism was dead. If it wasn't then, women like Mindy and Emily suggest that feminism is still feeling poorly.

The lighter moments are generally funny. When Emily says she thinks all the nurses hate her, Tyra says, "You saw the Facebook page?"

The dialogue, whether comic or dramatic, is well crafted. Micah gives Emily a pep talk that surprisingly turns out to have deeper emotional resonance. The actors, meanwhile, handle their roles capably. As Emily, Mamie Gummer is both believably fragile and believably capable.

But too many moments are too familiar from past medical dramas, especially "Grey's Anatomy." In the premiere, Emily is in the room twice when the same patient flatlines. She earns Dr. Bandari's grudging respect, but in the second episode, they're back to square one. Every patient has both a disease and a personal problem to confront.

Both episodes end with Emily, like Meredith Grey, reciting a voice-over monologue stating what she's learned, as the camera cuts to the participants in the various subplots, each of whom illustrates a point Emily is making. "We let go because we want to," she says in the conclusion of episode 2. "Because we have to. At the end of the day, there is no choice." (Doctor! Code green! The viewers' eyes are glazing over!)

On the positive side, unlike "Grey's," "Emily" will probably spare us scenarios in which many regular characters might die violently.

"Emily Owens" could find its own niche by sticking with the lighter shades of "Grey's." But if it can't find a way to jolt the medical action to life, it could also flatline.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/emily-owens-m-d-so-like-high-school/
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Nielsen Notes
Mom Shows Hurt Nick Jr.
By John Jannarone, Wall Street Journal

It might have seemed like a good idea at the time: To draw new viewers to its Nick Jr. children's network, Viacom Inc. recently scheduled a block of racy adult programming called NickMom. But the programs have sparked an outcry and sent ratings down 74%.

The controversy is threatening to grow. Angry parents across the country have joined forces on social media sites, and specially designed websites like cancelnickmom.com, to urge parents to contact advertisers like Target Corp. and Lysol to complain.

One of the people complaining online, Sara Dawson, of Bremerton, Wash., mother of a 3-year-old daughter, says she got a shock one day when Nickmom came on the TV. "Suddenly there was a woman doing standup comedy and she says the word 'a—.' Suddenly my daughter starts shouting 'a—! a—! a—!'"

Ms. Dawson said she immediately changed the channel. "We actually upgraded our Dish [satellite TV package] to get Nick. Jr. so my daughter could watch programming 24-7," Ms. Dawson said. "Now I'm thinking, 'sorry...you can't watch it.'"

A Nickelodeon spokesman said "research with moms tells us that this is an idea they like and want." He added that "with any brand new venture it will take time for the audience to build."

Known as Noggin until 2009, Nick Jr. is a sibling network to Viacom's Nickelodeon. It airs mostly cartoons popular for preschoolers, like "Dora the Explorer." In the late evening it also used to air cartoons—until Oct. 1, when NickMom made its debut, with the slogan "Mother Funny."

The programming block includes shows like docu-comedy "MFF: Mom Friends Forever" and stand-up comedy series "NickMom Night Out." The block is scheduled to air from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. on the east coast, when most toddlers could be expected to be asleep. But Viacom isn't delaying the broadcast for other parts of the country. So in Washington state, where Ms Dawson lives, for example, NickMom begins at 7 p.m. In Hawaii, NickMom kicks off at 4 p.m.

Nickelodeon says the show is aimed at mothers and it has been airing 10 notifications during the day alerting parents of the programming shift. The network also cites emails from fans, such as one 22-year-old woman from West Virginia who isn't a mother but enjoys sitting back with a glass of wine to watch NickMom. None of the advertisers have dropped out, the network says.

A spokeswoman for Target, one of the advertisers moms are targeting, said the company's goal when purchasing airtime, including on Nickelodeon properties, is to reach an audience that closely matches a typical Target guest.

Lysol parent Reckitt Benckiser Group PLC didn't reply to requests for comment.

Still, the viewership isn't what it was before NickMom started. In the week of its Oct. 1 debut, NickMom averaged just 131,000 viewers, down 74% from the same time slot a year earlier. On some nights, certain programs in the block didn't draw enough viewers to have their audience measured, Nielsen said.

Another mother, Gina O'Doherty, recently flipped on what she thought was the Brady Bunch for her 7-year old. In the show, the mother character was engaged in some needlepoint when a comment bubble popped up on the screen. "It said, Carol's idea of foreplay is needlepoint," recalled Ms. O'Doherty, of Omaha, Neb. "And I was like OK! It blew my mind, I thought, 'what are we doing to our children?'" The show turned out to be "What Was Carol Brady Thinking?"

Ms. O'Doherty tuned in briefly with her husband a second night to make sure the night before wasn't a case of programming gone wrong. She found a show called Parental Discretion, which featured "an old commercial with a woman at a Xerox machine" with a voice-over making a lewd joke.

She began posting protests on NickMom and Nick Jr.'s Facbook pages and signed up to cancelnickmom.com. "A lot of people say turn the channel. Well, adults have plenty of programming already. Why do they need more?"

The NickMom headache comes at a difficult time for Viacom, which is struggling with weak ratings at some of its key networks. Nickelodeon, for instance, has averaged 1.6 million viewers during its total programming day so far this year, down 25% from 2.2 million in the same period of 2011, according to Nielsen. Nick Jr. is a smaller network, with prime-time viewership holding steady at around 862,000 over the last two years through September.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390443749204578052881834903510.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_4
post #82800 of 93667
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Originally Posted by bobby94928 View Post

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Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Not having - or even seeing - an internet capable TV, I don't know how they connect to the HSI. It could be that it must be connected only by the HSI company. The User Agreement I quoted was over a year old. Perhaps there is an updated version that deals with Internet capable TVs. My BD player connects to the HSI via Ethernet cable.

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Originally Posted by CPanther95 View Post

Every TV I've bought in the last 3 years has had internet features.

Yep, and it's very simple to hook up. Simply hard wire an ethernet from a router to the TV or do it wirelessly.....

So it's not necessary to hook up the RG6 cable, and therefore irrelevant in the ongoing TOS thread.
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