or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2854

post #85591 of 93684
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
‘Hell’s Kitchen’ cooks up a win for Fox
Returning reality show averages a 2.2 in 18-49s
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Mar. 13, 2013

Fox’s “Hell’s Kitchen” diced up some low-rated competition last night.

The 11th-season premiere of the reality show drew a 2.2 adults 18-49 rating from 8 to 10 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights, finishing as the top program on a slow night.

Underscoring just how low ratings were, CBS’s “NCIS” and “NCIS: Los Angeles” reruns tied for No. 2 behind “Hell’s” with a 1.9 apiece.

“Hell’s” did fall 8 percent from last summer’s premiere, which averaged a 2.4. The program helped Fox to No. 1 for the evening.

Only two programs saw week-to-week gains last night. ABC’s “Celebrity Wife Swap” was up 7 percent from last week, to a 1.6 at 8 p.m.

And NBC’s struggling musical drama “Smash” grew 13 percent from last week, to a 0.9, though it still finished fourth in its timeslot.

The season finale of ABC’s “The Taste” actually fell 8 percent from last week, to a series-low 1.1.

CBS’s “Golden Boy,” airing behind the two earlier reruns, still managed to maintain last week’s rating, finishing with a 1.6 at 10 p.m. and winning the timeslot for the third straight week. That was way up from its one-time Friday night airing last week, which drew a 1.0.

Fox was first for the night among 18-49s with a 2.2 average overnight rating and a 6 share. CBS was second at 1.8/5, Univision third at 1.4/4, ABC fourth at 1.3/4, NBC fifth at 0.9/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.6/2 and CW seventh at 0.2/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-seven percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. Fox led with a 2.0 for “Hell’s,” followed by CBS with a 1.9 for a repeat of “NCIS.” ABC was third with a 1.6 for “Swap,” Univision fourth with a 1.3 for “Porque el Amor Manda,” NBC fifth with a 0.9 for an hour of “Betty White’s Off Their Rockers (0.9 at 8 for a rerun, 1.0 at 8:30 for an original), Telemundo sixth with a 0.5 for “Pasion Prohibida” and CW seventh with a 0.2 for a repeat of “Hart of Dixie.”

Fox led again at 9 p.m. with a 2.3 for more “Hell’s,” while CBS held onto second place with a 1.9 for a repeat of “NCIS: LA.” Univision was third with a 1.5 for “Amores Verdaderos,” ABC fourth with a 1.1 for “Taste,” Telemundo fifth with a 0.9 for “La Patrona,” NBC sixth with a 0.8 for repeats of “Go On” and “The New Normal” and CW seventh with a 0.2 for a repeat of “Beauty and the Beast.”

CBS took the lead at 10 p.m. with a 1.6 for “Golden,” with Univision second with a 1.5 for “Amor Bravio.” ABC was third with a 1.2 for “Body of Proof,” NBC fourth with a 0.9 for “Smash” and Telemundo fifth with a 0.4 for “El Rostro de la Venganza.”

Among households, CBS was first for the night with a 7.1 average overnight rating and an 11 share. Fox was second at 3.4/5, ABC third at 3.3/5, NBC fourth at 2.0/3, Univision fifth at 1.8/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.8/1 and CW seventh at 0.5/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/hells-kitchen-cooks-up-a-win-for-fox/
post #85592 of 93684
TV Notes
Seeking Funds for Movie, Creator of ‘Veronica Mars’ Turns to Kickstarter
By Dave Itzkoff, The New York Times's 'Arts Beat' Column - Mar. 13, 2013

If a “Veronica Mars” movie doesn’t happen now, there will be no mystery about who did it in — its loyal fans will be the culprits. Rob Thomas, the television producer and creator of “Veronica Mars,” the cult hit series that starred Kristen Bell as a crime-solving teenager, has thrown down a challenge to viewers who have long clamored for this show to be turned into a film, telling them that they had 30 days to help raise $2 million for the project and calling it “our one shot” to see it happen.

On Wednesday, Mr. Thomas posted his entreaty on Kickstarter, the fundraising Web site, writing that he had tried to pitch a film adaptation of “Veronica Mars,” which ended its television run in 2007 after three seasons on the UPN and CW networks.

“I probably stoked fan fervor in my optimistic comments about the prospects,” Mr. Thomas wrote, adding that Warner Brothers, which owns the “Veronica Mars” property, “wasn’t convinced there was enough interest to warrant a major studio-sized movie about Veronica and the project never got off the ground.”

But after learning of Kickstarter, and calculating that it would take about 30,000 donors pledging $71 each (or 80,000 donors pledging $25 each), Mr. Thomas wrote, “we could finance the movie, particularly if the cast and I were willing to work cheap.”

Since then, Mr. Thomas said, he and Ms. Bell have met with executives at Warner Brothers who, he said, have “agreed to allow us to take this shot.” He added: “Their reaction was, if you can show there’s enough fan interest to warrant a movie, we’re on board. So this is it. This is our shot. I believe it’s the only one we’ve got. It’s nerve-wracking. I suppose we could fail in spectacular fashion, but there’s also the chance that we completely revolutionize how projects like ours can get made.”

In her own post on the Kickstarter page Ms. Bell wrote, “I am currently the happiest blonde in a hamster ball the world has ever seen.”

As of 12 noon Eastern time on Wednesday the Kickstarter side had raised more than $200,000 in pledges from some 2,700 donors, or about 10 percent of its $2 million goal. The ball is in your court, “Arrested Development.”

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/13/seeking-funds-for-movie-creator-of-veronica-mars-turns-to-kickstarter/?hp
post #85593 of 93684
TV/Business Notes
‘The Good Wife’ Off-Network Rights Sell To Amazon, Hulu, Hallmark Channel, Broadcast Syndication For Nearly $2M An Episode
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Mar. 13, 2013

In an arrangement that reflects the changing off-network options for serialized dramas, CBS’ The Good Wife has been sold in a complex multi-window deal that involves two streaming partners, Amazon and Hulu; a basic cable network, Hallmark Channel; and broadcast syndication, for what I hear is a combined license fee of nearly $2 million per episode. “This is an off-network model for a unique serialized show in today’s television ecosystem,” said Leslie Moonves, President and CEO, CBS Corp.

Under the deal, the first three seasons of The Good Wife will become available on Amazon Prime tomorrow, with the current Season 4 coming later this year. Hulu Plus will roll out previous seasons of the show in September 2013, while Hallmark Channel will begin airing The Good Wife in January 2014. A weekend broadcast syndication run is scheduled to begin in September 2014, with the series sold in 85% of the country.

While procedurals that repeat well remain the holy grail for network drama in terms of syndication value, serialized shows with smaller but loyal audiences, once considered a non-starter when it comes to syndication, have found a whole new world of possibilities with the emergence of digital platforms where serialized dramas thrive. It took awhile for The Good Wife to sell, and it didn’t go to a top-tier basic cable network, but when all windows are factored in, its syndication value is not that far off from what some procedurals bring in. Three CBS dramas — NCIS: LA, Hawaii Five-0 (produced by CBS TV Studios), and The Mentalist (produced by Warner Bros TV) — hold the record for cable syndication license fees, all selling for north of $2 million an episode, in addition to broadcast syndication deals.

With the Amazon Prime SVOD deal kicking in tomorrow, CBS brass are hoping for an immediate effect. The rationale is that binge-viewing customers are so accustomed to such platforms, as evidenced by Breaking Bad on Netflix, it would send new viewers to The Good Wife‘s original telecasts on CBS the way it happened with Breaking Bad on AMC, which has been sizzling since the series’ previous seasons became available for streaming. Unfortunately, there won’t be much time to test the effect of the off-network run on the CBS airings this season as the legal drama is the first CBS series slated to wrap its season on April 28. But the critically praised series is a prestige piece for the network, and, since it is also owned by CBS and now has an off-network income stream coming in, it is fully expected to return next fall.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/03/the-good-wife-off-network-rights-sell-to-amazon-hulu-hallmark-channel-broadcast-syndication/
post #85594 of 93684
No political comments, please.

TV/Business Notes
Keith Olbermann and Current TV reach settlement -- Report
By Hillary Busis, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Mar. 13, 2013

Our long national nightmare is over: Nearly one year after filing a blistering, $70 million lawsuit against Current TV, Keith Olbermann and his former employer have reportedly reached a settlement. Specifics of the deal are confidential — and neither Current nor Olbermann has responded to EW’s requests for comment — but according to Deadline, the ousted host was awarded “a significant payout.”

Olbermann brought his nightly political program Countdown With Keith Olbermann to Current after departing from MSNBC in 2011. Upon being let go by Al Gore’s net less than a year later, he accused the progressive cable channel of creating “an environment in which major business errors and technical failures became commonplace and acceptable.” Olbermann demanded payment for the multimillion-dollar sum of his full five-year contract, as well as other damages.

Current TV is currently embroiled in another high-profile lawsuit over its recent sale to Al Jazerra. Olbermann, meanwhile, has reportedly approached ESPN about returning to the sports network, where his national TV career began in 1992. ESPN president John Skipper, however, has said that a re-do for Olbermann at his network isn’t likely to happen anytime soon.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2013/03/13/keith-olbermann-current-tv-settlement/
post #85595 of 93684
Critic's Notes
The Best Comedy of the Past 30 Years, Quarterfinals: Sex and the City vs. Seinfeld
By Yael Kohen, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Mar. 13, 2013

Vulture is holding the ultimate Sitcom Smackdown to determine the greatest TV comedy of the past 30 years. Each day, a different notable writer will be charged with determining the winner of a round of the bracket, until New York Magazine TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz judges the finals on March 18. Today is the final match of the quarterfinals, with author Yael Kohen deciding between Seinfeld and Sex and the City. Make sure to head over to Facebook to vote in our Readers Bracket, which has already veered from our critics' choices. We also invite tweeted opinions with the #sitcomsmackdown hashtag.

There’s a certain breed of single woman that still classifies herself according to one of Sex and the City’s four single-gal archetypes: Charlotte (the romantic), Miranda (the alpha career girl), Samantha (the sexpot), and, of course, Carrie (the so-called everygirl who was a combination of the other three). I loved Sex and the City when it was on HBO from 1998–2004; as a single twentysomething, I tuned in every Sunday night to see what crazy scenarios the women would find themselves in. For me, the show said something particularly true about the way the search for love and the process of dating seem to contradict one another. Unlike Seinfeld, whose characters tossed off relationships without a hint of scarring, Sex and the City was weighted with real-life, ego-crushing humiliations. And yet, who was the TV character I secretly wanted people to think of when they met me? Seinfeld’s Elaine Benes. She was funnier than any of those big-city brunchers.

Before now, that was the closest I ever got to comparing Seinfeld and Sex and the City. The humor on the two shows and the New York their characters inhabited seemed to operate in disparate spheres. That had something do with the shows airing in different decades (Seinfeld ended its nine-season run in 1998, the year SATC began), and something to do with SATC having the freedom to show sex, thanks to pay cable. But when looked at broadly, the shows do, in fact, reveal commonalities, at least superficially. Seinfeld and SATC both center on four thirtysomething single friends. They all slept around — with more people than was culturally acceptable — and spent the next day dissecting their partners and sexual escapades (in inspired euphemisms, in the case of Seinfeld, and with shocking explicitness in the case of SATC). Both shows memorably tackled masturbation (Seinfeld’s “contest” episode versus SATC’s “Rabbit”), the perils of talking dirty in bed (Jerry’s: “You mean the panties your mother laid out for you?” versus Miranda’s “You just love a finger in your ass”), and threesomes (George, who suggests one in a ploy to break up with a girlfriend, versus Charlotte, who considers one to please a dream guy).

Each show has a recurring conceit: Jerry Seinfeld, who plays a stand-up comedian modeled on himself, often starts and ends an episode with a relevant snippet of his act; Carrie Bradshaw, who is a columnist for a local paper (just as Candace Bushnell wrote the “Sex and the City” column for the New York Observer), “couldn’t help but wonder” aloud as she types her weekly essay on an iBook. While Seinfeld introduced perhaps more catchphrases into the American vernacular than any other show in history, Sex and the City did the same in its own way, transforming once-elite brands like Manolo Blahnik or the Magnolia Bakery into household names with mass appeal. Of course, the most obvious similarity is that they both take place in New York City — and not in the generic version of the city used by most Manhattan-set sitcoms, like Friends, which seemed to take place here simply for the instant urban hipness the name implies. Seinfeld and Sex and the City were written with a level of specificity that made real New Yorkers wonder if anyone outside the city could truly ever get it. In the case of Seinfeld, that insider-y level of detail came to life through its characters — the kinds of locals who talk like Jews even if they aren’t — and the “only in New York” situations they often found themselves in: George’s daylong feud over a parking spot, Elaine’s frustrating loss of a 212 area code, and (controversially) the Puerto Rican Day Parade. It was about the idea of New York and the frustrations it provides, so it never mattered that it looked like it was shot on a Hollywood lot, which it was. Glamour had nothing to do with Seinfeld’s Upper West Side world, where people spend their Saturday nights with Chinese food and a movie because they aren’t cool enough to be sipping cosmos at Bungalow 8. But on SATC, New York was a character, and one that you needed to fall for as hard as Carrie, Miranda, Samantha, and Charlotte had. The show painted Manhattan with the glossy sheen of the moneyed metropolis it was fast becoming, staying as on trend as these fantastically chic women with their glamorous jobs: sex columnist! PR exec! gallerina! So naturally the real estate had to evolve, too: Samantha leaves her stodgy Upper East Side building for a sprawling loft in the gentrifying meatpacking district; Miranda ultimately leaves Manhattan, in the final season, for a Brooklyn brownstone. The show was shot all over the city and was an integral part of New York’s popularity, even creating mini tourist industries in Lower Manhattan.

The differences between the shows are, of course, more obvious and dramatic, from the brand of humor each used to the number of cameras employed (SATC was a single-camera series at a times when multi-camera was still de rigueur) to the aesthetic of the local diners where the ensembles met to the now-abrasive roar of Seinfeld’s studio audience. Sex and the City began as a bawdy sex comedy, but eventually transformed into a more poignant examination of the search for love and all the ******** of dating that gets in the way of finding it. The show felt most like a sitcom during the lighter and funnier first three seasons. Admittedly, a lot of the laughs came from how shocking the language sounded. We forget, but women “didn’t talk that way” back in 1998, at least not on TV: modelizers, Mr. Pussy, and anal sex all got hilarious play. But by the fourth season, Miranda is pregnant, Charlotte is struggling with infertility and divorce, Carrie is breaking up with Aidan after his proposal, and the show is transitioning from a fizzy romp to an epic will-they-or-won’t-they soap opera. Friendship, not marriage, becomes the most important relationship in the women’s lives. It’s not that the show didn’t have laughs anymore (Miranda on motherhood is classic), they just weren’t as important.

That kind of feel-good, friends-to-the-end attitude was, of course, what Seinfeld was defiantly against — even if, ultimately, these four pals were friends to the end. Creators Seinfeld and Larry David had no interest in sentimentality or the deeper issues that sitcom writers like to hang a plot on. There were parents, neighbors, friends, boyfriends, girlfriends, and co-workers, but they existed as comedy fodder for the four main characters to kibitz and bicker over endlessly, along with the now-legendary minutiae that fill our lives and obsess us: forgetting where you parked your car in a mall garage, or getting stuck in coach when your best friend is in first class, or even debating the hierarchy of toes. (“The big toe is, after all, the Captain of the Toes,” Jerry tells George.) Jerry, Elaine, George, and Kramer famously never grew; they weren’t searching for life experiences or true love or babies. (They didn’t even want to see babies.) As the show went on, the characters became more absurd, less like the real people they started out as and more like caricatures. But to the end, it was their overreactions to the small things, and their underreactions to life’s big events, that made us laugh. That and the fact that their pettiness inevitably smacked them in the ass. They are all, essentially, screw-ups, even Jerry, the successful comedian. And as played by Seinfeld, Jason Alexander, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, and Michael Richards, they became the masters of their screw-up domain. (Stout, balding, nebbishy George Costanza is still, for many Americans, the prototypical loser.) As witty and clever as the writing could be, so much of the comedy came from the expressions and mannerisms of this peerless ensemble.

I can’t imagine anyone other than Sarah Jessica Parker, Cynthia Nixon, Kim Cattrall, and Kristin Davis as the friends on Sex and the City; they, too, comprise a perfect ensemble. But what struck me when I was comparing the shows was the debt their characters owe Elaine. She may never have been trendy or fashionable — she rocked loafers with white socks! — and she didn’t hang out with New York’s elite, but Elaine certainly dated and bedded as many men as Charlotte, Miranda, or Carrie. (“The Sponge” is named after Elaine’s desperation to buy a last supply of discontinued contraceptive sponges; it spawned the word sponge-worthy — as in, is a guy worthy of the last of her vanishing sponges?) The difference was that Elaine’s single status didn’t define her, nor did her sex. That’s partly because Seinfeld gave Elaine more to do; we saw aspects of her life that existed well beyond dating and relationships (jobs at Pendant Publishing and the J. Peterman catalogue, quarrels with Chinese deliverymen and the Soup Nazi) — but also because of the way the brilliant Louis-Dreyfus played her: She’s as assertive, opinionated, intelligent, neurotic, easily pissed off, emotionally superficial (in “The Stall,” she wonders how long she needs to stay with a boyfriend after he mangles his face in an accident), and, most important, as hilarious as her three male friends. So while never becoming the prototypical single woman, à la Carrie Bradshaw (Seinfeld was allergic to the emotional issues that would require), I’d argue that Elaine is still the funniest and ballsiest representation of a single white female on television. (Liz Lemon, who is often compared to Mary Tyler Moore, is another child of Elaine Benes.)

By the end of its run, Sex and the City felt more like a drama with funny moments than a comedy. The writers were more interested in moving us to tears than making us laugh. In that last episode, when Mr. Big finally tells Carrie “you’re the one” under the starry Paris sky, the writers took only tiny stabs at making it funny. Seinfeld, by contrast, never came within a mile of earnest. Its goal was comedy all the way. The show’s humor got as dark as a network comedy could get (recall “The Invitation,” in which George inadvertently kills his fiancée by buying cheap envelopes with toxic glue), but its irreverent focus on comedy — caricature, slapstick, buffoonery, et al. — prevented it from ever becoming bleak. In fact, thanks to them, failure has never been so captivating: We fall down, we get up, we fall down again, and never, ever learn a thing — other than another way to laugh about it.

Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Winner: SEINFELD

Yael Kohen is the New York–based author of We Killed: The Rise of Women in American Comedy.

http://www.vulture.com/2013/03/seinfeld-vs-sex-and-the-city-sitcom-smackdown.html
post #85596 of 93684
TV Notes
'Broad City' Gets Comedy Central Series Order
By Tim Molloy, TheWrap.com - Mar. 13, 2013

Comedy Central has ordered the new series "Broad City," a previously online series starring Upright Citizens Brigade alums Abbi Jacobson and Illana Glazar.

The show, whose executive producers include Upright Citizens co-founder Amy Poehler, is set to premiere with 10 episodes next year. It follows two friends as they find the strange and interesting aspects of even the most mundane events in New York City.

“Finally, there’s a television show set in New York City,” said Kent Alterman, Comedy Central's president of content development and original programming. “I’m immensely proud that we have done it first.”

“I'm excited to work with Comedy Central and introduce Abbi and Ilana to America,” said Poehler. “And all the other countries. And also Mars. We've got big plans.”

The series is executive produced by Jacobson, Glazer, Amy Poehler, 3 Arts’ Dave Becky and Generate’s Sam Saifer. Tony Hernandez is the co-executive producer.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/column-post/broad-city-gets-comedy-central-series-order-81076
post #85597 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVChallenged View Post

Careful there, there are still plenty of places where OTA is not a viable option. That's why "cable" took off in the first place.
Sorry, but cable does not have the same obligations that stations that use the public airwaves do. There is no regulated interest in serving the public need. It's like saying people should be entitled to cars because it's really far to walk from where they live.

Plus, the idea that pay TV is the only option for those unserved by OTA broadcasts is silly in this age of multiple ways of being informed and warned of impending danger.

OTA is like public library (with PBS being the bin of books being offered with a bucket next to it with a sign that says "donations, thank you") while cable and satellite are more like Amazon.com. HBO and Showtime are like a subscription book club.
post #85598 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post


Nielsen Notes
It’s decision time for bubble shows
'The Neighbors' and 'Elementary' awaiting their fate

Keep 'em both, says I.
post #85599 of 93684
Agreed, I like them both...

Also on the "best comedy shows" I'm afrad that Rosseane could win... no way in hell please?
post #85600 of 93684
Cable TV originated after World War II when somebody in Pennsylvania realized his TV Set couldn't pick up Signals because his town was behind a mountain that was between his city and Allentown/Philadelphia area stations. Taking his TV set to a mountaintop, he found he could pick up all the stations. He proposed setting up an antenna on that mountaintop, and stringing a wire down to where the town was, and hooking lines to peoples houses. The Idea took off, and for the next 30 years it's primary use was to bring TV to people who lived in rural and mountainous areas with little or no TV coverage.

Us city folk had access to these channels over-the-air, so there was no need to hook up for any service until.......

A little service called Home Box Office made it's debut in 1972. The people in the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania (That's Scranton/Wilkes-Barre for those of you in Rio Linda) were the first to get this channel, which featured first-run Movies uncut and commercial-free, for an additional $5.00 a month. It's growth was slow until 1975 when something else happened. A Satellite was launched from (ape Canaveral, and HBO bought a channel on that satellite (along with a few Independent TV Stations and another little something called ESPN). Within a few months HBO was available Nationwide, in areas where Cable TV was available. Unfortunately Federal Regulations prohibited Cable TV from becoming available in cities where people got most of their coverage over-the-air. And the TV stations, along with Movie Theaters wanted it kept that way. In the early 1970s if you went to the Movies you were greeted with an announcement that said free TV was about to become a thing of the past, and soon you would be PAYING to watch TV. eek.gif They wanted you to sign a petition for a law to ban Pay-TV. Theatergoers living the city sure had that "What the (Fudge)" moment. Then word got out that people living in the boondocks were getting "Special Channels" that us city folk couldn't get, including uncut movies. Hey, why can't we?

Our turn eventually came. The Regulations prohibiting Cable TV in urban areas was repealed, and in 1980 My Hometown (Redford, Michigan) got Cable. I was like a child on Christmas morning the day my house got hooked up. You could get basic service (25 Channels, including ESPN) for $7.99 a month. if you wanted the "Premium" Channels (HBO, Showtime and The Movie Channel) these were 6.99 a month each. If you bought the first two the third was tossed in for no extra charge. 28 channels of extacy for $21.00 a month! Oh Boy! All Mine! biggrin.gif

It's been over thirty years since Cable TV became available in my Hometown. I have to admit those were the days, but that's behind me now, and now I get my TV from elsewhere. cool.gif
post #85601 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Sorry, but cable does not have the same obligations that stations that use the public airwaves do. There is no regulated interest in serving the public need. It's like saying people should be entitled to cars because it's really far to walk from where they live.

Plus, the idea that pay TV is the only option for those unserved by OTA broadcasts is silly in this age of multiple ways of being informed and warned of impending danger.

OTA is like public library (with PBS being the bin of books being offered with a bucket next to it with a sign that says "donations, thank you") while cable and satellite are more like Amazon.com. HBO and Showtime are like a subscription book club.

You totally ignore the fact that cable/satellite bring those OTA channels to many who could not otherwise receive them. In that sense, pay TV is just as important as OTA TV. You also seem to ignore the fact that most games held hostage by the station "non-negotiators" are those, like the Super Bowl, that are on OTA networks. I don't know the answer, but IMHO those events on those networks should not be held hostage, and I'm a capitalist when the playing field is fair. Just because people switch during negotiations doesn't nean those channels are worth what is deing asked. It nust means that particular event is.
post #85602 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

Cable TV originated after World War II when somebody in Pennsylvania realized his TV Set couldn't pick up Signals because his town was behind a mountain that was between his city and Allentown/Philadelphia area stations. Taking his TV set to a mountaintop, he found he could pick up all the stations. He proposed setting up an antenna on that mountaintop, and stringing a wire down to where the town was, and hooking lines to peoples houses. The Idea took off, and for the next 30 years it's primary use was to bring TV to people who lived in rural and mountainous areas with little or no TV coverage.

Us city folk had access to these channels over-the-air, so there was no need to hook up for any service until.......

A little service called Home Box Office made it's debut in 1972. The people in the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania (That's Scranton/Wilkes-Barre for those of you in Rio Linda) were the first to get this channel, which featured first-run Movies uncut and commercial-free, for an additional $5.00 a month. It's growth was slow until 1975 when something else happened. A Satellite was launched from (ape Canaveral, and HBO bought a channel on that satellite (along with a few Independent TV Stations and another little something called ESPN). Within a few months HBO was available Nationwide, in areas where Cable TV was available. Unfortunately Federal Regulations prohibited Cable TV from becoming available in cities where people got most of their coverage over-the-air. And the TV stations, along with Movie Theaters wanted it kept that way. In the early 1970s if you went to the Movies you were greeted with an announcement that said free TV was about to become a thing of the past, and soon you would be PAYING to watch TV. eek.gif They wanted you to sign a petition for a law to ban Pay-TV. Theatergoers living the city sure had that "What the (Fudge)" moment. Then word got out that people living in the boondocks were getting "Special Channels" that us city folk couldn't get, including uncut movies. Hey, why can't we?

Our turn eventually came. The Regulations prohibiting Cable TV in urban areas was repealed, and in 1980 My Hometown (Redford, Michigan) got Cable. I was like a child on Christmas morning the day my house got hooked up. You could get basic service (25 Channels, including ESPN) for $7.99 a month. if you wanted the "Premium" Channels (HBO, Showtime and The Movie Channel) these were 6.99 a month each. If you bought the first two the third was tossed in for no extra charge. 28 channels of extacy for $21.00 a month! Oh Boy! All Mine! biggrin.gif

It's been over thirty years since Cable TV became available in my Hometown. I have to admit those were the days, but that's behind me now, and now I get my TV from elsewhere. cool.gif
I moved from the king of OTA (New York City) to the king of cable (San Diego) in the early 1980s.

Cable was not that pervasive in NYC at that time for the obvious reason: toplogy. Most of the area was flat and the broadcast antennas on top of the Empire State Building (and later the World Trade Center towers) served the tri-state region more than adequately.

San Diego was another story. So many valleys and hills that OTA coverage was difficult at best. Cable became the way to get proper TV coverage. It was said that over 80 per cent of the region was wired for cable. This all precedes the satellite TV era.
post #85603 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

A little service called Home Box Office made it's debut in 1972. The people in the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania (That's Scranton/Wilkes-Barre for those of you in Rio Linda) were the first to get this channel, which featured first-run Movies uncut and commercial-free, for an additional $5.00 a month. It's growth was slow until 1975 when something else happened. A Satellite was launched from (ape Canaveral, and HBO bought a channel on that satellite (along with a few Independent TV Stations and another little something called ESPN). Within a few months HBO was available Nationwide, in areas where Cable TV was available. Unfortunately Federal Regulations prohibited Cable TV from becoming available in cities where people got most of their coverage over-the-air. And the TV stations, along with Movie Theaters wanted it kept that way. In the early 1970s if you went to the Movies you were greeted with an announcement that said free TV was about to become a thing of the past, and soon you would be PAYING to watch TV. eek.gif They wanted you to sign a petition for a law to ban Pay-TV. Theatergoers living the city sure had that "What the (Fudge)" moment. Then word got out that people living in the boondocks were getting "Special Channels" that us city folk couldn't get, including uncut movies. Hey, why can't we?

Well, they weren't wrong were they. Not for the majority of households in the US anyway.

BTW, ESPN didn't launch until 1979.
post #85604 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
Seeking Funds for Movie, Creator of ‘Veronica Mars’ Turns to Kickstarter
By Dave Itzkoff, The New York Times's 'Arts Beat' Column - Mar. 13, 2013

As of 12 noon Eastern time on Wednesday the Kickstarter side had raised more than $200,000 in pledges from some 2,700 donors, or about 10 percent of its $2 million goal. The ball is in your court, “Arrested Development.”

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/03/13/seeking-funds-for-movie-creator-of-veronica-mars-turns-to-kickstarter/?hp

Wow, this is one of the quickest funded KS projects I've seen. It's barely been up a day and every top tier reward is gone. Based on projections this could easily achieve the budget of a well-funded indie movie.

Guess I'll have to settle for a t-shirt.
post #85605 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

You totally ignore the fact that cable/satellite bring those OTA channels to many who could not otherwise receive them. In that sense, pay TV is just as important as OTA TV. .

I did say that Pay-TV was originally the way for people with limited coverage to get more. I stand corrected on ESPN, All I know is from 1975 to 1980 I noticed those who had Cable at the time were getting new channels, and lots of them (For me at the time). My Grandparents in Greenbush, Michigan ran a small resort on the shores of Lake Huron, and in 1976 they subscribed to HBO, and had it placed in all the cottages so guests could have it. In the mid-1960s their house had a 50-foot tall TV Antenna atop their house, from which they got TWO channels! (The tower was dismantled after they got Cable in 1970). This was my first introduction to HBO and I was impressed! Bear in mind in the late 1970s I was one of countless city goers who became green with envy because we couldn't get it at that time.

Of course, things changed over the years, and still do,
post #85606 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

You totally ignore the fact that cable/satellite bring those OTA channels to many who could not otherwise receive them. In that sense, pay TV is just as important as OTA TV. You also seem to ignore the fact that most games held hostage by the station "non-negotiators" are those, like the Super Bowl, that are on OTA networks. I don't know the answer, but IMHO those events on those networks should not be held hostage, and I'm a capitalist when the playing field is fair. Just because people switch during negotiations doesn't nean those channels are worth what is deing asked. It nust means that particular event is.
So what?

Nobody has a fundamental right to TV. Nobody. It's not food. It's not water. It's not heat or shelter.

It's a form of entertainment. Even the news and emergency information is not the only source of such things, between the internet (even if it's only dial-up), cell phones and even HAM radio. I guarantee most people know about a tornado coming from other information sources well before the TV channels report it - and they get updates well after power failures and downed lines have made their TVs into paper weights.

We live in an enttiled society where we insist that we must have the entertainment we want, exactly how we want it for the price we want it - and when that fails, we'll simply take it.

OTA TV is provided as a service that is regulated by the government. However, there's no provision that says being out of range entitles you to the signal through other means. The only obligation is for the station to provide that signal within its license parameters, including the amount of power and the direction of the signal. Beyond that, it's up to you to figure it out.

There are two national satellite providers, cable companies that server 90% of the population and telcos that serve some number well below that. There are streaming services galore and when all else fails, put up a bigger antenna or move somewhere.
post #85607 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by lobosrul View Post

Well, they weren't wrong were they. Not for the majority of households in the US anyway.

BTW, ESPN didn't launch until 1979.
Maybe not, but the satellite launched in 1975, which is what the post stated.

It sat nearly empty and largely ignored for several years until ESPN agreed to buy a full time transponder in 1978 (when they discovered the price per hour was far cheaper if they owned it). They used it to demo coverage of NCAA games through early 1979 in a bid to get a contract with them prior to their launch later that year.

The almost lost the transponder when the support money from K.S. Sweet ran out before Getty Oil stepped in with additional investment dollars - which was also the catalyst for the NCAA agreeing to a contract with ESPN. Before that, there was worry the netowkr wouldn't survive the year.

Prior to the launch of the network, ESPN had been renting transmission equipment since their uplink facility wasn't completed until just before the day of launch - even the studio was still being painted hours before they went on the air. Launch night would be the first time the equipment had been fully tested.

After the launch of ESPN, that same satellite began to get the notice of other network startups that filled it by early 1981 - at far more money per transponder than what ESPN paid when it was still nearly empty.
Edited by NetworkTV - 3/13/13 at 1:51pm
post #85608 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

I did say that Pay-TV was originally the way for people with limited coverage to get more. I stand corrected on ESPN, All I know is from 1975 to 1980 I noticed those who had Cable at the time were getting new channels, and lots of them (For me at the time). My Grandparents in Greenbush, Michigan ran a small resort on the shores of Lake Huron, and in 1976 they subscribed to HBO, and had it placed in all the cottages so guests could have it. In the mid-1960s their house had a 50-foot tall TV Antenna atop their house, from which they got TWO channels! (The tower was dismantled after they got Cable in 1970). This was my first introduction to HBO and I was impressed! Bear in mind in the late 1970s I was one of countless city goers who became green with envy because we couldn't get it at that time.

Of course, things changed over the years, and still do,

Did you respond to the wrong post?
post #85609 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

So what?

Nobody has a fundamental right to TV. Nobody. It's not food. It's not water. It's not heat or shelter.

It's a form of entertainment. Even the news and emergency information is not the only source of such things, between the internet (even if it's only dial-up), cell phones and even HAM radio. I guarantee most people know about a tornado coming from other information sources well before the TV channels report it - and they get updates well after power failures and downed lines have made their TVs into paper weights.

We live in an enttiled society where we insist that we must have the entertainment we want, exactly how we want it for the price we want it - and when that fails, we'll simply take it.

OTA TV is provided as a service that is regulated by the government. However, there's no provision that says being out of range entitles you to the signal through other means. The only obligation is for the station to provide that signal within its license parameters, including the amount of power and the direction of the signal. Beyond that, it's up to you to figure it out.

There are two national satellite providers, cable companies that server 90% of the population and telcos that serve some number well below that. There are streaming services galore and when all else fails, put up a bigger antenna or move somewhere.

You do know that's a typical response from you, don't you? I didn't say Pay TV was essential, I said it was as essential as OTA TV, your argument, not mine. And the fact that OTA is regulated by the government means it should be accessible to as many as possible by whatever means there are. Hold Disney, ESPN, and any other cablenet hostage all you want, but network TV should be subject to other rules. And that's just my opinion. If you don't like it, so what yourself. mad.gif
post #85610 of 93684
"Can't we all just get along?" rolleyes.gif
post #85611 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Wow, this is one of the quickest funded KS projects I've seen. It's barely been up a day and every top tier reward is gone. Based on projections this could easily achieve the budget of a well-funded indie movie.

Guess I'll have to settle for a t-shirt.
Already up to $1.5 million. eek.gif

I might have to go with a t-shirt as well.

LOL@the Q&A.

Q: Veronica better end up with Logan, Rob. She just better.

A: That's not a question.

Q: We're just saying...

A: I hear you. Remember it's noir. There aren't a lot of happy endings.

Q: Noir, my ass. We've waited a long time for this.

A: (Busily reworking super-grim ending.)
post #85612 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by moob View Post

Already up to $1.5 million. eek.gif

I might have to go with a t-shirt as well.

LOL@the Q&A.

The video is great. Enrico Colantoni is very funny fighting the voices in his head.

post #85613 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

The video is great. Enrico Colantoni is very funny fighting the voices in his head.

Nice! Very nice!
post #85614 of 93684
That video made me nostalgic. They're gonna hit $2 million in a few minutes. That's insane. biggrin.gif
post #85615 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by moob View Post

That video made me nostalgic. They're gonna hit $2 million in a few minutes. That's insane. biggrin.gif

And Veronica Mars is back from the dead! biggrin.gif

There is real impetus for someone like Netflix to resurrect the show for another season now. Especially if this project pulls in 10 million plus as it could very possibly do.
post #85616 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post


OTA TV is provided as a service that is regulated by the government. However, there's no provision that says being out of range entitles you to the signal through other means. The only obligation is for the station to provide that signal within its license parameters, including the amount of power and the direction of the signal. Beyond that, it's up to you to figure it out.

OTOH, once a station has consented to serving people beyond the reach of their OTA transmission, they have a moral obligation to continue that service ... particularly when they also use the aforementioned service as basis for denying any other station/carrier to provide the same programming to the aforementioned people.

Conversely, there is no rational basis for denying "distant market" stations via cable/satellite if one can receive those station via terrestrial antenna. Yet, in 2013, we are still stuck with arbitrary "DMA" boundaries, syndication "blackouts" and other nonsense bought and paid for by the broadcast lobby.

PS: Almost exactly one year ago several towns in my state where essentially wiped off the map (google "West Liberty, KY") I'm pretty sure a least a couple of these towns are beyond the reach of any OTA TV transmitters (with the possible exception of KET,) yet the local stations still lay claim to them via the arbitrary DMA mechanism. If you claim exclusive rights to them, you should incur the same responsibilities as you would for your OTA viewers.

That being said, I agree that relying (solely) on TV as a warning device is not ideal, that doesn't change the fact that you really want those warnings coming from as many sources as possible.
Edited by HDTVChallenged - 3/14/13 at 12:58am
post #85617 of 93684
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Sports
NBC to air MLS marathon in new digs
By Michael Hiestand, USA Today - Mar. 12, 2013

NBC is scheduled to announce Wednesday that it will devote 10 hours to Major League Soccer coverage on NBC and its NBC Sports Network cable channel Saturday, including a show that will include live look-ins to four games.

And that show on NBCSN, which will resemble the roving NFL RedZone action, might be a preview of coming Olympic TV coverage.

"I think you're on to something there," NBC Sports executive producer Sam Flood tells USA TODAY Sports. "But I can't talk about anything yet."

After NBC airs the D.C.-New York (12:30 p.m. ET), announcers Arlo White, Kyle Martino and Russ Thaler will bus to NBC Sports' new studio in Stamford, Conn., for the whip-around show (5:30 p.m. ET). Also airing on NBCSN, will be Kansas City-Chicago (3:30 p.m. ET) and Portland-Seattle (8 p.m. ET).

I'm super excited for all this on Saturday. I hope NBC draws good enough ratings so they'll do stuff like this more often for MLS.
post #85618 of 93684
TV Notes
MSNBC's 'Ed Show' Moving to Weekends
By Erik Hayden, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Mar. 13, 2013

The Ed Show will be moving to weekends on MSNBC.

On Wednesday, the same day that Ed Schultz aired an interview revealing the man who recorded the "47 percent" video, the network announced that the show would move to the weekends starting in April.

"I raised my hand for this assignment for a number of personal and professional reasons," said Schultz on the air. "My fight on The Ed Show has been for the workers and the middle class. This new time slot will give me the opportunity to produce and focus on stories that I care about and are important to American families and American workers."

He added: "I’m very proud of the work our team has done here at 8 p.m., but sitting behind this desk five nights a week doesn’t cut it for me."

MSNBC did not immediately name a replacement for The Ed Show, which currently airs at 8 p.m. and 11 p.m. ET on weekdays.

“It’s an exciting time for MSNBC and I’m looking forward to having Ed’s powerful voice on our network for a long time," said the network's president, Phil Griffin, in a release.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/msnbc-ed-schultzs-ed-show-428493
post #85619 of 93684
TV Notes
NBC Shifts 'Smash' to Saturday Nights
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Mar. 13, 2013

NBC is moving its struggling musical series "Smash" to Saturday nights at 9 p.m. starting April 6, the network said Wednesday.

The shift was among a number of scheduling changes that NBC announced. And NBC said that the show will air its entire 17-episode season.

Even so, the move is not a good sign for the series, which started out strong with its first season, when it had "The Voice" as a lead-in, but has struggled since returning for its second season last month.

For its season premiere on Feb. 5, "Smash" drew an anemic 1.1 rating/3 share in the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic -- its lowest-rated episode at that date, and down 71 percent from the show's series premiere. It was also down 39 percent from its May 14 season finale.

Things got worse for the show -- which has been airing Tuesdays at 10 p.m. -- from there, with the show dropping to a new low of 0.7/2 on March 5, though it rebounded somewhat in its most recent airing on Tuesday.

The series underwent an upheaval after its first season, with the departure of creator Theresa Rebeck and a number of cast members. "Gossip Girl" showrunner Josh Safran was brought in to replace Rebeck, and the cast swelled to monumental proportions with guests stars and new regulars for its second season.

NBC's new matchmaking reality show, "Ready for Love," will begin airing in the Tuesdays at 9 timeslot on April 9, setting the series up in a plum position preceding "The Voice," which returns later this month.

"Go On," which had been airing before "Smash" on Tuesdays at 9, will be given a tryout in the Thursdays at 9:30 p.m. timeslot, following long-running but on-the-way-out sitcom "The Office." "Go On" will air its final two episodes of the season in that slot beginning April 4.

Here is NBC's full list of scheduling changes:

READY FOR LOVE
Will now air Tuesdays, beginning April 9 (9-11 p.m. ET) following “The Voice.”

CELEBRITY APPRENTICE
Beginning April 14 (9-11 p.m ET) will be expanded to two hours through the end of May.

THE VOICE
Will air encore episodes on Sunday, March 31 and Sunday, April 7 (7-10 p.m. ET), leading into original episodes of “The Celebrity Apprentice” (10-11 p.m. ET)

GO ON
Moves to Thursdays on April 4 and April 11, which will be the season’s final episode. Both episodes will air at 9:30-10 p.m. ET following “The Office.”

THE NEW NORMAL
One-hour season finale on Tuesday, April 2 (9-10 p.m. ET) following “The Voice.”

SMASH
Moves to Saturdays at 9 p.m. beginning April 6 and will air its entire season of 17 episodes.

WHITNEY
Will have a one-hour season finale on Wednesday, March 27 (8-9 p.m. ET).


http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/nbc-shifts-smash-saturday-nights-81196
post #85620 of 93684
TV Notes
Comedy Undercard: A Different World vs. Undeclared
By Kyle Buchanan, Vulture.com - Mar. 13, 2013

Vulture is in the midst of its Sitcom Smackdown, a three-week contest that pits the best sitcoms of the last 30 years against each other to crown the ultimate winner. But while that bracket focuses on the greatest, most innovative modern comedies, it couldn't cover all of the series that live on in our hearts, the ones that may not fit those highfalutin parameters but which we could talk about for days. To give these other series their moments to shine, every day we’ll be pitting two like-minded comedies against each other: We’ll pick our winner, and readers will then vote for their own. Today: It’s a rivalry between college-set comedies as we pit A Different World against Undeclared.

Today's contenders: A Different World (1987–1993) vs. Undeclared (2001–2002)

College seems like a great place to set a TV show, but when your characters fall in that no-man's-land between "teenage high-schoolers" and "grown-up doctors or lawyers," you've actually got your work cut out for you. Just ask Judd Apatow, whose beloved but low-rated Undeclared was cut down after one short season. On the other side of the spectrum, you've got A Different World, which stayed on the air for six seasons thanks to its fresh cast and plum scheduling berth after The Cosby Show, which it was spun off from. But which of these college sitcoms deserves to come out No. 1 in our school rankings?

University Setting: Undeclared was set at the fictional University of Northeastern California (where would that even be, geographically ... near Lake Tahoe?), while the all-black school Hillman College, where A Different World was set, was located in Virginia and based on real-life Spelman College.

Star-Crossed Lovers: Undeclared's Steven (Jay Baruchel) sleeps with Lizzie (Carla Gallo) during his first night at UNC, but that's before he finds out that she's got a clingy boyfriend played by Jason Segel. On A Different World, Whitley (Jasmine Guy) and Dwayne (Kadeem Hardison) couldn't seem more ill-suited for each other: She was an uptight southern belle, while he was a thoughtful brainiac with the flyest flip-up glasses in America. But do they make it work? Well, by way of answering that question, why don't you take a minute to relive the moment where Dwayne crashed Whitley's wedding? Be careful, though: This video is NSFW, because like the studio audience, you will begin shrieking and crying while watching it.

Supporting Player Who Took Over the Show: A Different World was supposed to follow Cosby daughter Lisa Bonet, but when the wild-child actress got pregnant during the first season, she departed the show and Whitley became the central character after a creative revamp. Segel didn't quite take over Undeclared to that extent, but while his recurring character began the series heard and not seen, he was centering episodes by the end of the season after Lizzie broke up with him for Steven. Frankly, the show seemed way more interested in him (and his Greek chorus of copy-shop co-workers played by David Krumholtz and Tenacious D's Kyle Gass) than in Lizzie.

Issues Tackled: Undeclared had a light touch, but A Different World wasn't afraid to go deep. Some of its Very Special Episodes tackled hot-button issues like AIDS, hate crimes, Operation Desert Storm, and — in a famous season premiere — the Los Angeles riots. The show wrung laughs out of looting! Sister Souljah was there! I mean ...

Older Father Figure: A Different World incorporated plenty of older actors like Glynn Turman and Mary Alice into its youthful cast, but Sinbad popped the most as the Jaleesa-wooing Coach Walter Oakes. Over at Undeclared, there was a literal father figure, as Loudon Wainwright played Baruchel's divorcing dad, who kept insinuating himself into his son's college life.

Before They Were Stars: College-set shows are a fertile breeding ground for young actors who go on to great fame, and these two were no different. Watch Undeclared now, a little over a decade after it aired, and marvel at how young and skinny Segel, Seth Rogen, and Sons of Anarchy star Charlie Hunnam were! Plus, you've got nearly unrecognizable guest spots from actors like Amy Poehler, Jenna Fischer, Kevin Hart, and Tom Welling. The graduating class at Hillman was plenty star-studded, too, launching famous names like Jada Pinkett, Marisa Tomei, and Halle Berry.

Opening Credits: Undeclared had a fun little riff from the Dandy Warhols, but A Different World's room-spanning opening credits sequence? Totally creative, amazing, and head-scratching. How'd they do that?

Are the shows any good? Yes. Undeclared holds up pretty well in its own gentle way, and since fewer than twenty episodes were produced, it's an agreeable pick for a Netflix marathon. A Different World is a more immediately dated comedy in its multi-cam, late-eighties way, but it grew into something genuinely wonderful when all the ingredients came together. (And there were a lot of ingredients, since there was so much cast turnover.) Watch those Different World videos I linked to! Come on! This show is weirdly underrated. Can we at least get Jasmine Guy a guest judge spot on RuPaul's Drag Race, for God's sake?

The Moment of Truth: Undeclared, you're great and sweet, but you didn't even get a sophomore year. Graduating with high honors, then, is ...

Winner: A Different World.

http://www.vulture.com/2013/03/comedy-undercard-undeclared.html
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Programming
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information