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post #83431 of 93726
Profile
Can Whitney Cummings Get Some Respect?
By Vanessa Grigoriadis, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Nov. 18, 2012

On a recent Tuesday, Whitney Cummings, 30, one of the most powerful women in lowbrow comedy and also one of the most disdained, bounds into her hospital-blue office in Burbank, California, to meet the writing staff of Love You, Mean It With Whitney Cummings, her new E! talk show. This is the third show that she has on TV this year—the other two are NBC’s Whitney, based on her long-term, non-altar-focused relationship, and CBS’s 2 Broke Girls, which she co-created with Sex and the City’s Michael Patrick King—but this is the one she’s counting on to reestablish her bona fides as a stand-up personality instead of just a sitcom star. “Stand-up, as weird as it sounds, is the only time I feel 100 percent secure and safe,” says Cummings later, in brown sneakers with silver studs and skinny black jeans. “Onstage, the biggest break you have is moving toward the truth, and when that starts being rewarded, you get a sense of liberation. It stops you from being apologetic about who you really are.”

That would be a particularly good feeling for Cummings, because last year, Whitney—on which she’s the star, writer, and executive producer—became everyone’s favorite punching bag, an experience that she calls “emotionally very paralyzing and traumatizing.” Unlike Saint Louis C.K., who can do no wrong, Cummings, panned by critics and bloggers, has a hard time proving she can do right. In the sea of female-centric comedies that have become TV staples—Lena Dunham’s Girls, Mindy Kaling’s The Mindy Project, Zooey Deschanel on Elizabeth Meriwether’s New Girl—Cummings’s shows would be ranked, by coolness, dead last. She’s the damaged woman, the one who covers up her scars by being too loud and too hard, and overcompensates for being emotionally unavailable by wearing her sexuality on her sleeve instead of hiding it behind baby fat or “adorkable-ness.”

This year, Cummings is hoping for another chance at acclaim. A lot of Cummings’s comedy is dark—about her need to smother a boyfriend, or about how she’s “emotionally unavailable” and “dead inside”—but she’s incredibly appealing in person: effusive and warm, with a smile for everyone she meets. She has a reputation in Hollywood as an anti-diva, someone who works sixteen-hour days and bends over backward to keep her staff happy. “I guess the verdict is in­—I am not a sociopath,” she says, flashing a grin. “It’s not effective or productive not to be nice. It would undermine the goals I want to achieve on any given day.”

As the writers jam onto her couches—in an office that includes a doctored advertisement for Whitney with the phrase “Half of All Marriages End in … sweatpants,” except the word suicide is taped over the last word (“Um, the person who did that might have been me,” says Cummings)—she offers a pep talk to help them reach the highest bar an E! show can reach. “I know we all got into comedy because we love dick jokes, we love ball jokes, all that stuff,” she says. “But I think we need to do something important with this show—and I know I’m an idiot—but we should do something that matters, something deeper.” She pauses. “Like if we’re talking about celebrities, let’s get into deeper issues, not just make a bunch of vapid, superficial jokes about Nicki Minaj’s butt, or Kim Kardashian’s butt, or whomever’s butt is the biggest.”

She ticks off upcoming segments like one on Spanx for pregnant women (“the one time you get to be fat and not have people objectify you”), a bit about the way guys always say “ ‘Oh, Kristen Stewart, she’s not that pretty.’ She still would never talk to you if she wasn’t famous and you were famous, okay?,” and the guests she wants to have on (Tim Cook, the CEO of Apple; Oliver Stone; Leonard Sax, author of Girls on the Edge). She’s open about her own experiences with sexism: “I remember my agent at ICM at the beginning of my career telling me that I wasn’t pretty enough, that I was always going to be a quirky sidekick,” she says. “And he was an ogre of a man. He should have been carrying a torch. If he was in a bar, he couldn’t have come near me, and then he was deciding my fate.”

After about half an hour, in which one of the writers uses the phrase “so much of what’s on TV is reinforcing super-­hetero-normative ideas of men and women,” a top producer, who has been shifting in his seat, interjects: “A lot of this will be decided as we write, of course, and hone the voice,” he says. “The key, though, is we can never come off as preachy.”

“Right, of course,” says Cummings. “This is just a vision to guide the taste.” She pauses. “I mean, we’ll still have dick and ball jokes. But I just want them to have a bigger impact. Let’s make those pussy jokes important.”

As with many a comedian, Cummings’s hard edge comes from childhood pain, and her edge is harder than most’s. On Whitney, the plot, such as it is, revolves around her hesitation at marrying a pretty great boyfriend, because she’s been damaged by her parents’ relationship, and the truth is somewhat similar, if not a great deal gloomier.

To the outside world, the Cummings family appeared respectable: Her mother was a publicist at Neiman Marcus, and her father called himself a “venture capitalist.” “Yeah, no,” she says. “Venture capitalist is a little like saying ‘actor.’ There’s Will Smith, and there’s the guy sitting at Coffee Bean.” She declines to describe her dad’s profession beyond saying “he was borrowing money, lending money, it was gone … I try to stay out of it.” Cummings’s mother was a problem drinker, and not around much. “After school, I’d wait for someone to pick me up and no one would, so I’d be like, ‘I guess I’ll walk home,’ ” says Cummings. “I had to be a hustler, because nobody did anything for me. I was always pimping myself out—being cute, or lying and scheming, so if my parents weren’t home or there wasn’t food, I could go to a neighbor’s who would say, ‘Do you want to stay for dinner?’ ”

She was also “the kid who always had something embarrassing going on,” she says. “I always had lice. The heat didn’t work in our house, so I’d get dressed in the morning by turning on the pilot on the stove. And I was as tall as I am now at 10.”

Cummings had an older half-brother, with whom she watched Three Amigos, Uncle Buck, and National Lampoon’s European Vacation over and over—“That’s how I learned about comedy, along with Three’s Company and The Cosby Show, which was my jam,” she says—and an older sister who lent her Doc Martens and with whom she ran away to Rehoboth Beach at 12. “At the beach it was … just acid, and guys, and you know,” she says. “Bad music. Ace of Base. A nose ring and earrings everywhere, shaving the back of my head like a hood-rat punk.” (Cummings lost her virginity “very, very young,” and adds, “Ironically, I was on vacation with my family in the Virgin Islands, which was my first foray into puns.”) Her mother and the police hunted the sisters down. “I saw the police, and I was running, running, running,” she says. “My mom pulled up, and I remember looking at her like, ‘I don’t know what I’m running from, I don’t know what I’m running to, Ma!’ ”

Her mother may have been aware enough of her shortcomings as a parent to drive Cummings directly to her own sister’s home outside Roanoke, Virginia. Cummings went to Catholic school there, raised a pinto horse that she named “Baby,” and learned “to do chores, to write a thank-you card, discipline, justice, grace—all things I hadn’t known. Learned to be a ****ing lady.” She pauses. “I had a second chance, and I wasn’t going to waste it. I got into a good high school, and I worked my dick off. From then on, I was focused.”

* * * *

Cummings’s emphasis on success—she went on to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania in three years—doesn’t mean that she doesn’t also have a lot of self-doubt, and the room sometimes vibrates with anxiety (she says that she started taking Trazadone and, a day after the writers’ meeting, tells me she “spun out” about having been too “much on a soapbox”). In her cozy dressing room a few days later, she pushes a mirrored sliding closet door to the side so that she can’t see herself. “I don’t want to look at myself—ever,” she says, picking at a plate of unsalted pasta delivered by a chef. “All I see is that my face is a problem. It’s asymmetrical. I get terrible bags under my eyes. On the show, I’m basically an animated character: We go into post and fix my face, because otherwise people would think I was Steve Buscemi.”

This tendency to worry made it particularly hard for Cummings to deal with the vitriol directed her way last year, plus she felt like she was the last to know. “I was working so hard—either at the office or home, and never going out or online—and then one night I went to an NBC event,” she says. “Everyone was treating me like I had cancer. ‘Are you hanging in there?’ I was like, ‘Yeah, this is the best time of my life!’ They said, ‘Everyone hated Seinfeld when it first went on the air,’ and, ‘You stay strong, girl.’ I Googled myself, which never ends well. I started realizing what was going on, and I went through trauma.”

For Cummings, some of the criticism, particularly that she was a poor role model for women, was hard to understand. “I wasn’t trying to make a perfect character who has it all figured out,” she says. “I’m interested in flaws. We’re allowed to have flaws. To me, the idea that women aren’t allowed to have flaws is the most anti-­feminist thing imaginable. Plus, I’m someone who just put two shows on the air with strong female leads, and I’ve got a writers’ room here with half women and half men. I’m inherently very good for women, or certainly well-intentioned for women.”

Cummings began frantically trying to turn the show around—but as a kid who learned a lesson that she had no one to rely on other than herself, she had a hard time listening to others. She tried softening her character and taking the focus off her by emphasizing the rest of the cast but felt that nothing worked. She began refusing to attend social events. “I wouldn’t leave the house because I became so paranoid about who thought what about the show,” she says.

And then her past, which she had pushed away for so long, became present. Soon after Whitney’s production began, her mother had a stroke, paralyzing the left side of her body. Later, she told Howard Stern, her sister, who had substance-abuse problems over the years, started doing heroin. Cummings called the dealer she was hanging out with, then sent her to rehab in Los Angeles, with a stop at the ER to treat pneumonia and gangrene.

“I just got lost last year,” she says. “And one of the biggest mistakes is that I didn’t keep doing stand-up because I physically didn’t have time.” (Cummings made her name on Comedy Central roasts of David Hasselhoff and Joan Rivers, although she says she won’t do any more of them: “When you’re the underdog,” it’s fine, she says, “but [now she would feel] like, ‘Pick on someone your own size.’ ”) “I moved to the Valley, and when you move to the Valley, your life ends. But there’s no place I want to be more in life than in the back room of the Comedy Store, with a bunch of comics, ripping on each other. That’s the closest thing to family I will ever have.”

But pity was not the feeling people had about Cummings last year. There was also jealousy. Because she became very, very rich. The fees for creating and starring in your own show, as she did on Whitney, are sky-high, and then, in the spring, the news came out that 2 Broke Girls, for which she had co-created the show as well as co-written the pilot—she came up with the horse—had been presold into syndication for $1.7 million an episode. I’d heard the take could eventually be about $45 million for Cummings.

“So I can afford the chef—I can afford this!” she calls out, to no one in particular.

“That’s a lot of money,” I say.

“Here’s the thing about that,” says Cummings. “My family will always make sure I am poor. My investments manager says he represents NBA players, and he’s never seen anything like this. The money comes in, and it just goes out.” She pauses. “I haven’t processed it. It’s just a number on a piece of paper … and when I got the call about it, my first thought was embarrassment. That’s how co-dependent I am: I felt sad for people who had to feel like, ‘Why don’t I have this?’ It bummed me out.” Later, when she says “I feel so blessed” in reference to another topic, she stops herself. “Who says that? Only *******s. Only people with $45 million. Ugh.”

This year, Cummings is going to have the Whitney character on the show grow: “Whitney will finally get a moment where she’s like, ‘You know what? I’m done being crazy,’ ” she says. “ ‘I’m done with my damage.’ ” And though her sister is now her “life,” she may not be ­totally done with co-dependency and looking for family in other places. She normally films Whitney before a studio audience on Wednesdays—“If I don’t hear noise from the audience, I get panic attacks,” says Cummings—but they’re accommodating the schedule of John Cleese, who plays a couples’ therapist. A crew of ­several dozen stands in for the studio audience, offering loud guffaws. “So, Alex,” says Cleese, turning to Whitney’s onscreen boyfriend, “you lied to Whitney because you wanted some alone time. Seems extreme. If you wanted some alone time, why didn’t you just take your laptop to the bathroom?”

There’s a lot of laughter for that line, and then a break for lunch. Cleese signs DVDs for the crew while his daughter Camilla, who was in the audience, runs up to greet him. “Oh, stop with all that,” she says to the crew getting him to sign autographs. “I spend my little time with him trying to beat his ego down,” she jokes.

“She never kisses me!” says Cleese.

“It’s like a Brillo pad!” says Camilla, pointing at his mustache.

They start talking about Cleese’s ranch in Santa Barbara, where he had an emu named Gwyneth Paltrow. “I went out with Blythe Danner,” says Cleese.

“I know, and you thought she was too old for you,” says Camilla. “And they tried to set you up with Jake Gyllenhaal’s mother, and you were like, ‘She’s nice.’ ”

Cummings puts an arm around both of them. “I love you guys,” she says. “You’re like my family.”

*This article originally appeared in the November 26, 2012 issue of New York Magazine.

http://www.vulture.com/2012/11/whitney-cummings-on-love-you-mean-it.html
post #83432 of 93726
TV Notes
'Last Resort' Co-Creator Shawn Ryan on Cancellation: 'It Wasn't a Huge Shock'
By Philiana Ng, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Nov. 19, 2012

Two days after ABC opted not to move forward with a full-season order of ambitious drama Last Resort, co-creator Shawn Ryan appeared on an Internet chat show to talk about the demise of his latest network series.

"Our ratings had been on the cusp, or really below the cusp, for a few weeks now. It didn't come as a huge shock," Ryan said Sunday afternoon on Kevin Pollak's Chat Show. "We were all hoping for a bounce. The only thing is, there's so much data now on viewership that you can always find some thing that looks good for your show. For us, it was we're doing better than that time slot's done in the last couple of years even though we're not doing well overall."

Last Resort, which centered on a renegade submarine crew finding refuge on an island, debuted to a respectable 9.1 million viewers and a 2.2 rating in the advertiser-coveted adults 18-49 demo before plummeting to 5.7 million viewers and a series low 1.2 for its most recent episode. Even so, there was a chance DVRs could be its saving grace, Ryan said, as the series saw "a huge bump, percentage-wise, from DVR use."

"It's a brutal time slot. We're up against Big Bang Theory, which is the No. 1 comedy on TV; we're up against The X Factor; we're up against NFL games on the NFL Network that draw a lot of men -- and men were liking our show," said Ryan, who has gone up against Big Bang three times (Lie to Me, The Chicago Code, Resort), of his show's competitive 8 p.m. Thursday home. "It wasn't a huge shock, and yet still it's a disappointment. I would compare it to if you have a relative who becomes terminally ill. You know it's coming, and yet you still are shocked when it happens."

Ryan -- who has several projects in the works, including a Beverly Hills Cop update at CBS -- expressed disappointment for the crew and the harsh reality that he and the writers will have to abandon ship in a few weeks.

"It's really disappointing for the people who work on the show, the crew who work on a weekly paycheck," he said. "The fact is, I'll still be able to feed my family, and I'm disappointed that creatively we won't be able to continue the story. I'm very clear that there are people who are now going to be out of a job in a few weeks with this decision -- and these are people who were working 14-, 16-hour days on behalf of the show, and I feel very bad for them."

The military premise likely didn't help Last Resort cater to ABC's female-skewing programming, especially with a soapy drama, Grey's Anatomy, as a lead-out. But Ryan maintained that there was confidence they could draw in men and women: "There was a military aspect to the show that research showed kept some women at a distance, even though the women who did come tended to like it and we thought there was growth potential for women."

Ryan also shared insight into why ABC slotted Last Resort -- an effort for the network to lure male viewers -- in the time period it did.

"The first point was, 'We gotta put something there; we don't go dark at 8 p.m. on Thursdays,' " Ryan explained. "They had had some initial success three years ago with FlashForward. That premiered big and eventually cratered, but at least they got an audience at the beginning -- an audience that was a little more male. They thought [Last Resort] was a big, bold concept that would attract people. They were worried about putting something that was a little more normal, that it would get swamped and disappear."

He added: "This was a show that they felt they could lure studios to put movie advertisements on." While that rationale made sense on paper, the addition of weekly NFL games on Thursdays may not have been fully accounted for by ABC. "Other shows before got to have eight, nine weeks of not going against football games drawing 8 to 9 million people."

Other quotes from the nearly two-hour chat:

On The Shield: "I was far more concerned with how the show would be perceived five years and 10 years down the line than what people would think that night of that episode. I wanted the show to exist in that way."

On "branding" FX: "It was clear FX was banking a whole new strategy of what they wanted to be on the success or lack of success of The Shield. … That's the way it turned out (branding the network). I did not know it then, and I was very aware of my own limitations. [Time] was built in to allow me and my staff to learn what our mistakes would be and to correct them. I know so much more now, and I can avoid the pitfalls."

On his nondistinctive writing style: "I always prided myself on being someone where I wanted the writing to be invisible and I wanted the whole to exist. I wanted to be able to move between different genres, between different things, and in a way I thought I'd have more ability to do that if I didn't have a signature thing."

On The Newsroom: "I watched every episode of The Newsroom, and I had certain story and structure issues at times with it -- and yet I just let it wash over me."

Watch the full interview below: [CLICK LINK BELOW]

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/last-resorts-shawn-ryan-cancellation-392156
post #83433 of 93726
Business Notes/TV Sports
Cable pioneer John Malone says sports costs are out of control
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - Nov. 19, 2012

Add cable industry pioneer and Liberty Media Chairman John Malone to the growing list of people who think sports programming costs are out of control.

"We’ve got runaway sports rights, runaway sports salaries and what is essentially a high tax on a lot of households that don’t have a lot of interest in sports," Malone said in an interview. "The consumer is really getting squeezed, as is the cable operator."

Indeed, by some industry estimates sports programming now accounts for about half of the typical pay-television bill.

Malone, who has been an operator of cable systems and a programmer in his long career, said "the control of sports rights by a few entities has almost created a redistribution of wealth." The entities he was referring to include News Corp., which owns 20 regional sports networks (RSNs) and is launching a national service; Walt Disney Co., which owns the ESPN juggernaut; Time Warner, whose cable channels TBS and TNT carry baseball and basketball, respectively; and Comcast, which also owns almost a dozen RSNs.

The price of sports is only going to get higher. News Corp.'s Fox Sports is near a deal to acquire a 49% stake in the New York Yankees cable channel YES for more than $1 billion and will look to recoup that investment by increasing subscriber fees. Time Warner Cable just launched its own pricey RSN in Los Angeles and spent billions for Lakers rights and may end up in a bidding war with Fox Sports for the rights to the Dodgers.

Competition between these media giants, Malone said, is "creating quite a bit of distortion in the valuation of sports rights."

Long known for his resistance to government rules and regulations, even Malone thinks it might be time for the Federal Communications Commission or Congress to step in.

"The only way it is going to change in the short run is for government to intervene," he said. One solution, Malone said, is that more expensive services such as ESPN or RSNs be offered to consumers on an a la carte basis. ESPN, according to consulting firm SNL Kagan, costs more than $5.00 per subscriber, per month. RSNs are also very expensive. SNL Kagan said Comcast's SportsNet in Washington, D.C., costs more than $4.00 per month, per subscriber.

Ultimately though, Malone thinks technology, not government, will solve the problem. As more platforms such as Netflix and Hulu emerge and increase the quality of their content, consumers will have options beyond the current pay TV system in which large programmers bundle their content together into a one-size-fits-all package.

"People will watch and pay for what they want, it is kind of inevitable," he said. "I can’t forecast the future but usually markets have a way of correcting themselves."

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-malone-sports-20121119,0,1724652.story
post #83434 of 93726
Obituary
Remembering Lucille Bliss (1916-2012)
By Edward Champion, edrants.com - Nov. 18, 2012

lucillebliss-470x260.jpg

I was 23 years old when I first spoke with Lucille Bliss over the phone. I was shy and uncertain and rudderless, toiling nine to whenever at a San Francisco law firm with two very friendly Russian women who laughed at my jokes. I was good at my job: good enough to earn the right to hit the second floor balcony every hour, taking seven minute breaks for the cigarettes I inhaled with the Plan B desperation of someone who wanted to be somewhere else.

I read fat books and scribbled doggerel into notebooks and worked an endless string of unpaid film shoots. I had no idea if I could ever earn money doing something I loved. In those thin-skinned days, I thought that I was a fairly reprehensible human being — in large part because people continued to suggest this. I was cursed with a mellifluous yet idiosyncratic voice that always seemed to offend someone and still does to this day, no matter how benign my intentions.

One morning, my day job duties required me to locate an audio facility to clean up a murky recording. Being an especially tenacious and thorough researcher, I located a recording studio that not only did the job very well, but that offered a surprisingly swift turnaround time. Because of this, I tried to throw them as much work as I could. The guy on the phone, perhaps sensing the vocal exuberance I would later put into The Bat Segundo Show, took a shine to me and asked if I was interested in voiceover. I said yes. He told me about Lucille Bliss, who I learned was the voice of Crusader Rabbit and Smurfette, and intimated that I should get in touch with her.

But I had no money at the time. I was still smarting from a vicious tax bill on the installment plan because of a previous employer’s scurrilous math. My extremely amicable roommate had moved out, leaving me with an additional share of the rent to pay. Did I want to learn from Lucille Bliss? Absolutely. But I had no financial cushion. I had no idea how much Ms. Bliss would charge. It would probably be astronomical.

I called the number that the guy had given me. A very kind and cheerful woman in her early eighties picked up. She asked me all sorts of questions. What did I want to do? Where had I gone to school? How long had I lived in San Francisco? I told her that I was thinking of going to this conference I had heard about called South by Southwest, but I wasn’t sure I could make it. “Oh, you should go!” she said. I didn’t have the heart to tell her that I couldn’t afford her lessons, especially when she told me later that she could teach me all sorts of ways to enhance my voice, which she called “amazing” after I had performed, with her quiet encouragement, an improvisation of a nervous squirrel seeking nuts in a park and an on-the-spot cheerful narration of a fictional documentary on Stalin, in which I recall making some especially bleak yet cheery jokes that made her laugh. We talked for hours. I never got the sense that Lucille’s main motivation was to sign up. She was more curious about who this young man was.

I concluded our conversation telling her that I’d think about voiceover. But I think Lucille had picked up on the fact that I was a dessicated husk when it came to money. I never thought I’d hear from her again.

But a few months later, Lucille called me out of the blue to see how I was doing. I was very apologetic. I told her how much I wanted to work from her, but intimated that I was still going through some financial difficulties. “Oh, that’s okay,” she said. “We all go through that.” But despite this, she talked with me for more than an hour. The one thing she said was that I should take any creative opportunity that came my way. I wasn’t sure what it was she sensed in me, but she was absolutely certain that I would go somewhere.

In hindsight, it seems strange to have received a much-needed confidence boost from Smurfette. I had never had a mentor. For most of my life, people looked to me as if I knew all the answers. Having someone as formidably talented and indelibly quirky as Lucille declare that I was capable of something more meant a good deal to me. And I took her advice. A few years later, I would go to war against my diffidence: working at magazines, writing and directing odd plays, talking my way into idiosyncratic gigs, dispensing quiet help where I could. If it hadn’t been for Lucille’s much needed words, I doubt that I would have taken as many chances as I have.

We don’t always know how our enthusiasm lifts another soul, but Lucille taught me that life is too short to stay silent.

http://www.edrants.com/remembering-lucille-bliss-1916-2012/
post #83435 of 93726
TV Review
‘American Masters: David Geffen’ (PBS)
By David Hinckley, New York Daily News - Nov. 19, 2012

You have never seen anyone less comfortable anywhere than David Geffen looked this summer when he was arm-wrestled into talking with some 400 journalists about this PBS “American Masters” special on his life.

One of the things that music and film mogul Geffen has bought with his multibillions of dollars is insulation, and it was clear he considers it money well spent.

But if he was only slightly more revealing in that session than the chair on which he was sitting, he still has written some story.

This “American Masters,” (8 p.m. Tuesday night) with a lot of help from Geffen’s own narration, turns that story into a fast-paced trip through 50 years of pop culture and the life of one Brooklyn kid who inserted himself into the heart of it.

Geffen managed and promoted the likes of Laura Nyro, Jackson Browne, the Eagles, Guns ’N Roses and dozens of other acts. And that’s even before we get to films like “Risky Business.”

He’s got an eye and an ear, no doubt. The question, some would say, is whether he also has a heart.

He has given hundreds of millions to charities. He has also left many folks, at one time or another, feeling stomped or screwed.

“American Masters” doesn’t ignore that part of the story, and Geffen doesn’t deny he plays hardball or often puts himself first.

Glenn Frey of the Eagles recalls Geffen telling him, “You’ll be rich. But I’ll be richer.”

There are dangling conversations here. But at the end of the day, given what Geffen has accomplished, it’s a hard story not to watch.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/tv-review-american-masters-david-geffen-article-1.1203412
post #83436 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Business Notes/TV Sports
Cable pioneer John Malone says sports costs are out of control
Funny, the same guy thats complaining about it works for a company thats part of the problem. Why not take a stand and fix the problem by starting with your own RSN's? rolleyes.gif
post #83437 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

I still remember the Dixie Chicks. Love them. They're friends. And they keep thinking radio boycotted them. We didn't. To this day, playing them sends a segment of the listenership punching the button for some other station. With today's minute-by-minute ratings, we can see it. It's suicide to send that big of a chunk of the audience elsewhere if your goal is mass appeal. If Letterman wasn't so obviously political, I'm sure it'd be more of a horse race.

That's a sad commentary on the radio industry, IMO. The "controversy" over the Dixie Chicks was a manufactured one (for reasons we can't discuss). If the industry in general had just decided to rise above it and begin playing them again, it would have soon been forgotten. People move on.

Ironically, "Taking the Long Way", their post-controversy album that swept the Grammy Awards, was perhaps the best work they'd ever done. By knuckling under to the worst instincts of one segment of their audience the radio industry let one of the most talented groups in country music history wither and die. All of us who enjoyed their music are the real losers.
post #83438 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Business Notes/TV Sports
Cable pioneer John Malone says sports costs are out of control
By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - Nov. 19, 2012

Add cable industry pioneer and Liberty Media Chairman John Malone to the growing list of people who think sports programming costs are out of control.

Ultimately though, Malone thinks technology, not government, will solve the problem. As more platforms such as Netflix and Hulu emerge and increase the quality of their content, consumers will have options beyond the current pay TV system in which large programmers bundle their content together into a one-size-fits-all package.

Um, yeah, I'll believe it when I see it. We're way past the point when technology could've solved the problem - there's nothing stopping ESPN et al from offering a streaming-only service. But they are beholden to existing business models with cable and sat that protect the cash cow coming from all those non-sports consumers.

If you can get people to pay for your service even though they don't watch it, what incentive do you have to 'solve the problem'? As far as they're concerned, there is no problem.
post #83439 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post


That's a sad commentary on the radio industry, IMO. The "controversy" over the Dixie Chicks was a manufactured one (for reasons we can't discuss). If the industry in general had just decided to rise above it and begin playing them again, it would have soon been forgotten. People move on.  Ironically, "Taking the Long Way", their post-controversy album that swept the Grammy Awards, was perhaps the best work they'd ever done. By knuckling under to the worst instincts of one segment of their audience the radio industry let one of the most talented groups in country music history wither and die. All of us who enjoyed their music are the real losers.

And yet here it is discussed and (mis)characterized as usual to a particular viewpoint.  Had they publicly disparaged a President you support, in a foreign venue, would you be similarly disposed?  The bottom line is, any performers who depend on public acceptance for their income have to understand that taking vocal and controversial political stands is fine and dandy, as long as they realize their paying customers have the same right to disagree and take their money elsewhere.  It's not a matter of right and wrong or "worst instincts" - no one was censored but you can't just have your say and refuse to let your audience have theirs.  

post #83440 of 93726
MONDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #83441 of 93726
No surprise as week 13 SNF eagles/cowboys does not get flexed.
No changes to the other sunday game times either.
post #83442 of 93726
Nielsen Notes (Broadcast)
NBC extends record Monday win streak
Takes its ninth straight, a new high for the network
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Npv. 20, 2012

NBC extended its Monday winning streak to nine weeks, a new record for the network, even with hit reality show “The Voice” falling to a season low on the night.

The network won all six half hours on the night and has now won every Monday night this season, the first time it has achieved such a feat in the people meter era, which dates back more than two decades.

NBC averaged a 3.3 adults 18-49 rating and 7 share on the night, according to Nielsen overnights, 27 percent ahead of second-place CBS with a 2.6/7.

“Voice” was once again the night’s top show on broadcast with a 3.7 from 8 to 10 p.m., down 16 percent from last week. It peaked with a 4.1 in its final half hour.

Lead-out “Revolution” also won its timeslot with a 2.6, even to last week despite the weaker lead-in.

Elsewhere last night, ABC’s “Dancing with the Stars” was up 10 percent from last week to a 2.3 from 8 to 10 p.m. for the semifinal performance episode.

CBS’s “2 Broke Girls” at 9 p.m. rose 6 percent from last week, to a 3.4. Earlier in the night a repeat of “Two and a Half Men” replaced the now-canceled “Partners” at 8:30 p.m. It grew 0.2 percent over last week’s original “Partners.”

And Fox’s dramas were both up over last week, “Bones” growing 5 percent to a 2.0 and “The Mob Doctor” up 13 percent to a still-anemic 0.9.

NBC led the night among 18-49s with a 3.3 average overnight rating and a 9 share. CBS was second at 2.6/7, ABC third at 2.2/6, Univision fourth at 1.7/4, Fox fifth at 1.4/4, Telemundo sixth at 0.5/1 and CW seventh at 0.4/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-six percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. NBC was first with a 3.5 for "Voice," followed by CBS with a 2.5 for "How I Met Your Mother" (3.0) and the repeat of "Men" (2.1). ABC was third with a 2.2 for "Stars," Fox fourth with a 2.0 for "Bones," Univision fifth with a 1.9 for "Por Ella Soy Eva," and CW and Telemundo tied for sixth at 0.4, CW for "90210" and Telemundo for "Rosa Diamante."

NBC was first again at 9 p.m. with a 3.9 for more "Voice," while CBS remained second with a 3.1 for "2 Broke Girls" (3.4) and "Mike & Molly" (2.9). ABC was third with a 2.4 for more "Stars," Univision fourth with a 1.8 for "Amores Verdaderos," Fox fifth with a 0.9 for "The Mob Doctor," Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for "Corazon Valiente" and CW seventh with a 0.3 for "Gossip Girl."

At 10 p.m. NBC led yet again with a 2.6 for "Revolution," with CBS second with a 2.2 for "Hawaii Five-0." ABC was third with a 2.0 for "Castle," Univision fourth with a 1.5 for "Amor Bravio" and Telemundo fifth with a 0.6 for "Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal" (0.7) and "El Rostro de la Venganza" (0.5).

ABC finished first for the night among households with an 8.4 average overnight rating and a 13 share. NBC was second at 5.7/9, CBS third at 5.4/8, Fox fourth at 3.1/5, Univision fifth at 2.0/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.7/1 and CW seventh at 0.5/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/nbc-extends-record-monday-win-streak/
post #83443 of 93726
TV Notes
Starz Cancels Kelsey Grammer's 'Boss' After Two Seasons
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Nov. 20, 2012

Kelsey Grammer's ruthless Chicago mayor has met his match: Starz, which has opted not to move forward with its political drama Boss after two seasons.

"After much deliberation, we have made the difficult decision to not proceed with [a third season of] Boss," Starz said in a statement Tuesday. "We remain proud of this award-winning show, its exceptional cast and writers, and are grateful to Kelsey Grammer, [creator] Farhad Safinia and our partners at Lionsgate TV."

Starz president Chris Albrecht picked up Boss straight to series, bypassing the traditional pilot stage. The latter is part of Albrecht's larger brand-building strategy for the HBO and Showtime rival, which also includes bold bets and a focus on cinematic dramas over half-hour comedies.

The series, which earned a Golden Globe nomination for best drama and an acting win for Grammer, drew 659,000 total viewers to its original October 2011 premiere en route to 1.72 million overall over its first weekend, falling shy of recent scripted launches. Season two returned down from its freshman run with a mere 317,000 viewers, ending in October with a season high of 440,000 viewers. The Lionsgate TV drama's sophomore season averaged 937,000 viewers when factoring in multiple premiere weekend airings, down from its first-year average of 1.1 million. Worth noting, Magic City -- which Starz produced in-house -- outperformed seasons one and two of Boss, averaging 1.25 million in its freshman run.

As is quickly becoming commonplace at Starz, the network ordered a second season of the drama nearly a month ahead of its series premiere. The cabler mounted a pricey campaign for awards-season attention for the series, which starred Grammer as a fierce political player battling an incurable degenerative disease and co-starred Kathleen Robertson, Jeff Hephner and Connie Nielsen. Ultimately, the Safinia-created show -- which counted Gus Van Sant and Grammer among its executive producers -- failed to receive recognition outside of the Golden Globes.

Dee Johnson boarded the Lionsgate TV drama as showrunner for season two, which featured the additions of Glee's Jonathan Groff and Sanaa Lathan. Had Boss continued with a third season, Johnson -- who joined ABC's freshman drama Nashville, also from Lionsgate, as showrunner earlier this year -- was scheduled to return to the series, which was in first position.

Under Starz president Albrecht, formerly of HBO, the premium cable network has been focused on more broadly appealing, commercial dramas, which he has dubbed "premium TV-flavored popcorn." In the past, he has talked about leaving "quieter dramas" -- a la Mad Men -- to the other networks, with his focus on such global hits as Spartacus, which will end its run next year.

Starz is scheduled to launch at least four scripted efforts in 2013, including the final season of Spartacus, season two of Jeffrey Dean Morgan starrer Magic City, period drama Da Vinci's Demons and limited series The White Queen with Janet McTeer. Michael Bay's Treasure Island prequel Black Sails and big swing Marco Polo are in the works.

Grammer -- who has been active as a producer this development season, selling projects to MTV and NBC -- already has lined up his next gig, joining Kyra Sedgwick in the ensemble cast of feature Reach Me.

Update: Sources confirm to THR that Starz has had talks to wrap the series with a two-hour movie. The second season finale tied up the season-long mystery with Grammer's Tom Kane still in full control of Chicago, and with his illness still under wraps.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/kelsey-grammer-starz-boss-canceled-393242
post #83444 of 93726
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9NdOVTkkllQ

Just do Frasier again.

Always thought Lilith was HOT in a Morticia Adams sortaway.
post #83445 of 93726
TV Notes
Elmo puppeteer Kevin Clash resigns from 'Sesame Street'
By Erin Strecker, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Nov. 20, 2012

Kevin Clash, the puppeteer behind Elmo, has resigned from Sesame Street in the aftermath of the allegations he had a sexual relationship with a minor.

In a statement to EW, Sesame Workshop said:

“Sesame Workshop’s mission is to harness the educational power of media to help all children the world over reach their highest potential. Kevin Clash has helped us achieve that mission for 28 years, and none of us, especially Kevin, want anything to divert our attention from our focus on serving as a leading educational organization. Unfortunately, the controversy surrounding Kevin’s personal life has become a distraction that none of us want, and he has concluded that he can no longer be effective in his job and has resigned from Sesame Street. This is a sad day for Sesame Street.”

In addition to his work as Elmo, Clash was the subject of the documentary Being Elmo: A Puppeteer’s Journey, released in 2011.

Clash was accused last week, and a day later, the accuser recanted. According to TMZ, a second accuser has now come forward.

UPDATE: Kevin Clash has released a statement:

“I am resigning from Sesame Workshop with a very heavy heart. I have loved every day of my 28 years working for this exceptional organization. Personal matters have diverted attention away from the important work Sesame Street is doing and I cannot allow it to go on any longer. I am deeply sorry to be leaving and am looking forward to resolving these personal matters privately.”

http://insidetv.ew.com/2012/11/20/kevin-clash-resigns-elmo-sesame-street/
post #83446 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

That's a sad commentary on the radio industry, IMO. The "controversy" over the Dixie Chicks was a manufactured one (for reasons we can't discuss). If the industry in general had just decided to rise above it and begin playing them again, it would have soon been forgotten. People move on.
Ironically, "Taking the Long Way", their post-controversy album that swept the Grammy Awards, was perhaps the best work they'd ever done. By knuckling under to the worst instincts of one segment of their audience the radio industry let one of the most talented groups in country music history wither and die. All of us who enjoyed their music are the real losers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flint350 View Post

And yet here it is discussed and (mis)characterized as usual to a particular viewpoint.  Had they publicly disparaged a President you support, in a foreign venue, would you be similarly disposed?  The bottom line is, any performers who depend on public acceptance for their income have to understand that taking vocal and controversial political stands is fine and dandy, as long as they realize their paying customers have the same right to disagree and take their money elsewhere.  It's not a matter of right and wrong or "worst instincts" - no one was censored but you can't just have your say and refuse to let your audience have theirs.  
As any business 101 class teaches keep your politics outta your business or you risk alienating 50% of your potential clients .
The D Chicks took one side & P-O'ed 50% or more of the C/W fans then back tracked & P-O'ed the other side as well . When you stand on stage & take a polarizing stance & then write songs that further the polarization is not a smart move in a music category like C/W is .
Me I didn't care one way or the other I hated them from the start smile.gif
Long Live Rock & Roll biggrin.gif
post #83447 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
Starz Cancels Kelsey Grammer's 'Boss' After Two Seasons
 

 

This is extremely disappointing. Great show, great performances, especially Grammer. So much better than that Magic City borefest.

post #83448 of 93726
It appears ABC is going to no longer have all HD programming for 4 weeks as 4 new SD episodes of "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition" are being broadcast Mondays starting on November 26th.
The previews have 4:3 video.
http://abc.go.com/shows/extreme-makeover-home-edition
post #83449 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
Starz Cancels Kelsey Grammer's 'Boss' After Two Seasons
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Nov. 20, 2012
Kelsey Grammer's ruthless Chicago mayor has met his match: Starz, which has opted not to move forward with its political drama Boss after two seasons.

We watched the first season, but deleted the second season from the TiVo before watching. It was so dark (literally and well as figuratively) and depressing.
post #83450 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by flint350 View Post

And yet here it is discussed and (mis)characterized as usual to a particular viewpoint.  Had they publicly disparaged a President you support, in a foreign venue, would you be similarly disposed?  The bottom line is, any performers who depend on public acceptance for their income have to understand that taking vocal and controversial political stands is fine and dandy, as long as they realize their paying customers have the same right to disagree and take their money elsewhere.  It's not a matter of right and wrong or "worst instincts" - no one was censored but you can't just have your say and refuse to let your audience have theirs.  

The point I was making was that the "controversy" was egged on and ginned up by radio stations, in many respects. The comment itself was relatively benign and innocuous (especially with regard to how the current president has been treated daily since before he even took office), took place overseas, and without being ginned up by certain media outlets wouldn't have even gotten noticed, much less taken on a life of its own. Some radio stations had CD bonfires and crushing "parties", and the rest of the media covered it as if it was a legitimate news story. It was pandering at its worst and the stations and DJ's that instigated these actions certainly didn't cover themselves with glory. The net result is a musical group that many people loved was blacklisted overnight, by many of the same people, for nothing more than a publicity stunt designed to goose up Arbitron ratings. It was an appeal to the mob, and the mob won. But that was the world we were living in at the time.
post #83451 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by drummerguy View Post

This is extremely disappointing. Great show, great performances, especially Grammer. So much better than that Magic City borefest.

Agreed. It was dark, yes, but brilliantly crafted and Grammer was a revelation. I'll miss it.
post #83452 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Agreed. It was dark, yes, but brilliantly crafted and Grammer was a revelation. I'll miss it.

I'll miss Kitty the most. Just found her extremely hot.

I liked the series and I'm disappointed it didn't go further.
post #83453 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Nielsen Notes (Broadcast)
Broadcast’s big hurt this fall: Dramas
The top shows are aging, the new ones aren't catching on
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Npv. 16, 2012
If last TV season was notable for how well comedies performed, this season may be notable for how much dramas are struggling.

Finally, these shows are facing more competition than ever on cable, where storylines and language are often more graphic and thus, to some viewers, more appealing.

AMC’s zombie drama “The Walking Dead” is the No. 1 drama this fall among 18-49s on broadcast or cable, the first time a cable show has achieved that feat during the regular season. And shows like FX’s “American Horror Story” and Showtime’s “Homeland” have seen big viewership gains.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/broadcasts-big-hurt-this-fall-dramas/

I hadn't thought about this until reading this article, but nearly all of the dramas I watch are on cable. The only broadcast drama I was watching, Last Resort, has already been cancelled. Even that show I couldn't see sustaining quality for a full season.

To me, dramas are better suited to cable not only because of more allowable content, but because of their shorter seasons. It's hard to sustain consistently compelling drama for 22 episodes.
post #83454 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesesteaks3 View Post

I hadn't thought about this until reading this article, but nearly all of the dramas I watch are on cable. The only broadcast drama I was watching, Last Resort, has already been cancelled. Even that show I couldn't see sustaining quality for a full season.
To me, dramas are better suited to cable not only because of more allowable content, but because of their shorter seasons. It's hard to sustain consistently compelling drama for 22 episodes.

I gave 7 new broadcast dramas a try this year: Last Resort, 666 Park Ave, Nashville, Elementary, Vegas, Revolution and the Mob Doctor. I've given up on most of them due to bad, cheesy writing, or they've been cancelled. I'm down to watching just Nashville still, but might give Elementary another try since I've heard it gets better after the pilot.

I think in a few years, we'll be down to no dramas on broadcast TV other than procedural's on CBS and soapy type shows on ABC. A sad state indeed.
post #83455 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by lobosrul View Post

I've given up on most of them due to bad, cheesy writing, or they've been cancelled. .

Garbage in, Garbage Out!
post #83456 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by lobosrul View Post

I gave 7 new broadcast dramas a try this year: Last Resort, 666 Park Ave, Nashville, Elementary, Vegas, Revolution and the Mob Doctor. I've given up on most of them due to bad, cheesy writing, or they've been cancelled. I'm down to watching just Nashville still, but might give Elementary another try since I've heard it gets better after the pilot.
I think in a few years, we'll be down to no dramas on broadcast TV other than procedural's on CBS and soapy type shows on ABC. A sad state indeed.
I know I'm in the minority, but I have grown to like Mob Doctor, especially the last two episodes. I also like Nashville and Elementary, but am a bit disappointed in Vegas, the one I was originally really looking forward to.
post #83457 of 93726
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fastslappy View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

That's a sad commentary on the radio industry, IMO. The "controversy" over the Dixie Chicks was a manufactured one (for reasons we can't discuss). If the industry in general had just decided to rise above it and begin playing them again, it would have soon been forgotten. People move on.
Ironically, "Taking the Long Way", their post-controversy album that swept the Grammy Awards, was perhaps the best work they'd ever done. By knuckling under to the worst instincts of one segment of their audience the radio industry let one of the most talented groups in country music history wither and die. All of us who enjoyed their music are the real losers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flint350 View Post

And yet here it is discussed and (mis)characterized as usual to a particular viewpoint.  Had they publicly disparaged a President you support, in a foreign venue, would you be similarly disposed?  The bottom line is, any performers who depend on public acceptance for their income have to understand that taking vocal and controversial political stands is fine and dandy, as long as they realize their paying customers have the same right to disagree and take their money elsewhere.  It's not a matter of right and wrong or "worst instincts" - no one was censored but you can't just have your say and refuse to let your audience have theirs.  
As any business 101 class teaches keep your politics outta your business or you risk alienating 50% of your potential clients .
The D Chicks took one side & P-O'ed 50% or more of the C/W fans then back tracked & P-O'ed the other side as well . When you stand on stage & take a polarizing stance & then write songs that further the polarization is not a smart move in a music category like C/W is .
Me I didn't care one way or the other I hated them from the start smile.gif
Long Live Rock & Roll biggrin.gif

The real problem for the Dixie Chicks was that most of the country audience is on the right side of the political spectrum, and their comment was on the left. There is a long history of musicians taking political stands, but mostly in rock & roll, and folk, and mostly on the left. Most of them built an audience from the stands they took, even if a few potential fans were alienated. There are even a lot of cases of right wing politicos using R&R songs with a clear left perspective in their campaigns. Springsteen's "Born in the USA" comes immediately to mind. One wonders if they really listened to the songs.

However, I think Archiguy has a good point - much of the controversy was ginned up by the media, because it suited them, and their ratings.
post #83458 of 93726
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
WEDNESDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving (Special)
(R - Nov. 16, 2001)
9PM - Modern Family
(R - Sep. 26)
9:31PM - Suburgatory
(R - Oct. 17)
10:00PM - Private Practice (Special Time)
* * * *
11:35PM - Nightline (LIVE)
Midnight - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Tim Allen; professional boxer Manny Pacquiao; Flo Rida performs)

CBS:
8PM - Survivor: Philippines
9PM - Criminal Minds
10PM - C.S.I.: Crime Scene Investigation
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Scarlett Johansson; musician Willie Nelson; Gary Clark Jr. performs)
12:37AM - Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Tom Hanks; comic Phil Hanley)

NBC:
8PM - Whitney
8:30PM - Guys with Kids
9PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
10:01PM - Chicago Fire
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Joseph Gordon-Levitt; reality-TV personality Kris Jenner; comic Dan Cummins)
12:37AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Amy Poehler; Alicia Keys performs)
1:37AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Statistician Nate Silver; mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey; The Features perform)
(R - Oct. 31)

FOX:
8PM - The X-Factor (LIVE, 120 min.)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Nature: My Life as a Turkey (R - Nov. 16, 2011)
8PM - NOVA: Inside the Megastorm
(R - Nov. 18)
8PM - Nova scienceNOW: Can I Eat That?
(R - Oct. 31)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Por Ella Soy Eva
9PM - Amores Verdaderos
10PM - Amor Bravio

THE CW:
8PM - Movie: Planes, Trains and Automobiles (1987)

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Rosa Diamante
9PM - Corazón Valiente
10PM - Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal
10:30PM - El Rostro de la Venganza

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Judge Andrew Napolitano)
(R - Nov. 15)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Director Ken Burns)
(R - Nov. 12)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Will Ferrell; Tenacious D performs)
(R - Aug. 2)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Max Greenfield; Chris Franjola; Sarah Colonna; Dov Davidoff)
post #83459 of 93726
TV Notes
Classic Johnny Carson Interviews to Air on TCM
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Nov. 20, 2012

Heeeeere's Johnny! Or, rather, heeeeeere he will be!

Turner Classic Movies has licensed 50 "Tonight Show" interviews that Johnny Carson conducted with Bette Davis, Elizabeth Taylor, Mel Brooks and others from the Carson Entertainment Group, TCM said Tuesday.

The interviews, many of which have not seen the light of day since they first aired, will appear under the banner "Carson on TCM," beginning next summer.

"Carson on TCM," which is being curated by filmmaker Peter Jones ("Johnny Carson: King of Late Night," "Stardust: The Bette Davis Story"), will first air as a series of five-interview showcases before being offered as single-interview interstitials that highlight stars being featured on the network.

Carson interviews with Truman Capote, Gregory Peck, Steve Martin and Drew Barrymore will also be aired.

The concept for "Carson on TCM" came about while Jones was making the PBS documentary "Johnny Carson: King of Late Night." Granted access to all existing episodes of "The Tonight Show" in the Carson archives, Jones put together a showcase package for the most memorable interviews.

TCM gave similar treatment to "The Dick Cavett Show" in 2006, showcasing interviews between Cavett and guests such as Katharine Hepburn, Groucho Marx and Alfred Hitchcock.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/classic-johnny-carson-interviews-air-tcm-65996
post #83460 of 93726
TV Notes
Mindy Project Exclusive: Amanda Setton to Depart, Anna Camp Bumped to Recurring
By Michael Ausiello, TVLine.com - Nov. 20, 2012

A little midseason tinkering is underway at The Mindy Project. TVLine has learned exclusively that Amanda Setton, who plays office sexpot Shauna on Fox’s rookie comedy, is departing the series.

Additionally, Anna Camp, aka Gwen, the longtime BFF of Mindy Kaling’s titular OB/GYN, has been bumped from series regular to recurring. I’m told Setton is exiting for creative reasons, while Camp asked to be taken off contract — a move that will allow the in-demand actress to pursue other opportunities while continuing to appear on Mindy Project (and a source insists she will continue to appear).

The mini shake-up comes as the show, which has already been picked up for a full season, is getting ready to introduce a new female character.

Earlier this week, a casting call went out for the recurring and potentially series regular role of Maggie, a tomboyish college friend of Mindy’s.

http://tvline.com/2012/11/20/the-mindy-project-amanda-setton-leaving-anna-camp-recurring/#utm_source=copypaste&utm_campaign=referral
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