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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2868

post #86011 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by rebkell View Post

Actually Walking Dead had nearly a 2-1/2 month break.

The difference between The Walking Dead and Revolution is that TWD is a great show that sometimes has a mediocre episode and is worth waiting for, while Revolution is a mediocre show that sometimes has a good episode.
post #86012 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by Argee View Post

Well the cable networks do not fill 15-18 hours a week with new programming like the networks do. I am pretty sure if NBC, CBS, ABC or Fox only did one hour of new original programming per week it might be a different story.

Well if you take away reality programming and repeats (and repeats of reality programming), it often looks that way. wink.gif
post #86013 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreedelp View Post

Cable channels usually don't move a show all over the schedule. Look at Fox and Raising Hope. RH was on Tuesdays all season until the 1 hour finale, which ran on a Thursday. NBC is moving Go On from Tuesdays to Thursdays and is moving Smash from Tuesdays to Saturdays (okay, a failing show, but still...). ABC moved Suburgatory from Tuesdays to Wednesdays to finish the season. Come on networks. Leave shows where they are. Otherwise, you risk losing viewers because we are already watching something else on the new days.

Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

Changing the time a series is shown, and/or frequently preempting it for some "Special" has been the death of many a series. People believe the show has been cancelled, and they move on to other things.

It sure has confused. me. Suburgatory moved to an hour earlier on Wednesdays, not from Tuesday to Wednesday. Happy Endings moved from Tuesday to Sunday to Friday, with multi-week breaks. Either way, now I have shows recorded on different recorders because of conflicts caused by the moves.

Then, of course, there are the many times they air a show for a week or two, take it off for three to four weeks, bring it back, and on and on and on.

This is why I record all episodes before I even start watching a show's season. How else are you supposed to keep up with plot developments?
post #86014 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by mreedelp View Post


It sure has confused. me. Suburgatory moved to an hour earlier on Wednesdays, not from Tuesday to Wednesday. Happy Endings moved from Tuesday to Sunday to Friday, with multi-week breaks. Either way, now I have shows recorded on different recorders because of conflicts caused by the moves.

Then, of course, there are the many times they air a show for a week or two, take it off for three to four weeks, bring it back, and on and on and on.

This is why I record all episodes before I even start watching a show's season. How else are you supposed to keep up with plot developments?

Then they cancel the shows and blame the viewers for not being able to keep track. Once they start moving a show around I figure it's probably on borrowed time anyway, so why invest more of my time?
post #86015 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Why NBC doesn't run this stuff by us first I have no idea. biggrin.gif
That would be interesting for not just NBC, but I suspect a lot of my favorite scripted shows would get canceled because of the general bias against scripted shows and CBS I feel here. I'm afraid all I'd be left with is zombies, brits, dealers, and ad men. smile.gif
post #86016 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

That would be interesting for not just NBC, but I suspect a lot of my favorite scripted shows would get canceled because of the general bias against scripted shows and CBS I feel here. I'm afraid all I'd be left with is zombies, brits, dealers, and ad men. smile.gif
I don't know if it's CBS insomuch as it's procedurals, which some of us aren't huge fans of, along with comedies with laugh-tracks. CBS just happens to have a lot of both of those. I can't hate CBS...after all, that's where you'll find Craig Ferguson. wink.gif
post #86017 of 93844
TV Reviews
‘Spies of Warsaw,’ ‘Rogue’
By Glenn Garvin, Miami Herald - Apr. 2, 2013

“It was easier when we were simply soldiers,” one spy says to the other as they try to calculate their responsibility — or, perhaps, reprehensibility — in the gruesome strangling of a colleague at the hands of the opposition. “Black and white. Now everything is gray.”

Gray is definitely the color of the night on Wednesday television with the debut of two shows cloaked in moral and narrative ambiguity. BBC America’s Spies of Warsaw (Wedneday at 9:00 p.m.) is a classic tale of espionage, chockablock with secret agents peering up one another’s skirts (often quite literally), while in DirecTV’s Rogue an undercover cop goes dangerously off the rails pursuing a private agenda.

If the titular Spies of Warsaw were under my command, the first question they’d be required to answer would be, why has it taken a quarter of a century and the intervention of a British television network to bring one of America’s best espionage writers to the screen? Since 1988, Alan Durst has turned out a dozen tense, atmospheric spy novels set in Europe during World War II without Hollywood so much as twitching a muscle. The Spies of Warsaw, as his book was titled, is neither the most recent nor the best.

(Which brings us to my second question: Why on earth was the word “the” deleted from the title? Did a focus group object? Does it make the name too long for Twitter? Is this the first shot in the long-anticipated War on Prepositions?)

Durst’s books all offer the same engaging elements that the BBC makes such excellent use of in this two-part miniseries: The claustrophobic lifeboat atmosphere of a society teetering toward its doom. A mixture of sly intelligence operatives and ordinary people caught up in events beyond their understanding. A continent stalked by totalitarian ideologies on which the middle will not hold.

Perhaps even more important is what they lack — the crippling deus ex technico that afflicts so many modern spy thrillers. In Durst’s pre-digital world, nobody ever uses his smart phone to redirect a reconnaissance satellite or collect surveillance footage from security cameras. The most cutting-edge technology on display in Spies of Warsaw is an 8mm movie camera.

These spies traffic not in electrons but flesh and blood. Humans — some willing players in what Rudyard Kipling called the Great Game of intelligence, some not — are seduced or extorted, blackmailed or bribed.

While Spies of Warsaw’s trappings are drawn from history books, however, its central concept is ripped from the headlines. Its various plots and counterplots revolve around one of history’s great intelligence failures: France’s belief, as World War II approached, that the network of bunkers, pillboxes and fortifications known as the Maginot Line, which stretched 200 miles along its border with Germany, would keep Hitler’s army at bay and prevent the outbreak of war.

David Tennant ( Doctor Who) stars as Jean Francois Mercier, a newly arrived military attaché at the French embassy in Warsaw. Under his cover as a superficial aristocrat engrossed in the diplomatic party circuit (“almost every night, I sip the wine, taste the food, find everyone fascinating,” he mocks himself), Mercier is running a network of spies against Germany.

From the reports he receives, Mercier has begun to suspect that Germany has devised new weapons and strategies that will enable it to bypass the Maginot Line and that war is much closer at hand than his government believes. His French intelligence bosses are unimpressed with his theory, which they think is disinformation being passed along to him by his new girlfriend, Anna Skarbek (Janet Montgomery, Black Swan), a League of Nations lawyer who is also seeing an exiled Russian journalist of dubious allegiance. Anna seems nonplussed by the suspicions. “They think I’m a spy?” she asks in amazement. “I’m a slut.”

* * * *

The covert uses of sexuality are also a big part of the landscape in Rogue, an intriguing crime drama unfortunately available only to subscribers to DirecTV’s satellite television service (Wednesday at 9:00 p.m.). It stars Thandie Newton (ER) as Grace Travis, an undercover police detective yanked from her assignment infiltrating a San Francisco gang after her young son is killed in a drive-by shooting.

Her colleagues are convinced that the child was just an unlucky bystander — “just a senseless tragic accident,” as one cop says. “It happens all the time.” But as news becomes evident suggesting that her son was actually the target of the hit, and that it was related to her police work, Grace goes back undercover without official authorization.

What distinguishes Rogue from a zillion or so other shows about undercover cops is Grace’s alienation from her fellow officers and even her own family, all of whom think she’s nuts. “It’s not a job,” Grace’s husband caustically observes of her undercover work. “It’s an addiction.” As her so-called real life crumbles, Grace finds that her most genuine relationship, steeped in lies though it may be, is the one with the crime boss (Martin Csokas, The Bourne Supremacy) who may have ordered the killing of her son. As it says in the song, love is a bullet-riddled thing.

http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/04/02/3320002/tv-reviews-spies-of-warsaw-rogue.html
post #86018 of 93844
TV Review
‘How to Live With Your Parents,’ don’t
The actors are hard not to like in this new ABC sitcom
By Tom Conroy, Media Life Magazine - Apr. 2, 2013

TV series succeed because we like the characters, not because we like the actors. Despite what network programmers seem to think, casting a popular star is no guarantee that a show will be a hit.

ABC’s new sitcom “How to Live With Your Parents (For the Rest of Your Life)” features three well-known and well-liked actors who are charming throughout the series’ premiere episode. But their characters make much less of an impression.

The episode doesn’t suggest that the show’s premise — a divorced woman and her daughter move in with her eccentric parents — will go anywhere in particular, and the jokes are run of the mill. Viewers will enjoy the visit but won’t be inspired to schedule a return engagement.

In the premiere episode, airing this Wednesday, April 3, at 9:31 p.m., Polly (Sarah Chalke), a recently divorced woman in her 30s, and her young daughter, Natalie (Rachel Eggleston), show up at the home of Polly’s eccentric mother, Elaine (Elizabeth Perkins), and stepfather, Max (Brad Garrett), whom they seem to have interrupted in an intimate moment.

Polly says she’s homeless because her ex-husband, Julian (Jon Dore), used that month’s rent to adopt a highway. She and Natalie move in.

Six months later, they’re still there. In voice-over, Polly says, “I’m not a failure. I’m trendy.” If there is indeed a trend of young adults moving in with their parents, it’s probably trending downward, but TV’s comic timing is usually sluggish. Back in 2003, a rash of sitcoms with this premise debuted on the networks, just as an earlier recession was ending.

Polly is working at a Whole Foods-type grocery store. “I’ve made quite a name for myself behind the smoothie counter,” she says in voice-over. “I’ve named all the smoothies after me.”

A customer asks Polly on a date, and Polly is forced to ask Max and Elaine to baby-sit, even though she’s afraid they’ll do or say something inappropriate to Natalie. She keeps having flashbacks to her own childhood, when Elaine once told her that she and Max were going to a wife-swapping party. For her part, Elaine says she’s not sure if she ever bathed Polly.

The date, naturally, goes bad. Even though the guy tells Polly that he’s taken an antidepressant, she encourages him to drink. Julian has to help her get him home.

Trying to overcome Natalie’s fear of dogs, Max and Elaine take her to an animal shelter. It turns out that Polly is much more afraid of dogs than her daughter is.

The humor is a mix of slapstick and low-key banter. When Natalie says she’s never been with a real dog, Elaine says to Max, “Are you thinking what I’m thinking?”

“I never know how to answer that,” he says.

Julian is a typical TV male in arrested development. When we first see him, he’s excited because he’s just bought a “life hammer” that will help him break out of his car in case of an accident. The tool pops up again after the date.

Although the chronology is a little fuzzy, Max and Elaine are supposed to be throwbacks to an era of groovier attitudes. This switcheroo — freewheeling parents with an uptight kid — is still going strong 31 years after “Family Ties” debuted.

The episode ends with a rather jarring shift in tone, as Polly lists, again in voice-over, the reasons she’s grateful for her family — even Julian, whose “good heart,” she says, “almost makes up for him having extremely bad credit.”

Though neither the dialogue nor the comic business sparkles, the lead actors shine. Perkins, who usually plays the stiffest person in the room, as on Showtime’s “Weeds,” is surprisingly believable as a free spirit, perhaps because she underplays throughout.

Garrett also holds back, something he couldn’t do in the cast of scene-stealers on “Everybody Loves Raymond.” And Chalke works the edge-of-hysteria act she perfected on “Scrubs.”

Although we like the actors, we don’t particularly care about their characters. The setup is too schematic for them to seem much more than types. Thus no one will finish the episode eager to find out what will happen next week.

If the show fails to draw a crowd, at least Polly won’t have to live with her parents for that much longer.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/how-to-live-with-your-parents-dont/
post #86019 of 93844
TV Notes
NBC hopes crime thriller fans will eat 'Hannibal' up
Bryan Fuller says his new drama pays tribute to the Hannibal Lecter legacy, while NBC executives see a sleeper hit in the making.
By Greg Braxton, Los Angeles Times - Apr. 2, 2013

You just can't keep a good cannibal down.

More than three decades after he first murdered and chomped his way to pop culture infamy, sophisticated serial murderer Hannibal Lecter is back, alive and well-fed. And although he has gone from the big screen to the small screen, his twisted appetites have not diminished during his absence.

Introduced in a series of bestselling novels by Thomas Harris that gave birth to a hit film franchise, which included the Oscar-winning "Silence of the Lambs," Lecter's latest incarnation is "Hannibal," a dark drama premiering Thursday on NBC.

The series is a prequel to the novels and films, positioning him as a psychiatrist who works for the FBI. He is recruited to help a troubled but gifted criminal profiler, Will Graham (Hugh Dancy), who has the ability to see inside the minds of serial killers. Lecter, however, has his own personal — and likely demented — agenda for the unwitting Graham.

Mads Mikkelsen ("Casino Royale") steps into the Lecter apron previously worn by Brian Cox ("Manhunter") and Anthony Hopkins, who won an Oscar for his portrayal. Helming the series is executive producer Bryan Fuller ("Pushing Daisies," "Heroes").

NBC, which has had a roller-coaster season and could use a new hit, is banking that Lecter has aged like a fine Chianti, the wine he famously consumed along with a serving of fava beans as he devoured the liver of one of his victims.

"We like making as much noise as possible, and we loved the idea of Hannibal as a series," said Jennifer Salke, president of NBC Entertainment. She was particularly excited about Fuller's involvement: "We love him as a visionary and a creator, and we're always behind what he's excited about. When he wanted to tackle Hannibal, we loved the idea. We think it's a little sleeper."

But times have changed since Lecter first arrived on the terror scene. The series is debuting just a few months after network executives came under fire as they tried to justify the flood of escalating violence on-screen in shows such as "Criminal Minds," "Dexter" and "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" that critics maintained were glorifications or even more troubling, inspirations for real-world killings. Those charges came in the wake of horrific mass shootings in Colorado and Connecticut that claimed numerous young lives.

NBC Entertainment Chairman Robert Greenblatt told reporters in January that although "Hannibal" would obviously be gruesome and gory, no killings would be depicted on-screen. Yet in the first five minutes of the first episode, a couple is shown being gunned down in their home, with blood spurting from torsos and necks in slow motion (the perspective is of Graham's re-imagining how the real killer committed the crime). Later, throats of two women are graphically slashed. In a later episode, a man is shot point-blank in the head, blood spraying onto a person standing nearby.

And that's not counting the display of murder victims, including women impaled on deer antlers and a couple displayed following their murder with the flesh skinned from their backs and held up with fish hooks and string like angel wings.

"Hannibal" is also premiering in the shadow of "The Following," Fox's drama that features a gleefully evil serial killer very much in the mode of Lecter — brilliant professor Joe Carroll (James Purefoy), who is so charismatic that he attracts a throng of followers eager to do his diabolical bidding, especially when it comes to wrecking the life of his target, former FBI agent Ryan Hardy (Kevin Bacon). Despite weekly depictions of graphic violence in which innocents are slashed, burned, maimed, gutted and shot at close range with spear guns, "The Following," which also puts Carroll's young son in peril, has attracted a solid viewership and will likely be renewed for next season.

Fuller is aware that "Hannibal" may trigger concern about its extreme content, and said his intent was to pay tribute to the Lecter legacy, calling it a "hybridization of the crime thriller and the horror movie." He said he wanted to particularly explore the personality disorders of Graham, and the relationship between him and Lecter, "two crazy men who need each other to understand each other."

Graphic violence and images are a necessary part of that dynamic, he said.

"It's about honoring the genre and respecting the source," Fuller said. "Those familiar with 'Silence of the Lambs' will have a certain expectation to the material, and at a certain point we have to deliver those ingredients. 'Silence of the Lambs' was beautiful and scary, but it was also graphic. We don't want to offend anyone, but this is an adult content show."

Added Salke, "After all, the show is called 'Hannibal.'"

Dancy said he did not feel the violence was gratuitous: "I have no interest in violence for the sake of it or for the lack of other ideas. There has to be imagination, purpose and circumstance. The violence Graham sees illustrates the weight that is on his shoulders, the murkiness of his world."

Mikkelsen said he is not approaching the character of Lecter as a man who specializes in torture and mayhem: "It's as close as you can be to Satan, but he doesn't see it that way. He enjoys the beauty of what he is doing."

While the debate over gun control rages on in Washington, the outcry over violence in popular culture that followed the Colorado and Connecticut shootings appears to have quieted down. There's been no major criticism or protest of the violence in "The Following."

Said Stephanie Moulton Sarkis, a psychotherapist who has written about the effects of TV violence: "I believe there's no outcry because audiences have really become desensitized to it, with shows like 'The Walking Dead' and others. If it bothered people, they wouldn't watch it. So it will continue."

HANNIBAL
Where: NBC
When: 10 p.m. Thursday


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-hannibal-violence20130402,0,4523058,full.story
post #86020 of 93844
TV Notes
BET Renews 'The Game,' Picks Up 4 New Shows
By Jethro Nededog, TheWrap.com - Apr. 2, 2013

BET announced at its Upfront presentation on Tuesday that it’s renewing four series, including "The Game," and picking up four new series, including Gabrielle Union's "Being Mary Jane."

"The Game," which saw cast changes and its 100th episode this past season, will go on to a seventh season. Executive Produced by show creator Mara Brock, Salim Akil, Kenny Smith and Erica Montolfo-Bura, the series stars Lauren London, Jay Ellis, Hosea Chanchez, Coby Bell and Wendy Raquel Robinson. Singer and actress Brandy will also return in a recurring role on Season 7.

Other season renewals went to video countdown show “106 & Park,” talent competition “Apollo Live,” “Bobby Jones Gospel,” gospel competition "Sunday Best," “Let’s Stay Together” and unscripted series "The Sheards."

The network previously announced in March that it renewed “Real Husbands of Hollywood” for Season 2.

Gabrielle Union starrer, “Being Mary Jane,” gets a series order. From the "The Game" and "Girlfriends," EPs, it stars Union as a successful TV news anchor who must deal with the typical rigors of life and career along with her dedication to family members who have less motivation that she does

BET has also picked up "Burns BBQ," which follows the workings of a family barbecue business; a revamped "Comic View," which highlight rising comedians; and the talk show, "T.D. Jakes Presents: Mind, Body, & Soul" with spiritual leader Bishop T.D. Jakes.

Additionally, its spinoff channel, Centric, has picked up two scripted comedies and has renewed five series.

Among Centric's renewals are "As Written," "Being," "Centric Certified," "Centric Comedy All-Stars" and "Culture List."

Heading up its new programming, two scripted comedies: "First Family," a comedy about an African-American President and his family in The White House; and "Mr. Box Office," which stars Bill Bellamy as a star forced to do community service as a high school English teacher in South Central L.A.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/bet-renews-game-picks-4-new-shows-83706
post #86021 of 93844
TV Review
Forever Young (TV Land)
By Allison Keene, The Hollywood Reporter - Apr. 2, 2013

TV Land, the channel for people who enjoy reruns of classic television (and shows devoted to Betty White), has tossed its hat into the reality TV game with Forever Young, a Real World-esque series (TV Land is owned by MTV parent Viacom) that puts five people under 30 and five folks over 70 in a house together to see what happens when people stop being polite and start needing Depends.

Ashton Kutcher (there's a Demi Moore joke in here, and I'm not going to make it) did something similar with his series Beauty and the Geek, another "social experiment" to see if people can stand being around those who are different from they are long enough to win money. There's no money to be won on Forever Young, but there are small prizes along the way as the two groups match up to complete tasks designed to make each more aware of the other's generation.

The promos for the series talk a lot about how far the Seniors and Juniors come in understanding each other's worlds, but mostly the show feels like hostile kids on an extended stay with grandparents. Further, some of the competitions are skewed in a way that suggests unfortunate generational expectations: the under-30s are asked (and fail) at questions like "Which war came first: World War II, The Civil War or the Vietnam War?" and "Which U.S. president brought the country out of the Depression?" whereas the seniors are asked what "Brangelina" is and the meaning of "sexting." Yikes.

The senior citizens rightly bring up that these aren't really generational things, these are facts that should have been learned in school. "School is different today; they don't teach you stuff," Angelina, one of the under 30s, comments. The Seniors don't buy it, and neither do I. (The narrator tells us that the Juniors think they've been cast in a spring break show before they arrive, which kind of sets the bar.) Speaking of bars, though, once everyone gets pulled into a game of beer pong, the bonding finally begins.

Despite being called "stuck in their ways," the Seniors (a spry bunch with varied backgrounds) seem pretty open to getting to know the young folk (a few of whom are genuinely likable) and their world, while some of the more hostile Juniors comment on the Seniors' memory problems. Although to that point, one competition requires the Seniors to print out a digital photo with the help of the Juniors (without the Juniors being able to look at the computer screens), which is a frustratingly familiar exercise in patience for most who have given tech support to their own parents or grandparents ("Just click it!!").

The half-hour series, which TV Land shelved for many years, is a mere six episodes long, but even in that short time, it's likely that everyone will say they've been on a "journey." What exactly will be gained by the cast or will be taken away by the viewers regarding the experience is unclear, though. Forever Young has enough sentimentality to be light-hearted entertainment for some, but more important, perhaps, it suggests on a larger level that we're in a society where the young and old don't mix nearly enough to generally feel all that comfortable together.

Although the show doesn't live up to being a "bold" experiment, by any means, I will grant the network's claim that it may make you want to call up and chat with the elders in your life. Until they need help printing a digital photo, of course.

FOREVER YOUNG
The Bottom Line: As much squabbling as a family get-together, with half the hugs.
Airdate: 10 p.m. Wednesday, April 3 (TV Land)


http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/forever-young-tv-review-432349
post #86022 of 93844
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
WEDNESDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - The Middle
8:30PM - Suburgatory
9PM - Modern Family
9:31PM - How to Live With Your Parents (For the Rest of Your Life) (Series Premiere)
10PM - Nashville
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Russell Brand; Bob Costas; Gary Allan performs)
12:35AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - Survivor: Caramoan -- Fans vs. Favorites
9PM - Criminal Minds
10PM - CSI: Crime Scene Investigation
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Louis CK; TV host Rachel Maddow; The Flaming Lips perform)
12:37AM - Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Lisa Kudrow; Bonnie Raitt performs)
(R - Feb. 20)

NBC:
8PM - Dateline NBC
9PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
10PM - Chicago Fire
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Rosario Dawson; Max Greenfield; Gloriana performs)
12:37AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Kathie Lee Gifford; actor James Purefoy; Dido performs)
1:36AM - Last Call with Carson Daly (Author Lawrence Wright; Room 237; Delta Rae performs)

FOX:
8PM - American Idol (120 min., LIVE)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Nature: What Plants Talk About
9PM - NOVA: Ancient Computer
10PM - Eat, Fast and Live Longer With Michael Mosley

UNIVISION:
8PM - Porque El Amor Manda
9PM - Amores Verdaderos
10PM - Amor Bravio

THE CW:
8PM - Arrow
9PM - Supernatural

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Pasión Prohibida
9PM - La Patrona
10PM - El Rostro de la Venganza

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Author Sheryl Sandberg)
11:30PM - The Colbert Report (Author A.C. Grayling)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Steven Yeun; Darius Rucker)

E!:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (60 min. compilation: Blake Shelton, Josh Duhamel, Brad Wollack, Chris Franjola, Sarah Colonna, Jen Kirkman, Jeff Wild, Fortune Feimster, Heather McDonald, Ross Mathews, Loni Love and TJ Miller)
post #86023 of 93844
Critic's Notes
Gerald McRaney and 'Southland' Still Riding High
By Eric Gould, TVWorthWatching.com - Apr. 3, 2013

Major Dad Gerald McRaney has had a renaissance of sorts in 2013.

His February guest appearance on FX's Justified was a perfect fit for that series, with McRaney, as Josiah Cairn, cooly riffing the hillbilly snark that's the show's trademark.

He played stealthy billionaire tycoon and potential vice presidential candidate Raymond Tusk, who out-played the normally unplayable Francis Underwood (Kevin Spacey) in the Netflix series, House of Cards.

And McRaney's turn on Southland last week, portraying Hicks, a retired police officer who was Officer John Cooper’s (Michael Cudlitz) training officer, was one of those singular, dramatic moments in television when the electrified minutes stood still. The performance's unvarnished authenticity was a television milestone.

The episode paints Hicks as an unfortunate character, a recent widower who drinks to fill long days — days that leave him lots of time to look back at the power and the glory of the job he no longer holds and feed the psychological impotence that occurs when a gun and a badge disappear.

Having lost his wife to illness, Hicks also lacks real relationships, particularly since his entire adult life was focused on being a cop.

Cooper is unwilling to let Hicks slip away, broken and addicted. He's staged his own intervention by chaining Hicks, dressed only in a grimy T-shirt and boxer shorts, to the plumbing pipes in Cooper's house to force Hicks to dry out. It's Cooper's renegade attempt to rehab the old dog who was once his mentor — the man who, despite hitting bottom, is still a father figure to him.

Missed it? You can watch the episode, entitled "Heroes," online. (You will need to log in with your local cable provider information). It's worth watching, and proof, yet again, that basic cable shows such as Mad Men and Breaking Bad are giving premium cable shows an equal run for their money – demonstrating that great drama isn't incumbent on uncensored language or frontal nudity. (And as if to underscore my point, it was just announced that Southland has won a Peabody Award for outstanding achievement in television.)

McRaney's ability to portray Hicks' agony over the end of his career, and the seemingly empty future in front of him, is as withering and redemptive as any television dramatic performance I can remember — from any of the old Playhouse 90 moments through anything done on St. Elsewhere, thirtysomething or Six Feet Under.

Not that we would have expected anything less from a television and film actor with 40 years of work behind him, including the series Jericho, Deadwood and Promised Land, as well as the Simon & Simon and Major Dad roles for which he is most well known. (Southland airs Wednesdays at 10 p.m. ET on TNT, and is winding down its fifth season with three episodes left. TNT has confirmed that McRaney will return for the Southland season finale, "Reckoning," airing April 17.)

It's also worth noting that the "Heroes" episode (co-written by series creator, and NYPD Blue veteran, Ann Biderman) stepped up Southland's game considerably. The show has always stood on the gritty side of police realism, in the style of its police forefathers such as Homicide: Life on the Street and Hill Street Blues, and has an ongoing habit of portraying sucker punch-style mayhem to keep the adrenaline at a high level.

But Biderman took the show to a gentler and more powerful level with the interpersonal match between Hicks and Cooper, creating an emotional precipice that emerged not from gun-wielding street crazies, but from the depiction of a mature life somehow spun out of control.

Hopefully this stellar acting, and writing, is not coming too late to keep the show out of the network's crosshairs, because it would be a mistake to cancel a show displaying this kind of creative surge.

The ratings have been down from last year, averaging about 1.3 million viewers — well below A&E's Duck Dynasty, which airs the same night. That's not cancellation territory, but it could be, depending on TNT's commitment to the show, which also has one of the best casts on television, including Cudlitz along with Shawn Hatosy, C. Thomas Howell, Regina King and Ben McKenzie.

It would be a shame to lose such a provocative, smart drama. And if McRaney is not up for Outstanding Guest Actor when the Emmy nominations come around this summer — well, that would be a glaring error, too.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=4631
post #86024 of 93844
I'm curious to know what you think...

Now that JR is dead, for real, is the new Dallas as interesting now as it was when it was in its heyday?
post #86025 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by humdinger70 View Post

I'm curious to know what you think...

Now that JR is dead, for real, is the new Dallas as interesting now as it was when it was in its heyday?

Didn't watch the original ... haven't watched the reboot ... so as far as I'm concerned, I guess they're both equally "interesting." smile.gif
post #86026 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by humdinger70 View Post

I'm curious to know what you think...

Now that JR is dead, for real, is the new Dallas as interesting now as it was when it was in its heyday?
IMHO they didn't really feature JR in the reboot anyway. He had his moments, but more as an adjunct with what John Ross, Bobby, Christopher and Cliff were doing. In fact, the whole original cast was more like just a hook to get viewers to get used the next generation. Bobby and Sue Ellen have the most prominent roles when it comes to original cast members. I don't think the writing or the deviousness are near as good as the original and although we watch, we don't really "care" about the new generation.
Edited by DoubleDAZ - 4/3/13 at 9:26am
post #86027 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTVChallenged View Post


Didn't watch the original ... haven't watched the reboot ... so as far as I'm concerned, I guess they're both equally "interesting." smile.gif

 

Yeah - we know you were more of a "Dynasty" guy. wink.gif

post #86028 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Critic's Notes
Gerald McRaney and 'Southland' Still Riding High
By Eric Gould, TVWorthWatching.com - Apr. 3, 2013

Major Dad Gerald McRaney has had a renaissance of sorts in 2013.

Huh? He never seems to be short of work. Since Deadwood and Jericho he regularly pops up on my screen.
post #86029 of 93844
Well it's official.

Leno is stepping down next year and Fallon is taking his slot.

Late Night schedules are about to get interesting again.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/official-jimmy-fallon-replace-jay-432682
post #86030 of 93844
It was "official" when Conan took over, too, wasn't it?

I think this episode is a rerun..... wink.gif
post #86031 of 93844
TBS Schedule. Summer 2014.

10pm Leno
11pm Conan

biggrin.gif
post #86032 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by VisionOn View Post

Well it's official.

Leno is stepping down next year and Fallon is taking his slot.

Late Night schedules are about to get interesting again.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/official-jimmy-fallon-replace-jay-432682
I don't know why NBC is so determined to force Leno out when he is still the top rated late night talk show. And NBC certainly doesn't have many shows these days that are winning their time periods. I know they want to attract a younger audience, but he hasn't lost the younger viewers yet. I enjoy his monologue, Headlines, Jaywalking, and various comedy bits. Seems a bit like age discrimination to me in favor of the younger guy. And to their credit, CBS is not trying to force Letterman to retire, and he has been around a while like Leno. To me, they should have selected Fallon as the replacement, but given Leno the option of another 3 years until he reaches 65. Since his ratings are still on top. I am just not a big fan of Fallon's style of show, and will probably switch over to Letterman or maybe Kimmel. And I don't see the point of moving the show to New York, since the Tonight Show has always had more of a west coast, Hollywood feel. We shall see if these planned changes turn out to be another failure like the Conan fiasco.
post #86033 of 93844
Leno's contract is up next year so it would need renegotiating. I expect Fallon is much, much cheaper.

I enjoy the variety show aspect of Fallon but I can't see anyway he can translate that to appeal to Leno's demo. Fallon has gadget blog guests and plays video games.
post #86034 of 93844
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylerSC View Post

I don't know why NBC is so determined to force Leno out when he is still the top rated late night talk show. And NBC certainly doesn't have many shows these days that are winning their time periods. I know they want to attract a younger audience, but he hasn't lost the younger viewers yet. I enjoy his monologue, Headlines, Jaywalking, and various comedy bits. Seems a bit like age discrimination to me in favor of the younger guy. And to their credit, CBS is not trying to force Letterman to retire, and he has been around a while like Leno. To me, they should have selected Fallon as the replacement, but given Leno the option of another 3 years until he reaches 65. Since his ratings are still on top. I am just not a big fan of Fallon's style of show, and will probably switch over to Letterman or maybe Kimmel. And I don't see the point of moving the show to New York, since the Tonight Show has always had more of a west coast, Hollywood feel. We shall see if these planned changes turn out to be another failure like the Conan fiasco.
This, I probably won't watch Dave or Kimmel though ...
post #86035 of 93844
TUESDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #86036 of 93844
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
Higher note for NBC’s ‘The Voice’
Second results show grows 5 percent over last week
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Apr. 3, 2013

“The Voice” became the rare show to grow in week two, perking up 5 percent in its second Tuesday episode of season four.

“Voice” averaged a 4.3 adults 18-49 rating at 8 p.m., according to Nielsen overnights, up from a 4.1 last week.

It became the highest-rated Tuesday program on broadcast since “Voice’s” third-season finale in December.

It undoubtedly helped that there was less original competition. CBS’s “NCIS” was a repeat this week and drew a 1.4 compared to a 3.2 for last week’s original episode.

“Voice” was easily the highest-rated program of the evening, and it carried NBC to a win on the night, even though ABC finished first during the final two hours of the night.

With CBS’s “NCIS” and “NCIS: Los Angeles” in repeats, “Dancing with the Stars Results” was the night’s No. 2 show, drawing a 2.2 at 9 p.m., off 8 percent from last week.

Lead-out “Body of Proof” notched a rare win at 10 p.m., averaging a 1.5 and tying Univision for first in the slot. Usual timeslot winner “Golden Boy” on CBS was hurt by its lack of original lead-in and managed just a 1.2, off 7 percent from last week.

NBC was first for the night among 18-49s with a 2.3 average overnight rating and a 7 share. ABC was second at 1.7/5, Fox and Univision tied for third at 1.6/5, CBS fifth at 1.4/4, Telemundo sixth at 0.7/2 and CW seventh at 0.2/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-seven percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

At 8 p.m. NBC was first with a 4.3 for “Voice,” followed by Fox with a 1.9 for “Hell’s Kitchen.” Univision was third with a 1.5 for “Porque el Amor Manda.” ABC and CBS tied for fourth at 1.4, ABC for “Splash” and CBS for a repeat of “NCIS.” Telemundo was sixth with a 0.5 for “Pasion Prohibida” and CW seventh with a 0.3 for a “Hart of Dixie” rerun.

ABC moved to first at 9 p.m. with a 2.2 for “Stars,” while Univision improved to second with a 1.8 for “Amores Verdaderos.” CBS and NBC tied for third at 1.6, CBS for a repeat of “NCIS: Los Angeles” and NBC for an hour of “The New Normal,” which drew a 1.9 and 1.4, the former its best rating since October. Fox was fifth with a 1.3 for a repeat of “New Girl” (1.3) and a new “The Mindy Project” (1.4), Telemundo sixth with a 0.9 for “La Patrona” and CW seventh with a 0.2 for a repeat of “Beauty and the Beast.”

At 10 p.m. ABC and Univision tied for first at 1.5, ABC for “Body of Proof” and Univision for “Amor Bravio.” CBS was third with a 1.3 for “Golden Boy,” NBC fourth with a 0.9 for “Smash” and Telemundo fifth with a 0.6 for “El Rostro de la Venganza.”

CBS was first for the night among households with a 6.2 average overnight rating and a 10 share. ABC was a close second at 6.1/10, NBC third at 4.5/7, Fox fourth at 2.3/4, Univision fifth at 2.0/3, Telemundo sixth at 0.8/1 and CW seventh at 0.5/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/higher-note-for-nbcs-the-voice/
post #86037 of 93844
TV-on-DVD Notes
Netflix's 'House of Cards' Getting DVD, Blu-ray Release
By Brent Lang, TheWrap.com - Apr. 3, 2013

"House of Cards" may be upending the way viewers watch television by releasing all of its episodes in one binge-friendly gulp, but Netflix's series will have a rather conventional afterlife.

The glossy, 13-episode political thriller will be released on DVD and Blu-ray on June 11, according to Home Media Magazine, which noted that the series is available for pre-sale on Amazon. The discs will be distributed by Sony Pictures.

The Blu-ray set will sell for $$65.99 and the DVD set will retail for $55.99. The show premiered all of its episodes on Feb. 1 on Netflix's streaming service, but the company says it will not release ratings.

"I honestly have no motivation to do it," Netflix's Chief Content Officer Ted Sarandos said at an AllThingsD's conference last February. "I don't sell ads, so ratings don't matter in that way."

The show, which was filmed with a reported budget of $100 million, has been a hit with critics, who have praised its incisive look at Beltway politics and the villainous performance of Kevin Spacey as a conniving congressman.

In the Los Angeles Times, Mary McNamara predicted that "House of Cards" could become the first non-televised series to score with Emmy voters and said it was a sign the service had arrived.

"Just as 'The Sopranos' turned HBO into a game-changer and 'Mad Men' re-invented AMC, 'House of Cards' makes Netflix an undisputed player in serialized drama," she wrote.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/netflixs-house-cards-getting-dvd-blu-ray-release-83801
post #86038 of 93844
TV Notes
'The Young and the Restless' Moves From Soapnet to TV Guide Network
By Michael O'Connell, The Hollywood Reporter - Apr. 3, 2013

Just a week after acquiring 50 percent stake of TV Guide Network, CBS is sending The Young and the Restless to the network as its new home for cable encores.

The move takes place this summer, marking the conclusion of the soap's tenure on Soapnet. The series will retain its 7 p.m. day-to-date schedule in the move. The series' move to TVGN marks the first programming announcement since CBS Corp. and Lionsgate partnered on TVGN television network and TVGuide.com on March 26, with CBS taking its stake from One Equity Partners.

The Young and the Restless, the top-rated daytime drama on U.S. television, recently celebrated 40 years on the air. It's been #1 for 24 of those years. Produced by Bell Dramatic Serial Company in association with Sony Pictures Television, the series had been getting encore presentations on Soapnet since 2006 -- where it was also the top-rated soap.

As a part of the new partnership, TVGN will be home to CBS’ programming, production and marketing assets in addition to Lionsgate’s film and TV resources. It currently reaches more than 80 million homes.

Though financial terms of the CBS deal were not disclosed, The Hollywood Reporter revealed that the company paid roughly $100 million for its stake. That's down from the $123 million One Equity originally paid Lionsgate to acquire the half share.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/young-restless-moves-soapnet-tv-432770
post #86039 of 93844
Nielsen Notes (Cable)
FX’s ‘Justified’ Viewership Down For Season 4 Finale
By Dominic Patten, Deadline.com - Apr. 3, 2013

The Season 4 finale of Justified on FX was watched by 2.249 million viewers last night. That’s down 16% from the 2.67 million who watched the drama’s Season 3 finale on April 10 last year. It’s also down sharply from the 3.95 million who watched the Season 4 premiere on January 8. That was the season high for Justified this year. That show also had 1.65 million viewers among Adults 18-49. Tuesday’s episode pulled in 934,000 viewers among Adults 18-49. That’s also down from the 1.35 million in the key demo who watched the Season 3 ender.

Developed by Graham Yost from Elmore Leonard’s Riding The Rap and Pronto novels and a short story by the author, Justified debuted on March 16, 2010 on the network. At FX’s upfront presentation in NYC on March 28, network president John Landgraf announced that the Emmy winning series would be coming back for a fifth season.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/04/fxs-justified-viewership-down-for-season-4-finale/
post #86040 of 93844
TV Review
NBC’s new ‘Hannibal’ has a look and a feel worth devouring
By Lori Rackl, Chicago Sun Times - Apr. 2, 2013

Pour yourself a glass of Chianti and buckle up for a ride on the cray-cray roller coaster.

NBC’s new serial-killer thriller “Hannibal” is a haunting, riveting — and yes, grisly — psychological drama that has the look and feel of a show audiences have become more accustomed to seeing on cable than broadcast.

This contemporary, reimagined take on characters from Thomas Harris’ novel “Red Dragon” comes from Bryan Fuller, whose previous creations include the quirky, dark shows “Pushing Daisies,” “Wonderfalls” and “Dead Like Me.”

Fuller’s latest project probes the budding relationship between talented and tortured criminal profiler Will Graham and diabolical Dr. Hannibal Lecter — pre-“Silence of the Lambs” and pre-imprisonment— whose bloodthirsty ways remain a secret, except to viewers. The two foils are brought together in the pilot by FBI agent Jack Crawford (Laurence Fishburne, “The Matrix”) as he tries to crack a case involving missing college girls.

British actor Hugh Dancy (“The Big C”) stars as Graham, a special investigator whose “horse is hitched to a post that is closer to Asperger’s and autistics than narcissists and sociopaths.” Graham’s uncanny ability to adopt the mindset of a killer makes him a valuable tool for the FBI. It also makes him a hot mess.

Calm, collected Lecter — a psychiatrist played with admirable restraint by Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen (“Casino Royale”) — is enlisted to help crime-fighters Graham and Crawford, often over one of Lecter’s exquisitely prepared home-cooked meals. (Quite the epicure, Lecter would be a lock in a “Top Chef” quickfire challenge using human organs.) “Hannibal” boasts famed Spanish chef Jose Andres as the show’s food consultant.

Later “Hannibal” episodes feature a seductive female crime blogger who seems like she mistakenly wandered over from a CW set. But even her somewhat annoying presence isn’t enough to shake the sturdy foundation built around an intriguing triumvirate of male characters. (Gillian Anderson of “The X-Files” reportedly will come on board later in the 13-episode season as Lecter’s shrink.)

Bloody and twisted, “Hannibal” may be one of the goriest programs on broadcast television. It’s also extremely well executed, from the artistic visuals and haunting soundtrack to the stellar cast and sharp scripts peppered with the perfect amount of gallows humor. Deliciously disturbing, “Hannibal” is bound to leave viewers hungry for more.

‘HANNIBAL’
9 to 10 p.m. CT Thursdays on WMAQ-Channel 5
Rating: ★★★1/2 (out of four)


http://www.suntimes.com/entertainment/19233933-421/nbcs-new-hannibal-has-a-look-and-a-feel-worth-devouring.html
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