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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2880

post #86371 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by lokilarry View Post

Any word on Grimm?
Grimm was broadcast an hour later in the Brian Williams slot, at least here.
post #86372 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by lokilarry View Post

Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't all of the major networks have some affiliated news channel on cable that could have aired all of the news coverage? Fox showed Hell's kitchen last night in its entirety.
Not all of them.

Even if they did, it would still require them to not want to put hyped up news stories on the network with the most viewers as opposed to a cable network where far fewer people would see it.

Here's how TV works:

- News goes on the broadcast network to make people tune in to breaking stories.
- Sports goes on the cable networks to get people to pay for cable in order to watch sports. The only exceptions are games that start before prime time and those really, really high rated events (like playoffs and finals and the Super Bowl) that boost the OTA numbers enough to beat everyone else up against them.

Fox likely figured (rightly) that the coverage would extend past their prime time window, which ends at 10PM. As a result, they likely stuck with their Fox News Channel since it rates well enough to draw people in and it avoids screwing up the local news hit time.
post #86373 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

Grimm was broadcast an hour later in the Brian Williams slot, at least here.
Was it a new episode? It was a repeat here on the NBC alternate KICU(baseball on main NBC channel).
post #86374 of 93675
Its a long wait to get a new episode for Grimm with 2 reruns and the gap till Tuesday the 30th.
post #86375 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by lokilarry View Post

Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't all of the major networks have some affiliated news channel on cable that could have aired all of the news coverage? Fox showed Hell's kitchen last night in its entirety.
Not all of them.

Even if they did, it would still require them to not want to put hyped up news stories on the network with the most viewers as opposed to a cable network where far fewer people would see it.

Here's how TV works:

- News goes on the broadcast network to make people tune in to breaking stories.
- Sports goes on the cable networks to get people to pay for cable in order to watch sports. The only exceptions are games that start before prime time and those really, really high rated events (like playoffs and finals and the Super Bowl) that boost the OTA numbers enough to beat everyone else up against them.

Fox likely figured (rightly) that the coverage would extend past their prime time window, which ends at 10PM. As a result, they likely stuck with their Fox News Channel since it rates well enough to draw people in and it avoids screwing up the local news hit time.

While FOX stayed with normal programming, we opted to go the news route using a combo of FNC and WFXT and using FOX network for a short time between the arrest and presser when nothing was going on.
post #86376 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SATURDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Late night shows are preceded by late local news)

CBS:
8PM - NCIS: Los Angeles (R - Jan. 10)
9PM - The Mentalist[/b] (R - Oct. 14)
10PM - 48 Hours Mysteries

Nah...At 8pm, CBS is airing the "Vegas" episode it preempted last night (4/19.)
post #86377 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by lokilarry View Post

Any word on Grimm?
Grimm was broadcast an hour later in the Brian Williams slot, at least here.

A Grimm repeat was shown here (San Diego) at 9pm, and an expanded 11pm newscast took over the 10pm NBC slot. Brian Williams' newsmagazine was on at 7pm. San Diego has an NBC O/O affiliate.
Edited by domino92024 - 4/20/13 at 1:12pm
post #86378 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by domino92024 View Post

A Grimm repeat was shown here (San Diego) at 9pm, and an expanded 11pm newscast took over the 10pm NBC slot. Brian Williams' newsmagazine was on at 7pm. San Diego has an NBC O/O affiliate.
SF Bay Area NBC went the Giants/Padres game as soon as Prez walked out the door & when the game was over went into 3/4 of what was left of Rock Center
post #86379 of 93675
About the "writers" for reality shows, I remember some years ago (10?) there was some law about 'prize money' TV shows having to be honest contests. With all the recent comments here about scripting them, I guess that is no longer the law?
post #86380 of 93675
Or perhaps it is still the law, but the purported contestants are paid their acting fees and the prize is never really awarded.
post #86381 of 93675
FRIDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #86382 of 93675
TV Notes
'Glee Project' to consider renewal
By James Hibberd, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Apr. 20, 2013

With Glee getting a surprise renewal for two more seasons, Oxygen is set to consider a renewal for its reality show spin-off The Glee Project.

The network will begin conversations about a potential third season, sources say.

Fox was bogged down in negotiations for a Glee renewal in recent weeks, and during that time the fate of The Glee Project seemed uncertain. And these new talks don’t necessarily mean the reality show will continue. But given that the Fox pickup is for two seasons, there does seem to be plenty of time to launch another round of the competition, which awards at least one winner with an arc on the Fox series.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2013/04/19/glee-project-renewal/
post #86383 of 93675
Emmy Notes
Why The TV Academy Reversed Its Decision On Merging Longform Categories
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Apr. 20, 2013

The timing of last year’s decision by the TV Academy to consolidate the four longform acting categories into two was baffling as it came a couple of days after the record-breaking debut of History’s miniseries Hatfields & McCoys and the network premiere of HBO’s Hemingway & Gellhorn, which had opened at the Cannes Film Festival. The TV Academy moved to cut the categories in half amidst a renaissance of the longform genre with such programs as British imports Downton Abbey, which started off in the miniseries field, Sherlock and Luther; History’s Hatfields & McCoys and FX’s American Horror Story, which was submitted as a miniseries. At the time, TV Academy’s SVP Awards John Leverence explained the decision by saying that the decrease in longform categories “corresponds to their primetime presence.”

But this week, just as the consolidation was about to take effect, the TV Academy reversed its decision, keeping the lead and supporting acting fields intact. “What a difference 13 months make,” Leverence said yesterday. He said the May 2012 vote “was based on how the longform (programming) was trending — the patient was on the table getting last rites.” But now “there has been a major revival of the longform. The consolidation was based on last year’s reality, not based on this year’s reality; what we thought was happening reversed itself.”

I’d argue that the longform revival had already started when the TV Academy voted to consolidate the acting categories but it certainly continued over the last year with such new entries as Sundance Channel’s Top Of The Lake, History’s The Bible (not necessarily Emmy material), Lifetime’s Steel Magnolias and HBO’s upcoming Behind The Candelabra, which just landed a competition slot in Cannes. The final installment of Showtime’s The Big C also was done as a miniseries. Leverence said the question about possibly reconsidering last year’s decision”based on the new longform landscape”, was first raised by members of the producing branch of the Academy. Bob Bergen and Lily Tomlin, Governors of the Performers Peer Group, then introduced the reversal proposal, which was voted by the Board Thursday night. With about two thirds of the Emmy entries in, the number of acting submissions in the longform categories this year is projected to be roughly on par with last year, Leverence said, giving TV movie/miseries performers the same odds of getting nominated as last year.

While the TV Academy Board on Thursday opted to keep the acting longform categories, they did not address possibly reinstating separate TV movie and miniseries/limited series fields which have been merged since 2011. That may change as the longform volume is expected to keep growing. Fox and FX are making a big push in the limited series arena, with FX recently greenlighted its first program under the initiative, a remake of Fargo, and Fox expected to make its first order soon. History continues to fly the miniseries flag with the upcoming Bonnie & Clyde mini (in association with Lifetime). Additionally, NBC has The Sound Of Music staging coming up. What’s more, the broadcast networks, which carry the Primetime Emmys, had long been complaining about the telecast featuring so many longform categories because for the last decade, TV movies and miniseries had largely been obscure programs on cable that few viewers had seen. Not anymore. With longform entries like Hatfields & McCoys, American Horror Story, The Bible and Steel Magnolias drawing larger crowds than many series, broadcasters now probably won’t mind keeping the movie/miniseries acting fields.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/04/tv-academy-longform-acting-reversal-john-leverenc/
post #86384 of 93675
Critic's Notes
On TV, a new breed of Modern Woman
Addict, political wives, bipolar CIA operative and more: TV's female leads are breaking ground with their unexpected choices. Thanks to the feminist revolution and TV's increasing ascendancy, women are allowed to make mistakes without paying the ultimate price. It's all quite refreshing.
By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times - Apr. 20, 2013

A ruthlessly self-aware political wife reconsidering her choices. A sensual socialite facing down an oppressive age with informed good humor. A group of young women so busy defying social expectations they've forgotten to have any of their own. A working mother with a gift for passionate stillness. A recently recovered drama addict determined to save the world. A bipolar CIA operative, an optimistic bureaucrat, a frightened sex slave turned canny warrior.

The female leads of "House of Cards," "Parade's End," "Girls," "The Good Wife," "Enlightened," "Homeland," "Parks and Recreation" and "Game of Thrones" are very different sorts of women who share one important trait: We have never seen their like before. While everyone was fixated by the rise of the television anti-hero, on "The Sopranos," on "House," on "Dexter" and "Breaking Bad," female characters quietly went post-archetype.

More than 40 years after Mary Richards and Maude Findley made their Modern Woman debuts (and 130 since Ibsen's Nora slammed the door heard 'round the world), another group of groundbreaking women has emerged on television. They work and they parent; love but don't always marry; betray or suffer betrayal but don't necessarily divorce; have flaws, including mental illness, but are not destroyed by them. Most important, they falter, they despair, and then they move on .

Although lacking in demographic diversity — they are all white and mostly middle class — these characters are the fruits of both the feminist revolution and television's increasing ascendancy. Shut out of the new blockbuster economics of Hollywood, the middle-aged actress and the creators of midlevel films have turned their attention to TV, especially cable series, creating leading ladies of a whole different caliber.

How else to account for Robin Wright's terrifyingly splendid Claire Underwood in "House of Cards"? Having made a deal with the devil to avoid boredom, she finds the devil himself boring. Or Tom Stoppard and Rebecca Hall's Sylvia Tietjens of "Parade's End," so different from her literary progenitor, with her insights into the era's sexuality, laughing as she batters herself against the brick wall of Edwardian society. "Good Wife" Alicia Florrick (Julianna Margulies) and Daenerys (Emilia Clarke) in "Game of Thrones" may live in worlds apart, but each accepts the inevitability of compromise and twists it into a new source of power.

They are refreshing because their choices are so unexpected, and their choices are unexpected because they actually have them.

For centuries, female characters were for the most part allowed two endings: marriage and death. Early feminists, including Louisa May Alcott, Edith Wharton, Virginia Woolf and later Kate Millet created memorable women who often railed against the narrowness of society, but in the end they either got married or died, often by their own hand. Alcott did her best to have Jo March remain "a happy spinster," but in the end, even she capitulated to the demands of her audience. In "A Doll's House," Nora left her narcissistic husband, and that is where we left her — even Ibsen couldn't quite imagine what would happen next.

Now we can. Through characters such as Claire and Sylvia, Alicia and "Homeland's" Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes), we can imagine Anna Karenina if she believed she had a future, Jane Eyre with self-esteem, Elizabeth Bennet granted a real education and maybe a trip or two to London. We can see Tess of the d'Urbervilles provided legal counsel or Jo March allowed to run away and be a soldier.

Access to birth control, equal pay for equal work and the invention of Lycra are all important hallmarks of increasing freedom for women, but so is the existence of "Parks and Recreation's" Leslie Knope (Amy Poehler), an unrelenting optimist with goals both lofty and ludicrous and whose marriage was worth an episode or two before the show moved on. Or "Enlightened's" Amy Jellicoe, whom Laura Dern infuses with all the hope, anxiety and awkwardness that comes with conscious personal transformation.

Being a modern invention, television had a starting point a bit further along the liberation timeline than "The Taming of the Shrew" or Kate Chopin's "The Awakening." Lucy Ricardo was certainly quite unhappy with the limitations of being a housewife rather than a singing star or even a career gal, but she stopped short of throwing herself under a train.

There have always been exceptions — the oeuvre of Norman Lear, "The Mary Tyler Moore Show," "Julia," "Cagney & Lacey," Helen Mirren's Jane Tennison in "Prime Suspect" and more recently, the women of "Bones," on which Emily Deschanel's Dr. Temperance Brennan is marked by the brilliant-but-socially-stunted personality that is the hallmark of a male lead. Even so, most female characters came and went in a fairly limited number of shapes and sizes. Tina Fey was welcome and wonderful as the creator of "30 Rock," but Liz Lemon was an updated Rhoda Morgenstern — a beautiful, brilliant woman cloaked in overeating and self-deprecation.

And for better and worse, many of these archetypes are alive and well today — on "House of Cards," Kate Mara's character is absurdly outdated as a young reporter who thinks she can sleep her way to success. But even as recently as five years ago, characters such as "Homeland's" Carrie and "Enlightened's" Amy simply didn't exist, and women such as Alicia Florrick or Leslie Knope would have been one-dimensional wives or working gals whose real passion was passion. "Sex and the City" took "That Girl," tricked her out in Manolos, poured her a Cosmo and handed her a condom, but the Fab Four were pretty much fixated on their love lives.

Still, the idea that women could be just as sexually predatory and analytical as men was a game changer and perhaps the secret reason women seemed to vanish from television in the years after "Sex and the City" ended — where on earth, network executives seemed to wonder, were we supposed to go from here?

They didn't disappear entirely, but for several years it did seem as if "Law & Order's" Mariska Hargitay, "Bones'" Deschanel and "30 Rock's" Fey were the only three left standing, at least on the networks. Cable was a different story. After the success of "The Sopranos," which did almost as well by its women as its men, both premium and basic were suddenly attractive to actresses who had aged out of the increasingly narrow scope of feature films. Holly Hunter and Kyra Sedgwick went to TNT with shows that played more like cinema than television, and when Glenn Close brought Patty Hewes to life on "Damages," things really began to change.

Patty was a cipher, a woman you loved to hate, with the sort of delicious contradictions usually reserved for male leads, and her love life had nothing to do with it. Indeed, her primary relationship was with another woman, a daughter figure whom she tried to curry and kill. Patty was almost Shakespearean, but far more King Lear than Lady Macbeth. "Damages" struggled to sustain its complicated narrative structure, but Patty Hewes did more than make her mark; she punched a hole in the wall.

Two years after "Damages'" debut, "The Good Wife" appeared. What many anticipated to be simply a novel narrative twist — what happens after the loyal political wife assumes the position during her husband's fall — became something more profound. Not only did creators Michelle and Robert King re-invent the procedural as true character drama but they and Margulies also created a new sort of woman, quiet where one expected hysterics, contemplative where scheming seemed more predictable.

Critics were charmed, but more important, so were audiences. Not surprisingly, a spate of new female-centric shows sprung up in its wake. Some were instantly terrific ("New Girl") and some were instantly terrible ("The Playboy Club"); many were just smart new renditions of old characters.

Increasingly, though, they were filled with characters we had never seen before, women allowed to make mistakes without paying the ultimate price, who not only survived the third act but also went on to the fourth.

Which is usually where the good stuff happens.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-women-on-tv-20130421,0,4327673.story[/url
post #86385 of 93675
TV Notes
Five Days In April: TV's Captivating Boston Bombing Drama
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Apr. 20, 2013

Back in 1963, when President Kennedy was shot by sniper fire while being driven in a motorcade in Dallas, network television did something unprecedented. It wiped out all regular programming for the next several days, following the unexpected breaking news story wherever it led. Eventually, that period came to be known, by historians, as “Four Days in November.”

Fifty years later, from the time this past Monday when bombers ruthlessly disrupted the Boston Marathon to Friday night, when the surviving second bombing suspect was located and safely apprehended, television spun out another (literally) captivating ongoing narrative of its own.

Call it — because it fits perfectly — “Five Days in April.”

In terms of importance and historical weight, there is, of course, no comparison between the felling of a U.S. president and the disruption of a local sporting event. But in other respects, comparing the two cold-blooded acts of murder, set half a century apart in the history of both America and television, reveals a lot about how things have changed.

And how, in other respects, they haven’t.

In both 1963 in Dallas and 2013 in Boston, the routes for these very public events were published and diagrammed in advance: the motorcade route for JFK, and the Marathon route through the streets of Boston. In both cases, the perpetrators could pick their spots and wait.

Both breaking-news tragedies involved unexpected, horrifying acts of violence, followed by a frenzied and far-flung manhunt. In both instances, the aftermath included the claiming of other lives, both of officers who just happened to cross paths with the alleged perpetrators, and of the alleged killers themselves.

Both stories had a nation huddled around its TV sets for days. Both had an emotional resonance that, to anyone who watched, will never be forgotten. There also, though, were very significant differences between then and now.

• 1963: Though there were TV cameras at several points along the JFK parade route, not one was in place at Dealey Plaza that dark day in Dallas. Only one man, Abraham Zapruder, filmed the assassination, with a newly acquired 8mm camera he was trying out. Without it, and without police-dispatch recordings from the open mike of one motorcycle cop, there would be no as-it-happened complete record of the event. (And even then, Zapruder’s view of the first shot was obscured by a street sign.)

• 2013: Because cameras were already in place at and near the finish line of the Boston marathon, footage of the two explosions was available immediately, and shown exhaustively — footage showing people selflessly running towards the source of the blasts, to aid victims. And in the days that followed, authorities tapped security cameras along the route, and even asked everyone at the event to upload images and videos from their phones and cameras. Once pictures of the two suspects were released to the media, everything moved into high gear, careering from chase to shootout to city-wide lockdown to eventual capture.

• 1963: There was no cable, much less 24-hour cable news networks, yet TV acted just like a broadcast version of CNN 50 years ago. And while the JFK assassination was not shown on TV then, the murder of alleged assassin Lee Harvey Oswald, while being transferred into federal custody, was. On some networks, the murder was even televised live — one of the many unbelievably shocking, stunning events from those four days of constant news coverage.

• 2013: The manhunt portions of the story, in the final day, were told, for the most part, out of camera range, but were no less dramatic for it. Accounts of the first suspect’s death, and the shootout with police, were reported verbally, with no supporting footage or images. When the second suspect was located hiding in a backyard in Watertown, on or under a dry-docked boat, we were shown still images from Google and Bing, but TV cameras weren’t close enough to film live. Shots were heard, but not seen, and even the moment of capture was described, not shown. Even so, it was a riveting TV event, unfurling in prime time on Friday night as a nation watched.

•1963: Out of the four days of coverage, CBS anchor Walter Cronkite cemented his reputation as a trusted newsman — and his near-loss of composure when announcing Kennedy’s death remains an iconic moment in TV history.

• 2013: CNN and Fox News both blew it (CNN most egregiously) by misreporting news of arrests at midweek, but clear, trustworthy voices did emerge throughout the week of Boston coverage. Among the very best: Pete Williams of MSNBC, who emerged as the smartest and best-informed of the bunch. (Oh, and kudos to Jon Stewart of Comedy Central’s The Daily Show as well, for enumerating and ridiculing CNN’s string of mistakes.)

•1963: “Four Days in November” concludes emotionally, when young John-John Kennedy salutes his father’s coffin as it passes by in the presidential funeral cortege.

• 2013: “Five Days in April” concludes emotionally, when residents of Watertown line the streets to salute, and applaud, police and other authorities as they leave the area after capturing the surviving suspect. It was an impromptu parade of sorts, obviously emotional for the participants as well as the onlookers.

And that applied to the onlookers watching on TV, as well.

http://www.tvworthwatching.com/BlogPostDetails.aspx?postId=4777
post #86386 of 93675
TV Sports
Marv Albert revs up for another NBA playoff run
By Michael Hiestand, USA Today

TNT's Marv Albert, who began calling NBA games when Lyndon Johnson was president, begins another NBA postseason when he calls the Chicago Bulls at the Brooklyn Nets on Monday (8 p.m. ET).

Albert says he has no plans to step away from broadcasting assignments that also include calling CBS/Turner's NCAA basketball tournament action and NFL games on CBS.

"I'm happy doing exactly what I'm doing," Albert tells USA TODAY Sports. "I have the passion and love the preparation."

Still, he hasn't taken to sending out his thoughts on Twitter yet. "People write what's on their mind. It's like stream of consciousness," Albert says. "I just don't feel it's important to let people know I just bought a loaf of rye at Whole Foods five minutes ago."

Still, Albert says he understands "the psyche" of social media like Twitter: "It reminds me of the old letters to the editor. ... Everybody has an opinion."

With more than 40 NBA games ahead, Turner Sports has more playoff action than ESPN and ABC combined. Albert, through the Eastern Conference Finals before ABC carries the NBA Finals, will call games with analyst Steve Kerr -- who recently had a shot at Albert's play-by-play role.

As a novelty last week, Kerr sort of served as the play-by-play voice on a TNT game with analysts Chris Webber and Reggie Miller. Albert says he didn't feel like that performance put his job security in jeopardy: "Steve did a nice job, but I don't think that's the broadcasting of the future. What they did was fine. But I think you need a genuine play-by-play voice. Game calls can't be just, 'Oh, by the way,' as part of a larger discussion."

Albert, who began calling NBA action for the New York Knicks in 1967, was courtside at an NBA game that was resurrected in cyberspace Thursday -- Game 5 of the 1997 NBA Finals. At issue: Whether Chicago's Michael Jordan was suffering from food poisoning, rather than the flu, while turning in a 37-point performance.

Albert, who sat courtside to call that game, says he thinks "that's very possible. It's not astonishing it wouldn't be the flu but simply another type of upset stomach. But it was one of the most incredible performances I've seen. He was sick."

Another big name from Jordan's career, former Bulls coach Doug Collins, was in the news Thursday as he stepped down as Philadelphia 76ers coach. Albert, who worked TV games with Collins at NBC and TNT, says it's "hard to say" if Collins wants to get back into broadcasting.

"But if that's what he wants to do, everybody (in TV) will be after him," Albert says. "He should be a coach, general manager or broadcaster. I don't see him being out of basketball for long."

Just like it's hard to imagine Albert ever being out of the TV announcing game.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/columnist/hiestand-tv/2013/04/18/nba-playoffs-marv-albert-tnt-doug-collins/2094609/
post #86387 of 93675
TV Reviews
Deciphering the Enemy
By Dorothy Rabinowitz, Wall Street Journal - Apr. 18, 2013

The never-diminishing lure of dramas set in World War II, any part of it, couldn't be better exemplified than in the new PBS series about four seemingly ordinary women whose matchless detective skills—honed during their war service—beat anything Scotland Yard has to offer. True, there's nothing novel in the concept of amateur female sleuths outwitting the best of the British police establishment, but there is everything to say, otherwise, for the exceptional dramatic heft of "The Bletchley Circle." The title alone speaks for its aspirations. Bletchley is a name whose wartime resonance doesn't fade—it grows. It was at Bletchley Park, an estate in Buckinghamshire, that the British government gathered an undercover army from all over the Allied world—top cryptographers and mathematicians whose work it was to decipher the enemy's codes, which they did with phenomenal success.

There is in this three-part drama only the briefest glimpse of the characters performing their war work at Bletchley. Still, that's enough to establish the authority of these fictional code breakers who will return to a civilian life that gives them nothing like the satisfaction of outwitting the enemy—of helping win the war through analyses that could, for instance, correctly predict where German troops would be in three days' time.

A marvelously complex atmosphere of wartime tension hovers over the peacetime lives of these characters—no small saving grace in a script that includes the hunt for yet another tiresome serial killer/rapist with strange sexual tastes, now a staple of British television mysteries. He's fortunately rendered negligible by the larger, instantly compelling drama of this series set in the England of the early 1950s.

The period detail of this still-grim postwar era has a power all its own. It's one that informs every instant of this saga filled with talk of rationing, with haunted-looking men limping from war wounds and worried about their jobs—men like Timothy (Mark Dexter), whose wife, Susan (Anna Maxwell Martin), is the leading member and chief inspiration of the team of former Bletchley code breakers. An air of constraint—of secrecy—is a constant in Susan's world, especially when it comes to questions like who held what undercover government job during the war. Everyone asked is forbidden to answer and they don't, with just enough ostentatiousness to make the point. All of which serves to evoke, again, the atmosphere of the war, ended nine years earlier.

Secrecy hangs heavy at home, too, for Susan who has, despite an apparently agreeable marriage and two children, never lost her memory of the ecstasy she had found in her war work—in the use of her mind, that is. Her husband is far from pleased that she wants to bother important people at Scotland Yard with her suggestions about ways to uncover the tracks of a serial killer. As a substitute, he offers to get her a new puzzle book to work on. It's a wonderful portrait packed with inhibited silences and evasions, the product of perfect performances—Ms. Martin's and Mr.Dexter's—perfectly sustained throughout.

THE BLETCHLET CIRCLE
Begins Sunday, April 21 at 10 p.m. on PBS


* * * *

An exploration of sorts of the fate of a man released after nearly 20 years on Georgia's death row, "Rectify" is a work of fiction as its creator, Ray McKinnon, is careful to point out. It is a work nonetheless clearly meant to address realities like life on death row, and the death penalty itself, which it does with a steely eye. It's the story—a genuinely suspenseful one between eruptions of florid excess—of a still-young man, Daniel Holden (Aden Young), released when his sentence for the rape and murder of a teenage girlfriend is overturned thanks to DNA evidence. More precisely, it's a view of what the first seven days of freedom for such a man would be like—one who returns to a hometown whose citizens have, at best, mixed feelings about the release of the man most of them think guilty, and some would like to see dead. A man whose mother, Janet—a superbly subtle portrayal by J. Smith-Cameron—can't quite bring herself to embrace his return.

His most ardent and unconflicted champion is his younger sister, Amantha (Abigail Spencer), who has fought for her brother's freedom for years—only Daniel isn't up to the work of responding. He's unprepared to deal with anything like his sister's love and attention, tactful as it is, intelligent as it is. He is, we're meant to see, a man frozen by time, by the years on death row, his inability to process the world he faces—but not one devoid of feeling and gratitude. He's a cerebral man, his mind full of his reading and of the images of his life behind bars.

Who else he is or wants to be the film spends an inordinate amount of time uncovering in ultimately wearying detail, the indulgent study of Daniel's every pensive moment. A pity some fraction of all this delicate nuance wasn't reallocated—it could have done wonders for one or two of the evil stock characters here.

That said, "Rectify" is an ambitious and eloquent series, vivid in its portraiture of family and local citizens who don't know quite what to make of Daniel (a proclivity the film seems to share)—assurance enough of an engrossing six hours.

RECTIFY
Begins Monday, April 22 at 10 p.m.on Sundance Channel


http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324493704578430733618729660.html?mod=WSJ_ArtsEnt_LifestyleArtEnt_6
post #86388 of 93675
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SUNDAY Network Primetime Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET)

ABC:
7PM - America's Funniest Home Videos
8PM - Once Upon A Time
9PM - Movie: Remember Sunday (2013)

CBS:
7PM - 60 Minutes
8PM - The Amazing Race
9PM - The Good Wife
10PM - The Mentalist

NBC:
7PM - The Voice (120 min.)
(R - Apr. 15)
9PM - All-Star Celebrity Apprentice (120 min.)

FOX:
7PM - Bob's Burgers
(R - Mar. 3)
7:30PM - The Cleveland Show
8PM - The Simpsons
(R - Jan. 27)
8:30PM - Bob's Burgers
9PM - Family Guy
(R - Nov. 11)
9:30PM - American Dad

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Call the Midwife
9PM - Masterpiece Classic: Mr. Selfridge: Part 4
10PM - The Bletchley Circle (Series Premiere)

UNIVISION:
7PM - Aquí y Ahora
8PM - Nuestra Belleza Latina (120 min.)
10PM - Sal y Pimienta

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie - Lara Croft: Tomb Raider (2001)
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post #86389 of 93675
TV Notes
Boston bombings to dominate Sunday morning shows
By Hal Boedeker, Orlando Sentinel - Apr. 20, 2013

Discussion about the Boston Marathon bombings and the suspects will fill the Sunday morning talk shows. A look at the guest list, which has been very fluid this weekend:

ABC's "This Week" features Mayor Thomas Menino, D-Boston, and author Dennis Lehane at 11 a.m. on WFTV-Channel 9. One panel brings together ABC's Dan Abrams, former FBI agent Brad Garrett and Richard Clarke, former White House counterterrorism adviser. Another panel has Sen. Dan Coats, R-Ind.; Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss.; Richard Haass of the Council on Foreign Relations; David Remnick of The New Yorker; and ABC's Martha Raddatz.

"Fox News Sunday" welcomes Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., and Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., at 10 a.m. on WOFL-Channel 35. Other guests are Charles Ramsey, commissioner of the Philadelphia Police Department, and Philip Mudd, counterterrorism specialist. The panel will be Bill Kristol; Juan Williams; Gen. Michael Hayden, former CIA director; and former U.S. Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif., now director, president and CEO of the Woodrow Wilson Center.

CNN's "State of the Union" offers a discussion with Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.; Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; and Sen. William "Mo" Cowan, D-Mass. Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani is another guest at 9 a.m. and noon. A panel on national security features Rep. Mike McCaul, R-Texas; former U.S. Rep. Tim Roemer, D-Ind., a former member of the 9/11 Commission; and Alberto Gonzales, former U.S. attorney general.

NBC's "Meet the Press" talks to Rep. Mike Rogers, R-Mich., and Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., about what comes next after Boston. The program starts at 9 a.m. on WESH-Channel 2. NBC's Pete Williams and Michael Leiter, former director of the National Counterterrorism Center, discuss the investigation. The panel will be NBC's Tom Brokaw, Peggy Noonan of The Wall Street Journal, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jeffrey Goldberg of The Atlantic and Michael Chertoff, former secretary of homeland security.

CBS' "Face the Nation" also talks to Rep. McCaul and former Mayor Giuliani at 10:30 a.m. on WKMG-Channel 6. Other guests are Gov. Deval Patrick, D-Mass; Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis; and Tom Ridge, former secretary of homeland security. There will be interviews with Newtown family members Carlee Soto, Erica Lafferty and Neil Heslin.

CNN's "Fareed Zakaria GPS" looks at the minds of terrorists with author/CNN contributor Peter Bergen ("Manhunt") and author Jessica Stern ("Terror in the Name of God"). New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly is another guest at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Discussing the latest in the Boston investigation are counterterrorism specialist Mudd and Stephen Flynn, professor at Northeastern University.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/blogs/tv-guy/os-boston-bombings-to-dominate-sunday-talk-20130420,0,5828607.post
post #86390 of 93675
Washington Notes
FCC Blesses Red Sox Player's F-Bomb: He 'Spoke From the Heart'
By Aaron Couch, The Hollywood Reporter - Apr. 20, 2013

If ever there were an excuse for on-air f-bomb, this is it.

When the Boston Red Sox returned to Fenway Park Saturday for its first game since the bombing of the city's marathon, designated hitter David Ortiz gave a brief but rousing speech punctuated by some R-rated language.

After thanking Boston Mayor Thomas Menino, Mass. Gov. Deval Patrick and the city’s police department, Ortiz yelled “This is our f---ing city!” Ortiz added: “And nobody's going to dictate our freedom. Stay strong.”

The game against the Kansas City Royals was broadcast nationally on MLBN, as well as regionally on NESN. It was also carried on local radio stations WEEI 850 and WUFC 1510.

But Ortiz’s f-bomb isn’t going to land him in hot water with the FCC, with FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski tweeting his blessing from the government agency’s official Twitter account.

David Ortiz spoke from the heart at today's Red Sox game. I stand with Big Papi and the people of Boston - Julius

Ortiz’s speech comes one day after the surviving suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing, Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, was taken into custody in Watertown, Mass. after a large-scale manhunt. His brother, suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev, was killed in a shootout early Friday morning.

The Red Sox went on to defeat Kansas city 4-3 in the game.

Watch the video below. [CLICK LINK]

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/fcc-blesses-red-sox-players-443391
post #86391 of 93675
TV Review
‘Remember Sunday’ (ABC)
By Brian Lowry, Variety.com - Apr. 18, 2013

In entertainment terms, the absence of short-term memory clearly has multiple uses, from the Nolan brothers’ twisty “Memento” to the Adam Sandler comedy “50 First Dates” to now “Remember Sunday,” a Hallmark Hall of Fame romance built around a similar (if more shamelessly romantic) premise. Zachary Levi (“Chuck”) plays a man who becomes a virtual blank slate every morning — the burning question being whether his condition will be an impediment to a relationship with the winsome Molly (Alexis Bleidel). Thanks almost entirely to the leads, it works on an emotional level, if only for those willing to short-circuit their brains.

At its core, the movie (written by Barry Morrow from a story by producer Michael Kase, and nicely directed Jeff Bleckner) probes a familiar romantic conundrum: Is it possible for love, that intangible bond Hallmark has built a greeting-card empire upon, to overcome the hurdles and cruel breaks life can throw its way? It’s just that the challenge here is so fundamental — an inability to forge memories together — that the love-vs.-challenge dilemma doesn’t quite seem like a fair fight.

The movie sort of takes its time explaining how Levi’s Gus — a brilliant scientist — suffered an aneurysm that neutralized the part of his brain responsible for short-term memory. So he awakens to a labeled file saying, “Read me every morning” — part of the support system developed by those around him, including his caring and concerned sister (Merritt Wever).

None of that, however, can prepare him for the mix of emotions when he falls for Molly (Bleidel), a cash-strapped waitress/student with a history of failed relationships and trusting the wrong guys.

For a while, “Remember Sunday” gets by on the poignant nature of Gus’ predicament, recalling any number of movies where budding romance is complicated by one party’s issues. Gradually, though, Gus’ contortions to avoid telling Molly the truth, coupled with the frequent interruptions and mix-ups that derail his attempts, begin to grow tedious.

Fortunately, Levi evokes genuine sympathy as he labors to keep re-educating himself daily about Molly, whose mix of excitement and confusion is certainly understandable. Together, the stars instill the movie with sweetness and a sense of melancholy, and will likely manage to get those who buy Mother’s Day cards embroidered with flowers rooting for them, even if the situation doesn’t.

Granted, at its best “Remember Sunday” is strictly OK. Then again, when it comes to giving in emotionally and enjoying this sort of movie, sometimes being unburdened by a memory isn’t such a bad thing.

REMEMBER SUNDAY
Movie; ABC, Sun. April 21, 9 p.m.


http://variety.com/2013/tv/reviews/tv-review-remember-sunday-1200369774/
post #86392 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

Was it a new episode? It was a repeat here on the NBC alternate KICU(baseball on main NBC channel).
You know, it was a rerun. It's been crazy around here with my MIL in the late stage of hospice care. We watched the recording after I posted my comment and I didn't go back to correct it. Sorry.
post #86393 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV Notes
NBC Shelves Hannibal Episode
By Margaret Lyons, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Apr. 19, 2013

NBC has decided to pull a particularly gnarly episode of Hannibal next week at the urging of the show's creator, Bryan Fuller. Fuller tells Variety that "given the cultural climate right now in the U.S., I think we shouldn't air the episode in its entirety," and that he "didn't want to have anyone come to the show and have a negative experience."

The episode, filmed several months ago, apparently included children murdering each other; a condensed, less murdery version will be available on NBC.com.

How long until we go back to normal, and no one minds episodes of serial-killer shows about child murderers?

http://www.vulture.com/2013/04/nbc-shelves-hannibal-episode.html

I now hope this show and Bryan Fuller fails, that is all.
post #86394 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by SidsDad View Post

I now hope this show and Bryan Fuller fails, that is all.

confused.gif Bryan Fuller gave us the wonderful 'Wonderfalls' and the sublime 'Pushing Daisies', two of the most uplifting, wistful, beautifully photographed, and criminally underrated television shows of all time. My wife & I watched the 'Wonderfalls' boxset whilst on our honeymoon (c'mon now, there's going to have to be some downtime while the batteries recharge wink.gif). Kept the good vibrations going. Those two terrific shows earn him a permanent pass from any future professional transgressions from me.
post #86395 of 93675
Al Michaels busted DUI.
TMZ says 0.8 legal limit so he should be ok.


edit:
The bad part is now we have to wait all the way until the nbc hall of fame game in august for munchkin bob costas to give his annoying halftime preach. rolleyes.gifbiggrin.gif
Edited by dcowboy7 - 4/21/13 at 12:45pm
post #86396 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Al Michaels busted DUI.
TMZ says 0.8 legal limit so he should be ok.


edit:
The bad part is now we have to wait all the way until the nbc hall of fame game in august for munchkin bob costas to give his annoying halftime preach. rolleyes.gifbiggrin.gif
You really should re-think this whole post. Your comments imply that it is okay to drink and drive and people who "preach" about not doing it are an annoyance.

Unbelievable...
post #86397 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Al Michaels busted DUI.
TMZ says 0.8 legal limit so he should be ok.


edit:
The bad part is now we have to wait all the way until the nbc hall of fame game in august for munchkin bob costas to give his annoying halftime preach. rolleyes.gifbiggrin.gif
Are you serious? If he had a BAC (Blood Alcohol Content) of 0.8 he'd be deader than the proverbial doornail. In most states the limit is 0.08 and if a driver hits that level he's not considered "ok" as you and TMZ contend. There must have been a reason he was pulled over by the authorities to have an alcohol test in the first place. And, I also can't believe you added your edit. If anybody wants to drink in front of their computer or TV, that's their problem. However, if they want to drink and drive, that's everybody's problem including mine, keenan's, Bob Costas's, and anybody else who may be on the road near them.

I'll get off my soapbox now.

No I won't... Grow up (and I'm not saying this to Bob Costas). Many families have had lives touched by drunk drivers. Just because his level was right on the mark doesn't mean he shouldn't be chastized.

P.S. I just checked and this is the important part of the story regarding Al Michaels. Please note there was no mention of his BAC, but he did spend the night in jail. SANTA MONICA, Calif. -- Police in Southern California say that NBC Sports announcer Al Michaels has been arrested on suspicion of drunken driving. Santa Monica police Sgt. Richard Lewis told NFL.com that Michaels was taken into custody Friday night at 9:30 p.m. PT. Officers pulled him over for making an illegal U-turn and placed him under arrest once they determined he was driving drunk, Lewis said. Michaels was booked into jail at 11:07 p.m. PT and was released Saturday morning. Greg Hughes, a spokesman for NBC Sports, says the company "is aware of the situation" and has been in contact with Michaels. Hughes had no further comment. A call Sunday by The Associated Press to Michaels' agent was not immediately returned.
Edited by BoilerJim - 4/21/13 at 2:38pm
post #86398 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

Washington Notes
FCC Blesses Red Sox Player's F-Bomb: He 'Spoke From the Heart'
By Aaron Couch, The Hollywood Reporter - Apr. 20, 2013


But Ortiz’s f-bomb isn’t going to land him in hot water with the FCC, with FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski tweeting his blessing from the government agency’s official Twitter account.

Even if the FCC Chairman wasn't ok with it, the agency doesn't have the power to fine individuals, only OTA stations.
post #86399 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by keenan View Post

You really should re-think this whole post. Your comments imply that it is okay to drink and drive and people who "preach" about not doing it are an annoyance.

Unbelievable...

Not implying youre assuming & its really just munchkins that preach are annoying....kinda like if the oopma loompas were used in Bloombergs anti soda ad campaign you know cause they work in a candy factory (sorry if thats too inside ny).

Always reminds me of the Barney Miller ep where Harris' gf made maryjane brownies & they ate them without knowing so Barney said to Harris:

"You shouldnt drive your car, you better take a bus" & Harris says "If i can't drive my car how am i gonna drive a bus."
post #86400 of 93675
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcowboy7 View Post

Not implying youre assuming & its really just munchkins that preach are annoying....kinda like if the oopma loompas were used in Bloombergs anti soda ad campaign you know cause they work in a candy factory (sorry if thats too inside ny).

Always reminds me of the Barney Miller ep where Harris' gf made maryjane brownies & they ate them without knowing so Barney said to Harris:

"You shouldnt drive your car, you better take a bus" & Harris says "If i can't drive my car how am i gonna drive a bus."
Those of us in other parts of the US know about Oompa Loompas, Bloomberg 16 oz. NYC sodas, and Barney Miller. rolleyes.gif
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