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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2780

post #83371 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi Master View Post

Move them to a the sports only tier and the crap will stop.
And, if you're a cable operator, what's your incentive for doing that? Putting ESPN on a higher-cost tier reduces the number of subscribers it's available to which negatively affects what you can charge for the two minutes an hour of ad time you get. Plus, ESPN isn't going to negotiate with you if you do that. Even if it were successful, your per-subscriber rate would likely triple.

But as for the premise of "buying up all the sports rights" it seems to me to be going the other direction. College nets such as the Big Ten Network, Longhorn Network and the like have robbed ESPN of rights it used to have. (The games I get on GamePlan are pathetic. Used to be quite a lineup) It only got NASCAR because NBC didn't want it anymore and the number of MLB and NBA games they have is really small. March Madness is still on CBS/TBS/etc and almost all golf final rounds are on Golf, NBC or CBS. ESPN has ONE NFL game per regular-season week and no Super Bowls.

With Fox Sports rumored changes and NBC and CBS with sports channels that need programming, I think you're already seeing this go the other way. But that could actually drive prices UP as more sports networks battle for a rather fixed number of marquee events.
post #83372 of 93648
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
FRIDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Last Man Standing
8:30PM - Malibu Country
9PM - Shark Tank
10PM - 20/20
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live (From Brooklyn: David Letterman; Vampire Weekend performs)
(R - Oct. 31)

CBS:
8PM - Undercover Boss: Cinnabon, Inc.
9PM - CSI: NY
10PM - We Will Always Love You: A Grammy Tribute to Whitney Houston (Special)
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Dr. Phil McGraw; comic Carmen Lynch; Divine Fits performs)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (James Spader; Variety editor Cynthia Littleton)

NBC:
8PM - Go On
(R - Sep. 18)
8:30PM - Guys with Kids
(R - Oct. 17)
9PM - Grimm
10PM - Dateline NBC
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Chris Matthews; Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele; The Mowgli's perform)
12:37AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Helen Mirren; TV host Carson Daly; Nintendo of America president Reggie Fils-Aime; Miguel performs)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Chris Elliott; "The Goon"; The Jezabels perform)
(R - Oct. 29)

FOX:
8PM - Kitchen Nightmares
9PM - Fringe

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Washington Week in Review
8:30PM - Need to Know
9PM - Craft in America
10PM - The Mind of a Chef: Rotten
10:30PM - The Mind of a Chef: Rene

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Ella Soy Yo
9PM - Amores Verdaderos
10PM - El Amor Bravio

THE CW:
8PM - America's Next Top Model (Season Finale)
9PM - America''s Next Top Model (Special)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Rosa Diamante
9PM - Corazón Valiente
10PM - Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal
10:30PM - El Rostro de la Venganza

HBO:
10PM - Real Time with Bill Maher (Season Finale, LIVE; Eric Idle; David Frum; Michael Moore)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Hayden Panettiere; Brad Wollack; Ingrid Haas; Ross Matthews)
(R - Nov. 8)
post #83373 of 93648
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Nov. 9, 2012

MOYERS & COMPANY
Public Television, Check local listings

This week’s new edition is all about the winds of change – literally. It’s called “Hurricanes, Capitalism and Democracy,” and features, in one segment, Naomi Klein discussing climate change and capitalism. In another segment, Trevor Potter analyzes the true impact of “big money,” the Super PACs and such, on the 2012 election. Important questions – and the answers, my friend, are blowing in the wind. The answers are blowing in the wind. To find where and when the show runs in your area, check the Moyers & Company website.

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

David Lean directed, and Peter O’Toole starred in, this widescreen 1962 historical epic, set in lands that, though with different names, figure prominently in today’s international conflicts and history. O’Toole cuts an accurately flamboyant figure as T.E. Lawrence, and costars include Alec Guinness, Omar Sharif and Anthony Quinn.

FRINGE
Fox, 9:00 p.m. ET

The Observers now know that the Fringe team – what’s left of it – is more powerful and threatening than they had, uh, Observed. And tonight, the freedom fighters of the future (or is that for the future?) instigate their own Fringe event. And if they can indeed affect the future, then anything is possible – except, I suppose, avoiding this series’ scheduled cancellation.

HUNTED
Cinemax, 10:00 p.m. ET

Sam (Melissa George) didn’t die last week, but she could have – and that’s the point the guy who didn’t kill her was trying to make, as he now insists he’s on her side. But in a show so steeped in paranoia, Sam doesn’t even know which side she’s on. Or, at least, whom she can trust among those already on it.

REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER
HBO, 10:00 p.m. ET
SEASON FINALE:
End of Season 10. Last show of the year features Eric Idle as the opening interview guest. And on the panel, guests include David Frum and Michael Moore, whose respective vocal viewpoints ought to be especially combustible – but capable of giving off light as well as heat.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #83374 of 93648
TV/Business Notes
Viacom chief says MTV 'is not broken' despite ratings slide
By Meg James, Los Angeles Times - Nov. 15, 2012

Wall Street analysts are nervous about Viacom Inc.'s short-term growth amid a ratings slump at the company's key television networks.

Ratings are down about 30% this season at MTV, the company's signature cable channel. The youth-skewing network also is losing its juggernaut franchise "Jersey Shore," which could make matters worse. And for the last year, Viacom's other major cash cow, Nickelodeon, has been struggling to stop the flight of young viewers.

TV networks provide about 90% of the Viacom's profits.

On Thursday, Wells Fargo media analyst Marci Ryvicker was blunt during a conference call with analysts to discuss the company's fiscal fourth quarter. Viacom earnings were up 13%, but revenue was down 17% for the July-September period. Domestic ad revenue declined 6%.

"There is a fear out there that MTV is broken," Ryvicker said.

Viacom Chief Executive Philippe Dauman quickly shot back: "It is not broken."

"MTV is very healthy," a defensive Dauman said. "Indeed, we have a great development pipeline and we have just added one of the major talents in our business in addressing young audience in Susanne Daniels."

Daniels, whose hiring as MTV's programming chief was announced this week, was intregal to the now-defunct WB network's success more than a decade ago by championing such shows as "Dawson's Creek," and "Buffy the Vampire Slayer." More recently, Daniels was a consultant to OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network.

"We have had our eye on [Daniels] for a long time," Dauman said, adding, "She will bring with her some additional talent who will bring to bear more development in the reality and scripted area. We have a good pipeline and this will turbo-charge it."

Viacom is not alone in its ratings woes. Major networks including CBS, ABC and Fox have also stumbled this season as digital video recorders and portable tablets become more popular with consumers. Ratings giant Nielsen, meanwhile, is struggling to accurately measure viewing on alternative screens, adding to the anxiety in the TV industry.

"The entire broadcasting and cable industry is at an inflection point as time-shifted viewing is becoming more prevalent," Dauman said.

However, he said, the company's first order of business is improving its ratings.

"We are engaging in self-help. We are going to create the supply, the inventory, so we can capture the [advertiser] demand that is out there," Dauman said. "That's why it is so important on building our programming and building our ratings."

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-mtv-not-broken-20121115,0,2281077.story/
post #83375 of 93648
TV Review
‘Raised Wild,’ mostly monkey business
Animal Planet series cooks up a jungle mystery where none exists
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine - Nov. 15, 2012

We all love those documentaries in which attractive, intense archaeologists, anthropologists or historians — who usually have a British accent — head off into a remote area to investigate a mystery. They hack through the bush, interview shy villagers and travel on rickety but picturesque conveyances, all the while giving us breathless updates on their progress. If they could have avoided all that trouble by simply doing a Google search, well, that's besides the point, right?

In the premiere episode of Animal Planet's "Raised Wild," a new documentary series that will investigate stories of children who were raised by animals, the British anthropologist Mary-Ann Ochota travels to rural Africa to search for "the monkey boy of Uganda" and spends most of the hour colorfully chasing leads that she could have circumvented by simply typing into her browser the phrase "the monkey boy of Uganda," which would tell her the boy's identity and where he could be located.

The actual facts about the boy's life are interesting and could have been told much better without all the running about. Since the producers are so obviously straining to improve the story, we tend to doubt everything we hear and see. The show is wasting its own time as well as ours.

In the premiere episode, which airs this Friday, Nov. 16, at 9 p.m., Ochota presents the story of the monkey boy as if it were a shadowy modern legend and not something that has been reported on in newspapers and in a BBC documentary. She first heads to an area of Uganda where the stories of the boy emerged.

Somehow having learned the name of the woman who found the boy in the jungle, Ochota, sitting in a candlelit room, whispers to the camera the devastating news that the woman moved away several years ago.

Fortunately, the next day Ochota tells us that the woman's husband, who helped her return the boy to his native village, is still alive. Even trusting viewers will suspect that she knew this before she blew those candles out.

One lead follows another as Ochota locates the orphanage that first took the boy in, and then a teacher who helped him recover some language, and finally a man she refers to his as his current guardian. Traveling from place to place, she rides on the back of a man's motorcycle and in a run-down riverboat.

As mentioned above, all this travel and fuss is pointless.

Along the way, we gradually learn the story of the boy, whose name is John Ssebunya. According to the witnesses whom Ochota interviews, he was found in 1992 in an area populated by vervet monkeys; his body was covered in a light coating of fur; and he moved and vocalized like a monkey.

Apparently around 7 years old, he had fled his abusive father three years before. His mother, according to neighbors, had died from a snakebite.

Reenactments present all this as fact, although many important details in this version differ from previous published versions, most of which say that John spent well under a year in the bush.

The crucial question is whether the monkeys actually accepted John as one of their own and helped him survive or simply allowed him to forage for food in their territory. Although John's own account would usually be enough to settle it, he seems to have developmental difficulties that make his memory of events suspect.

At least John has no obvious motivation to embellish his story. "Raised Wild" does — namely, ratings. But by jazzing up this story, the show loses both our trust and our interest.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/raised-wild-mostly-monkey-businesss/
post #83376 of 93648
MTV or should I say No MTV has been "Broken" since they got away from the MUSIC!

If I RAN a cable system MTV would be way up in the 4 digit area while MTV HITS would be in 2 digit zone.
post #83377 of 93648
Nickelodeon is in a Slump.

MTV is in a Slump.

VIACOM is in a Slump

Garbage in, garbage out!
post #83378 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Nov. 9, 2012

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA
TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

David Lean directed, and Peter O’Toole starred in, this widescreen 1962 historical epic, set in lands that, though with different names, figure prominently in today’s international conflicts and history. O’Toole cuts an accurately flamboyant figure as T.E. Lawrence, and costars include Alec Guinness, Omar Sharif and Anthony Quinn.

I just received my 1080P, DTS-HD MA bluray copy of this film at my door a few days back. It's looks and sounds, oh, so much better than anything TCM broadcasts....
post #83379 of 93648
THURSDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #83380 of 93648
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Booming ‘Bang’ rises to a series high
Hot sitcom averages 17.4 million total viewers
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Nov. 16, 2012

“The Big Bang Theory” is the hottest scripted show on TV.

For the second straight week, and third time this season, “Bang” hit a series high among total viewers, and it also notched a season best among adults 18-49.

“Bang” drew 17.4 million total viewers at 8 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights, up from a previous series best of 16.7 million last week.

The show also averaged a 5.5 in 18-49s, the week’s highest-rated program so far and up from a 5.1 last week.

“Bang” led the night among total viewers and 18-49s, and it also paced CBS to an easy win on the final Thursday of the November sweeps.

With the strong “Bang” lead-in, “Two and a Half Men” (4.1) and “Person of Interest” (3.1) also reached season highs in the demo.

Another network, Univision, also posted a season high for the night with the live broadcast of the Latin Grammys. It averaged a 1.9 from 8 to 11 p.m., peaking with a 2.1 at 9 p.m.

Meanwhile, elsewhere last night, ABC’s new drama “Last Resort” slid to 1.3, tying a series low, at 8 p.m. But the network’s 10 p.m. drama “Scandal” hit a season high with a 2.1.

Fox’s “Glee” also dipped to a season-low 2.1 at 9 p.m.

And NBC’s 9 p.m. “The Office” was, not surprisingly, down 17 percent from last week when it had a special lead-in from “The Voice.” It averaged a 2.0, ranking as the network’s top show of the night.

CBS finished first in primetime with a 3.4 adults 18-49 rating and 10 share. Fox and ABC tied for second with a 2.2/6 apiece, Univision was fourth with a 1.9/5, NBC was fifth with a 1.4/4, the CW was sixth with a 0.9/3, and Telemundo was seventh with a 0.5/1.

CBS led at 8 p.m. with a 4.8 for “Bang” (5.5) and “Men” (4.0). Fox’s “The X Factor” was second with a 2.4 and Univision was third with a 1.9 for the first hour of the Latin Grammys. NBC’s “30 Rock” (1.2) and “Up All Night” (1.3) and ABC’s “Resort” tied for fourth with a 1.3. The CW was sixth with a 1.2 for “The Vampire Diaries” and Telemundo was seventh with a 0.5 for “Rosa Diamonte.”

CBS’s “Person of Interest” tied ABC’s “Grey’s Anatomy” for first at 9 p.m. with a 3.1 apiece, the first time “Person” has matched its ABC rival in the hour. Fox’s “Glee” and Univision’s Latin Grammys tied for third with a 2.1 apiece. NBC’s “Office” (2.0) and “Parks and Recreation” (1.7) were fifth with a 1.9, the CW’s “Beauty and the Beast” was sixth with a 0.6, and Telemundo’s “Corazon Valiente” was seventh with a 0.5.

At 10 p.m. CBS led again with a 2.3 for “Elementary,” followed by ABC’s “Scandal” in second with a 2.1. Univision’s final hour of the Latin Grammys was third with a 1.7, NBC’s “Rock Center with Brian Williams” was fourth with a 1.1, and the first hour of a soccer match on Telemundo was fifth with a 0.5.

CBS also led the night in households with an 8.5 rating and 14 share. ABC was second with a 4.6/7, Fox third with a 3.9/6, NBC and Univision tied for fourth with a 2.4/4, the CW sixth with a 1.4/2, and Telemundo seventh with a 0.7/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/booming-bang-rises-to-a-series-high/
post #83381 of 93648
TV Notes
CBS Pulls the Plug on Partners
By Matt Webb Mitovich, TVLine.com - Nov. 16, 2012

CBS has cancelled Partners after a half-dozen episodes. The freshman comedy, starring David Krumholtz and Michael Urie, premiered to 6.5 million total viewers and a 2.4 demo rating, demonstrating just 75 percent retention out of How I Met Your Mother from the get-go.

The numbers ebbed and flowed from there, with the show this past Monday hitting a series-low rating of 1.8, while drawing 5.6 million viewers.

CBS comedy repeats — beginning with Two and a Half Men on Nov. 19 — will fill the Mondays-at-8:30 void effective immediately, with Rules of Engagement Season 7 or the midseason newbie Friend Me likely to eventually claim the time slot.

http://tvline.com/2012/11/16/cbs-cancel-partners/
post #83382 of 93648
TV Notes
'American Chopper' ending after 10 years
By James Hibberd, EW.com - Nov. 16, 2012

The Teutuls are going to build their final bikes on the network next month. One of Discovery’s most popular programs, American Chopper helped pioneer the “docusoap” reality genre and inspired a surge of gear-head shows. Chopper‘s run will conclude with the previously announced four-way bike build-off special titled The Revenge airing live from Las Vegas on Dec. 11.

“After 10 years and 233 episodes of incredible, riveting reality television, American Chopper will be ending its run,” says Eileen O’Neill, group president, Discovery and TLC Networks. “This series was one of the very first family-based reality programs on television. Special thanks to Pilgrim Studios for over a decade of great producing. The Teutuls have given us really innovative bike builds and real drama since 2002. We wish both Orange County Choppers and Paul Junior Designs the best.”

The series had a simple format — a father and son building custom motorcycles amid frequent infighting. Yet nothing about the show’s colorful history has been straight forward. American Chopper has changed networks, switched names and was previously cancelled, only to rise again.

“I have mixed emotions,” executive producer Craig Piligian tells EW.com. “It’s had a great run. We had a lot of ups and downs. There’s been so much that’s happened to this family over the last 10 years. We’ve seen them grow to a huge motorcycle shop. We’ve seen them fight bitterly. We’ve seen them sue each other. And recently we’ve seen them come together to open up a new business. I think the show has come full circle.”

American Chopper premiered as a Discovery Channel special in 2002, then launched as a regular series a few months later. In 2008, Discovery moved the show to its sister channel TLC. A couple years passed, then behind-the-scenes warring between Senior and Junior prompted TLC to outright cancel the show. Parties soon made up and in 2010 the company re-ordered the program as American Chopper: Junior vs. Senior. The series later reverted to its original title and switched back to Discovery.

“This was the first family docusoap,” Piligian says. “They put on display, for all to see, what really happens in a tight family business, warts and all. I’m really proud they were so open and honest.”

Paul Senior and Junior’s spirited attitudes helped make the show engaging for fans, but could also make things difficult behind the scenes. At one point when shooting the current final season, Piligian fired Junior and kicked him off the set. “It’s a very tumultuous relationship, not only between the father and son, but between us as well,” Piligian says. “Junior and I would have it out, and at one point awhile back, I said, ‘We’re done with you.’” The two reconciled and Junior returned to work shortly thereafter.

Given the show’s on-again, off-again history, one has to wonder: Is this really the end? Could American Chopper rise again in a year or two? “American Chopper was cancelled before and we came back even stronger,” Piligian says. “It’s been a resilient, powerful show. Right now they’re telling me it’s cancelled. I can only comment: ‘Who knows what the future holds.’”

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/11/16/american-chopper-cancelled/
post #83383 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by kingpcgeek View Post

TV Notes
'American Chopper' ending after 10 years
By James Hibberd, EW.com - Nov. 16, 2012
The Teutuls are going to build their final bikes on the network next month. One of Discovery’s most popular programs, American Chopper helped pioneer the “docusoap” reality genre and inspired a surge of gear-head shows. Chopper‘s run will conclude with the previously announced four-way bike build-off special titled The Revenge airing live from Las Vegas on Dec. 11.
“After 10 years and 233 episodes of incredible, riveting reality television, American Chopper will be ending its run,” says Eileen O’Neill, group president, Discovery and TLC Networks. “This series was one of the very first family-based reality programs on television. Special thanks to Pilgrim Studios for over a decade of great producing. The Teutuls have given us really innovative bike builds and real drama since 2002. We wish both Orange County Choppers and Paul Junior Designs the best.”
The series had a simple format — a father and son building custom motorcycles amid frequent infighting. Yet nothing about the show’s colorful history has been straight forward. American Chopper has changed networks, switched names and was previously cancelled, only to rise again.
“I have mixed emotions,” executive producer Craig Piligian tells EW.com. “It’s had a great run. We had a lot of ups and downs. There’s been so much that’s happened to this family over the last 10 years. We’ve seen them grow to a huge motorcycle shop. We’ve seen them fight bitterly. We’ve seen them sue each other. And recently we’ve seen them come together to open up a new business. I think the show has come full circle.”
American Chopper premiered as a Discovery Channel special in 2002, then launched as a regular series a few months later. In 2008, Discovery moved the show to its sister channel TLC. A couple years passed, then behind-the-scenes warring between Senior and Junior prompted TLC to outright cancel the show. Parties soon made up and in 2010 the company re-ordered the program as American Chopper: Junior vs. Senior. The series later reverted to its original title and switched back to Discovery.
“This was the first family docusoap,” Piligian says. “They put on display, for all to see, what really happens in a tight family business, warts and all. I’m really proud they were so open and honest.”
Paul Senior and Junior’s spirited attitudes helped make the show engaging for fans, but could also make things difficult behind the scenes. At one point when shooting the current final season, Piligian fired Junior and kicked him off the set. “It’s a very tumultuous relationship, not only between the father and son, but between us as well,” Piligian says. “Junior and I would have it out, and at one point awhile back, I said, ‘We’re done with you.’” The two reconciled and Junior returned to work shortly thereafter.
Given the show’s on-again, off-again history, one has to wonder: Is this really the end? Could American Chopper rise again in a year or two? “American Chopper was cancelled before and we came back even stronger,” Piligian says. “It’s been a resilient, powerful show. Right now they’re telling me it’s cancelled. I can only comment: ‘Who knows what the future holds.’”
http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/11/16/american-chopper-cancelled/

Quoting Gloria Estefan from her song Go Away:

"And When You're Gone We Won't Miss You At All!"

My only regret is it will most likely be replaced by another "Reality" show. mad.gif
post #83384 of 93648
TV Notes
Freshman ABC Dramas ‘Last Resort’ And ’666 Park Avenue’ Cancelled
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Nov. 16, 2012

ABC is not going forward with freshman dramas Last Resort and 666 Park Ave, opting not to order more episodes of either show. I hear the intention is for the series’ original 13-epispde orders to play out the way ABC did last season with Pan Am, which received a peculiar one-episode back order. Like was the case with Pan Am, ABC is not shutting the door on the shows completely, formally keeping them in consideration for next season. The shows are not being released, though it is highly unlikely that ABC would renew the dramas for a second season after not giving them a back order. Last Resort and 666 Park Ave both opened soft (2.2 and 2.1 Live+Same Day rating in adults 18-49) and never gained traction. Both received sizable DVR bumps in Live+7 — often over 50% — but that wasn’t enough to offset their miniscule overnight deliveries. In their most recent outings, both Last Resort and 666 Park Ave drew a 1.2 18-49 rating (Live+Same Day).

Last Resort is the latest high-profile casualty in the ABC Thursday 8 PM slot, which over the last few years claimed FlashForward, The Deep End, My Generation, Charlie’s Angels and Missing. Since Ugly Betty, the only ABC program to get traction in the hour has been reality show Wipeout, which the network has available as midseason replacement. With its male skew, Last Resort never meshed with the rest of ABC’s heavily female lineup. Additionally, its time slot pitted it against CBS’ strong male-centered comedy block of The Big Bang Theory and Two And A Half Men and football on cable.

The cancellation simplifies things for Last Resort co-creator/executive producer Shawn Ryan, who has been juggling the ABC drama and a Beverly Hills Cop reboot he has set up at CBS. Ryan will now be able to focus his attention on Beverly Hills Cop, which just tapped Brandon T. Jackson as the lead and is expected to get formal pilot greenlight when Ryan delivers the final script.

After landing the Sunday 10 PM slot in May, 666 Park Ave gradually evolved from a spooky drama to a glitzy soap with supernatural elements to better fit with its lead-in Revenge. But ultimately, the series starring Vanessa Williams and Terry O’Quinn wasn’t able to connect with viewers.

Of its freshman class this fall, ABC gave drama Nashville and comedy The Neighbors full-season orders, while canceling Last Resort and 666 Park Ave. The last new ABC fall series, comedy Malibu Country, launched this month and has received an order for three additional scripts.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/11/last-resort-666-park-ave-cancelled-abc/
post #83385 of 93648
Business Notes
Netflix CEO: Amazon Losing Up to $1 Billion a Year on Streaming Video
By Peter Kafka, AllThingsD.com - Nov. 16, 2012

Reed Hastings says that, one day, Amazon will provide real competition for Netflix.

But the Netflix CEO says Jeff Bezos will have to spend a lot of money before that happens: Hastings says Amazon is losing between $500 million and a $1 billion a year as it acquires streaming video content rights.

Hastings says he generated those numbers based on the value of the content deals that Amazon won when the two companies competed head to head. He says he thinks Amazon’s costs are split evenly between its U.S. operations and Europe, where it operates the Lovefilm streaming service.

Last month, Netflix said it was on track to spend $2.1 billion on content over the next year.

In the U.S., Amazon rents and sells digital movies and TV shows on a one-off basis via its Amazon Instant Video service. It also offers a large catalog of titles for free to customers who pay $79 a year for its Prime shipping service, and recently began testing an option that lets customers pay $8 a month for Prime; Hastings’s estimate is based on acquisition costs for the Prime/video bundle.

Netflix charges $8 a month for its streaming service.

Hastings made his comments during an interview with Dow Jones editors in New York. Amazon hasn’t responded to a request for comment. Update: Here’s Amazon spokesman Andrew Herdener, via email: “We don’t comment on our individual investments but it’s correct that Prime Instant Video is an amazing value for customers. Not only do Prime members get unlimited streaming video, but they also get free 2-day shipping and the Kindle Owners’ Lending Library as well.”

Last week, a report from broadband service company Sandvine pegged Netflix’s share of Internet traffic at 33 percent, with Amazon at 1.8 percent. But Hastings says he takes the newcomer seriously: “Amazon is the best competitor we’ve ever faced.”

http://allthingsd.com/20121116/netflix-ceo-amazon-losing-up-to-1-billion-a-year-on-streaming-video/
post #83386 of 93648
Business/Legal Notes
'Big Brother' vs. 'Glass House' Legal Saga Continues With New Lawsuit
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Nov. 16, 2012

The legal battle over CBS's "Big Brother" and ABC's similarly themed reality offering "The Glass House" isn't over yet.

Former "Big Brother" producers Kenny Rosen, Corie Henson and Michael O'Sullivan, who were sued by CBS after moving on to ABC's rival show, have now filed suit themselves against CBS, claiming that the network breached its contract by violating its non-disclosure agreements with them.

The suit also accuses CBS of waging a legal harassment campaign with its original suit, which was filed in the spring.

"CBS made these allegations as part of its campaign to prevent, or at the very least, disrupt and harass, the production of a new reality show 'The Glass House,' which CBS regarded as competitive with its reality show 'Big Brother,'" the suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Central California on Thursday, reads. "Plaintiffs had previously worked on 'Big Brother' and then took jobs on 'The Glass House.' CBS intended to send a message that former CBS employees who later dared to work for a competing show would be punished."

The complaint says that, in its earlier suit, CBS accused the producers of violating their non-disclosure agreements by using trade secrets obtained while working on "Big Brother." However, the producers say, the agreements stipulated that disputes should be settled by arbitration, not federal court, where CBS filed its complaint.

The suit goes on to claim that, when it became apparent that the judge expressed doubt in CBS's legal arguments, the network dropped the suit and filed an arbitration demand against Rosen, Henson and O'Sullivan -- and then violated the confidentially clause of the non-disclosure agreement by issuing a press release saying that it would now pursue the matter through arbitration.

According to the complaint, the non-disclosure agreement stipulates that any arbitration "will be treated as confidential and will not be disclosed to any third party to such proceedings."

CBS believes that the former "Big Brother" producers are merely trying to stall the arbitration proceedings with their suit.

“We believe this is simply an attempt to delay the inevitable arbitration proceeding," a CBS spokesman told TheWrap in a statement. "We are very confident in our position that there has been a violation of signed, written confidentiality agreements, and we will look forward to a determination of that matter by the arbitration panel.”

CBS filed suit in the spring, before "Glass House" premiered, claiming that there were too many similarities between the shows -- which both monitor the activities of a group of people living in the same dwelling -- to be coincidental, and claimed that the producers had brought secrets from "Big Brother" to their new venture.

U.S. District Court Judge Gary Feess was disinclined to agree. In his June decision not to grant CBS's restraining order against the show, Fees wrote, "the Court ... has concluded that, while it cannot say that CBS will not prevail at trial, it has concluded that success on the merits is unlikely."

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/big-brother-vs-glass-house-legal-saga-continues-new-lawsuit-65566
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Edited by dad1153 - 11/24/12 at 1:08am
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Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Nov. 17, 2012

ALICE DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE
TCM, 8:00 p.m. ET

Made in 1974, this intimate romantic comedy-drama isn’t the sort of movie you’d instantly associate with its director, Martin Scorsese, who made it between Mean Streets and Taxi Driver. Ellen Burstyn and Kris Kristofferson star – but yes, Harvey Keitel is in here, too, in a small supporting role. Amazingly, this movie inspired a 1976 TV spinoff, CBS’s Alice, starring Linda Lavin as Alice. The movie roles of waitress Flo and diner owner Mel, played by Diane Ladd and Vic Tayback, went in the TV series to Polly Holliday and… Vic Tayback.

JOHN CARTER
Starz!, 9:00 p.m. ET

This 2012 science fiction film, based on Edgar Rice Burroughs’ A Princess of Mars novel, turned out to be the Ishtar of fantasy movies, a thudding box-office and critical failure so instantaneous and universal, it became instantly legendary. Just the sort of movie you’re happy to have avoided in the theaters, but equally happy to check out on TV. So here it is, starring Taylor Kitsch from Friday Night Lights in the title role.

BEDAZZLED
TCM, 10:00 p.m. ET

Written by and starring Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, this 1967 comedy take on the Faust story presents Cook as the devil and Moore as his hapless latest victim. The Devil is not above playing underhanded to claim a soul, which is why he enlists the embodiment of Lust, as played by Raquel Welch, to seduce him. It doesn’t work: But you have to give her a Scarlet A for effort.

THE GRAHAM NORTON REPORT
BBC America, 11:00 p.m. ET

In tonight’s new installment of TV’s most unguarded talk show, Cameron Diaz ropes a cow. I know, it sounds udderly ridiculous, but give it a chance. And on the same show, Diaz reveals that her first stylish haircut was designed to emulate Rod Stewart – and she reveals that to another of Norton’s guests. Namely, Rod Stewart.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
NBC, 11:29 p.m. ET

This week’s guest host is Jeremy Renner, and the musical guest is Maroon 5. I guess, after Anne Hathaway last week, SNL wanted to return the balance closer to the male side of things.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Business Notes
Netflix CEO: Amazon Losing Up to $1 Billion a Year on Streaming Video
By Peter Kafka, AllThingsD.com - Nov. 16, 2012
Reed Hastings says that, one day, Amazon will provide real competition for Netflix.

But the Netflix CEO says Jeff Bezos will have to spend a lot of money before that happens: Hastings says Amazon is losing between $500 million and a $1 billion a year as it acquires streaming video content rights.

http://allthingsd.com/20121116/netflix-ceo-amazon-losing-up-to-1-billion-a-year-on-streaming-video/

Translation:

"The studios are eating our lunch with how much they now demand for streaming rights, so we can only assume they're doing the same to Amazon because they would never try to make a more favorable deal with a place that sells discs instead of renting them...."

I wouldn't be surprised if this is a way of making themselves look better in preparation for upcoming news on write-downs on their original series programming costs.

Of course, in other news, Netflix will be rolling out a new premium service called "IPster" to capitalize on the demand for streaming content from people who have no idea what the internet is anymore.
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FRIDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
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TV Notes
Showtime orders more 'Web Therapy'
By Hillary Busis, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Nov. 16, 2012

Web Therapy lives! Showtime announced today that it has ordered a third season of the improvised comedy, which stars Lisa Kudrow as narcissistic online therapist Fiona Wallice. The series was adapted from a web series created by Kudrow, Dan Bucatinsky, and Don Roos.

Previous seasons have featured guest appearances by stars including Meryl Streep, Jane Lynch, and two of Kudrow’s former Friends co-stars, David Schwimmer and Courteney Cox. Season 3 will continue that tradition, including guest turns by Meg Ryan, Modern Family‘s Jesse Tyler Ferguson, and ex-Friend Matt LeBlanc, who’s currently starring on his own Showtime series (Episodes).

The 10-episode new season will air in 2013.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/11/16/web-therapy-season-3/
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Nielsen Overnights
ABC Wins Demo, But Friday a Downer for All
By Jordan Zakaran, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Nov. 17, 2012

Led by old standbys and some feisty executives, ABC narrowly won the 18-49 demo war on Friday night.

Every major network show was either down or even during primetime. ABC's 8-9 pm offering of Tim Allen's Last Man Standing and Reba McEntire's Malibu Country earned a 1.4 and 1.3 in the 18-49 respectively, down 14 and 24 percents from last Friday.

The network's top show on the evening, hour-long reality series Shark Tank, took home a 1.9 in the demo (and a six share), a drop of 10 percent from seven days ago. News show 20/20 scored a 1.4, down 13 percent -- though it did beat out NBC's rival Dateline, which had a 1.2 in demo.

The rest of NBC struggled as well; both Matthew Perry's Go On, and Friends With Kids, which is executive produced by Jimmy Fallon, netted just a 0.7 in 18-49. Grimm, its supernatural mystery series, netted a 1.6, down a tick (and six percent) from last week.

Over at CBS, Undercover Boss fell in the demo to a 1.7, though it earned a 5.3 overall. CSI: NY fell to a 1.4, while the Whitney Houston tribute, We Will Always Love You, took in a 1.4, as well.

Fox's Fringe, in its final season, garnered a .9 in the demo.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/tv-ratings-abc-wins-demo-391693
post #83393 of 93648
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Translation:
"The studios are eating our lunch with how much they now demand for streaming rights, so we can only assume they're doing the same to Amazon because they would never try to make a more favorable deal with a place that sells discs instead of renting them...."
I wouldn't be surprised if this is a way of making themselves look better in preparation for upcoming news on write-downs on their original series programming costs.
Of course, in other news, Netflix will be rolling out a new premium service called "IPster" to capitalize on the demand for streaming content from people who have no idea what the internet is anymore.
That's exactly how I read that post as well, Hastings is talking more to investors and analysts than about competition with Amazon.
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TV Reviews
The Decade of Nature's Wrath
By JoNancy DeWolf Smith, Wall Street Journal - Nov. 16, 2012

Watching "The Dust Bowl" is not easy. The four-hour PBS documentary by Ken Burns does unfold over two nights. But otherwise this tale of the environmental catastrophe that befell the southern Great Plains of the U.S. in the 1930s offers no relief from harsh truths. Although the film ends on an odd note that seems to endorse near-subsistence farming as the only moral and sustainable form of agriculture, it makes an important record of a receding era.

Most Americans have heard more about the people who fled the Dust Bowl and headed toward California—the "Okies"—than about the ones who stayed. Yet a majority of the prairie farmers and small-town folks—the worst-hit areas were in Oklahoma, Texas, Colorado, Kansas and New Mexico—did not leave as the land dried up and the soil blew away. Always praying for rain, always hoping for a good crop next year. Never knowing they were in the middle of a perfect storm;, one that mankind, not God, had set in motion.

It began before World War I with the so-called great plowup that lasted into the 1920s, when the federal government encouraged a huge land rush. The southern plains were covered with grasses that thrived in an area without much rain. But these were wet years, and especially when the war created a demand for wheat, people rushed in to homestead and grow crops for the marketplace. Some were immigrants who had fled Europe in search of farmland they could never hope to own in the old country. Others were speculators from the cities, known as suitcase farmers, who had wheat planted—on land they visited only rarely—as an investment. Altogether some 5.2 million acres of prairie were plowed up.

Eventually, the wheat bubble burst. While prices fell, the rain did not and by the early 1930s the land was drying out. When the seasonal winds came, there were no grasses to hold the soil and over millions of acres it was picked up and carried in huge dust and sand storms that tortured the landscape and its inhabitants for nearly a decade.

We learn what it was like not only from archival photographs and film from the period, but also from many people who lived through it as children. Their stories paint a picture of mounting horror—of siblings lost to dust pneumonia; of suicides; of stoic mothers ground down by trying to raise children through years of near-starvation; of beloved herds of cattle slaughtered by government order; of plagues of ravenous jackrabbits and grasshoppers. Overshadowing it all were the terrifying storms of black clouds, 100 miles wide and taller than mountains, that turned day into night and could bury a man or a car or even a house in a matter of hours.

What the people of the Dust Bowl states endured, how they endured and why they stayed even after hope of deliverance was gone, proves impossible to fathom. What ended the worst suffering—the rains came back, better tilling practices were developed to combat soil erosion, the government stepped in with land-management advice and subsidies and jobs to tide people over—is easier to explain.

When "The Dust Bowl" is shown in classrooms, the most explicit message may be, as one expert says here, that if you move someplace where nature has determined that only grass should grow, don't plow it up and try to grow food crops. And don't use up water from aquifers to make land arable in a place where nature does not drop enough rain. That's what is happening today, the film asserts darkly, where the old Dust Bowl may soon become a desert again.

The central heroine here is a homestead woman who spent more than half a century farming on the prairie and saw only about 10 bumper crops in all that time. Yet in the 1960s she and her husband were still using the same earth-friendly farming equipment they had bought in the '20s, and when she died her will specified that her land never be put under the plow again. A lovely story, although viewers may be forgiven for wondering who would feed them and the world if everybody had a philosophical aversion to the business of farming.

THE DUST BOWL
Sun. and Mon., 8 p.m. on PBS


* * * *

Much of the new Discovery series "Breaking Magic" takes place in the streets of New York, London and Warsaw, where four magicians wow bystanders with amazing tricks, mind-blowing illusions and death-defying stunts. It should be clear to us each time that there is nothing supernatural about any of the magicians, whether they are making "intelligent" motor oil crawl across a table top in a mechanic's shop, causing soft-drink cups to erupt with snow in hot weather, or leaping off a tall tower on a bungee chord that has been cut in half. Yet this is the real thrill of magic, isn't it? The euphoria caused by the suspension of disbelief can be more exciting than the entertainment of the trick itself.

Behind all of the magic, though, are forces even more astounding. Physics, chemistry, Bernoulli's principle, phenolphthalein, memory wire, what have you. Magic may be the mystery, as someone says here, but science is the truth. The show is like blackjack too: It moves so fast that if one illusion fails to excite you, there is another right behind it.

There's the Australian James Galea using a vortex cannon (we learn later) to demonstrate destructive mind control to a group of gawping onlookers. There's the American Wayne Houchin, turning silver into gold on the streets of Queens, N.Y. There's the Canadian Billy Kidd, confounding beefy martial artists with her impossible feat of swordplay, and the Brit Ben Hanlin showing Londoners how to extract coded spy messages from a filament of telephone-receiver wire. Why did the magicians spill wine on a jacket while restaurant patrons watched with their mouths open and the jacket burst into flames? That's another great thing about the magic here: In the end all things will be known.

BREAKING MAGIC
Sundays, 10 p.m. on Discovery


* * * *

Just a reminder that BBC America's "Top Gear" is not only the greatest car show ever, but the funniest. This week, hosts James May and Richard Hammond demonstrate how to drive in a postapocalyptic world. Watch them try to navigate in the total blackout of a nuclear winter, with only the computer-generated voice of a GPS to guide them along the road, or not. What is the best car to choose when you are down to the last few gallons of gas on the planet? A Pontiac GTO, says Mr. Hammond. "Yes, they are a bit crap, and they corner like carnival floats. But listen to this!" he exalts as he vroom-vrooms the 7.4 liter V-8 engine. When the end is nigh, what could be better than a muscle car to remind us that life was good?

TOP GEAR
Monday, 8:30 p.m. on BBC America


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324556304578120653895183658.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_6
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TV Review
Liz & Dick (Lifetime)
By Brian Lowry, Variety - Nov. 16, 2012

Given the off-the-charts camp factor in the tantalizing prospect of Lindsay Lohan playing Elizabeth Taylor, Lifetime might prize descriptions of "Liz & Dick" as "trashy" or "awful." So the network might harbor mixed emotions in reading that the movie about Taylor and her tumultuous romance with Richard Burton is actually pretty good, all things considered, despite an inevitably episodic nature and one glaringly unnecessary device. Such fact-based TV movies are rare these days, but this post-Thanksgiving telecast is just hammy enough to generate numbers rivaling the hordes of paparazzi that dogged the not-always-happy couple.

The movie's secret weapon, it turns out, isn't Lohan at all, but rather New Zealander Grant Bowler (barely recognizable from a small part on "True Blood") as the dashing, often-drunken Burton, who classes up the movie in much the way Burton's classically trained Shakespearean actor played off Taylor's lifelong movie star.

Directed by Lloyd Kramer from a script by Christopher Monger, the narrative is framed, somewhat unfortunately, by having the two speak directly to the camera against a stark black backdrop, in what approximates a kind of posthumous interview about their relationship. While it offers another means of getting inside their heads, it has a certain beyond-the-grave quality -- exalting their epic love, yes, but feeling too much like something from one of the Mitch Albom movies Kramer helmed.

"I fell for you the moment I saw you," Burton tells her (and Bowler has the rich Welsh baritone down pat), one of several lines of dialogue -- including "My heart is broken, and you have the smashed pieces" -- seemingly calibrated to appeal both to those willing to embrace the romance and those eager to approach the movie like a screwball comedy.

The first 30 minutes or so are devoted, appropriately, to the beginning of their torrid affair on the set of "Cleopatra," where the two go a bit too quickly from squabbling to screwing, essentially under the noses of their respective spouses. In this case, the adage, "If the trailer's rocking, don't come knocking," more than applies.

After that, Liz and Dick engage in epic fights, spend money like drunken sailors, take refuge from the prying press by living on a yacht, and struggle through Burton's bouts of melancholy over failing to win Oscars, including when she earned her second for "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf" while he was overlooked.

OK, so there's plenty of fun to be manufactured watching the movie -- and even drinking games, like taking a swig every time a doctor or associate delivers bad news. Still, Bowler is quite good as Burton, and Lohan certainly is adequate, barring a few awkward moments, thanks largely to the fabulous frocks and makeup (courtesy of Salvador Perez and Eryn Krueger Mekash, respectively) she gets to model.

Moreover, there is something strangely fascinating about a couple so madly hot for each other as to be unable to find equilibrium or peace, as well as how the Taylor-Burton pairing helped pave the way for a more aggressive (and intrusive) breed of celebrity journalism. The movie also benefits from the revelation about Taylor saving Burton's love letters long after his death, which came more than a quarter-century before hers.

In a sense, the producers shrewdly used Lohan -- no stranger to the tabloids herself -- as a publicity multiplier, but they needn't have worried.

Because while "Liz & Dick" is wobbly at times, the movie ultimately stands on its own.

LIZ & DICK
Movie; Lifetime, Sun. Nov. 25, 9 p.m.


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324556304578120653895183658.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_6
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TV Notes
Miranda Cosgrove and 'iCarly' set for a last dance
The Nickelodeon series' character and its star are all grown up and ready to say a bittersweet goodbye to fans as the network eyes a new crop of 'high-concept' shows.
By Yvonne Villareal, Los Angeles Times - Nov. 17, 2012

Miranda Cosgrove, the sprightly star of Nickelodeon's "iCarly," is sitting on the floor of the show's fictional Ridgeway school set during a lull in production — practicing lines and adjusting the collar on her bright blue jacket. Try as she might, though, she can't ignore the inevitable.

Looking up at her character's locker that towers above her — a veritable landmark among the tween-set — the brunet wunderkind summons a cornball glance at costar Jennette McCurdy sitting beside her. "Think of me fondlyyyy/ when we say goodbyeeee," the twosome mirthfully croon to each other, calling up a ballad from "The Phantom of the Opera."

The charmingly goofy off-screen moment between the friends and costars mimics the shenanigans viewers have come to enjoy on the teen-centered show about three pals who produce a popular online series. But the clownish antics are in the closing stages: After five seasons, one of the network's preeminent shows is wrapping its run. On this June day, Cosgrove and McCurdy are in the thick of the show's swan song, filming the one-hour send-off, "iGoodbye,"which will run Nov. 23.

PHOTOS: 'iCarly' by the numbers

For the generation that grew up on "iCarly," this was a show that spoke its language — before "Gossip Girl" or "Awkward" tried to do the same. The half-hour comedy, from Nickelodeon sire Dan Schneider, soared to popularity in no small part because of the way it converged the television and computer screen — a radical notion in 2007. It was a well-timed concept that resonated with a young constituency mesmerized by cellphones, computers and iPods. The show was also unusual in portraying young children on their own with no parental nemeses or guardians.

The ending of one of its longest-lived hits comes at a crucial time for Nickelodeon. The network — which will also lose hit teen sitcom "Victorious" (also created by Schneider) — saw its audience levels fall nearly 30% over the past year, a drop reflected in "iCarly's performance.

By its second season, "iCarly" had overtaken Disney's "Hannah Montana," the seemingly untouchable ruler of tweens, as TV's No. 1 series among kids (ages 2 to 11) and tweens (ages 9 to 14). Its current season is averaging 3.2 million viewers, down nearly 32% from the previous season. It now clocks in at No. 7 among kids and No. 3 among tweens, with Disney stalwart "Good Luck Charlie" taking up the crown.

Part of the drop-off could be attributed to changes in behavior as viewers turn to TV watching on computers, phones or tablets. The amount of time 12- to 17-year-olds spent watching traditional TV dipped dramatically in the fourth quarter of 2011, according to a Nielsen report. Those viewers watched an average of 100 hours of TV each month, down from 105 hours in the same period in 2010. Among children ages 2 to 11, the shift was less dramatic: an average of 109 hours, 6 minutes a month, down from 112 hours, 46 minutes the previous year.

Marjorie Cohn, the network's president of original programming and development, doesn't minimize the task that lies ahead. "It's a hurdle," Cohn said. "It's always sad to lose a ratings workhorse. But our job is to replace it with another one, so that's what we're going to do."

Viacom, which owns Nickelodeon, has invested tens of millions of dollars into development of new programs to find that replacement. Its recent launch of a revamped "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" has already helped the network make gains. And Cohn categorized the network's next crop of live-action shows as "high concept" — with some projects centering on ghosts and superheroes. On Saturday, Nickelodeon will roll out "Marvin Marvin," starring Lucas Cruikshank (a rising Nickelodeon star best known as the character Fred Figglehorn in a series of YouTube videos) about an alien trying to fit in as a human teenager.

Not that the "iCarly" universe is totally imploding. In keeping with its tradition of launching spinoffs, the network will feature two offshoots from the show: In "Gibby," Noah Munck carries on his role as the oddball teen, with viewers following him as he gets a job at a recreational center and winds up becoming a mentor to four middle-school students. In "Sam & Cat," McCurdy resumes her role as Sam and will be paired with "Victorious" character Cat (Ariana Grande) for the show in which the duo become roommates and start a babysitting business. And Jerry Trainor, who plays Carly's older brother Spencer, will appear in the comedy "Wendell & Vinnie." The network will also continue to show "iCarly" in reruns.

"One of the things that is interesting and fun about kids television is that the audience turns constantly and there are new kids all the time," said Cohn, who has been at the network for more than two decades. "And they're different than the kids that came before. I think it's important if you're going to stay contemporary and relevant that you are offering shows that are made for the generation that is just joining into that tween mind-set. They want to have shows of their own."

"It's weird to think of it as being a pioneer, in some ways, because technology becomes so ubiquitous and we adapt so quickly to new tools," said Shelley Pasnik, director of New York-based Center for Children and Technology. "But when you look back to when it first began, it was a time when young people were still getting accustomed to the personal broadcasting via YouTube, Tumblr … it rode that wave. But it didn't lose its resonance with the everyday concerns, anxieties and aspirations of young people."

Connecting with kids

The "iCarly" fictional Web show-within-the-show was often as spontaneous as what actual teenagers are generating on the Internet. There was Carly and her friend Sam's famous outbursts of random dancing — luring First Lady Michelle Obama to take part when she guest-starred — or that time they made spaghetti tacos, inciting an army of kids to demand a new entree.

When the friends are not holed up in Carly's attic producing the show, they're at school dealing with the travails of youth: annoying teachers, high school dances, love triangles, etc.

The entertainment carried over to "iCarly's" website, supplying media-hungry tweens with online videos, quizzes and blog posts between episodes (now de rigueur for almost all TV shows).

"It wasn't just something that you watched through the TV," Cosgrove said. "You could also communicate back to the 'iCarly' world. I think that was something that was very new to kids and that appealed to them."

The 19-year-old, who got an early start starring as a 10-year-old band manager in 2003's Jack Black comedy "School of Rock," is more soft-spoken and docile than her fictional persona. Like many a child star, she has parlayed her "iCarly" stardom into a singing career — albeit a more subdued one than her peers Miley Cyrus, Selena Gomez and Demi Lovato.

Being young and famous would fall in line with the setup of the show and others like it. "iCarly" was part of a genre of shows — Nick's "Big Time Rush" and "Victorious" and Disney's "Hannah Montana," "Sonny With a Chance," etc. — that played up the idea of showbiz fantasies.

"Thirty years ago, there wasn't Disney, there wasn't Nickelodeon," said Yalda T. Uhls, a researcher at Children's Digital Media Center@LA, who co-wrote a study on how values in children's TV have shifted over the years. "Now there's all these channels that are specifically catering to this one audience, and they're competing with shows like 'American Idol' and a moment where kids are growing up being groomed thinking they can be the next star." She suspects the next trend will be a return to more traditional values, stories that emphasize belonging to a group.

Ask Schneider, whose next projects are the "iCarly" spinoffs, and he'll tell you the comedy's point was illustrating kid empowerment.

The 46-year-old TV producer, who previously created the hits "Zoey 101," "Drake & Josh" and "The Amanda Show," had originally designed a show that would center on a teenager who gets plucked from a crowd by a casting director and joins the cast of a popular CW-like TV show. But it would turn out to be expensive to produce, so Schneider went back to the drawing board, enlisting the help of his wife, Lisa Lillien, and friend Steve Molaro, producer of "The Big Bang Theory."

PHOTOS: 'iCarly' by the numbers

"Out of that discussion in my den came the idea of, 'Hey, what if it's a Web show?'" Schneider recalled. "I like to make shows that make kids feel good about themselves. I loved it because while, yes, it is very cool to be cast in a popular TV show but even cooler to create it yourself, do it yourself, control it yourself."

It helped that there weren't parents to put a stop to it. Carly lives with her older brother Spencer because her father is stationed overseas (there is no mention of her mother). Schneider wanted to evoke a feeling of kid freedom, inspired by trips he would take to visit his older sister in college. It was an idea that had Nickelodeon on edge.

"The network had a concern that the audience might perceive it as unusual that there was not parental supervision present at all times," he said. "I resisted that strongly and felt that this was the better way to go." The final installment will see Carly's dad return from service.

"In the episode, we're all moving on," a soft-spoken Cosgrove said. "It's sad because it's kind of the same as how it is in real life. We all kind of grew up and had our childhoods on set, and now it's time to leave it behind."

Cosgrove, at the time of the interview, was just a couple of months away from starting her first semester at USC to study theater (her followers on Twitter, @MirandaCosgrove, have since been along for the ride as she has chronicled sketch class achievements and library encounters: "You know ur in trouble when u go to check out books at the library to write an essay & the guy checking u out says "May the force be with u," she recently tweeted).

The finality of it all was not lost on Schneider. He conducted exit interviews with the cast on his own — an "audio scrapbook," as he called it — asking questions such as "What's your favorite episode?" and "If 'iCarly' were going to be erased or destroyed forever and you could only save one [episode], which would it be?"

"I just wanted to have it because 'iCarly' was something really magical," he said. "And not just for us involved in making it, but a generation of kids. I know that when these kids are in college, they'll have 'iCarly' as a point of reference. Sort of like the way some kids had 'Saved by the Bell.' We'll be a form of nostalgia and that's really cool."

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-nickelodeon-icarly-ends-20121118,0,5681694,full.story
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kingpcgeek View Post

TV Notes
'American Chopper' ending after 10 years
By James Hibberd, EW.com - Nov. 16, 2012
The Teutuls are going to build their final bikes on the network next month. One of Discovery’s most popular programs, American Chopper helped pioneer the “docusoap” reality genre and inspired a surge of gear-head shows. Chopper‘s run will conclude with the previously announced four-way bike build-off special titled The Revenge airing live from Las Vegas on Dec. 11.
“After 10 years and 233 episodes of incredible, riveting reality television, American Chopper will be ending its run,” says Eileen O’Neill, group president, Discovery and TLC Networks. “This series was one of the very first family-based reality programs on television. Special thanks to Pilgrim Studios for over a decade of great producing. The Teutuls have given us really innovative bike builds and real drama since 2002. We wish both Orange County Choppers and Paul Junior Designs the best.”
The series had a simple format — a father and son building custom motorcycles amid frequent infighting. Yet nothing about the show’s colorful history has been straight forward. American Chopper has changed networks, switched names and was previously cancelled, only to rise again.
“I have mixed emotions,” executive producer Craig Piligian tells EW.com. “It’s had a great run. We had a lot of ups and downs. There’s been so much that’s happened to this family over the last 10 years. We’ve seen them grow to a huge motorcycle shop. We’ve seen them fight bitterly. We’ve seen them sue each other. And recently we’ve seen them come together to open up a new business. I think the show has come full circle.”
American Chopper premiered as a Discovery Channel special in 2002, then launched as a regular series a few months later. In 2008, Discovery moved the show to its sister channel TLC. A couple years passed, then behind-the-scenes warring between Senior and Junior prompted TLC to outright cancel the show. Parties soon made up and in 2010 the company re-ordered the program as American Chopper: Junior vs. Senior. The series later reverted to its original title and switched back to Discovery.
“This was the first family docusoap,” Piligian says. “They put on display, for all to see, what really happens in a tight family business, warts and all. I’m really proud they were so open and honest.”
Paul Senior and Junior’s spirited attitudes helped make the show engaging for fans, but could also make things difficult behind the scenes. At one point when shooting the current final season, Piligian fired Junior and kicked him off the set. “It’s a very tumultuous relationship, not only between the father and son, but between us as well,” Piligian says. “Junior and I would have it out, and at one point awhile back, I said, ‘We’re done with you.’” The two reconciled and Junior returned to work shortly thereafter.
Given the show’s on-again, off-again history, one has to wonder: Is this really the end? Could American Chopper rise again in a year or two? “American Chopper was cancelled before and we came back even stronger,” Piligian says. “It’s been a resilient, powerful show. Right now they’re telling me it’s cancelled. I can only comment: ‘Who knows what the future holds.’”
http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/11/16/american-chopper-cancelled/

Loved this show, we will miss it for sure!
post #83398 of 93648
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET)

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos
8PM - The 40th Anniversary American Music Awards (Three hours, LIVE)

CBS:
7:00PM - NFL Football: Regional Action (continued from 4:25PM, LIVE)
7:30PM - 60 Minutes
8:30PM - The Amazing Race
9:30PM - The Good Wife
10:30PM - The Mentalist

NBC:
7PM - Football Night in America (80 min., LIVE)
8:20PM - NFL Football: Baltimore Ravens at Pittsburgh Steelers (LIVE)

FOX:
7PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Apr. 15)
7:30PM - The Cleveland Show
8PM - The Simpsons
8:30PM - Bob's Burgers
9PM - Family Guy
9:30PM - American Dad

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
7PM - Nova: Inside the Megastorn
8PM - The Dust Bowl: The Great Plow Up (120 min.)
10PM - The Dust Bowl: The Great Plow Up (120 min.)
(R)

UNIVISION:
7PM - Thalia Habítame Siempre (Special)
8PM - Mira Quién Baila (Season Finale, 2 1/2 hrs.)
10:30PM - Sal y Pimienta

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie: Shrek Forever After (2010)
9PM - Yo Me Llamo (120 min.)
post #83399 of 93648
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Nov. 18, 2012

THE DUST BOWL
PBS, 8:00 p.m. ET
PREMIERE: Part 1 of 2.
This two-part nonfiction miniseries, the latest from Ken Burns and company, is another evocative, surprisingly instructive, almost astoundingly relevant look at the past. This time, it’s about the environmental catastrophe that ravaged the Great Plains in the previous century – and why mankind, not nature, was at fault. For a full review, see David Sicilia’s TV Moneyland. Concludes Monday. Check local listings.

THE WIZARD OF OZ
TBS, 8:00 p.m. ET

Even though it’s on cable, and its telecast is no longer a big deal, I still think it’s worth pointing out that it’s time, once again, for the first around-the-holidays TV showing of this 1939 classic. And there’s prequel coming soon, so it’s a good time to take a new look at the original. Judy Garland stars.

THE GOOD WIFE
CBS, 9:30 p.m. ET

Judd Hirsch guest stars this week, playing a particularly feisty judge – and there’s feistiness outside the court as well, including some confrontations that get dangerously physical. Julianna Margulies stars, and Amanda Peet continues her recurring guest role.

THE WALKING DEAD
AMC, 9:00 p.m. ET

The psychological ramifications of Rick’s latest loss continue to shake him. And why not, since the romantic triangle that opened this series is now down to just Rick. But I can’t help thinking that we saw the gunshot, but didn’t see the results, and so maybe there’s a surprise coda down the road. Meanwhile, already down the road – or in the compound and the prison – are more dangers. And have you noticed that, in both places, the humans are more dangerous than the walkers?

HOMELAND
Showtime, 10:00 p.m. ET

Who would have expected, at the end of last season, where this show would take us this year? And tonight, there’s another twist, as Brody and Carrie find themselves even more tightly intertwined. Claire Danes, Damien Lewis star.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #83400 of 93648
TV Notes
‘Next Caller’ Creator Sounds Off On Series Demise
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Nov. 17, 2012

In a post on his blog, Stephen Falk, creator/executive producer of NBC midseason comedy Next Caller, discusses the network’s decision last month to pull the plug on the series. Next Caller, produced by Lionsgate TV and Universal TV, starred Dane Cook as a foul-mouthed satellite radio DJ forced to share the mic with a chipper NPR feminist (Collette Wolfe). Jeffrey Tambor, Joy Osmanski and Wolé Parks co-starred in the series whose four completed episodes won’t air. In a post titled Advice To Young TV Writers (but really: What Happened To My NBC Show), Falk describes the effect the cancellation has had on him, addresses the potential reasons for Next Caller‘s demise, shares some lessons from the experience and voices support for female comedy writers. Here is his post in his entirety.

Hey, you aspiring TV writers. It’s a hard job to crack into, but if you’re good enough and driven enough, it will happen for you. Don’t give up!

For if you work hard enough, someday you too may work on your own show for a year — from pitch to outline to script to pilot to the triumph of being picked up to series: the Golden Ticket. Then you might move across the country to actually make the show, hire a hundred actors and writers and crew members, and then in the middle of editing the 4th episode, get your show abruptly cancelled via late-night Friday phone call from Los Angeles. Then the fun part: you get to walk in shock back to your office — abandoning the confused editor waiting to lock the episode — and personally call all the actors and writers and crew and inform them the proverbial plug has been pulled and they no longer have a job, sorry. You will talk them through the tears and confusion — attempt to ameliorate the soon-to-be full-blown PTSD taking root already in them, all the while pre-knowing yours will go untreated and indeed sneak up on you weeks later. Do you clean out your office now? Do you wait — ? ****! But first you better go see about that one prop for episode 5 you had to approve — oh, yeah. None of that matters. Everything has stopped. This is the moment after the 10.0 earthquake. Suddenly, nothing is the same. You don’t have a show anymore. Twenty minutes ago it was what took up 17 hours of your day. 24 hours of your mental real estate. It literally doesn’t exist anymore. The frozen people of Vesuvius had more warning than you did.

Then you can hole up in your rented NYC apartment and sleep for a few weeks because you are so sleep deprived that you once fell asleep literally on your feet in the writers room. Also, you had to sign a 6-month lease so you’re paying for the place anyway and you’re also, you know, paralyzed. And then a hurricane might hit and you can sit in the dark for 5 days and throw out your food and attempt to soothe your dog who is traumatized by the dark and the constant wailing sirens. Eventually you will pack up your apartment and drive three-thousand miles back across the country with your dog (because she is afraid to go in a crate in a plane) and after a number of days noting the varied and constantly-changing topography of the country, listening to podcasts or music or just the sound of the motor and the snoring of your dog in the front seat next to you, you too might find yourself in a shithole Arizona motel eating Taco Bell and watching Zooey Deschanel on Letterman and drinking a bottle of Jameson’s you smartly got back at an Albertson’s in Gallup, New Mexico, not knowing when you’d find another store selling anything but beer, and realizing you’ve been avoiding writing any of this down because you are no longer an employed professional writer so have no pulpit from which to give advice. You assume you will work again, but the fatalistic side of you will be tempted to Google “professions” and see if you have any aptitude for anything other than writing. (You don’t.)

Okay, so this is clearly my indirect, cowardly way to get into finally talking about what happened to me when my midseason NBC sitcom Next Caller, was abruptly “cancelled” before it even aired a few weeks ago. As to why the decision was made to peacock us: there are many theories and reasons and sub-reasons — many having to do with them having no place for us with 5 midseason shows and never really committing to us that much in the first place by only ordering six episodes, and needing to focus advertising dollars on other shows that were working when some of their other new shows didn’t. But what it comes down to in the end is, I think, that they just didn’t like what I was doing that much.

And I say “I,” because I was not only the creator and showrunner, but the sole Executive Producer as well. So the blame falls squarely on me; which is how I wanted it. Of course this is not fair or the whole story. There is a larger discussion that has to do with network expectations verses the Creative’s expectations; the wisdom of holding to what you deem good vs. What They Want; making yourself laugh first. But I won’t have that argument here because I would like to work again and because I will get too angry and passionate and I can’t type fast enough. (But if you corner me and get a few drinks in me I will be happy to have the discussion/rant in private.) I don’t really blame anyone. The network executives are people doing a difficult job. People I mostly really like. I was a first-time showrunner 3,000 miles away — naturally it was not the most comfortable position for them. They couldn’t really keep an eye on me or give me notes in person. I wish they could have, though. If you’ve ever been separated from a romantic partner, let’s say, you know how impossible real communication is long distance. Sure you can Skype your tits or whatever, but real conversation is often strained and intentions and meanings somehow confused and corrupted by the distance and maybe also by the satellites the words have to bounce off to reach their intended targets. We are monkeys who need to look into each other’s faces to gauge true intent, and on speakerphone with 11 people (9 of whom you haven’t met) giving you notes on something you’ve made your whole writing staff stay up until 3am working on in the room, miscommunication can be the only outcome.

I am of course bummed out for myself and my bank account and my career and the resulting “waste” of a full year of my life (during which I was balancing not only making my own show but being Co-EP on the final season of Weeds). But mostly I’m really sad that the audience won’t get to see the show we made (and were in the process of making), because I managed, through fortune and hours and hours of reading scripts and taking meetings, to hire an extraordinary writing staff of fun, awesome, cool, talented writers — all of whom I plan to continue to be friends with. (Seriously, this was a good staff, and I put them through the paces; many moved across the country just to do this show; I put relationships in jeopardy for some of these folks. Whatever. They’re awesome.) The actors were similarly fantastic. Collette Wolfe is a dream. I hired her based on seeing her in Young Adult — a movie in which I think she stole the show in a 5-minute role. Collette will go on to have a crazy career and this will be but a blip. But hopefully a fun blip. Dane Cook is a natural and the nicest, most easy-going, hard working, ethical guy you could hope to meet — who also happens to live in a house that almost literally looks down on all of us. (I know some people might not like his stand-up, but he’s really good at it. Test your old opinions: go see him at the Comedy Store some night; test your old MySpace-days prejudice). Working with Jeffrey Tambor — an actor who has been in two of Top Ten sitcoms of all time — will probably be the highlight of my career. He is the nicest, most interesting, inquisitive, playful, insightful, smart man around. And not only are Joy Osmanski and Desmin Borges, Chris Perfetti and Trey Gerrald all stupendous actors, I have no doubt I will be friends with them for years to come. I will miss all of them, and already do.

This has gone on longer than I intended. I don’t love talking about my personal life that much on the Internet, but I have to get over the fact that it’s not narcissistic to acknowledge that there are some people who read my stuff and are genuinely curious and wonder what the **** happened with Next Caller. So that’s it. That’s the story. Tomorrow I will drive through the rest of Arizona and California and arrive at my house in Los Feliz, unpack, return the rental car, and try to figure out what’s next. I’m not starting from a dead stop — ironically I have yet another pilot at NBC that I wrote with my old Weeds boss Jenji Kohan that is still “in the mix,” and an old Showtime pilot I wrote that suddenly five years later has new life — but the future is, for the first time in many years, completely open and thus, terrifying.

Still want to be a writer? Of course you do. Hopefully my tale of woe sounds exciting and like a hard-shell-taco-and-whiskey you’d happy to swallow (otherwise, quit now). Good. Now go write some more. (I recommend Swork in Eagle Rock if you need a good writing cafe.)

Thanks for reading,

Stephen Falk. (Sent from outside a Starbucks in Flagstaff, AZ.)

PS: I will brag about something for a second, though. I can now say with certainty: if you ever find yourself in the position to get to put together a comedy writing staff, and then you complain that you can’t find enough funny women… Nay, if you already have a show on the air and you have like 12 guys and 2 women: you didn’t look hard enough. I insisted on having as near even as possible ratio of females to males (not including me they were 5:4), and aside from getting to be smug about it, it just makes for better energy and perspective in the room to have an even gender balance. Do it.


http://www.deadline.com/2012/11/next-caller-creator-sounds-off-on-series-demise/
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