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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2794

post #83791 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
Traditional TV season slips away
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Dec. 7, 2012
. ... DirecTV's Audience Network (Channel 101) will re-air the entire series of "24" from the beginning at 8 p.m. Jan. 7 nd for the first time the show will be presented in HD. ...

How can that be? Are they remastering those first several seasons which, if I remember correctly, were broadcast in FOX's widescreen 480p...? It looked pretty good (especially close-ups) relative to most everything else on TV at the time, but it sure wasn't HD.
post #83792 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

How can that be? Are they remastering those first several seasons which, if I remember correctly, were broadcast in FOX's widescreen 480p...? It looked pretty good (especially close-ups) relative to most everything else on TV at the time, but it sure wasn't HD.

If it is a remaster then that's a good sign that Fox will finally release the 24 collection on Blu-ray. The excuse at the time of the DVD release was that the early seasons were not in HD.
post #83793 of 93675
NCTA's Powell: Escalating Sports Costs Could Invite Government Scrutiny
Says operators and programmers need to be careful not to blow up the model
By John Eggerton -- Broadcasting & Cable, 12/7/2012 12:41:13 PM


National Cable and Telecommunications Association president Michael Powell warns operators, programmers and sports leagues that they need to be careful that escalating sports rights costs don't blow up their business model and prompt government intervention.

http://www.broadcastingcable.com/article/490753-NCTA_s_Powell_Escalating_Sports_Costs_Could_Invite_Government_Scrutiny.php
post #83794 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

He knows this how ?

Unless I'm mistaken, most provider-linked DVRs monitor commercial skipping activities and report the user's viewing habits to the company that issued the DVR.

If you're suggesting that the provider can a) detect FF usage, and b) tell the difference between using FF during the commercials rather than during the program itself, you are mistaken.
post #83795 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

He knows this how ?

Unless I'm mistaken, most provider-linked DVRs monitor commercial skipping activities and report the user's viewing habits to the company that issued the DVR.

If you're suggesting that the provider can a) detect FF usage, and b) tell the difference between using FF during the commercials rather than during the program itself, you are mistaken.

My (perhaps mistaken) understanding was that the people providing viewing information to Nielsen are provided with special DVRs. Do you have information which would contradict this? With a specially programmed DVR, they could collect any of that information. My personal experience with them was when they still collected information by way of a hand-written paper-based log. I wasn't involved for very long, though. I don't think they liked the detailed entries I provided when I was channel surfing wink.gif
post #83796 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post


My (perhaps mistaken) understanding was that the people providing viewing information to Nielsen are provided with special DVRs. Do you have information which would contradict this? With a specially programmed DVR, they could collect any of that information. My personal experience with them was when they still collected information by way of a hand-written paper-based log. I wasn't involved for very long, though. I don't think they liked the detailed entries I provided when I was channel surfing wink.gif

 

About a year ago, I read about Nielsen providing that type of specialized info to advertisers.  Also, Tivo had a voluntary tracking data program that they sold to advertisers, and they planned to increase it to 100K households.  Tivo said that advertisers got second-by-second data, so they could identify the best time during a program for the ad to be placed, and knew exactly when they lost their audience, and even when viewers stopped and played it over again.

post #83797 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

If you're suggesting that the provider can a) detect FF usage, and b) tell the difference between using FF during the commercials rather than during the program itself, you are mistaken.

TiVo has this information. And as long as you know the program and the length, you would know when they are FF through commercials. I know I opted in for my data to be used by TiVo. ALthough I have no idea how they actually keep track of it, but they supposedly have detailed information.
post #83798 of 93675

Quick google, and I found that TiVO has 2 viewer measurement programs, Power||Watch is the opt-in program with 45K viewers (demographics available), and Stop||Watch, anonymous data from 350K viewers.  Second by second, live and delayed viewing.  Here's the summary for both programs:

 

https://stopwatch.tivo.com/products/index.html

post #83799 of 93675
WEDNESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog

THURSDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #83800 of 93675
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
ABC’s ‘Scandal’ shoots to a series high
Second-year drama draws a 2.5 in 18-49s
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Dec. 7, 2012

ABC took a chance when it renewed the low-rated “Scandal” last May.

It looks like that chance is paying off.

For the second straight week the second-year drama hit a series high, and it topped timeslot rival “Elementary” on CBS for the second time, too.

“Scandal” averaged a 2.5 adults 18-49 rating at 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights, up 14 percent over last week’s 2.2 and winning its timeslot.

Even more impressive, its lead-in was smaller this week, with the 9 p.m. “Grey’s Anatomy” falling 3 percent and tying a season low with a 3.0.

“Scandal” has been getting some positive buzz lately. Star Kerry Washington recently was named one of Entertainment Weekly’s entertainers of the year, and she and “Scandal” creator Shonda Rhimes are appearing on “Oprah’s Next Chapter” this weekend.

“Elementary,” meanwhile, averaged a 2.3 in the hour, up 5 percent over last week.

Earlier in the evening CBS’s “Two and a Half Men” hit a season high with a 4.2, the second straight week it has scored a season best following all the hubbub over series co-star Angus T. Jones’ controversial denouncement of the show in an online video that went viral.

NBC’s “The Office” grew 11 percent week to week, to a 2.1 at 9 p.m., but the soon-to-end “30 Rock” fell to a series-low 1.1 at 8 p.m.

Both of Fox’s shows were down versus last week, with “The X Factor” sliding 11 percent, to a 2.4, and lead-out “Glee” dipping 4 percent, to a 2.1.

CBS was first for the night among 18-49s with a 3.4 average overnight rating and a 10 share. Fox was second at 2.3/6, ABC third at 2.2/6, Univision fourth at 1.6/4, NBC fifth at 1.3/4, CW sixth at 0.8/2 and Telemundo seventh at 0.5/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won't be available for several weeks. Forty-six percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. CBS led with a 4.8 for "The Big Bang Theory" (5.3) and "Men" (4.2), followed by Fox with a 2.4 for "Factor." Univision was third with a 1.6 for "Por Ella Soy Eva" and ABC fourth with a 1.2 for "Last Resort." NBC and CW tied for fifth at 1.1, NBC for "Rock" (1.1) and "Up All Night" (1.2) and CW for "The Vampire Diaries," and Telemundo was seventh with a 0.5 for "Rosa Diamante."

CBS was first again at 9 p.m. with a 3.2 for "Person of Interest," growing 10 percent over last week, while ABC moved to second with a 3.0 for "Grey's." Fox was third with a 2.1 for "Glee," NBC fourth with a 1.8 for "Office" (2.1) and "Parks and Recreation" (1.5), Univision fifth with a 1.7 for "Amores Verdaderos" and CW and Telemundo tied for sixth at 0.5, CW for "Beauty and the Beast" and Telemundo for "Corazon Valiente."

ABC moved to first at 10 p.m. with the 2.5 for "Scandal," with CBS second with the 2.3 for "Elementary." Univision was third with a 1.3 for "Amor Bravio," NBC fourth with a 1.0 for "Rock Center with Brian Williams" and Telemundo fifth with a 0.6 for "Pablo Escobar: El Patron del Mal" (0.7) and "El Rostro de la Venganza" (0.5).

CBS also finished first for the night among households with an 8.6 average overnight rating and a 14 share. ABC was second at 4.8/8, Fox third at 4.0/6, NBC fourth at 2.4/4, Univision fifth at 2.0/3, CW sixth at 1.3/2 and Telemundo seventh at 0.7/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/abcs-scandal-shoots-to-a-series-high/
post #83801 of 93675
Obituary
'Night Court' Creator Reinhold Weege Dies at 63
By Mike Barnes, The Hollywood Reporter - Dec. 7, 2012

Reinhold Weege, creator of the daffy 1980s sitcom Night Court, which ran for nine seasons on NBC and earned seven Emmy Awards and 31 nominations but never the big comedy prize, has died. He was 63.

Weege, who before Night Court wrote and produced for ABC’s Barney Miller -- another lovable Manhattan-set sitcom set in the world of the law -- died Dec. 1 of natural causes in La Jolla, Calif., a family spokeswoman told The Hollywood Reporter.

Night Court, which starred the youthful Harry Anderson as night-shift judge and Mel Torme fan Harry Stone and John Larroquette as lecherous assistant district attorney Dan Fielding, began as a midseason replacement and ran from 1984-92. It was a top 10 show in 1986-87 and 1987-88.

Night Court anchored an early "Must See TV” Thursday comedy lineup for NBC, which opened with The Cosby Show, followed by Family Ties and Cheers.

With Weege receiving a writing credit on 105 of the comedy’s 193 episodes, Night Court received best comedy series Emmy nominations in 1985, 1987 and 1988 -- losing out to Cosby, The Golden Girls and The Wonder Years, respectively. Weege captured his first Emmy nom in 1979 when Barney Miller was up for best comedy series but lost to Taxi.

Larroquette collected a then-unprecedented four consecutive Emmys for best supporting comedy actor for playing Fielding before withdrawing his name from consideration in 1989. (In an inside joke during the third season, it was revealed that his character’s real first name was Reinhold, but he changed it to Dan out of embarrassment.)

Night Court often walked the line between lunacy and reality, and its edginess pushed the envelope of network television at the time. Needing a break from the intense demands of a weekly sitcom, "Reiny" retired from the show after six seasons. He also received four WGA nominations and a Humanitas Award nom for his work.

A native of Chicago, Weege also wrote for the TV adaptations of M*A*S*H and Semi-Tough as well as for Fish, the Barney Miller spinoff that starred Abe Vigoda. He created the short-lived sitcom Park Place, which was set in a legal aid clinic and starred Harold Gould and Alice Drummond, and wrote and directed TV's Nikki and Alexander, with Tim Matheson and Irena Ferris.

In 1968, his senior year at Prospect High School in Mount Prospect, Ill., Weege played Cromwell in A Man for All Seasons opposite future Babylon 5 star Bruce Boxleitner as Sir Thomas More. Shelley Pierce, his high school girlfriend whom he later married, portrayed Lady More. The play won the Illinois state drama competition.

In a story he told to the Chicago Tribune, Weege embarked on a career in Hollywood in 1976 after he was fired from his job as a reporter for a suburban newspaper. He wrote about a “secret meeting, which should have been public” concerning a development project in Schaumberg, Ill., that angered advertisers of the paper.

His big break came when he was hired as a staff writer for Barney Miller. After three years, Weege left the show to strike out on his own with Night Court.

In addition to his ex-wife Shelley, survivors include his daughters Tez and Alix and granddaughter Zoe.

A funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. on Dec. 16 at Forest Lawn Memorial Park and Mortuary in the Hollywood Hills. For more information, contact Bonnie Covelli at weege12.16.12@gmail.com.

In lieu of flowers, donations can may be made to the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/reinhold-weege-night-court-barney-miller-dies-398653
post #83802 of 93675
Nielsen Notes (Cable)
'Duck Dynasty' Finale Gives A&E an All-Time High
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Dec. 7, 2012

The popularity of A&E's reality series "Duck Dynasty" continues to grow along with the Robertson clan's beards.

The Season 2 finale of "Duck Dynasty" on Wednesday was A&E's most-watched and highest-rated telecast in the network's history, amassing 6.5 million total viewers, with 3.9 million of them in the 18-49 demographic that's most important to advertisers.

The season finale also yielded network records in the 25-54 and 18-34 demographics with 3.8 million and 2 million viewers, respectively.

Overall, the second season of "Duck Dynasty" has grown 139 percent in total viewers and 127 percent in the 18-49 demo over last season's averages.

“’Duck Dynasty’ represents the best of A&E’s unique brand of storytelling, showcasing authentic and engaging characters,” said Bob DeBitetto, President and General Manager of A&E Network and BIO Channel. “It’s extremely gratifying to see more and more viewers flocking to the series week after week.”

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/ratings-duck-dynasty-finale-gives-ae-all-time-high-68351
post #83803 of 93675
Washington Notes
Will The FCC’s Chairman Give Rupert Murdoch A Holiday Gift In 2013?
By David Lieberman, Deadline.com - Dec. 7, 2012

The curious thing about Julius Genachowski‘s tenure as FCC chairman is that he’s been a virtuoso in dealing with broadband issues but tone deaf when it comes to traditional media. Case in point: Look at all the people he has infuriated with his attempt to make it easier for a company to own a TV station and major newspaper in the same city. (A proposal Genachowski circulated would put the burden on the FCC to show why it should block a cross-ownership arrangement in the 20 largest markets.) The effort is tailor-made for Rupert Murdoch. He’s kicking the tires at The Los Angeles Times and Chicago Tribune — two cities where Fox also owns TV stations.

That has foes of media consolidation seeing red. “We cannot live in a vibrant democracy unless people get divergent sources of information,” Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-Vt) said yesterday. “I intend to do everything I can to prevent this proposal from going forward.” That effort has momentum. This week Genachowski — under pressure from Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, a potential swing vote on the five-member commission – said he’d accept more public comment on media ownership rules, pushing any decision into January at the earliest. Some of Genachowski’s most vigorous supporters tell me that they believe he blew it: If opponents effectively use the time to rally others to speak out against the plan, it’s probably toast.

Still, the battle continues. News Corp lobbyists met with FCC staffers last week to argue for a relaxation of the cross-ownership rules. According to their FCC filing summarizing the discussion, Murdoch’s team believes that the largest media markets “are unquestionably diverse and competitive enough.” Without more investment in newspapers we could see “ongoing erosion of robust journalism, harming both localism and diversity in markets across the country.” Public interest advocates point to a story this week in The Economist that says the newspaper business is still profitable and has begun to stabilize. What’s more, they say, there are plenty of potential investors such as Warren Buffett who are stepping up to support newsrooms without worrisome concerns that they might monopolize local news and advertising.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/12/fcc-julius-genachowski-rupert-murdoch-media-cross-ownership-rules/
post #83804 of 93675
TV Sports
The man viewers never see plays a big role in TV boxing
By Michael Hiestand, USA Today - Dec. 7, 2012


(Photo: Will Hart, HBO)

TV networks carrying boxing cannot show running scores, because there aren't any.

At least not any available publicly. And that's given Harold Lederman a TV sports job for 27 years. On HBO's $60 pay-per-view Manny Pacquiao-Juan Manuel Marquez fight (Saturday, 9 p.m. ET), he'll work again as a sort of human scoreboard.

Not that you'll see him as he scores the fight, but you'll hear him explain who he thinks is ahead and why -- or sometimes appear in graphics.

As he sits ringside alongside HBO's Roy Jones Jr., Jim Lampley and Larry Merchant, he intentionally won't wear headphones. He does not want to hear what they're saying.

"I judge the fight exactly the way the judges see it," says Lederman, 72. "Let me tell you the truth, the headphones magnify the blows and makes it sound like the roof is caving in."

As for hearing the announcers, Lederman says their points would only be a distraction. "I don't want to listen to them. I don't want to hear anything about, say, Pacquiao's family. My job is only to explain to the public how the fight should be scored. I worked that out a long time ago."

Not that it was the focus of his career. Starting in 1961, he began 50 years of deciphering scrawled prescriptions as a pharmacist in New York until he retired last year while undergoing treatment for prostate cancer.

A lifelong boxing fan, who began judging pro boxing in 1967, Lederman traveled to every continent except Antarctica to score what he saw, even as he kept "getting fired from my normal jobs because I wasn't around."

HBO hasn't never felt the need to show him on-air, except for one appearance last year for the sake of novelty. (HBO spokesman Ray Stallone suggests viewers shouldn't hold their breath for another: "He gets one on-camera appearance per century.")

But Lederman's voice became well-known enough that customers picking up prescriptions occasionally recognized it and wanted to talk boxing. "I'd take the time to talk as long as it didn't jeopardize my job," he says.

Something he saw while at home watching a fight on HBO in 1986 led to TV. "I thought that what I was looking at and what the commentators were saying weren't the same thing. So I called HBO and said I thought they should hire a boxing judge."

He did not expect to hear back. But weeks later Ross Greenburg, then with HBO Sports, gave him a tryout on a Trevor Berbick-Pinklon Thomas heavyweight title fight. Berbick was the heavy favorite, Lederman says, but he told his wife he was worried that "Pinklon is going to belt this guy out in the first round and my TV career will be over."

Turns out Berbick won in a decision. (Although he lost his first title defense -- to Mike Tyson.) "Berbick won because it was the only time Eddie Futch trained him. I told Eddie I owed my TV career to him," Lederman says.

Lederman quit judging in 2001 to avoid any perceived conflict-of-interest in the boxing world, where TV networks help organize the sport as well as cover it. "And my daughter Julie took over for me, working fights for the WBC and New York athletic commission. I'm very, very proud of her."

Fine. Some parents might worry about about their kids getting into a field where everybody is supposed to be authoritative but often end up looking inconsistent. And, sometimes, that includes Lederman. In June, he said Pacquiao won all but one round in a fight against Timothy Bradley -- but two of three judges gave it to Bradley.

The one judge who went with Pacquaio suggested that Lederman can add to judging controversies: "People watch television and they hear Harold (Lederman) ... and that's the way they see it."

Says Lederman: "I'm just trying to give the public my educated opinion based on 35 years of judging pro boxing."

Here's another one of his opinions: Having lost two decisions and gotten a draw in three fights in Nevada against Pacquiao, Marquez just might have a shot at a decision Saturday -- because those boxers will meet for the first time with judges from outside Nevada.

"Marquez has had nine different Nevada judges for three fights that all ended in controversy," says Lederman, who says judges can make $5,000 each to work mega-fights such as the ones involving Pacquiao. "Maybe Nevada just wants their guys to make the money. I've screamed they have to use judges that don't come from Nevada."

That'll happen Saturday, as a judge from New Jersey and from England will join a Nevadan on the scoring.

Why would Nevada judges favor Pacquiao? "We don't know," Lederman says. "We just know what happened."

But he has a theory. "Maybe it's because Pacquiao is more aggressive. Effective aggressiveness is just supposed to be 25% of scoring. But that's the textbook version. The true story is that 99% is for clean punching."

Career tips: John Kruk says being named as a game analyst this week on ESPN's marquee Sunday night MLB games wasn't part of any master plan.

"I never dreamt this would happen," he says. "I thought when I retired I'd never be seen again."

But, after retiring after 10 MLB seasons in 1995, he tried Fox Sports Net's now-defunct Best Damn Sports Show -- "it was free and loose" -- and did some local Philadelphia Phillies TV games until he joined ESPN in 2004.

He says he told ESPN he "didn't want to travel, didn't want to go back into stadiums" because he was done with all that. But after working occasional games in recent years, he felt "some excitement in being back."

Kruk replaces Terry Francona, who left to manage Cleveland, who'd replaced Bobby Valentine, who'd left to manage Boston -- and has since been fired. But, Kruk says, at least ESPN won't have to worry about losing him to managing: "There's no way in the world I'd ever manage anything. And if I ever coached anything, it'd be women's softball."

Back on-air: ESPN's Sean McDonough, after last week having successful surgery for what he had described to USA TODAY Sports Media as a "hole in my head," will return on-air with assignments including the Valero Alamo Bowl with Texas-Oregon State on Dec. 29 and the Allstate Sugar Bowl with Louisville-Florida on Jan. 2.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/hiestand-tv/2012/12/06/manny-pacquiao-boxing-hbo-harold-lederman/1751537/
Edited by dad1153 - 12/7/12 at 2:29pm
post #83805 of 93675
TV Reviews
The Widow Was a Spy
By Dorothy Rabinowitz, Wall Street Journal - Dec, 7, 2012

"Restless" comes on the heels of more than a few films about hidden wartime pasts, most of them about Nazis. Not so in this richly textured World War II spy-thriller based on a novel by William Boyd. Its heroine Sally Gilmartin (Charlotte Rampling) is, like all her spy colleagues, devoted to the Allied cause, as the film makes amply clear from the start. It doesn't take much longer to recognize that the story she has to tell is a deeply sinister one. To know that, it's only necessary to look at Sally in the opening scenes, set in the mid-1970s, as she reveals her past to her astounded adult daughter, Ruth (Michelle Dockery). It's hard to think of another actress with as formidable a gift as Ms. Rampling's for exuding a sense of menace. A power all the more potent in characters like Sally—that is, proud, assertive women, self-possessed and, in one way or another, haunted.

It's a testament to the crackling intelligence of the script (written by Mr. Boyd) that the nature of that menace hangs elusively in the air until the end. Still, the real heart of this two-part series lies in the dazzling action scenes involving a British secret-service unit, told in flashback and set in splendidly evocative wartime (and prewartime) backgrounds—Paris, London, Washington, and there's a brief stop at 33rd Street and Third in New York. That's not to mention a long solo drive down a frightfully isolated road in New Mexico, past a prominent roadside sign announcing the way to Alamogordo—a name with a certain ring to it, Alamogordo having been the site of the first atomic-bomb test.

The driver of that car had been Sally's younger self, British agent Eva Delectorskaya, Sally's real name. As her daughter, and we, learn at the outset, the person known as Sally Gilmartin had been born of Russian parents, had been a member of a British secret-service unit during the war and an espionage agent. One taught to use her wits, go behind enemy lines, and find her way back alone in strange terrain, miles from safety—the section on the spy training school and its training exercises is itself worth tuning in for, if only for the blood chilling scenery—and to dispense with the enemy physically when necessary. Agent Eva's wartime history, revealed in those flashbacks (Hayley Atwell plays the young Eva), includes some spectacular instances in which she's shown doing just that.

Thirty years after the war, she's preparing to use her wits again, to go behind enemy lines once more, so to speak, and even to take physical action against a foe. She's in danger from certain enemies over matters related to her wartime work, people determined to kill her, whose identities she will not disclose till the very end. Fearful—and much to her daughter's dismay—this widow of a respected academic visits the local arms dealer to buy protection. She knows guns well, as she shows during that visit—an encounter eloquent in its detail, in her expertise on weaponry and bullets on casual display in her discussion with the gun dealer. A scene like numerous others in the show whose small moments deliver a large quotient of the heft and color in "Restless."

When it comes to color, and for that matter heft, none of the characters, Ms. Rampling's Sally aside, is the equal of Lucas Romer. He's played by Rufus Sewell, who brings majestic verve to the role of the dashing spymaster and unrelenting disciplinarian, and also a boss who becomes something more than a friend to young Eva—one of the few revelations allowable about this drama perilously awash in potential spoilers. There's not much, to be sure, likely to spoil the pleasures of this work, one of whose charms is a refreshingly unhurried air even as it goes ripping sharply along, suspenseful to the end.

RESTLESS
Begins Friday, Dec. 7, at 9 p.m. on Sundance Channel


* * * *

The latest Mel Brooks special comes titled "Mel Brooks Strikes Back!"—though at what it would be hard to say given this hour packed with Mr. Brooks at his most endearing. That doesn't, unsurprisingly, prevent him from sending his audience into gales of laughter over every mumbled half-sentence he utters, over his memories of Brooklyn and the Catskill Mountains, and also subjects a lot less rich in comic possibilities, like tomato sandwiches. The kind his mother used to make for his lunch, he explains, which she then delivered to her young son, sitting outdoors, by tossing them from the window of their apartment. That son proceeds to relate in extraordinary detail, and even more extraordinary confidence, how the tomato got squashed into the Kaiser roll, how he ate it, how he arranged for more squashed-tomato sandwiches, and a lot more it's impossible to find the confidence to describe here.

All of this the Westwood, Calif., studio audience adores as they do everything else he says in this show (Mr. Brooks is paired with interviewer Alan Yentob, creative director for the BBC.) This adoration is especially unsurprising given how much else he says comes via clips of classic Mel Brooks films and TV appearances—routines from "Your Show of Shows" with Sid Caesar and Carl Reiner, scenes from "Blazing Saddles" and "High Anxiety." But there is, as well, a lively question-and-answer session with this audience—a vital presence, like many of the audiences seen on the clips of old Brooks shows. It's not possible to look at the faces here without seeing the joy in them as they break into bouts of helpless laughter. Impossible too not to think of the difference between this laughter and those automatic yelps of applause, cheers and whistles, the substitutes for actual laughs—a response that can't be summoned at will—heard these days from the studio audiences for our late-night comedy kings.

Among the show's highlights you can hear Mr. Brooks's snappy duet, spoofing the joys of combat, with his old partner Ronnie Graham. Called "Retreat," it was written in the 1950s—too close to the war to win many hearts. The lyrics are nonetheless irresistible, the performers even more so.

MEL BROOKS STRIKES BACK!
Monday, Dec. 10, at 9 p.m. on HBO


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324001104578163310270339022.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_6
post #83806 of 93675
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SATURDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Movie: The Borrowers (2011)
10PM - Castle
(R - Sep. 24)

CBS:
8PM - Frosty the Snowman
(R - Dec. 7, 1969)
8:30PM - Frosty Returns
(R - Dec. 1, 1995)
9PM - The Flight Before Christmas (2008)
10PM - 48 Hours

NBC:
8PM - The American Giving Awards (120 min.)
10PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
(R - Nov. 21)
* * * *
11:29PM - Saturday Night Live (Jamie Foxx hosts; Ne-Yo performs; 93 min.)

FOX:
8PM - UFC: Henderson vs. Diaz (LIVE, 120 min.)
* * * *
11PM - MasterChef
(R - Jul. 23)
Midnight - 30 Seconds to Fame SD
(R - Jul. 31, 2002)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Austin City Limits: Steve Martin; Sarah Jarosz (R - Nov. 6, 2010)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Sábado Gigante (3 hrs.)

TELEMUNDO:
6:30PM - Movie: The Princess and the Frog (2009)
8:30PM - Movie: Ratatouille (2007)
post #83807 of 93675
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Dec. 8, 2012

'AMERICAN MASTERS: LENNONNYC'
PBS, 8:00 p.m. ET

A repeat, but an excellent one: This 2010 documentary examines John Lennon’s years in New York. It’s a story about his arrival, his legal fight to stay there, and, eventually, his happy nesting phase with Yoko Ono and his artistic resurgence. It’s also about his murder, but it’s the life, not the death, that dominates here. Check local listings.

WAR HORSE
Showtime, 8:00 p.m. ET

On stage, the titular equine was a thing of majesty – a skeletal maxi-puppet that, like the rest of this story about a horse and his trainer in WWI, left a lot to the imagination, in the very best interpretation of that phrase. This 2011 movie version, directed by Steven Spielberg, goes for the literal interpretations instead: real horses, real battlefields. The story is the same, but judge for yourself whether the same can be said of the dramatic impact. Jeremy Irvine stars.

THE CRYING GAME
Flix, 10:15 p.m. ET

Here’s a cinematic love story that’s far from the norm: Neil Jordan directed this 1992 character drama, which stars Stephen Rea as an IRA terrorist who finds himself sympathizing with a captive (Forest Whitaker), and being drawn to the captive’s enigmatic lover (Jaye Davidson). The movie is 20 years old now, but I still feel, in this case, saying more would be a major spoiler.

BOUND
IFC, 10:15 p.m. ET

Here’s a cinematic love story that’s far from the norm: It’s a modern film noir love triangle, which isn’t unusual at all, but in this case two of the three corners of the triangle are occupied by women. This beautifully photographed and cleverly written movie was concocted by the Wachowski brothers, who now are a different type of sibling team: He’s still Andy, but his sibling is now Lana. Joe Pantoliano plays the low-level mobster, Jennifer Tilly plays his shapely moll, and Gina Gershon plays the ex-con plumber who comes between them. The seduction scene with Tilly and Gershon is so hot, you may want to keep a dishrag nearby to wipe the fog from your TV screen.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE
NBC, 11:29 p.m. ET

Jamie Foxx is tonight’s guest host, and Ne-Yo is the musical guest. Foxx is an old hand at sketch comedy: In addition to hosting SNL once before, he also clocked three years on Fox’s In Living Color in the early Nineties. Ne-Yo, on the other hand, is a relative Ne-Yophyte.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #83808 of 93675
TV Notes
NBCUniversal, Hearst Corp. Close Deal to Rebrand G4 as Esquire Channel
By Lacey Rose, The Hollywood Reporter - Dec. 7, 2012

In its bid for the largely untapped metrosexual viewership, NBCUniversal is set to rebrand G4 channel as the Esquire channel.

Sources tell The Hollywood Reporter that the NBCUniversal-owned cable network has closed a deal with Esquire parent Hearst Corporation to shift the former gaming network to a destination more in line with the modern male. The effort is designed to capture a growing, upscale demographic that isn't being reached through other male networks, including adrenaline-heavy Spike and History.

Some of the new programming -- which will focus on such genres as cooking, travel and fashion -- already is in production as the rebrand is expected to take place during the first half of 2013, according to sources. True to the decade-old network's heritage, there will be gaming fare as well.

An NBCU spokesperson declined comment.

The news comes nearly a year after NBCU cable entertainment chairman Bonnie Hammer hired longtime NBC marketing executive Adam Stotsky to take the helm as general manager at G4. Earlier this fall, his team canceled the network's Attack of the Show! and X-Play, a move that followed press reports of the net's desire to include more than simply geek TV.

In exploring potential partners, NBCU had conversations with Hearts rival Conde Nast as well. For their part, NBC and Hearst Corp. have a history, having served as co-owners of A&E Networks as recently as this summer, when the former sold its 15.8 percent stake for $3.03 billion. Hearst maintains an ownership stake in the cable group, which includes Lifetime, A&E, History and Bio.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/nbcuniversal-hearst-corp-close-deal-399481
post #83809 of 93675
TV Notes
Pre-Launch Controversy Helped ‘Jersey Shore’. Will It Do The Same For ‘Buckwild’?
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Dec. 7, 2012

Here we go again. In December 2009, MTV’s launch of Jersey Shore, about a group of party-loving young Italian Americans, drew the ire of Italian American organizations and legislators who mounted a campaign against the show. Sen. Joseph F. Vitale, chairman of the New Jersey Italian American Legislative Caucus, and Richard Bilotti, chairman of the New Jersey Italian and Italian American Heritage Commission, sent a letter to MTV parent company Viacom asking them to cancel the show for its “offensive, inaccurate” portrayal of Italian-Americans. “Jersey Shore is a fabrication created by MTV Networks and marketed to represent reality,” the letter says. “This is a far cry from a documentary of a naturally occurring subculture existing in New Jersey.”

Now history seems to be repeating itself with MTV’s upcoming reality series Buckwild, about a group of thrill-seeking twentysomethings in a small West Virginia town, which has been dubbed “The Jersey Shore Of Appalachia” and “Hillbillies Gone Wild” (watch trailer below). MTV has already anointed it a successor to departing hit Jersey Shore by scheduling it in Jersey Shore‘s Thursday 10 PM slot and has been using the same type of provocative promo campaign that it used for Jersey Shore three years ago, perhaps hoping to spark controversy again for extra publicity. As a result, the network is getting a similar reaction from legislators. Sen. Joe Manchin III (D-W.Va.) today sent a letter to MTV President Stephen Friedman asking that the network “put a stop to the travesty called Buckwild.... Instead of showcasing the beauty of our people and our state, you preyed on young people, coaxed them into displaying shameful behavior — and now you are profiting from it. That is just wrong.”

Just as it did three years ago with Jersey Shore, MTV is keeping mum, not commenting on the controversy surrounding Buckwild, anticipating that lightning will strike twice and a pre-launch backlash will turn into ratings gold.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/12/pre-launch-controversy-helped-jersey-shore-will-it-do-the-same-for-buckwild/#more-384968
post #83810 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Aleron Ives View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

He knows this how ?

Unless I'm mistaken, most provider-linked DVRs monitor commercial skipping activities and report the user's viewing habits to the company that issued the DVR.

If you're suggesting that the provider can a) detect FF usage, and b) tell the difference between using FF during the commercials rather than during the program itself, you are mistaken.

My (perhaps mistaken) understanding was that the people providing viewing information to Nielsen are provided with special DVRs. Do you have information which would contradict this? With a specially programmed DVR, they could collect any of that information. My personal experience with them was when they still collected information by way of a hand-written paper-based log. I wasn't involved for very long, though. I don't think they liked the detailed entries I provided when I was channel surfing wink.gif

Nielsen? Who cares? They are a very small portion of the DVR universe. If a non-Nielsen DVR is connected, none of the proposed activities occur.
post #83811 of 93675
Business Notes
'The Judy Garland Show' Rights Go Up for Auction
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Dec. 7, 2012

Have a really big Judy Garland fan on your holiday shopping list? Have a spare $1 million or so kicking around? You might be interested in this.

The rights for Garland's variety series "The Judy Garland Show" are being put up for auction by The Royalty Exchange, the online auction house said Friday. Bidding, which begins at $1 million, will be open until Dec. 20.

The package includes the rights to all 26 episodes of the series, which ran on CBS from 1963 to 1964, with home video/DVD, video-on-demand, clip clearance and sync license rights included.

The auction lot also includes outtakes from the show, a behind-the-scenes photo gallery, press and glamor stills from the series, and an audio commentary from people who were involved with the show.

After winning a network bidding war in 1963, CBS agreed to pay "The Wizard of Oz" star Garland $24 million for the show -- at the time, one of the biggest television deals on record, and a much-needed cash influx for Garland, who had been experiencing tax troubles. The eclectic list of guests who appeared on the show includes Barbra Streisand, Mickey Rooney, Count Basie, Lena Horne, Bob Newhart, Peggy Lee and Garland's daughter, Liza Minnelli. Garland would also perform solo concerts on the program.

Watch a clip from Streisand's appearance on the show below.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/judy-garland-show-rights-go-auction-68371
post #83812 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

My (perhaps mistaken) understanding was that the people providing viewing information to Nielsen are provided with special DVRs. Do you have information which would contradict this? With a specially programmed DVR, they could collect any of that information. My personal experience with them was when they still collected information by way of a hand-written paper-based log. I wasn't involved for very long, though. I don't think they liked the detailed entries I provided when I was channel surfing wink.gif

Nielsen gets the data from people meters. Information identifying the provider, program, original provider and time are embedded sub audibly into the audio. People meters are worn by Nielsen participants like pagers and record what is viewed broken down to the commercial level. This is also how they identify what is viewed on a delayed basis.
post #83813 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Business Notes
'The Judy Garland Show' Rights Go Up for Auction
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Dec. 7, 2012
Have a really big Judy Garland fan on your holiday shopping list? Have a spare $1 million or so kicking around? You might be interested in this.

The rights for Garland's variety series "The Judy Garland Show" are being put up for auction by The Royalty Exchange, the online auction house said Friday. Bidding, which begins at $1 million, will be open until Dec. 20.

The package includes the rights to all 26 episodes of the series, which ran on CBS from 1963 to 1964, with home video/DVD, video-on-demand, clip clearance and sync license rights included.

The auction lot also includes outtakes from the show, a behind-the-scenes photo gallery, press and glamor stills from the series, and an audio commentary from people who were involved with the show.

After winning a network bidding war in 1963, CBS agreed to pay "The Wizard of Oz" star Garland $24 million for the show -- at the time, one of the biggest television deals on record, and a much-needed cash influx for Garland, who had been experiencing tax troubles. The eclectic list of guests who appeared on the show includes Barbra Streisand, Mickey Rooney, Count Basie, Lena Horne, Bob Newhart, Peggy Lee and Garland's daughter, Liza Minnelli. Garland would also perform solo concerts on the program.

Watch a clip from Streisand's appearance on the show below.
http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/judy-garland-show-rights-go-auction-68371

eek.gifeek.gif Wow!! 24 million for 26 episodes?!?! In 1963/1964?!!? That sounds like alot in 2012, but that was almost fifty years ago.
post #83814 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

My (perhaps mistaken) understanding was that the people providing viewing information to Nielsen are provided with special DVRs. Do you have information which would contradict this? With a specially programmed DVR, they could collect any of that information. My personal experience with them was when they still collected information by way of a hand-written paper-based log. I wasn't involved for very long, though. I don't think they liked the detailed entries I provided when I was channel surfing wink.gif

Have they ever released data on what kinds of commercials are most often watched, and which ones are most often skipped? I cannot believe Advertisers would be willing to put good money after bad realizing their ads are just going to be skipped (And I'm sure we all know what kinds of ads send people reaching for that "Fast-Forward" Button!). mad.gif
post #83815 of 93675
TV Notes
‘How I Met Your Mother’ Renewal Deadline Looms: Will The Cast Return?
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Dec. 7, 2012

Exactly a year ago, David Shore, creator/executive producer of Fox’s drama House was pushing the network to make a decision on the future of the show by the end of 2011 so he can give it a proper ending if faced with cancellation. At the time, House was in its eighth season, with Shore and star Hugh Laurie’s contracts coming up. Fox and producing studio Universal TV didn’t have a license fee deal for another season. The network didn’t make a decision by end of December as Shore wished, but by the beginning of February, the verdict was in - House would end its run after eight seasons.

Fast forward a year to this week. CBS‘ comedy How I Met Your Mother is in Season 8 and the last year of its current license deal with the network, with the contracts of creators Craig Thomas and Carter Bays and the cast all up at the end of the season. Like Shore, Thomas and Bays had requested a decision to be made by the end of this month because of the overarching mythology of the show, which needs to begin building toward the big mother reveal when an end date is set. Three weeks before the end of the year, there is activity on all three fronts — talks are underway between CBS and HIMYM producer 20th Century Fox TV as well as between 20th TV and Thomas and Bays and between the studio and reps for the series’ stars, Jason Segel, Josh Radnor, Cobie Smulders, Neil Patrick Harris and Alyson Hannigan.

CBS has been open about its desire to bring HIMYM for another season. “We want the show to come back next year,” the network’s entertainment president Nina Tassler said in August. “We’re not there yet in terms of resolving the situation, but we’re pretty optimistic.” It appears that the studio, 20th TV, and Thomas & Bays are also open to the idea of another season. But what about the cast? A virtual unknown when the show launched in 2005, Segel has seen his feature career take off over the past seven years. I hear that as of now, Segel has indicated that it is unlikely for him to return. He has not shut the door though.

In another walk down TV memory lane, in 2003 the deals of the Friends cast were coming up after the ninth season, and star Jennifer Aniston was public about her desire to leave and focus on her feature career. But ultimately she and the rest of the cast signed on for an abbreviated 10th and final season that would bag everyone a huge payday. Like the Friends‘ cast, the HIMYM quintet is a very tight group, with the actors supporting each other. So it is not inconceivable, in a sign of camaraderie, for Segel to agree to a (possibly abbreviated) final season.

CBS and 20th TV both have good track record in completing complex negotiations. CBS has been able to bring back Two And A Half Men, also from an outside studio (Warner Bros.), several times in down-to-the-wire negotiations. And 20th TV has successfully renewed the deals with the casts of its top series after sometime contentious negotiations. With its Monday lineup taking a hit this fall facing competition from The Voice and suffering from the move of Two And A Half Men to Thursday, it is important for CBS to secure HIMYM for another season, especially as another tough negotiation with Warner Bros. for Men is coming up.

http://www.deadline.com/2012/12/how-i-met-your-mother-renewal-deadline-looms-will-the-cast-return/
post #83816 of 93675
TV Review
Big Cat Week on National Geographic Wild spots a leopard
Boone Smith heads to Afghanistan to search for the elusive snow leopard in a Big Cat Week opener on Nat Geo Wild that's both illuminating and bracing.
By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times - Dec. 8, 2012

For the premiere episode of its third annual Big Cat Week, National Geographic Wild has upped the stakes.

Having already explored man-eating lions and most of their lethally gorgeous kindred, this Big Cat Week opens Sunday night in Kabul where big cat tracker and National Geo fave Boone Smith and his team stops before entering the mountains in search of the elusive snow leopard.

Hoping to find a part for their busted radio transmitter, they wander the streets of the Afghanistan capital like "Homeland" extras, while the requisite urgent voiceover explains that the Taliban is currently on a killing spree and that Smith and his team would do well to keep a low profile.

PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times

Rather difficult to do for the movie-star handsome Smith (seriously, are big cat trackers drawn from the same gene pool as paramedics and firefighters?) and, of course, his camera crew. But no matter, the colorful marketplace gives the piece the regional flavor on which National Geographic has built its reputation and if the anxiety-provoking soundtrack does force one to wonder if Mandy Patinkin's Saul will be appearing from a shadowy doorway with the necessary hardware, no doubt a visit to Afghanistan contains a certain amount of danger even for environmentalists. (Memo to CIA: When next you have to rescue hostages from a foreign city à la "Argo," send in the National Geo big cat team.)

Joining Smith in the field is John Goodrich, another good-looking if a bit more laid-back conservation scientist as well as local tracker Hussain Ali who, mercifully, looks like a normal person. Up we go into the mountains, learning how global warming is decreasing the snow pack that, though a boon to native herders, is decreasing the leopard's natural habitat.

This sort of information is the stated raison d'etre for Big Cat Week, which is part of the Big Cats Initiative's attempt to increase awareness about dwindling and endangered species. Snow leopards, found only in the mountains of Central Asia where they are hunted by herders and poachers seeking their fur and spectacular tails, are on the endangered list. (Interesting fact: They cannot roar.) And indeed, while in Kabul, Smith finds it easier to procure an illegal snow leopard pelt than a radio part.

Up we go into the mountains, where we learn about the tracking patterns of the leopards and watch the experts train local conservationists on how to set a snare and use a tranquilizer gun. The team hopes to put tracking collars on several leopards to learn more about the population.

It is laborious and often boring work. An intrusive voice tries too hard to keep the mood tense by asking things like "will the team get the traps set in time?," which is pretty annoying since it is safe to assume that they will.

THE ENVELOPE: Awards season has arrived

And indeed, they do, leading to 10 or 15 truly exciting minutes in which we see both the un-scripted excitement of the team (the local conservationist is so excited, Smith has to calm him down so he doesn't upset the leopard) and the exquisite leopard himself. During those dead-of-night moments, the tension is quite real.

Watching the animal struggle while the guys with the tranqs hurry up the trail and take aim, the viewer joins the team in admiring the beauty of the leopard and fearing for its well-being, both before it is sedated and after, when the drug leaves the animal groggy and in real danger of slipping from its steep and unstable mountainside.

It's a lot of work for a few moments of splendor, but that's how it goes when you're hunting the big cats.

'Snow Leopard of Afghanistan'
Where: National Geographic Wild
When: 8 p.m. Sunday


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-big-cat-week-20121208,0,2814553.story
Edited by dad1153 - 12/8/12 at 6:57am
post #83817 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

Have they ever released data on what kinds of commercials are most often watched, and which ones are most often skipped? I cannot believe Advertisers would be willing to put good money after bad realizing their ads are just going to be skipped (And I'm sure we all know what kinds of ads send people reaching for that "Fast-Forward" Button!). mad.gif
Ad agencies and PR firms spend oodles of cash researching this. Don't expect results to be released as it's proprietary information. All kinds of audience testing can and is done on television commercials. It's up to the advertiser as to how much more he or she is willing to spend to perform that research and have a commercial that's crafted accordingly.

There's also a price for positioning, though agencies that put the most money on a network's books can pretty much demand positions.

So, if you see a forgettable ad in the middle of a cluster, it probably belongs to an advertiser who didn't quite have the budget as the client who was first in or last out (local ads notwithstanding as that's a whole different ballgame).

And if you want to know another dirty little secret, those same clients spend more cash with PR firms for placement on television talkies and media features. Most of the "experts" you see on cable news or network morning shows get there courtesy of the PR firm they or their employer hired. The big People of the Year lists from the News magazines are less about research into the people who should be on it and more jockeying by PR firms to get their clients on the list. Same goes for Presidential awards the the like. If I told you what a certain charity spent in a bid to get its CEO a Nobel Prize, you'd be visibly sick.

But I digress..
post #83818 of 93675
TV Review
Have yourself a merry little 12 Disasters of Christmas
By Ed Bark, UncleBarky.com - Dec. 6, 2012

There's nothing particularly wrong with a cloying, gooey made-for-TV Christmas movie.

'Tis the season after all.

After a while, though, tolerance levels can be exceeded by the likes of ABC's Christmas with Holly, ABC Family's The Mistle-tones, Lifetime's Finding Mrs. Claus and Hallmark's Matchmaker Santa. To name just a very few of the new ones this season.

So if you're in the mood for a palate-cleanser in reverse, you could do worse than -- drumbeat optional -- Syfy's 12 Disasters of Christmas. Loopily entertaining and biblically proportioned, it premieres on Saturday, Dec. 8th at 8 p.m. (central).

Don't expect any holly jolly. In the early minutes of 12 Disasters, good ol' grandma is impaled by a giant lethal "ice spear" from above before an inflatable Santa Claus and Frosty are also taken out. But before her demise, granny gives granddaughter Jacey (Magda Aponowicz) one of five golden rings she'll needed to avert the end of the world.

Jacey's bearded dad is Joseph (Ed Quinn looking like a young James Brolin) and her mother is Mary (Holly Elissa). Throw in an asthmatic kid brother named Peter (Ryan Grantham) and it's modern day New Testament time in a little town called Calvary.

12 Days also includes a weak-kneed betraying mayor named Jude (Andrew Airlie) and Kane the nefarious, family business-killing "warehouse store" magnate (an all-sneer performance by Roark Critchlow).

A basically no-name cast fits right in with the mostly cheesy special effects. But there's a little pulling power, too, with Joseph and Jacey in a desperate search for the remaining hidden rings after finally buying into the apocalyptic visions of an old coot named Grant (Donnelly Rhodes).

"So you're saying two turtles doves and 12 drummers drumming is the end of the world?" Joseph asks with a straight face that must have required multiple takes even on a limited budget.

"That's exactly right," he's told. And it's all according to an ancient Mayan doomsday prophecy scheduled to come true on 12-21-12.

The movie also will treat viewers with visions of a Santa and his sleigh going airborne via a giant funnel cloud. And you won't want to miss one of the main characters getting electrocuted and then vaporized by a string of outdoor Christmas lights. There's no plague of fruit cakes, though.

12 Days probably won't be sponsored by Hallmark cards or Kay Jewelers. It doesn't like seem like a very good fit for either of those two. But a commercial for a Time-Life collection of heavy metal hits might be right in sync.

Not to spoil too much, but we're en route to a happy holiday ending after various characters get their eggs nogged. Viewers who have had their fills of prototypical Christmas movie cheer might want to get into the proper Syfy spirit by priming themselves with their favorite spirits.

That way, the holiday red water running from the kitchen faucet might go down a little easier.

GRADE: C+

http://unclebarky.com/reviews_files/f164c401e8c993dff32034b5f7c452b0-1465.html
post #83819 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

How can that be? Are they remastering those first several seasons which, if I remember correctly, were broadcast in FOX's widescreen 480p...? It looked pretty good (especially close-ups) relative to most everything else on TV at the time, but it sure wasn't HD.
You're confusing the broadcast format with the production format. Lot's of shows were created in HD, but shown in SD during the ramp-up to HD broadcasting. Further, it doesn't matter what the format of the network is/was - the show was mastered in one format, then a copy in the appropriate format would be provided to the network (unless they had the ability to convert the program themselves).

Another example would be "Lost", which was mastered in 1080p, but broadcast in 720p.
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

If you're suggesting that the provider can a) detect FF usage, and b) tell the difference between using FF during the commercials rather than during the program itself, you are mistaken.
I'm afraid it's you who is mistaken.

TiVo knows second by second what you're doing with their DVRs, even if you turn off suggestions.

For example, they know which commercials people rewatch or skip during the Super Bowl and even knew exactly how many of their users jumped back to rewatch "nipple-gate". Another related story here: http://news.cnet.com/2100-1041_3-5154219.html

From the second article:
Quote:
So what information does TiVo collect about its viewers? The company can indeed tell what has been watched on a particular TiVo box, down to the second, including the number of times a moment was rewound and played again, or a commercial was skipped.

The information is transmitted back to TiVo headquarters in Alviso, Calif., via the same phone line used to download show schedules to the DVR inside a home. The information itself is used to automatically suggest which shows a viewer would like, based on previous selections.

This ability is why they've been able to put a "press thumbs up to record" indicator over promotional spots for shows. It allows you to set up a series pass for a show just by pressing one button during the promotional spot.

Now, some of the cable DVRs might not have quite that much information, but they still know when you fast forward (and how far you were into a show when you did) since they need to have that kind of control to limit those functions during PPV and paid On Demand programming.

These boxes are computers, and like Google, your ISP or even your browser, they track everything you do.
post #83820 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Selden Ball View Post

My (perhaps mistaken) understanding was that the people providing viewing information to Nielsen are provided with special DVRs. Do you have information which would contradict this? With a specially programmed DVR, they could collect any of that information. My personal experience with them was when they still collected information by way of a hand-written paper-based log. I wasn't involved for very long, though. I don't think they liked the detailed entries I provided when I was channel surfing wink.gif

Have they ever released data on what kinds of commercials are most often watched, and which ones are most often skipped? I cannot believe Advertisers would be willing to put good money after bad realizing their ads are just going to be skipped (And I'm sure we all know what kinds of ads send people reaching for that "Fast-Forward" Button!). mad.gif

After the Janet Jackson "wardrobe malfunction" during the 2003 Super Bowl, TiVo said how many uses rewatched that specific piece of video and the highest number of times it was replayed. That ain't Nelsen.
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