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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2795

post #83821 of 93699
FRIDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #83822 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

After the Janet Jackson "wardrobe malfunction" during the 2003 Super Bowl, TiVo said how many uses rewatched that specific piece of video and the highest number of times it was replayed. That ain't Nelsen.
No, if it were Nelson, it would go something like:

"You showed a nipple - Haw! Haw!..."

wink.gif
post #83823 of 93699
TV Review
For Bo Jackson, playing was enough
A documentary explores the life and phenomenal but brief sports career of Bo Jackson.
By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times - Dec. 7, 2012

We're lucky if we have the gift to do one thing well in this life. Even most superheroes just get a single superpower. ("Wait — you're faster than a speeding bullet and you're more powerful than a locomotive? How is that fair?")

So there is something about the multiple-graced — the physicist with the body of a supermodel or the wrestler who writes award-winning poetry — that can seem most unnatural.

But inspirational as well: "You Don't Know Bo: The Legend of Bo Jackson," the final film in the second of ESPN's "30 for 30" series of sports films, tells the story of Bo Jackson, who in the late 1980s and early 1990s simultaneously played football for the Los Angeles Raiders and baseball for the Kansas City Royals. And while this is remarkable in itself — it left no time to train for either sport, for one thing — there was something in the very way he moved that set him apart from his peers.

PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times

Coaches, teammates and sportswriters speak of him in mythological terms. He is compared to Paul Bunyan, described as "something out of Homer," or someone who came "from outer space to play for the Royals." As with Hercules or Superman, there were stories of great physical feats done in his youth.

Such was the depth and the beauty of his play, we are told, that even when he struck out it was worth watching. "He did something every day that you had not seen before," relates one of his former coaches.

But there was a moral element to his heroism, as well. He turned down a quarter-million dollars from the New York Yankees to join the team straight out of high school because he wanted to go to college. And he turned down winning Alabama head coach Bear Bryant — "neighbors would come and look at the phone" that Bryant had called him on, Jackson remembers — because underdog rival Auburn would allow him to play sooner.

And he spurned football out of college just to invalidate his draft pick by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, whom he felt had tricked him out of his amateur status to keep him from playing baseball, and became a baseball player instead. In football, we see him continuing a 91-yard touchdown run clean out of the stadium because he was moving too fast to stop; we see him leap right over a mountain of players to score.

In baseball, he makes a catch, runs up the wall and takes a perpendicular walk before coming down. His hits were of unparalleled distance, his throws of fantastic speed and accuracy. He sailed through the air to make catches.

Director Michael Bonfiglio makes it easy to appreciate these moments; it's hard not to choke up sometimes, watching Jackson at work — or perhaps "play" is the better word, and one not applicable to every athlete. He was famous — everyone alive then remembers the "Bo Knows" campaign that helped Nike beat Reebok, though I do not remember the NBC cartoon "ProStars," in which a cartoon Jackson fought crime alongside Wayne Gretzky and Michael Jordan — but fame does not seem to have mattered to him particularly.

Jackson, as legends do, burned brightly but briefly, his seemingly effortless progress stopped by injury: a tackle that popped his hip out of its joint, and led finally to a hip replacement. He returned to play a few more seasons of baseball, hitting a home run his first time back at bat.

But though he had the old strength, he no longer had the speed. He ended his career at 32 with a minimum of fuss; he woke up one morning, he recalls, and said, "I'm going to retire this afternoon."

The epitaph he wants for his gravestone is "Here lies a ballplayer." Jackson is in neither the baseball nor the football Hall of Fame, he is remembered as something more than a mere player — one of those great gifted beings who are given for a time to walk among us and make the world seem more marvelous.


'30 for 30: Bo Jackson'
Where/When: 6 p.m. Saturday on ESPN; 9 p.m. Saturday on ESPN 2


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-bo-jackson-documentary-review-20121208,0,6666936.story
post #83824 of 93699
Quote:
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

If you're suggesting that the provider can a) detect FF usage, and b) tell the difference between using FF during the commercials rather than during the program itself, you are mistaken.
I'm afraid it's you who is mistaken.

TiVo knows second by second what you're doing with their DVRs, even if you turn off suggestions.

For example, they know which commercials people rewatch or skip during the Super Bowl and even knew exactly how many of their users jumped back to rewatch "nipple-gate". Another related story here: http://news.cnet.com/2100-1041_3-5154219.html

Not being familiar with the technology TiVo uses, I will withhold judgement. But the ability for a product with far under 5% marketplace penetration to report commercial viewing hardly supports the author's contention that commercial skipping is decreasing. And quickly skimming through the Cox (my vendor) privacy statement, I see nothing that would allow that sort of information gathering.

[BTW, does TiVo allow manual programming of the DVR? If so, how would it deal with that sort of information?]
post #83825 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

And quickly skimming through the Cox (my vendor) privacy statement, I see nothing that would allow that sort of information gathering.

From Cox Cable's website dated June, 2012:
Quote:
We may share certain data, including personal information, with service providers, vendors, marketing agencies and services, data management and analytics services, affiliates, and contract workers. We may also share certain data, including personal information, with Cox. Additionally, we may store certain data, including personal information, on servers located at third-party data centers. In addition, we may obtain data, including personal information, from outside sources.

And I'm sure "certain data" can be implied to mean anything they want it to mean. You sign up with a cable company and I guarantee you, they have all their bases covered.
post #83826 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

You're confusing the broadcast format with the production format. Lot's of shows were created in HD, but shown in SD during the ramp-up to HD broadcasting. Further, it doesn't matter what the format of the network is/was - the show was mastered in one format, then a copy in the appropriate format would be provided to the network (unless they had the ability to convert the program themselves).

As far as I know, FOX didn't film '24' (or 'Firefly' either for that matter) in HD. They filmed it in 480p and that's what they broadcast it in. Or maybe they filmed it in widescreen 480i and doubled the frame rate to get 480p. Stalwart AVS contributor foxeng might be able to tell us for sure....
post #83827 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

As far as I know, FOX didn't film '24' (or 'Firefly' either for that matter) in HD. They filmed it in 480p and that's what they broadcast it in. Or maybe they filmed it in widescreen 480i and doubled the frame rate to get 480p. Stalwart AVS contributor foxeng might be able to tell us for sure....
IMDB lists only the following for format:
Quote:
Cinematographic process
D5 (1080p/24) (master format)
Super 35 (3-perf) (source format)

Printed film format
Video (HDTV)

Aspect ratio
1.78 : 1

No mention of SD or widescreen SD.

While IMDB isn't always right, I'll take their information over your guess.
post #83828 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

IMDB lists only the following for format:
No mention of SD or widescreen SD.
While IMDB isn't always right, I'll take their information over your guess.

Are you sure that what format they finished shooting the show at was also what they began shooting the show at? '24' was on the air for a long time and spanned the period from before widespread HD adoption to when it was commonplace. Many TV shows went from 35mm (and 16mm) to HD video. Few of those early filmed series got telecined into HD because there was virtually no HDTV at the time.
post #83829 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Are you sure that what format they finished shooting the show at was also what they began shooting the show at? '24' was on the air for a long time and spanned the period from before widespread HD adoption to when it was commonplace. Many TV shows went from 35mm (and 16mm) to HD video. Few of those early filmed series got telecined into HD because there was virtually no HDTV at the time.
According to Wikipedia, the show aired in 1080i on Sky TV. Nothing I can find says it didn't air that way from the beginning. So, it seems logical it was being finished in 1080p, but simply airing in "Faux Vision" here in the US until Fox went to HD.

The production company likely wanted to ensure best syndication potential later by mastering in HD from the start.

For what it's worth, though, I just looked and the original season one DVD set was anamorphic 16x9.

Finally, don't forget that NYPD Blue (another Fox studios production) went HD in 2001 (the same year 24 started) and E.R. went HD in 2000.
post #83830 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

[BTW, does TiVo allow manual programming of the DVR? If so, how would it deal with that sort of information?]
You mean manual like programming a VCR for date, time, and channel? Yes, you can. It will still attempt to show a title for the block of time you recorded based on its program guide data, though.
post #83831 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

And quickly skimming through the Cox (my vendor) privacy statement, I see nothing that would allow that sort of information gathering.

From Cox Cable's website dated June, 2012:
Quote:
We may share certain data, including personal information, with service providers, vendors, marketing agencies and services, data management and analytics services, affiliates, and contract workers. We may also share certain data, including personal information, with Cox. Additionally, we may store certain data, including personal information, on servers located at third-party data centers. In addition, we may obtain data, including personal information, from outside sources.

And I'm sure "certain data" can be implied to mean anything they want it to mean. You sign up with a cable company and I guarantee you, they have all their bases covered.

Under "What Information We Gather":

"Cable Television Services – New cable set top box tools allow tracking of tuner selections made through your box. We treat this information as anonymous and confidential and will not disclose it without your consent. We sometimes combine anonymous and aggregate tuner information with additional demographic information and may use or share it with others for programming, marketing, advertising and similar purposes"

No mention of what recordings are watched, or what commercials are skipped.
post #83832 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by ToddR View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

[BTW, does TiVo allow manual programming of the DVR? If so, how would it deal with that sort of information?]
You mean manual like programming a VCR for date, time, and channel? Yes, you can. It will still attempt to show a title for the block of time you recorded based on its program guide data, though.

If I manually recorded CBS from 7:30pm until 11:30pm, what show title would it attempt to show?
post #83833 of 93699
Nielsen Overnights
‘Dateline’ Up, ‘Blue Bloods’ & ‘Last Man Standing’ Down, ‘Fringe’ Steady
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Dec. 8, 2012

With the exception of a repeat of last week’s SNL Christmas (1.5/5) special, Friday night was light on holiday fare. At 10 PM, CBS‘ police family drama Blue Bloods (1.4/4) was down a tenth from last week but was the most watched show of the night with 11.073 million viewers. CBS also had the second and third most watched shows of the night with 9 PM’s CSI:NY (1.5/5) pulling in 9.975 million and 8 PM’s Undercover Boss (1.6/6) getting 7.939 million. CSI:NY was down from its November 30 1.5/4 rating. Undercover Boss slipped two tenths from last week’s 1.8/6, down 11% week to week. NBC’s Dateline NBC (1.7/5) was up 55% in the 18-49 demographic over last week’s 1.1/3. With 9.663 million watching on average, CBS won Friday night in terms of total viewers while NBC was tops in the 18-49.

Over on ABC, Last Man Standing (1.4/5) was down 13% from last week. The network’s other Friday comedy, Malibu Country (1.4/5) slipped 7% from November 30. The comedies improved the hour 40% for ABC among the 18-49 compared to the same night in 2011. Like last week, ABC’s 9PM had a Shark Tank (1.5/4) repeat. At 10 PM, The Holidays Unplugged 20/20 (1.3/4) was down fourth tenths from last week’s 1.7/5. In its closing 13 episode run, Fox’s Fringe (0.9/3) was flat with its last original show back on November 16, as was Kitchen Nightmares (1.2/4). The CW’s Nikita (0.4/1) was steady with last week’s season high. At 9 PM, the CW ran a repeat of The Arrow (0.2/1).

http://www.deadline.com/2012/12/ratings-rat-race-dateline-up-fringe-steady-last-man-standing-blue-bloods-down/
post #83834 of 93699
TV Sports
N.H.L. Void Has Networks Scrambling
By Michelin Maynard, The New York Times - Dec. 9, 2012

DETROIT — Usually at this time of year, hockey fans would plant themselves in front of their televisions and watch players like Sidney Crosby, Alexander Ovechkin and Marian Hossa command the ice.

Instead, they have been reminded that Ken Dryden was tall, Guy Lafleur had a side part, and the boards in arenas once bore only team logos.

For more than two months, as the lockout dragged on, sports channels that usually show N.H.L. games have had to scramble to fill their lineups. Sports network officials say audiences are a fraction of what they would typically expect, although die-hard fans are sticking around for the substitutes.

“It’s frustrating,” said Greg Hammaren, the senior vice president and general manager of FoxSports Detroit, the television home of the Red Wings.

In Michigan, the average Red Wings game is viewed in more than 100,000 households. Hammaren said about 65,000 of them are in the metropolitan Detroit area, which has earned the nickname Hockeytown.

To fill the vacancies left by canceled games, FoxSports Detroit has shifted telecasts of the Pistons from its high-definition channel to the main FoxSports channel.

It is also planning to run more college hockey games, and it is talking with the Red Wings about showing games played by the Grand Rapids Griffins, the American Hockey League team owned by the N.H.L. club.

“People want live hockey again,” Hammaren said.

FoxSports is leaning on its video library of past Red Wings games and those played by the Detroit Tigers. During the summer, Tigers telecasts are the highest-rated in Major League Baseball, according to FoxSports Detroit, often drawing the most viewers of any program on local TV. Hammaren said the video archive offered endless possibilities.

“If you’re an anti-Yankees fan, an anti-Red Sox fan, we can show those,” he said, referring to games in which the Tigers beat them. Of Justin Verlander, the Tigers’ pitching ace, Hammaren said, “If you want to see all the Verlander games, I can program a month of those.”

Another market that is showing classic games is Chicago. Broadcasts of previous Blackhawks games have generated e-mails from some grateful fans, said Phil Bedella, the vice president and general manager of Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

“A lot of people send us messages saying: ‘Thank you. I’ve been telling my kids what Bobby Hull was like, what Stan Mikita was like, and now they can see them,’ ” Bedella said.

But, he added, “I’d like to be doing classic games as well as Blackhawks games.”

The situation is especially frustrating because the hockey audience swelled the last two years, since the Blackhawks won the 2010 Stanley Cup.

Comcast SportsNet Chicago, which reaches Iowa, southern Wisconsin, most of Indiana and nearly all of Illinois, brings in 110,000 households in Chicago for each game and 135,000 over all, according to the network’s statistics.

The network plans to show the Hockey City Classic, a four-team college tournament in February at Soldier Field. But in Chicago, college hockey cannot compete with the Blackhawks, who have official bars across the city, a lively social media effort and extensive fan-related events.

“We just really want them back,” Bedella said, adding that hockey to Blackhawks fans was like a religion.

He has a multitude of options in the future, however, because the network carries the Bulls, the White Sox and the Cubs as well as the Blackhawks. One plan, should the N.H.L. cancel the season, is to run “a more robust spring training schedule,” he said.

Currently, Comcast SportsNet Chicago plans to show five White Sox preseason games and three Cub games, but those numbers could easily be increased.

So far, Bedella said, the Blackhawks’ major advertisers have kept with the amended schedule, and he expects they will return when play resumes, whether this winter or next fall.

But he lost advertisers who place one-time spots throughout the season, according to their needs. He cannot blame them for leaving.

“It’s the holidays, and the ads have to run,” Bedella said.

The audience numbers in Detroit and Chicago pale in comparison with those in Canada, where Saturday night broadcasts are a national tradition.

“Hockey Night in Canada” typically attracts two million viewers for telecasts in eastern Canada and a million for games in western Canada, said Chuck Thompson, a spokesman for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

Like American stations, the CBC has shown vintage telecasts. Until last weekend, it ran a contest called Your Pick, in which fans voted for the classic games they wanted to view.

But instead of a Saturday night game, the network showed the animated movie “Up,” which kicked off the CBC’s holiday programming.

Thompson said nonhockey programming would be shown until it was clear whether a settlement would be reached. The CBC has contingency plans for 2013, and was pleased with the Your Pick contest, which attracted about 250,000 to 300,000 viewers a game. “It was modest, but it was where we expected them to come in,” Thompson said. (“Up” drew nearly 600,000 viewers.)

If only some of those viewers would drop into the Souper Bowl in Pittsburgh. The bar sits opposite Consol Energy Center, the home of the Penguins. Its motto is “The Place to Be for Happy Hour and Pens Games,” and its mascot is a penguin chugging a beer.

“We’re struggling quite a bit,” said Jess Satavy, a bar manager.

Before a game, 500 people would pack the two-story bar, making it tough to get a seat, and others stuck around to watch broadcasts. The bar would be open until 2 a.m. for postgame stragglers.

Now, unless there is an event across the street, “we close up when the happy hour crowd leaves,” Satavy said. The doors are usually shut by 9 p.m. The bar counts on revenue from hockey season to carry it through the summer, meaning 2013 will be tough unless games return. Satavy said she was not expecting a hockey season.

“We’ve gotten our hopes up so many times that at this point, we’re pessimistic,” Satavy said. “We don’t want to be disappointed again.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/09/sports/hockey/tv-networks-scramble-to-fill-nhl-void.html?ref=media&_r=0
post #83835 of 93699
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET)

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos
8PM - Disney Prop & Landing (Special)
(R - Dec. 8, 2009)
8:30PM - Prep & Landing: Naughty vs. Nice (Special)
(R - Dec. 5, 2011)
9PM - Movie: Christmas With Holly (2012)

CBS:
7PM - 60 Minutes
8PM - The Amazing Race (Season Finale, 120 min.)
10PM - The Mentalist

NBC:
7PM - Football Night in America (80 min., LIVE)
8:20PM - NFL Football: Detroit Lions and Green Bay Packers (LIVE)

FOX:
7PM - NFL Football: Regional Action (continued from 4:25PM, LIVE)
7:30PM - The OT (LIVE)
8PM - The Simpsons
8:30PM - Bob's Burgers
9PM - Family Guy
9:30PM - America's Dad

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Christmas at St. Olaf: Rejoice, Give Thanks, and Sing (R - Dec. 20)
9PM - Masterpiece Classic: Downton Abbey
(R - Jan. 15)
10PM - Masterpiece Classic: Downton Abbey
(R - Jan. 22)

UNIVISION:
7PM - Aquí y Ahora
8PM - La Rosa de Guadalupe: El Club de las Flores
9PM - Feliz Navidad con Los Nuestros, Tony Bennett y Sus Amigos (Special)
10PM - Sal y Pimienta

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie: Rescue Dawn (2006)
9PM - Movie: Babylon A.D. (2008)

Edited by dad1153 - 12/9/12 at 10:32am
post #83836 of 93699
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Dec. 9, 2012

THE SIMPSONS
Fox, 8:00 p.m. ET

Portlandia fans, take special note: On tonight’s new episode, Homer and Marge get some new neighbors. They’re from Portland, and they’re aggressively trendy – and their voices are provided by Portlandia stars Fred Armisen and Carrie Brownstein. What could be better? Well, how’s this? Their son is played, vocally, by Patton Oswalt – who already demonstrated his animated voice-work chops by starring as Remy the culinary rat in Ratatouille.

MIRACLE ON 34TH STREET
AMC, 8:00 p.m. ET

In honor of the holidays, AMC is showing this classic 1947 movie, starring Edmund Gwenn as an Oscar-worthy department-store Santa, at 8 p.m. ET tonight. And again tomorrow night. And Tuesday. And Wednesday. And Thursday. In TV terms, I guess, it’s the gift that keeps on giving. Maureen O’Hara and a very young Natalie Wood co-star.

WARGAMES
Sundance, 8:00 p.m. ET

With so many Sunday night series already shut down for the holidays, there’s time to look around and see what else is on – including this 1983 thriller, made at the beginning of the home-computer era. That’s evidenced easy by the bright-type-on-dark-screen prompts, the high-pitched modem sounds, and the “war room” graphics that are charmingly basic – if not BASIC. Next year, WarGames will be 30 years old, but the story itself has aged very well. So has star Matthew Broderick, it should be pointed out.

DEXTER
Showtime, 9:00 p.m. ET

It sure looks like love: Dexter (Michael C. Hall) has shown a protective streak towards Yvonne Strahovski’s Hannah. He’s resisted the request by his sister Debra (Jennifer Carpenter) to kill Hannah for her string of past murders, slept with her (Hannah, not Debra, though this season even that was a possibility), and, last week, made sure Hannah’s father wouldn’t be able to blackmail her. But this week, information from the father ends up in Debra’s hands, which makes Dexter’s love life, and family life, even more complicated. Especially at Christmas…

HOMELAND
Showtime, 10:00 p.m. ET

Last week, Carrie (Claire Danes) was captured by Abu Nazir (Navid Negahban) – something else she now has in common with Brody (Damian Lewis), besides having a somewhat tenuous grip on both reality and morality. She was released, but rather than running to safety, she ran back into the lion’s den, looking for Nazir herself. Crazy? Well, she was given that diagnosis last season…


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #83837 of 93699
TV Notes
What TV Showrunners’ Cameos Say About Their Shows
By Matt Zoller Seitz, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Dec. 8, 2012

When it came time for someone to be handed the grossest scene in Sons of Anarchy’s season finale this Tuesday, the show’s creator, Kurt Sutter, stepped into the spotlight: His character, the deranged biker Otto, who has been in prison for three seasons, bit off his own tongue to avoid having to testify in an ongoing racketeering investigation. This moment one-upped another of Sutter’s thespian showstoppers, in which Otto masturbated in a prison infirmary bed while biker mama Tara (Maggie Siff) held his head, her wrist scented with the favorite perfume of Otto's murdered wife. That Sutter would cast himself as arguably the most extreme character on an already extreme show is a testament to his perverse sense of humor. But it's also part of a TV tradition.

Like film directors before them, showrunners have been known to cast themselves in cameos or recurring roles that seem to tease out themes, answer criticisms, or sum up the show as a whole. Herewith, a list of seven other notable TV auteurs who have popped out of the writers room to step in front of the camera, and what their winking appearance might have meant. (Note: This excludes series in which writers regularly moonlight as actors, such as The Office, and the likes of I Love Lucy and Curb Your Enthusiasm, in which the showrunner or executive producer also plays the main character.)

David Chase, The Sopranos
The creator of HBO's Sopranos appears in the season two episode "Commendatori," in which Tony and his crew visit Italy on business. Hitman Paulie Walnuts (Tony Sirico) visits a waterfront café, reveling in the atmosphere. He glances at a nearby table of men drinking espresso, makes eye contact with one of them (Chase), and says the episode's title, a running gag in this installment. The man just stares. "Buongiorno", Paulie says cheerfully, raising his cup. The man turns away without uttering a syllable, and Paulie is so offended and uncomfortable that he gets up and leaves, a scene that expresses how the Garden State gangsters feel insufficiently Italian in their mother country. It may also be a response to season one complaints by Italian-American anti-defamation activists that Chase was (a) giving Italian-Americans a bad name and (b) was not Italian enough to be making a show about Italian-Americans, since his family's surname was DeCesare until his parents changed it. But it’s hard to hang labels on this moment because here, as elsewhere on The Sopranos, Chase doesn’t spell things out.

Winnie Holzman, My So-Called Life
The creator and head writer of ABC's My So-Called Life played the recurring role of Cathy Kryzanowski, the guidance counselor who tries to help the heroine's best friend Rayanne (A.J. Langer), and substitute teaches an English class. It's perfect that she'd cast herself as a compassionate but professionally detached authority figure surrounded by young people who were still finding themselves, since that was the position she occupied on the set of a high school drama cast with teen and twentysomething actors. Holzman acted in other shows she produced or helped write, including thirtysomething (as Sherry Eisen) and Once and Again (as Shelley).

Carl Reiner, The Dick Van Dyke Show
The creator of CBS's The Dick Van Dyke Show also played the star of the fictional The Alan Brady Show, where Van Dyke's Rob Petrie worked as a TV writer. Brady was initially photographed only from the back, but we started to see his face around season four. He was egotistical and hot-tempered, and many jokes were made about his toupee. It's the perfect self-deprecating role for a man running a sitcom that poked fun at the insecurities of showbiz types. Scene-stealing came naturally to Reiner; before transitioning to writing and producing, he performed in Broadway musicals and wrote and acted in Your Show of Shows and other sketch comedy programs.

Ron Moore, Battlestar Galactica
The showrunner of SyFy's acclaimed Battlestar reboot gave himself a cameo in the show's final episode. He plays an anonymous man reading an issue of National Geographic that contains a story about the discovery of the bones of Helo and Athena's child, Hera. Among other things, the moment is a sly comment on the physical realism and sociological detail that Moore brought to the science fiction drama. National Geographic aims to make distant events and foreign cultures accessible to English-speaking Westerners who may not know much about the subjects going in. It’s a publication about things that are happening right now, or that happened a long time ago and can be verified. (The clip below is in Spanish, but Moore pops up at 5:38.)

Dan Harmon, Community
The recently ousted creator of NBC's meta-sitcom has a sort-of cameo in the season two episode "For a Few Paintballs More." He's the guy on the Greendale Community College poster that promises, "You're Already Accepted!" Given Community's densely layered pop culture allusions, it’s fitting that Harmon would make a cameo that amounts to a DVD Easter egg, posing in a still image that makes him the literal poster boy for the school's low academic expectations.

David Simon, The Corner and The Wire
Writer-producer David Simon eased out of daily journalism and into TV writing in the early nineties via NBC's Homicide: Life on the Street, a drama set in Baltimore, where he was a crime reporter for the Baltimore Sun. Simon has cameos in two of his HBO projects; both are connected to his pre-television career. In the six-part miniseries The Corner, based on Simon's book about the effects of drugs on a Baltimore neighborhood, he appears in episode four as a cop. In the second season of The Wire, he's one of the reporters shouting questions at corrupt labor leader Frank Sobotka (Chris Bauer). In the drama's fifth and final season, which is set partly at the Sun, Simon has a cameo as a reporter — presumably the same one yelling at Sobotka.

Matt Groening, The Simpsons and Futurama
Former cartoonist Groening has made many cameos in his series The Simpsons and Futurama, as himself and as caricatures of himself. On The Simpsons, he's been: a courtroom sketch artist in season five's "The Boy Who Knew Too Much"; trapped by Comic Book guy's supervillain the Collector in "Treehouse of Horror X"; and revealed as the puppetmaster manipulating the family in the opening couch gag of season thirteen's "Blame It on Lisa." On Futurama, Groening has made repeated appearances as a severed head in a tank filled with life-preserving fluids. These cameos are Groening’s version of cartoonist Al Hirschfeld hiding his daughter Nina’s name in his drawings and Alfred Hitchcock making self-conscious yet self-deprecating cameos in his films. Like the shows’ other ongoing in-jokes, they turn a pop culture reference into a game that stretches out over decades.

[CLICK LINK BELOW FOR YOUTUBE CLIPS OF THESE SHOWRUNNER CAMEOS]

http://www.vulture.com/2012/12/what-tv-showrunners-cameos-say-about-their-shows.html
post #83838 of 93699
TV Notes
Andrew Dice Clay Showtime Special Premiering New Year's Eve
By Matt Zoller Seitz, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Dec. 8, 2012

For anyone still looking for a New Year's Eve date, Andrew Dice Clay is still available.

The comedian, last seen on TV during a stint on HBO's Entourage, recently taped a stand-up special for Showtime -- and the network announced Friday that it will premiere Monday, Dec. 31, at 10 p.m.

“My filth is derived from watching people, whether it be behind a bedroom door or on a New York City subway,” said Clay. “At the end of the day, it’s comedy, it's what I do. If I really did just one-quarter of what I say on stage, I’d be doing 25 to life."

Indestructible marks Clay's first televised stand-up special in 17 years. It was taped in August at Chicago's Arcada Theatre. It was produced by LOL Comedy Inc. in association with DRO Entertainment and Brave Lion.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/andrew-dice-clay-showtime-special-399498
post #83839 of 93699
Business Sports
IATSE OKs Strike Against Fledgling Pac-12 Network
By Todd Cunningham, TheWrap.com - Dec. 8, 2012

IATSE has authorized a strike against the fledgling Pac-12 network, which it called an unfair employer because of its use of non-union employees at college sports broadcasts.

The union announced just after midnight that it would be set up pickets Saturday at several of the conferences men’s basketball games, including contests involving USC, Arizona State, Oregon State, Oregon and Washington.

Since going on the air in September, and operating under IATSE’s jurisdiction, the network has used non-union employees during its broadcasts of Pac-12 conference sporting events, the union said in a statement.

Calls to the network by TheWrap early Saturday morning were not returned.

The aim of the strike is to establish area standard wages and benefits for daily hire technical employees of the PAC 12 Network working on live sporting events, the union said.

Matt Loeb, president of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, said that his group declared the network an unfair employer and authorized the strike after polling the executive board.

“These folks go above and beyond to guarantee the viewers the experience they deserve, and these workers deserve the dignity of a contract that secures their interests in return," he said in a statement.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/iatse-oks-strike-against-fledgling-pac-12-network-68476
post #83840 of 93699
Obituary
Elisabeth Murdoch, Matriarch of a Journalism Family, Dies at 103
By Robert D. McFadden, The New York Times

Dame Elisabeth Murdoch, the 103-year-old mother of the media tycoon Rupert Murdoch, the widow of an Australian newspaper baron and one of her nation’s most noted philanthropists, died on Wednesday at her estate near Melbourne.

Mr. Murdoch announced her death.

Elisabeth Joy Greene was just a teenager, a shy, obedient girl of privilege, rail thin and fashionably coiffed (though not long out of pigtails), when she was introduced to Keith Murdoch in 1927. He was 42, already a wealthy, famous and worldly newspaperman destined to become one of Australia’s foremost publishers. He had seen her debutante picture in a society magazine and had come courting.

Months later, in June 1928, they were married. She was 19. As a wedding present he gave her a sprawling estate at Langwarrin, near Australia’s southeast coast. They called it Cruden Farm, after the ancestral parish of his Scottish forebears, and it became the seat of Murdoch family life for generations.

There, while her husband amassed a newspaper and radio empire in Melbourne, Adelaide and Brisbane and became a political power broker, she gave birth to her four children: Helen in 1929, Rupert in 1931, Anne in 1936 and Janet in 1939.

She reared them with what she called “loving discipline,” to discourage materialism, especially in the headstrong Rupert. She sent him for eight years to Geelong Grammar, a boarding school near Melbourne that imposed a military regimen and canings. He was bullied and teased and became decidedly unhappy, but his mother was firm.

“I was never indulgent with them because my husband was inclined to be a bit indulgent, so I had to swing the other way,” she told Frances Jones last year. “They all grew up to appreciate my attitude about material things.”

She was also alert to her husband’s self-indulgences. During the Depression, when the Murdochs hired men desperate for work to build stables and other outbuildings at the farm, she was aghast when her husband drove up one day in a Rolls-Royce. She ordered him to return it.

And she herself was frugal. For decades, according to The Australian, a national broadsheet, she refused to have heating in the house, resisted hairdressers and one year gave up a trip abroad to pay for a pool in the garden. The newspaper said she preferred to spend money on the garden rather than herself.

Dame Elisabeth, who was styled Lady Elisabeth when her husband was knighted in 1933 and Dame Elisabeth when she was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1963, said her philanthropies were inspired by Sir Keith, a trustee of national museums and galleries. He died in 1952.

Although much of her husband’s wealth went for taxes, she inherited shares in his media company, News Limited, and its subsidiaries; a Melbourne magazine, and a newspaper in New South Wales. The Adelaide News and Sunday Mail went to her son, and became the foundations of his international media empire.

Dame Elisabeth gave millions to more than a hundred charities. Her beneficiaries included deaf children, epileptics, victims of mental illness and substance abuse, prison inmates and Melbourne institutions. These included the Royal Children’s Hospital, of which she was president from 1954 to 1965, the Australian Ballet and the Royal Botanic Gardens. Last year she greeted Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, at ceremonies to dedicate new facilities at the hospital.

At Cruden Farm, she developed a magnificent garden, with a lake and vistas of woodlands, lawns and beds of roses, irises and honeysuckles. Rows of lemon-scented eucalyptus lined the long, winding driveway like sentries. The garden became a centerpiece of her life — she worked on it for more than 80 years — and a treasure of landscape architecture, which she opened to the public.

In a life that spanned a century, Dame Elisabeth met and entertained royalty, prime ministers and presidents and many world leaders in business, entertainment and other fields. The house at Cruden Farm was comfortable, if not imposing, with white columns across the portico and an Australian flag flying from the roof. The public rooms were filled with photographs, mementos and old oak furniture.

She was a matriarch from a gentler age, speaking softly, keeping track of appointments in a small red leather diary, writing letters in her own hand, reading biographies voraciously, and each week playing bridge, calling it her secret vice. In 2009, her family and 500 guests attended her 100th birthday, and the Spanish tenor José Carreras performed eight songs.

Even after her centennial, Dame Elisabeth, alert and observant, kept up a busy schedule of meetings, charity functions and gardening chores. She got around with a walker and a wheelchair, and in the garden used an electric buggy driven by her gardener as they discussed what to trim, remove, plant or rearrange.

Elisabeth Joy Greene was born on Feb. 8, 1909, in Melbourne, the third daughter of Rupert and Marie Grace De Lancey Forth Greene. Her father was the wool expert of the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency and the son of a Scottish railway engineer who had emigrated to Australia. Her mother, descended from Scottish and English forebears, was active in society and philanthropic circles.

She attended elite schools in the Melbourne area, St. Catherine’s in Toorak and Clyde in Woodend. While still a schoolgirl, she knitted woolen shirts for babies at the Melbourne Children’s Hospital and was rewarded with a tour. There she saw victims of abuse and neglect, and she was appalled. She volunteered to work one day a week at a free kindergarten for poor children. She said these early experiences were the seeds of her philanthropies after her marriage.

Dame Elisabeth’s oldest child, Helen Handbury, died in 2004. Besides her son Rupert, she is survived by her two other daughters, Anne Kantor and Janet Calvert-Jones, as well as many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. A News Limited newspaper, The Courier-Mail of Brisbane, said she is survived by 77 direct descendants.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/business/media/dame-elisabeth-murdoch-matriarch-of-journalism-family-dies-at-103.html?ref=media
post #83841 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

As far as I know, FOX didn't film '24' (or 'Firefly' either for that matter) in HD. They filmed it in 480p and that's what they broadcast it in. Or maybe they filmed it in widescreen 480i and doubled the frame rate to get 480p. Stalwart AVS contributor foxeng might be able to tell us for sure....

You can't film in 480p, as that is a video format. Filming usually requires either 16mm or 35mm film.

Before production started to change from shooting on film, to shooting on video, scripted dramas were shot on film and edited on film. Then they were shot on film and telecined to video (analog) for editing. Ultimately going to digital editing of the telecined film.

Shooting on Super35 film, as pointed out, would be a great way to ultimately go back and retelecine the source and re-edt it as HD. Just look at what they are doing with Star Trek: The Next Generation. While it wasn't framed for 16:9, it is still HD. The super 35 source for 24 could easily have been framed for 16:9.

The main point is that no one in their right mind would shoot a show like 24 on low resolution video. I doubt that 20th Century Fox would have been that dumb.
post #83842 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

If I manually recorded CBS from 7:30pm until 11:30pm, what show title would it attempt to show?
The first show airing in that time block. I have a recurring manual record from 7pm till 12:30am every Sunday night of CBS to cover 60 Minutes, Amazing Race, Good Wife and The Mentalist. These are shows either my wife, I or both of us watch. The recording gets labeled either 60 MINUTES or NFL Football, as on CBS doubleheader weeks, football is officially scheduled till 7:30pm.
post #83843 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

Under "What Information We Gather":
"Cable Television Services – New cable set top box tools allow tracking of tuner selections made through your box. We treat this information as anonymous and confidential and will not disclose it without your consent. We sometimes combine anonymous and aggregate tuner information with additional demographic information and may use or share it with others for programming, marketing, advertising and similar purposes"
No mention of what recordings are watched, or what commercials are skipped.
Here's the thing:

If it makes you feel better thinking your cable company doesn't know everything thing you do with your box and when you do it, then more power to you. However, your personal desire to believe that doesn't change anything.

In fact, your cable company prefers your thinking.
post #83844 of 93699
post #83845 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nayan View Post

G4 to become The Esquire Channel
http://www.gameinformer.com/b/news/archive/2012/12/08/g4-to-become-the-esquire-channel.aspx
Man, I miss TechTV...

That whole deal with them killing the channel is one of several reasons I will never again subscribe to Comcast for TV service.

Now I use their internet to stream the TWIT network.
post #83846 of 93699
It's clear that the runners at The NFL Today on CBS got the message. For the second week in a row, a tragedy occurred involving NFL players, this time, two Dallas Cowboys players, one who unfortunately was killed in a car accident driven by a player who was intoxicated.

They (CBS) did away with their opening graphics and dove right into the story (plus a follow-up on the Jevon Belcher story) and some serious commentary, especially some scathing commentary from Shannon Sharpe.

They spent some 12-14 minutes on those stories.
post #83847 of 93699
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Nielsen Overnights
‘Dateline’ Up, ‘Blue Bloods’ & ‘Last Man Standing’ Down, ‘Fringe’ Steady
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Dec. 8, 2012

I dumped Last Man Standing because of the constant political junk. I also don't like the actress swap they pulled with the oldest daughter.
post #83848 of 93699
SATURDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #83849 of 93699
TV Notes
New NBC game show 'Take It All' gets six-night trial run
By Rob Owen, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette - Dec. 9, 2012

If you participate in a White Elephant gift exchange this time of year, then you'll probably be familiar with the premise of NBC's "Take It All" (9 p.m. Monday-Friday this week and 10 p.m. Dec. 17, WPXI), which gets a six-night, holiday-season trial run.

Hosted by "Deal or No Deal" star Howie Mandel, this game show features a player opening a prize worth thousands. The next contestant can steal an already opened prize or take a chance on another unopened prize, hoping it turns out to be something better.

Once only two contestants are left -- NBC's description of the show doesn't explain how eliminations work -- the players have to choose to keep the prize they have or try to take all the prizes. If both choose to keep their own, they will keep what they've won in prior rounds. If one player chooses to keep their own prize and their opponent chooses "take it all," the "take it all player" goes home with everything. If both choose "take it all," both contestants leave the show empty-handed.

"It's like poker," Mr. Mandel said in a recent teleconference. "They get a chance to face-off of each other and against each other ... it's the most surprising social experiment I've ever been part of. I thought 'Deal or No Deal' was an incredible social experience, this takes it to the next level."

Unlike in some White Elephant gift exchanges, where players bring the tackiest, gaudiest gift they can find, there are no duds in "Take It All."

"Well, the only dud, if you want to call it a dud, is you end up out," Mandel said. "The prizes are like characters in themselves. I mean, you will see things that you haven't seen on any other show. Things like hovercrafts and [submarines] and jet packs, and things like you've never seen before, so they're all amazing. I mean, I'm just as blown away as the contestants when the gifts are revealed and I go, 'Oh my, God, this is amazing. I want one,' you know?"

Mr. Mandel said hosting game shows has taught him he can never accurately judge how people will react in a high-pressure, game show environment.

"I learned that I'm fascinated with the human condition. You put people in different environments and they probably don't even know what they're going to do," he said. "They get up there and there's hundreds of thousands of dollars cash in front of them -- diamonds, boats, gifts, and real estate -- and you watch their eyes glaze over and they become a different person.

"That's true when you get into a casino, so I'm fascinated by what happens," he continued. "All I try to do as the host is just direct the traffic and hope that I keep them as clear as possible and as focused as possible, so that they can manipulate whatever plan they have of attack in the clearest possible way."

http://www.post-gazette.com/stories/ae/tv-radio/preview-new-nbc-game-show-take-it-all-gets-six-night-trial-run-665580/
post #83850 of 93699
TV Notes
Shonda Rhimes: Katherine Heigl's Emmy Slam 'Stung'
By Chris Harnick, HuffingtonPost.com - Dec. 9, 2012

Shonda Rhimes is opening up to Oprah Winfrey about Katherine Heigl's very public "Grey's Anatomy" slam. In 2008, Heigl famously made it known that she would not submit her name for the Emmy race -- after winning the award in 2007 -- saying she wasn't given good material to work with.

"On some level it stung," Rhimes told Winfrey during an interview airing as part of "Oprah's Next Chapter." "On some level, I was not surprised. When people show you who they are, believe them." Rhimes said that mantra has carried her through the years. "It has served me well," she said.

In the past, Rhimes said she was surprised by Heigl's statements, but asserted the actress asked for a lighter load to accommodate her film work.

"When I was told about it, my reaction was surprised," Rhimes said in 2008. "I have a really wonderful working relationship with Katherine. Everybody knows Izzie is one off my favorite characters ... The back half of the season, Katherine asked me to write her light so that she could do her movie. I don't feel insulted."

Heigl left the series earlier than expected, but has said she would like to return to the character of Dr. Izzie Stevens.

"I really, really, really want to see where [Izzie] is," Heigl told E! Online. "I just want to know what happened to her and where she went and what she's doing now." Heigl said she told producers about her desire to return.

"I want them to know that I'm down with it if they want me to, but I completely understand if it doesn't necessarily work," she told the hosts of "The View."

In response, Rhimes told TV Guide at the time that "it was really nice to hear her appreciating the show." But, she added, "We are on a track we have been planning, and the idea of changing that track is not something we are interested in right now."

"Grey's" star Patrick Dempsey recently told HuffPost TV that he wants to see Izzie's storyline resolved. "It's always hard losing characters that we've grown to love, and certainly from that initial first group, it's unfortunate to see people go on, but I don't think Shonda [Rhimes] will bring anybody back," Dempsey said. "I don't think Izzie's character (Katherine Heigl) was ever really resolved, and I think there's a moment there that should be resolved -- I think that would be nice for the fans. I'm not sure that would happen, but that would be some nice closure I think."

Watch a clip from "Oprah's Next Chapter" below. Winfrey's interview with Rhimes and "Scandal" star Kerry Washington airs Sunday, December 9 at 9 p.m. EST on OWN.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/07/shonda-rhimes-katherine-heigl-own-oprahs-next-chapter_n_2259933.html?utm_hp_ref=tv
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