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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2883

post #86461 of 93720
TV Sports
Jon Hamm to host 2013 ESPYS
By John Mitchell, EW.com's 'Inside TV' Blog - Apr. 24, 2013

During an appearance this morning on LIVE with Kelly and Michael, Jon Hamm announced that he will be hosting the 2013 ESPYS.

“The ESPYS is designed to showcase the year’s best sports moments in a sharp, fun and entertaining manner and Jon’s the perfect host for this year’s show. His appearances on shows like 30 Rock and SNL show that humor and creativity are two of his main strengths,” ESPYS executive producer Maura Mandt said in a statement. “The combination of Jon’s dry wit with his passion for sports will give fans a unique and original view of the year in sports.”

The 2013 ESPYS will air live on ESPN on July 17 at 9 p.m. ET from Nokia Theatre in Los Angeles. Previous hosts for the show have included Justin Timberlake, Seth Meyers, and Samuel L. Jackson.

Ever-ready with the jokes, Hamm said of his hosting gig, “I’m very excited to be hosting the ESPYS. As a longtime sports fan and a marginally successful high school athlete I feel my skill-set jibes well with a host’s duties. I now have to figure out what cleats to wear with a tuxedo.”

This year’s Arthur Ashe Courage Award will honor Good Morning America anchor Robin Roberts, who returned to the show in February following a nearly six-month leave to undergo a bone marrow transplant.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2013/04/24/jon-hamm-2013-espys-host/
post #86462 of 93720
Nielsen Overnights (18-49)
CBS squeaks ahead of NBC for Tuesday win
Averages a 2.2 in 18-49s to NBC's 2.1 rating for the night
By Toni Fitzgerald, Media Life Magazine - Apr. 24, 2013

NBC had the night’s top show, but CBS had the more consistent lineup, leading the latter to a very tight Tuesday night win.

CBS averaged a 2.2 adults 18-49 rating and 6 share in primetime, according to Nielsen overnights, just ahead of NBC’s 2.1/6.

“Voice” was the No. 1 show of the evening, averaging a 4.0 at 8 p.m. The night’s No. 2 show, “NCIS,” aired in the same timeslot and drew a 2.7.

But while “NCIS” lead-out “NCIS: Los Angeles” retained most of its lead-in with a 2.6, NBC’s ratings plummeted. The now-canceled “Ready for Love,” airing its final regularly scheduled episode, managed just a 1.2, falling to a 1.0 in its final hour at 10 p.m.

ABC’s “Body of Proof” was the only program on the Big Four to see gains versus last week, up 7 percent to a 1.5 at 10 p.m. and topping CBS’s competing “Golden Boy” by a tenth.

With CBS and NBC out in front for the night, Univision placed third at 1.6/4, ABC and Fox tied for fourth at 1.5/4, Telemundo was sixth at 0.9/2 and CW seventh at 0.4/1.

As a reminder, all ratings are based on live-plus-same-day DVR playback, which includes shows replayed before 3 a.m. the night before. Seven-day DVR data won’t be available for several weeks. Forty-eight percent of Nielsen households have DVRs.

NBC began the night in the lead with a 4.0 at 8 p.m. for “Voice,” followed by CBS with a 2.7 for “NCIS.” Fox was third with a 1.9 for “Hell’s Kitchen,” Univision fourth with a 1.6 for “Porque el Amor Manda,” ABC fifth with a 1.1 for “Splash,” Telemundo sixth with a 0.6 for “Pasion Prohibida” and CW seventh with a 0.4 for “Hart of Dixie.”

CBS took the lead at 9 p.m. with a 2.6 for “NCIS: LA,” while ABC moved to second with a 2.0 for “Dancing with the Stars Results.” Univision was third with a 1.8 for “Amores Verdaderos,” NBC fourth with a 1.3 for “Love,” Fox fifth with a 1.1 for repeats of “New Girl” and “The Mindy Project,” Telemundo sixth with a 1.0 for “La Patrona” and CW seventh with a 0.3 for a repeat of “America’s Next Top Model.”

At 10 p.m. ABC was first with a 1.5 for “Body of Proof,” with CBS second with a 1.4 for “Golden Boy.” Univision was third with a 1.3 for “Que Lindo Amor,” Telemundo fourth with a 1.1 for “El Señor de los Cielos” and NBC fifth with a 1.0 for more “Love.”

CBS was also first for the night among households with an 8.3 average overnight rating and a 13 share. ABC was second at 5.8/9, NBC third at 4.1/6, Fox fourth at 2.2/3, Univision fifth at 1.9/3, Telemundo sixth at 1.0/2 and CW seventh at 0.7/1.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/cbs-squeaks-ahead-of-nbc-for-tuesday-win/

* * * *

TV Sports
One hot start for the NBA playoffs
Los Angeles-San Antonio matchup spurs ABC to big numbers
By Louisa Ada Seltzer, Media Life Magazine - Apr. 24, 2013

There is one big advantage to the Los Angeles Lakers just barely making the playoffs: Bigger first-round playoff ratings for NBA carriers.

Tonight the Lakers and host San Antonio Spurs square off in game two of their first-round playoff series at 9:30 p.m. on TNT.

LA, which has won five NBA championships in the past 12 years, squeaked in as the eighth seed in the Western Conference, setting up an exciting first-round showdown with the top-seeded San Antonio Spurs.

Usually you have to wait until the second or third round for a match up with this much star power, but instead it’s coming in round one, and already that has spurred higher ratings for the playoffs.

Game one of the series on ABC Sunday averaged a 4.6 household rating, according to Nielsen overnights, the best opening-round matchup on the network in 10 years.

Though LA superstar Kobe Bryant is sidelined with an injury, the playoff series has plenty of intrigue. Both squads have a star guard returning for the postseason after being sidelined by injury, Tony Parker for San Antonio and Steve Nash for Los Angeles.

And the Lakers are the rare team with a big man, Dwight Howard, who can compete with the Spurs’ future Hall of Famer, Tim Duncan.

The Spurs won the first game easily, 91-79. But after the Lakers staged a furious post-All-Star-break rally to even make this year’s playoffs, don’t expect them to bow out easily.

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/one-hot-start-for-the-nba-playoffs/
post #86463 of 93720
TV Notes
NBC Orders 12-Day, 24/7 Live Competition Series For Fall, Cash Prize Up To $10 Million
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Apr. 24, 2013

NBC this fall will be mounting one of the most ambitious unscripted efforts ever attempted. The network has ordered The Million Second Quiz, a new live competition that combines trivia knowledge and endurance. The contest, where time equals money, will last 1,000,000 seconds or 12 days (11.57 days to be precise.) It comes from All3Media America (formerly Studio Lambert USA), the company behind CBS’ Undercover Boss, and Universal TV. Created by Stephen Lambert, The Million Second Quiz will air live in primetime and on NBCUniversal’s digital platforms the rest of the time in a type of coverage reserved for major sporting events like the Olympics. The Million Second Quiz will originate from a gigantic hourglass-shaped structure built in the heart of Manhattan. Its walls will be made out of glass so the contestants and the game play is visible from the street, somewhat in the vein of David Blaine’s stunts.

The four players who have remained in the game the longest at any time serve as reigning champions and get to live in the hourglass. To avoid being unseated in the primetime show where one of the reigning champions gets challenged, the four must continue to play 24 hours a day, taking strategic breaks to rest and sleep.

Viewers will be able to play along at home in real time and sync to the live primetime broadcast in what NBC calls “the first fully convergent television experience.” Viewers playing from home who win will be flown to New York to appear on the show in primetime. When the million seconds draw to a close, the champions will battle it out and the ultimate winner could claim a cash prize of up to $10 million, a record for a reality/game show. “The Million Second Quiz is a genre-redefining spectacle,” said NBC’s head of alternative Paul Telegdy. “It is a game, a social experiment, and a live interactive event all wrapped into a uniquely sticky entertainment experience. What is exceptional about The Million Second Quiz is that it embraces technology’s ability to allow everyone in America to actively participate and compete in a way that has never been done.” The Million Second Quiz is executive produced by Stephen Lambert, Eli Holzman and David Hurwitz.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/04/nbc-orders-12-day-247-live-competition-series-for-fall-cash-prize-up-to-10-million/
post #86464 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post


The worst part? We had to see an extra 5 minutes per hour of that crap in the 80's.

IMO What's replaced those extra five minutes if FAR WORSE than the show!

BTW Dr. Don, I consider ANYTHING that butts into a show I'm watching a Commercial whether it's for a product or another TV Series or News Flash. It's all "Clutter" and in some cases the total surpasses 20 minutes! mad.gif
post #86465 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntocoast View Post

BTW Dr. Don, I consider ANYTHING that butts into a show I'm watching a Commercial whether it's for a product or another TV Series or News Flash. It's all "Clutter" and in some cases the total surpasses 20 minutes! mad.gif
Well, you need to be specific. A promo for another show is not a commercial. Nor is a newsbreak. Still, I routinely edit a ton of primetime broadcast dramas, myself. There may be some that run less than 40 minutes, but none that I watch. And that rules out most of the top 20.

Just ran back through a list of edited programs I have. Found TWO at :38 minutes. Both TNT dramas. You'd think television you pay for would come with fewer than broadcast.
post #86466 of 93720
Not scientific, I know, but I have to hit the "30 second skip" button on average two more times to get past a commercial block on a typical basic cable channel (SyFy, FX, etc) than I do for a broadcast channel like ABC, Fox, NBC.
post #86467 of 93720
Supposedly some cable channels edit syndicated programs so they can cram in more advertisements. TNT and USA often overlap the end credits of one program with the startup sequence of the next. They wouldn't have to do this if they weren't using more advertising time.
post #86468 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by Garrett Adams View Post

Might depend on region. Here the Sacramento/Stockton region Sundance in HD is not available but their major shows are on HD On Demand. Currently they are Top of the Lake and Rectify.

That is how I was able to watch Top of the Lake, I think they posted the episodes the day after they aired on TV. It was especially nice for me, as I don't even subscribe to the regular Sundance channel.
post #86469 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post


2. I'll give you that one. But only marginally. I will say I haven't seen any age-inappropriate advertising airing on G programming (forget local news. that's a whole 'nuther discussion). Once the V-chip became available and we went all digital (requiring most to get new sets), then I lost all sympathy for people who complain about anything airing outside of G-rated programming. Yeah, I see Vagisil commercials running on shows that air between 8 and 9. But they're not G-rated shows. The public has a V-chip. Use it. Now, if a boob flashes during the Super Bowl (G-rated), then the onus is on the networks. If it's G, then everything on it better be kid-friendly.

I dunno - there's one segment of TV advertising that I'd like to see confined to somewhere out in the far, obscure reaches of the cable universe during "adult" programming hours. I'm speaking, of course, of boner drugs. Now, I know that boner drugs are very popular with certain segments of the mature male demographic. And lots of younger lads too. They are, after all, the ultimate recreational drugs, no? But golf telecasts and network news shows are just lousy with 'em. I'm so tired of those damn people in those damn clawfoot bathtubs I'd like to drown them myself. Every time one comes on, if there are any kids watching, I can see them start to giggle and squirm and look at me out of the corners of their eyes. I know what the little urchins are thinking: "Does he need that drug like the people in the bathtubs? After all, he's soooo old."

Man, I hate those ads. Seriously, I do.
Edited by archiguy - 4/24/13 at 2:21pm
post #86470 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

I dunno - there's one segment of TV advertising that I'd like to see confined to somewhere out in the far, obscure reaches of the cable universe during "adult" programming hours. I'm speaking, of course, of boner drugs. Now, I know that boner drugs are very popular with certain segments of the mature male demographic. And lots of younger lads too. They are, after all, the ultimate recreational drugs, no? But golf telecasts and network news shows are just lousy with 'em. I'm so tired of those damn people in those damn clawfoot bathtubs I'd like to drown them myself. Every time one comes on, if there are any kids watching, I can see them start to giggle and squirm and look at me out of the corners of their eyes. I know what the little urchins are thinking: "Does he need that drug like the people in the bathtubs? After all, he's soooo old."

Man, I hate those ads. Seriously, I do.

I could not agree with you more. My son and I watch a lot of sports and when he was younger it was quite embarrassing. Now that he's just shy of an adult we make fun of them, but still they need to go away.
post #86471 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by cheesesteaks3 View Post

That is how I was able to watch Top of the Lake, I think they posted the episodes the day after they aired on TV. It was especially nice for me, as I don't even subscribe to the regular Sundance channel.
Direct TV doesn't carry Sundance in HD. So I was surprise to find Top of The Lake on Netflix in HD currently watching episode 3. I'm really enjoying Elizabeth Moss in something besides Mad Men.
Edited by biggiE48 - 4/25/13 at 11:44pm
post #86472 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

I dunno - there's one segment of TV advertising that I'd like to see confined to somewhere out in the far, obscure reaches of the cable universe during "adult" programming hours.
Ah, now you're talking about cable. Different beast. Again, no sympathy. You know going in that certain channels are going to contain certain content. Unlike broadcast, their adherence to "family hours" is purely voluntary. Restrict kids' access to just the cartoon and family nets and you'll be okay. Every cable box has the ability.
post #86473 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

I dunno - there's one segment of TV advertising that I'd like to see confined to somewhere out in the far, obscure reaches of the cable universe during "adult" programming hours. I'm speaking, of course, of boner drugs. Now, I know that boner drugs are very popular with certain segments of the mature male demographic. And lots of younger lads too. They are, after all, the ultimate recreational drugs, no? But golf telecasts and network news shows are just lousy with 'em. I'm so tired of those damn people in those damn clawfoot bathtubs I'd like to drown them myself. Every time one comes on, if there are any kids watching, I can see them start to giggle and squirm and look at me out of the corners of their eyes. I know what the little urchins are thinking: "Does he need that drug like the people in the bathtubs? After all, he's soooo old."

Man, I hate those ads. Seriously, I do.

And so do I. The people behind those ads don't give a Rat's @$$ as to WHO is in front of the TV when these kinds of ads are aired, After seeing such a commercial DURING A CHILDREN'S SHOW mad.gif I decided to no longer pay for a subscription. For the last six years I've been a "Zero TV" person, and I don't see myself returning to "Appointment TV" anytime soon. tongue.gif
post #86474 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Ah, now you're talking about cable. Different beast. Again, no sympathy. You know going in that certain channels are going to contain certain content. Unlike broadcast, their adherence to "family hours" is purely voluntary. Restrict kids' access to just the cartoon and family nets and you'll be okay. Every cable box has the ability.

Actually, I was talking about the boner drug ads that are prominently featured on Big Four broadcast networks during the evening newscasts and golf telecasts. Of course, they saturate the airwaves all over the cable channels as well, but are concentrated there on the specialty networks that appeal to older folks. Wish we could get those banned until, say, midnight.
post #86475 of 93720
I hate those ads too, but if they put them after midnight their target audience will all be asleep.
post #86476 of 93720
TV Notes
Guillermo del Toro Developing 'Monster' Series With HBO
By Tim Kenneally, TheWrap.com - Apr. 24, 2013

Guillermo del Toro is working on a "Monster" of a project with HBO.

The "Pacific Rim" director is developing a drama series with the cable network, "Monster," about a brilliant young doctor whose choice to save a dying 12 year old boy unwittingly unleashes a pandora's box that leaves him battling to stop a plot of mass genocide and clear his own name.

"Monster" is based on the manga comic series of the same name, by Naoki Urasawa. Shogakukan Inc. Publishing will serve as consulting producer on the project.

Del Toro and Steven Thompson are co-writing the story and executive producing, with Thompson writing the script. Don Murphy, Susan Montford and Gary Ungar are serving as non-writing executive producers.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/article/guillermo-del-toro-developing-monster-series-hbo-87671
post #86477 of 93720
TV Notes
ABC Family's 'Terminales' Gets Series Order
By Philiana Ng, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Apr. 24, 2013

ABC Family has greenlighted Chasing Life, formerly known as Terminales, to series.

With the pickup, the cable network has gone 3-for-3 with its drama pilots, with the murder mystery Twisted (formerly Socio) and The Fosters launching in the summer.

The 10-episode series will debut in early 2014. Production will begin in July in Santa Clarita, Calif.

Based on the Mexican format by Miguel Angel Fox, the series centers on a young woman's life after she is diagnosed with a terminal illness. Italia Ricci, soap veteran Mary Page Keller, Aisha Dee, Richard Brancatisano, Haley Ramm and Abhi Sinha are among the cast.

Aaron Kaplan (GCB, Terra Nova) will executive produce the Lionsgate/Televisa project. Susanna Fogel and Joni Lefkowitz, who wrote the pilot, also serve as executive producers.

ABC Family, which is gearing up for a busy summer with eight scripted and unscripted series on the schedule, still has yet to make an official decision on Bunheads and The Lying Game, opting to wait until after it's summer offerings premiere. In an effort to sample one of its new scripted offerings, the network aired a sneak preview of the Twisted pilot following the season finale of Pretty Little Liars.

Last month, the network took to social media to announce a Pretty Little Liars spinoff, Ravenswood, which will debut in October.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/abc-familys-terminales-gets-series-419962
post #86478 of 93720
Business/Critic's Notes
A La Carte TV Will Never Be
By Andrew Wallenstein, Variety.com - Apr. 24, 2013

The prospect of consumers getting the ability to choose which cable channels they want has proven to be a remarkably resilient fantasy.

Maybe that’s because TV executives can’t seem to resist giving the proposition just enough attention to make it seem possible. Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam described the a la carte business model at the National Assn. of Broadcasters confab earlier this month as “a novel way that could help protect subscriptions in the long run.” An unprecedented antitrust suit filed by Cablevision against Viacom has also renewed speculation.

But now is as good a time as any to point out the absurdity inherent in a debate that has raged from Congress to coffee shops going back a decade. A-la-carte channel choice no longer makes a lick of sense in the age of on-demand viewing. A post-bundle world would require a much different environment than the one a la carte fans envision, one that probably draws more on title-oriented platforms like Netflix or iTunes than on TV’s linear lineage.

A la carte might seem too damned reasonable to criticize. After all, if the average U.S. home watches only about 16 channels per month out of the 135 channels a typical pay TV subscription provides, why can’t it just be given a menu from which to pick and choose channels?

But programmers and distributors have more than $30 billion worth of reasons to not break up the bundle of channels they’ve sold together since the pay TV biz began.

Still, let’s put aside for a moment the contention that content companies have long made, which is that individual channels would cost so much more in an a la carte scenario that unbundling won’t be worth it. Instead, think about your favorite channel: How many individual programs on it do you regularly watch?

There’s no available data on this, but consider there are maybe one or two channels out there at most that inspire the kind of devotion where you’re watching more than half of the content available on a particular channel. But beyond that, who really watches more than 10% of what’s available on any single channel?

In our long-suppressed zeal to free ourselves of the multichannel bundle, it’s easy to overlook that a network in and of itself is just another kind of bundle.

A la carte is a conceptual slippery slope: If a consumer is given the ability to cherrypick, say, Bravo, but forgo Disney Channel and Nickelodeon why would the same consumers be OK with paying for Bravo shows “Rachel Zoe Project” and “Watch What Happens Live” when all they want is “Top Chef?” If I just want one hour of a channel, why would I pay for 23 others I don’t want?

And if you enjoy “Top Chef,” it’s possible you’re likelier to watch Food Network’s “Chopped” or HGTV’s “Ace of Cakes” than non-foodie Bravo programming. A cross-channel purchase based on genre is more compelling than any one channel.

A la carte confuses the true brand currency of the TV kingdom: it’s the shows, not the channels. The programming-to-pricing ratio will be out of whack as long as the channel model holds sway.

To create a marketplace truly better off without the bundle, content companies would have to share their product in one massive trove for onestop shopping of tens of thousands of programs, where they can be re-aggregated by consumers free of traditional borders including channels, production companies and the conglomerates themselves. Then let great user experience and data-mining take care of the rest.

That may not mean the channels of yesteryear go away entirely. But the notion that unbundling will leave channels more important than ever, is folly. A la carte is a delusion we’ve held onto for so long that no one bothered to notice how obsolete it already is.

http://variety.com/2013/biz/news/a-la-carte-tv-will-never-be-1200410243/
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TV Notes
‘Smash’ Finale Gets Sunday Airdate
By Nellie Andreeva, Deadline.com - Apr. 24, 2013

NBC‘s Smash is getting a slot upgrade for its finale. The network has announced that the musical drama — which was banished to Saturdays after several very low-rated airings on Tuesday — will get a send-off on a Sunday.

Smash will end its second season with a two-hour finale May 26, the first Sunday after the end of the season, airing from 9-11 PM. That will serve as a series finale as there is no possibility for Smash to come back next season.

http://www.deadline.com/2013/04/smash-finale-to-gets-sunday-airdate/
post #86480 of 93720
TV Notes
Kevin O'Leary of 'Shark Tank' is always smelling blood
'Mr. Wonderful' — sneers, insults and all — is the undeniable star of ABC's hit reality show. 'Nothing-burgers' beware.
By Scott Collins, Los Angeles Times - Apr. 24, 2013

They call him Mr. Wonderful. But Kevin O'Leary was recently engaged in one of his less-than-wonderful rants, the kind familiar to anyone who loves to hate him on ABC's "Shark Tank." (Fridays at 9 p.m.)

"If I were the president of the United States, I would make unions illegal," O'Leary declared, between sips of Cabernet during a Sunday brunch at the Four Seasons in Beverly Hills. "They no longer serve a functional purpose in democracy, in my view.

"My problem with unions is they breed mediocrity," the 58-year-old former educational software mogul turned investor added, warming to his topic. "Let's say you're a union member on an airline and you're serving people and you do a spectacular job and you're better than your peers. I can't reward you. I can't pay you more. I can't pay you for performance. In fact, I have a hard time firing you when you don't perform."

What about people who work at places like Wal-Mart, which has blocked unions and offers generally low pay?

"Nobody forces you to work at Wal-Mart," O'Leary retorted. "Start your own business! Sell something to Wal-Mart!"

And so it goes with O'Leary, whose self-described politics are "a little right wing of Attila the Hun." Finishing up its fourth season, "Shark Tank" has slowly grown from near-flop to bona fide hit for ABC on Friday nights. Since it drew 4.2 million viewers for its August 2009 premiere, "Shark Tank" now notches well more than 6 million viewers and is Friday's No. 1 show. And O'Leary — a short, balding, fireplug-like force of nature from Canada — has become its undeniable star.

Essentially "American Idol" for entrepreneurs, "Shark Tank" features O'Leary, Mark Cuban and other moguls sitting in judgment of struggling inventors and proprietors, many of whom have taken on second mortgages and massive credit-card debt to try to realize an American dream that threatens to crumble into dust. Successful pitches get investment offers from the "sharks," who put up their own money. Failures get sent packing, often with a figurative kick in the seat from Mr. Wonderful (the tongue-in-cheek nickname came from real estate tycoon Barbara Corcoran, one of the other sharks on the show).

The show is several notches above the typical reality fare, mostly because the participants do have to know something about business if they're going to survive interrogation from the sharks. The program is taken seriously enough that in 2011, several sharks — although not O'Leary — were invited to speak to students at the Harvard Business School.

All told, the sharks have invested more than $23 million over the four seasons, with O'Leary providing nearly $3.5 million of that total, according to the producers. However, O'Leary and the others decline to say how much they've made off their bets.

O'Leary's put-downs are often brutal — and memorable. He called an inventor of a folding-neck guitar "a nothing-burger" and shouted that he should be arrested for stupidity (his crime consisted of balking at O'Leary's deal terms). When another entrepreneur choked up recalling tough times when he had to live in his car, O'Leary scolded: "Don't cry for money. It never cries for you." An aspirant who drove a hard bargain for his graffiti-cleanup business elicited a typically warm reply from Mr. Wonderful: "You are dead to me," O'Leary hollered.

"He has all the sensibilities of being the meanie, the toughie," said Scott Sternberg, a veteran reality TV producer who's not involved in "Shark Tank" but describes himself as "addicted" to the show. "He's got a big opinion and a big mouth.... He's a very entertaining Wicked Witch of the West."

PHOTOS: Cable vs. broadcast ratings

John Saade, who supervises "Shark Tank" as executive vice president of alternative series at ABC, said: "He's a completely unique television personality. He almost looks like a character out of 'The Simpsons.' But he is able to say things that are sharp and funny but ultimately meaningful."

Mom's example

O'Leary says he took his best financial lessons from his mother, Georgette, a Montreal seamstress who quietly invested for years and left behind an estate worth hundreds of thousands of dollars, even though she had divorced O'Leary's father when the boy was young and the family's means were modest.

"I looked at her account and said, 'How is it all possible?'" he recalled.

The secret, he said, was his mother's insistence on bonds and stocks that pay interest and dividends, which over the years accumulated into a large nest egg. He determined that he would follow the same path in his own investing.

He initially dreamed of a photography career. Beside him at brunch sat a vintage Leica M6, which he still uses to snap photos. But perhaps sensing that his instinct for commerce was far greater than that for art, he wound up getting an MBA at the University of Western Ontario.

In the early 1990s, with the PC revolution roaring, O'Leary started a software business in his basement with two partners. Ten thousand dollars in startup money came from his mother. That business grew into SoftKey, which churned out popular educational programs for kids. Growth was phenomenal, and in 1999 the toy giant Mattel bought the company for more than $3.5 billion.

That rags-to-riches tale is the essence of the Kevin O'Leary Story, a calling card mentioned in the opening credits to "Shark Tank."

But almost as soon as the ink was dry on the deal, Mattel began bleeding tens of millions of dollars as crates of unsold and returned computer products piled up. Analysts accused SoftKey of exaggerating demand by shipping far more units to stores than they could reasonably expect to sell — which company officials denied.

O'Leary, who had become a Mattel employee, got the boot (and also a $6-million payday by selling the company's stock at the right time); Chief Executive Jill Barad soon followed him out the door. Within months, the toy maker had quickly unloaded the division in a hasty attempt to make amends, but the damage was done. Businessweek later called the SoftKey buy one of the worst deals of all time.

Asked about the experience now, O'Leary sheds some of his bluster. He says that SoftKey and Mattel amounted to "a huge cultural misfit."

"It's sad what happened," he said.

Was it really one of the worst deals ever? "Not anymore it isn't," he quickly replied. "There have been worse deals since then."

"The deal I made — not quite the most abysmal for shareholders" is a motto that might earn O'Leary's withering scorn on "Shark Tank." But in the end — or at least, in TV land — that was not what mattered.

The SoftKey saga gave O'Leary credibility in the business world, something that allowed him to elbow his way into cohosting a business show on Canadian TV about a decade ago. Then, in 2006, he was cast on a Canadian reality series called "Dragons' Den" — which reality impresario Mark Burnett later adapted into "Shark Tank."

Picking winners

O'Leary looked up as a fortysomething man wearing a hoodie approached his table at the Four Seasons.

"Are you around tonight?" O'Leary asked the visitor, adding that he was going to a barbecue and wanted a friend to tag along.

Daymond John considered the offer. A fellow shark on "Shark Tank," John is the founder of FUBU — a clothing company aimed at the hip-hop community — and is reportedly worth $100 million. In a coincidence that might as well have been scripted, he happened to be hanging out at the Four Seasons with his friend the Miami rapper Pitbull, a.k.a. "Mr. Worldwide," just as O'Leary was chatting with a reporter.

"Going with a white man to a barbecue?" said John, an African American, to O'Leary, with mock doubt.

"You'll be my manservant," O'Leary shot back. "It'll be terrific."

He suggested John bring along Pitbull too. But the clothing magnate noted that the rap star was about to catch a flight overseas.

"He's probably not going to stop his tour to India to go to your barbecue," John said.

Pitbull swung by O'Leary's table to say hello and the unlikely pair — Mr. Wonderful and Mr. Worldwide — engaged in small talk. O'Leary gazed after him as the musician and his entourage headed over to a nearby banquette.

"I find that a very difficult business," O'Leary murmured in a confidential tone. "I don't know how you pick winners" in the recording industry.

One way you can pick winners, of course, is by hedging bets all over the place. And that's what O'Leary is doing these days. He publishes books — a second financial self-help guide comes out this fall, and a third is in the works. He's started his own mutual fund and mortgage companies, gleefully admitting that he's trading in on his TV celebrity to midwife new ventures.

"Absolutely," he chortled when it's noted that he probably wouldn't find as many clients for O'Leary Funds if he weren't so recognizable. "You'll wish you had your money with us."

And then there are the "Shark Tank" deals. He's partnered with a U.S. Marine on a caffeine-free energy drink. The luthier whom O'Leary called a "nothing-burger"? They've cut a deal with Fender to make 150 folding-neck guitars as prototypes — with O'Leary poised to take a big cut if the idea takes off.

"If I were a young person today, I'd say screw all that and start my own business," O'Leary said.

Look how well it turned out for O'Leary. Of course, prospective entrepreneurs have to "know their numbers," as he frequently counsels on "Shark Tank."

And what if they don't?

"Thank goodness they meet me," he said, beaming. "That's wonderful. That's why they call me Mr. Wonderful."

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/tv/showtracker/la-et-st-kevin-oleary-shark-tank-20130421,0,73173,full.story
post #86481 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by archiguy View Post

Actually, I was talking about the boner drug ads that are prominently featured on Big Four broadcast networks during the evening newscasts and golf telecasts. Of course, they saturate the airwaves all over the cable channels as well, but are concentrated there on the specialty networks that appeal to older folks. Wish we could get those banned until, say, midnight.

Until Congress amends the "V-Chip" Law so that it includes Commercials, I simply refuse to watch any TV. As I am posting this I have two Animated Series and 20 Movie Serials consisting of of over 200 chapters heading for my house. When I receive them my DVD inventory will surpass the 35,000 hour mark. At the rate I watch them, before I run out of videos not only will I know who succeeds Obama as President, I'll now who succeeds that person, and the next, and the next, and the next, and possibly even the next, and that's if all of them get re-elected for a second term! biggrin.gif
post #86482 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by biggiE48 View Post

Direct TV doesn't carry Sundance in HD. So I was surprise to find Top of The Lake on Netflix in HD currently watching episode 3. I'm really enjoying Elizabeth Moss in something by sides Mad Men.

thanx for the info, I just watched the first two eps on netflix, it is good and getting pretty engrossing. I have a feeling I'm gonna have to finish it sooner rather than later, whether I have the time or not LOL
post #86483 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Well, you need to be specific. A promo for another show is not a commercial.

DrDon, you're using a technicality on this. A one hour drama used to have 50 minutes of showtime in 60 minutes. Now we're getting 42 minutes or less of showtime in that same 60 minutes. Promos aren't paid commercials, but they are in-house commercials just the same. And remember there used to be promos way back then too. And with several minutes of promos being shown, why are there those blasted pop-up ads? I hope the next wave of dvr/stb technology blocks that crap! Which leads me to another point. I really don't think ad skipping technology would be in such demand if tv programming wasn't over-saturated with them. I don't ever remember such hate about ads until the 90's when showtimes were getting seriously cut due to more ads.
post #86484 of 93720
TV Notes
Streaming on Yahoo, It’s ‘S.N.L.’
By Brian Stelter, The New York Times - Apr. 25, 2013

When they were performing on “Saturday Night Live” three decades ago, Al Franken, Bill Murray and Eddie Murphy surely didn’t expect they would ever be streamed on computers and phones. In fact, they probably would have made fun of the idea.

But it’s reality now, as the owner of the “S.N.L.” archive, Broadway Video, tries to wring a profit out of the old episodes. On Wednesday, Yahoo announced that it had acquired the exclusive rights to classic clips from 1975 through 2012, effective in September. The clips will be removed from Hulu and NBC.com, where they currently reside, and be shown instead on Yahoo, which wants to share in the buzz the show creates.

The deal between Broadway Video and Yahoo highlights the jockeying among companies that want to have a library of online videos to call their own. A dizzying number of online video producers are pitching their programs to advertisers this month, ahead of the traditional television upfront sessions in May. While these Web programs’ quantity and quality are increasing quickly, there are doubts about whether the advertising dollars are.

“On one hand, digital video advertising is growing fast and its prominence is increasing,” said Clark Fredricksen of the research firm eMarketer. “On the other, compared to television, online video is an incredibly competitive market, where you have more companies fighting over far less.” Mr. Fredricksen’s company estimates that $4.1 billion will be spent on online video ads this year, in contrast to $66.4 billion on television ads.

“There are a handful of major conglomerates who split revenues from the huge TV-ad pie,” Mr. Fredricksen said, “while the digital video world features hundreds of companies fighting, comparatively, for scraps from the TV table.”

Attaching, barnaclelike, to television might be a way to stand out from the crowd. Yahoo, which is trying for a turnaround under its chief executive, Marissa Mayer, has content-sharing relationships with many major media companies, but its video hub, Yahoo Screen, has lagged rivals like Google, which owns YouTube.

Erin McPherson, a Yahoo vice president who oversees the company’s video business, said the company jumped at the “S.N.L.” opportunity. She said the “S.N.L.” clips would be “widely distributed” across Yahoo, suggesting a strategy that will go beyond the current Yahoo Screen site.

“Rather than competing with Hulu, Netflix or any other platform, we see this as a step toward adding scale and breadth to the great content we are already offering users,” Ms. McPherson said.

Yahoo and Broadway Video declined to comment on terms, but people with knowledge of the arrangement said access to the “S.N.L.” library had cost upward of $10 million a year in the past.

Hulu, the online video Web site owned by Comcast, The News Corporation and the Walt Disney Company, enjoyed an immediate bump in traffic when it added “SNL” to its collection. These days, however, Hulu — which its owners are considering selling — is concentrating on other content. It will promote several of its forthcoming original series at an event for advertisers next week.

Under the deal announced on Wednesday, Hulu will still stream clips and full episodes from the current television season. Yahoo will be able to do that, too. But Yahoo will have the old “S.N.L.” clips all to itself, giving it something special to show off — although only for one year. The deal will be up for renegotiation at that point.

Jack Sullivan, chief executive of Broadway Video, said the deal would let “S.N.L.” increase its distribution internationally, since the clips of classic episodes have generally only been accessible in North America in the past.

For a company like Yahoo, “having TV-like offerings is really important,” said Mike Vorhaus, president of the digital media consulting firm Magid Advisors. That’s because online video ads have partly taken the place of Web display ads, sometimes called banner ads, in advertisers’ budgets; as Mr. Vorhaus put it, “You can only take so much banner money away before there’s no banner money left at all.”

“Now they kind of have to pursue TV money,” he added.

Along the way they’re becoming more like TV. Earlier this year, a sendup of dating reality shows created by Yahoo, “Burning Love,” was deemed worthy of running on the cable channel E! as well. Sony, another company that will be presenting to advertisers next week, was recognized for treating Jerry Seinfeld’s experimental Web series “Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee” like a TV series when it ordered a 24-episode second season.

And Netflix, the ad-free streaming service that so many other companies want to resemble, was praised for commissioning “House of Cards,” the Washington thriller that could have fit right in on HBO or AMC. On Wednesday night, Netflix released a long-term vision statement for investors that summed up why it and so many of its competitors are optimistic about their chances: “While Internet TV is only a very small percent of video viewing today, we think it will grow every year,” it said, citing faster Internet speeds, sales of Internet-connected TV sets, improvements to TV apps and the possibilities for personalized online video ads.

The competition for Internet TV viewing, it concluded, “is just beginning.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/25/business/media/saturday-night-live-archives-moving-to-yahoo.html?ref=technology&_r=0
post #86485 of 93720
TV Notes
NBC Releases Pulled 'Hannibal' Episode as Web Series
By Lesley Goldberg, The Hollywood Reporter's 'Live Feed' Blog - Apr. 24, 2013

Mere days after pulling the fourth episode of Hannibal, NBC has released the hour online.

The hour, which features a storyline about children killing other children, was removed from the network's schedule in the wake of the Boston Marathon bombing. The hour, titled "Ceuf," has instead been released as a six-part web series and released Wednesday, a day before the fifth episode of the series.

In a message to fans of the Silence of the Lambs prequel, showrunner Bryan Fuller explains that the episode details the relationship between Hannibal (Mads Mikkelsen) and Abigail Hobbs (Kacey Rohl). "As the series goes on, this relationship gets much more complicated becomes a load-bearing element of our storytelling," Fuller explains in a short message introducing Part 1. "We wanted to make sure that you have all the scenes in order to follow the story along."

The episode, he notes, will still air in international markets but not in the U.S. The fifth episode of Hannibal airs Thursday at 10 p.m. on NBC.

Check out all six parts, and Fuller's message, below. [CLICK LINK]

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/nbc-releases-pulled-hannibal-episode-445922
post #86486 of 93720
Business Notes
Netflix push into original fare may be bad news for Hollywood
By Matthew Fliescher, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - Apr. 24, 2013

The desire of Netflix to acquire more original programming such as the political drama "House of Cards" could mean bad news for Hollywood, which has come to count on the company as a good customer and a steady source of revenue.

Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings noted Monday that some of the company's big content deals didn't work out as planned. Many shows Netflix got rights to ended up having little appeal to its subscribers.

"Many of our earliest deals were with networks and cable networks and included some shows that have not proven successful," Hastings said.

So going forward, Netflix will be a little more picky about what it buys, and some analysts are warning that this could hurt TV producers.

In a report released Tuesday, media analyst Michael Nathanson of Nomura Equity Research warned that means the Netflix gravy train could be ending for companies such as Viacom and CBS. The bottom line of companies that have sold to Netflix "will be harmed as they lose these high-margin license fees," Nathanson wrote.
For example, Viacom's deal with Netflix is estimated to be worth $130 million annually. Netflix has indicated it won't be renewing that pact, which gave it lots of content from Viacom, parent of cable channels including Nickelodeon and MTV.

Instead, Netflix will try to cherry pick hit shows from Viacom. Whether Viacom is interested in selling shows on an individual basis remains to be seen. Many programmers like to bundle the hits with the less successful programs in package deals.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-netflix-revenue-hemlock-grove-house-cards-viacom-media-earnings-nomura--20130423,0,2075697.story
post #86487 of 93720
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhufnagel View Post

DrDon, you're using a technicality on this. A one hour drama used to have 50 minutes of showtime in 60 minutes. Now we're getting 42 minutes or less of showtime in that same 60 minutes. Promos aren't paid commercials, but they are in-house commercials just the same. And remember there used to be promos way back then too. And with several minutes of promos being shown, why are there those blasted pop-up ads? I hope the next wave of dvr/stb technology blocks that crap! Which leads me to another point. I really don't think ad skipping technology would be in such demand if tv programming wasn't over-saturated with them. I don't ever remember such hate about ads until the 90's when showtimes were getting seriously cut due to more ads.
Yes, but the original argument was that networks were selling more commercials than ever and that's just not true. The paid commercial level hasn't significantly changed in decades. I'm not arguing that program length is shorter than it was 40 years ago. But I get annoyed when people come out and say "they're cramming in more commercials... greedy... profit..." etc. If you want to argue that program length was shorter than in 1968, fine. Do that. But to equate the addition of promos as "cramming more advertising down our throats" just isn't the case.
post #86488 of 93720
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
THURSDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Network late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Wife Swap
9PM - Grey's Anatomy
10PM - Scandal
* * * *
11:35PM - Jimmy Kimmel Live! (Kaley Cuoco; Goran Visnjic; Olly Murs performs)
12:37AM - Nightline

CBS:
8PM - The Big Bang Theory
8:31PM - Two and a Half Men
9:01PM - Person of Interest
10:01PM - Elementary
* * * *
11:35PM - Late Show with David Letterman (Jim Parsons; the Madden 25 video game cover athlete presents the Top Ten; Snoop Lion performs)
12:37AM - Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (Zac Efron; author Anna Quindlen)

NBC:
8PM - Community
8:30PM - The Office
(R - Sep. 27)
9PM - The Office
9:31PM - Parks and Recreation
10:01PM - Hannibal
* * * *
11:35PM - The Tonight Show With Jay Leno (Gwyneth Paltrow; J.B. Smoove; Billy Ray Cyrus perform)
12:37AM - Late Night With Jimmy Fallon (Susan Sarandon; Anthony Mackie; The National performs; Aaron and Bryce Dessner perform with The Roots)
1:36AM - Last Call With Carson Daly (Kevin Bacon; designer Ron Finley; Superhumanoids perform)

FOX:
8PM - American Idol (LIVE)
9PM - Glee

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - The 'This Old House' Hour (R - Oct. 25)
9PM - Frontline: The Retirement Gamble
(R - Apr. 23)
10PM - Antiques Roadshow: Rapid City
(R - Apr. 22)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Porque el Amor Manda
9PM - Amores Verdaderos
9:57PM - Qué Bonito Amor

THE CW:
8PM - The Vampire Diaries
9PM - Beauty and the Beast

TELEMUNDO:
8PM - Premios Billboard de la Música Latina (Three hours)

COMEDY CENTRAL:
11PM - The Daily Show with Jon Stewart (Sen. Joe Manchin)
11:31PM - The Colbert Report (Author Bishop Gene Robinson)

TBS:
11PM - Conan (Snooki and JWOWW; Ken Marino; Mark Normand)
(R - Feb. 20)

TBS:
11PM - Chelsea Lately (Topher Grace; Dan Levy; Loni Love; Gary Valentine)

FX:
11PM - Brand X with Russell Brand
post #86489 of 93720
TV Notes
Is 'American Idol' Having Its Worst Week Ever?
By Jethro Nededog, TheWrap.com - Apr. 24, 2013

Fox's "American Idol" is having a really bad week. The network’s big revenue generator is showing signs of distress.

"The falloff has really been the last two years," Brad Adgate of media-buying firm Horizon Media told TheWrap. "You have to look at what's happened since then with the competition and the audience fatigue and the judges and the number of choices out there."

At its height in 2006, the show was attracting about 30 million viewers an episode. Compare that number to last week's results episode, which brought in 11.9 million total viewers and was beat in the key 18-49 demo by repeats of "The Big Bang Theory" – yes, reruns.

Also read: 'The Voice' Boss, Coaches on Show's Chemistry, Rival 'American Idol': We Don't Even Consider Them

If the ratings woes weren't enough to worry network and show executives, add an explosive story about an alleged judges shuffle to the mix. On Tuesday, THR reported that the show producers had plotted to replace new judge Mariah Carey with former judge Jennifer Lopez. Insiders claim it was a desperate move to create buzz and curiosity among viewers in order to revive this season’s flagging ratings. But that plot was stopped dead in its tracks when the diva reportedly threatened litigation.

Fox reps vehemently deny the news, saying it's "just another ridiculous 'Idol' judge rumor, likely started by talks of Jennifer performing on the finale."

We're inclined to try and believe Fox. This is the kind of showbiz depravity that we like to believe doesn't really happen. But when hundreds of millions of dollars (and egos) are on the line, these are the lengths that producers can go to in order to stop (or at least slow) the bleeding.

As if this week wasn't already bad enough, NBC's "The Voice" celebrated a milestone – it beat "Idol" (and everyone else on the small screen) for the first time in both total viewers and the advertiser-coveted 18-49 demographic.

This, by the way, after taking "Idol's" spot in the Emmy race last year.

On the financial side, "Idol" has been and still is Fox's major breadwinner. Even with its declining ratings, the show brought in $836.4 million in ad revenue last year – more than $100 million more than 2011's take, according to Kantar Media

But, that doesn't mean Fox is content to stand back and watch its dominance go to that show with the spinning red chairs. It has way too much at stake.

This season, Fox charged $340,000 (versus $500,000 for Season 11) for a 30-second spot during the performance shows on Wednesday and $300,000 during Thursdays' results show, according to SNL Kagan. Those prices are usually generated by the previous season's sweeps ratings.

So, it's possible that if "Idol" doesn't deliver the promised eyeballs (or CPM, a measurement used in advertising to reflect an ad's reach), it will have to make them up. SNL Kagan analyst Deana Myers said, "Networks use make-goods [ad time in other time spots] to make up for the promised CPM to advertisers."

Since Season 12 is currently averaging 17.9 million (versus Season 11's 21.9 million), the timing of this decline – right before May sweeps – must have Fox shaking in its boots.

"It's been [Fox's] cash cow," Adgate says. "It puts pressure on them to come up with other hit shows, something that's going to pick up the slack, to remain competitive. They have relied on that show year in and year out. When fourth quarter would come to an end, they were fourth place for many seasons in adults 18-49. And then 'American Idol' would start and within a month or so they were tops in 18-49. Those days appear to be over. They have to bolster their overall lineup and don't be over reliant on 'American Idol.'"

Who knows? It may be scary enough to kick off its superstar new judge – midseason.

http://www.thewrap.com/tv/column-post/american-idol-having-its-worst-week-ever-87716
post #86490 of 93720
TV Notes
Role as cancer patient weighed heavily on Laura Linney in ‘The Big C’
By David Hinckley, New York Daily New - Apr. 24, 2013

After four years playing a woman with terminal cancer, Laura Linney went home and stayed in bed for two weeks.

“I’m still in angst” about the role, Linney told television critics recently. “I’m greatly relieved and I’m nostalgic already. I still think about it every day.”

Starting Monday at 10 p.m., television viewers can share the experience. That’s when Showtime kicks off “The Big C: Hereafter,” a four-episode finale to the story of Linney’s Cathy Jamison, a schoolteacher who parlays her melanoma diagnosis into an accelerated bucket list.

She has tried to do and say all the things she put off, sometimes delighting family and friends and sometimes confounding them with her quirky whims and graveyard humor.

She tells her son Adam (Gabriel Presso) that he’ll fail chemistry over her dead body, “and I’m in a unique position to make good on that threat.”

As the final four episodes begin, Cathy’s days clearly are dwindling down to a precious few.

Executive producer Jenny Bicks admonishes viewers, however, not to assume that “The Big C” is on an inexorable march to a death scene.

It’s bigger than that.

“It’s that very Buddhist concept that we’ve explored on the show in the past,” says Bicks. “It’s not necessarily about, ‘Oh, Cathy’s going to die at the end of the first episode and be a ghost.’ It’s really about the fact that we’re both here now and we’ll all be dead at some point.”

Have a nice day!

Linney, too, says the show has never been about Cathy’s death.

“The script came to me during a period where I was really in an existential swirl about time,” Linney said, “and how we use our time and the choices we make about our time, what is worth our time, and about the privilege of aging.”

All that said, Bicks and Linney say the show will not suddenly cut to black or drift into an amorphous fadeout.

“We had a lot of discussions about what we wanted for these last episodes,” says Bicks. “We didn’t want to shortchange it. We knew we wanted an ending.”

“We had all sorts of ideas about what could and could not happen,” said Linney. “We had all sorts of fun. Like, she would go off to an island. She was going to start a dancing school.”

In the end, she admitted “my greatest fear” was that the story would not be allowed to finish.

“You can’t dangle a show set within the context of cancer and time and a life and then not be responsible for the end of that narrative, whatever it might be.”

Physically, Linney in these final episodes looks gaunt, bearing little resemblance to the cheerful lady who introduces “Downton Abbey.”

Still, she says the impact of playing Cathy has been more mental than physical.

“At the end of the day I could wash [the makeup] off,” she says, “ which a lot of people can’t.

“The reality is I’m a very healthy person who has the privilege of being an actress who can hopefully tell a story that other people can relate to.”

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/linney-faces-big-article-1.1325151
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