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Hot Off The Press: The Latest TV News and Information - Page 2925

post #87721 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by dad1153 View Post

TV/Business Notes
Can Local News Take On Watchdog Role?
By Michelle Salemi, Variety.com - Jun. 13, 2013

Can local TV news really fill the watchdog role in the 21st century that local newspapers did in the 20th?

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/can-local-news-take-on-watchdog-role-1200496365/
Considering there's another article above about the fact that Gannett has just bought up a bunch of stations, giving them access to the majority of viewers in something like 20 of the top 25 markets, I'm pretty sure the local watchdogs are out of the hunt when it comes to any real journalism.

Most local newscasts spend less than 10 minutes on local stories (and that often includes local sports coverage). The rest is retreads of national stories and weather.

That is, if the news hasn't been eliminated to save money...for the big owners.

Pretty soon, most "local" stations will be nothing more than remote control media playback systems puppeted from some central location far from the people they're supposed to serve. A lot of stations are that - or close to it - right now. It's only a matter of time until cost shaving takes pretty much all of them down that path.

Once Sinclair, Lin, Clearchannel and Gannett own them all, it will be all done by robots.
post #87722 of 93827
My take is Watergate never would have been uncovered by many of today's "journalists", so what good are they? They are no longer society's watchog over government because too many news organizations have become political. Too many have also become talking heads who just yak-yak all day long. Until journalists get back to digging for the truth regardless of ideology, they might as well collect unemployment.
post #87723 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

My take is Watergate never would have been uncovered by many of today's "journalists", so what good are they? They are no longer society's watchog over government because too many news organizations have become political. Too many have also become talking heads who just yak-yak all day long. Until journalists get back to digging for the truth regardless of ideology, they might as well collect unemployment.
Actually, they would have found out about it only because, today, the same leak that led to the Watergate story would have been a leak via Twitter, a file sharing site or some other social media resource.

The difference is, today, all the work would be done for the journalists. All they would have to do is repeat what the press release says.

...and that's exactly how they do it now.

Today, news is sold by keywords and hash tags. A guy at home in his PJ's can do that.
post #87724 of 93827
Critic's Notes
Noah Emmerich Is the Best Dramatic Performer of the Year
By Matt Zoller Seitz, Vulture.com (New York Magazine) - Jan. 14, 2013

Noah Emmerich is one of those excellent, understated performers often referred to as a That Guy — in other words, he's a great character actor equally likely to turn up as the hero's best friend (see The Truman Show) or as a sadistic general (Super 8). On FX's standout spy drama The Americans, Emmerich finally gets a starring role, and the most wonderful thing about it is, a glance at his character bio will tell you that he's meant to be a supporting player. But that has always been the greatest test of a TV actor's talent: projecting so much intelligence, sensitivity, and inspiration that a secondary character seems to acquire the same weight and importance as the show's ostensible leads. As Stan Beeman, the depressed but super-competent FBI agent investigating Russian spies, Emmerich never seems as though he's trying to seize the spotlight; somehow it just naturally seems to swing in his direction, and when it's not shining on him, you wonder where he is and what he's thinking and feeling. It's a great match of actor and role, and during The Americans' most powerful Stan-centric moments, Emmerich gives me the kind of electric charge that I got while watching James Gandolfini in the first season of The Sopranos. It's the kind of part, and the kind of performance, that makes you realize that this former bit player always had star quality, but for whatever reason, it just took a while for the world to figure it out.

Emmerich wins you over right from the start, when, in the pilot, he talks to his next-door neighbors, the secret KGB agents Elizabeth and Phillip Jennings (played by Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys) and their kids in the Beeman family's kitchen. He has the sort of jocular confidence that you associate with certain mundane macho guys — assistant gym coaches, striving veteran salesmen, and the like. There's a smile in his voice but also an undefinable edge of menace; you can't be entirely sure why he's saying what he's saying, or how much he knows, and whether he's messing with you, and if he is, whether it's on purpose or because that's just how he comes across. This is a tremendously helpful quality to have when your job requires you to get information out of people.

But there's a lot more to Stan than affable intimidation. Before he moved to Washington with his family to become a counterintelligence agent, he went undercover with white supremacists in St. Louis, and the experience traumatized him so badly (the particulars are still a mystery) that he's seemed wounded and recessive ever since. Emmerich plays Stan as somebody who no longer trusts himself or knows himself, a man so psychically wounded that he feels as though marriage and fatherhood are a kind of extended performance, more given than felt. We don't know precisely what drives Stan, but we see his demons manifested in the actions he takes, and in the expressions on his face as he takes them. The conflicted feelings play out in Stan's eyes even as Emmerich composes the character's face in a way that would plausibly hide the turmoil from other people. This is as emotionally transparent as a performance can get without seeming as though it would give away the character's secrets if it were happening in life.

Stan's affair with the Russian consulate worker Nina (Annette Mahendru) doesn't seem like a refuge from a failing marriage, as his wife, Sandra (Susan Misner), is as beautiful and loving as a man could wish. Perhaps it's motivated by a desire to have something new in his life, something unspoiled? Or to be able to feel that he's protecting somebody in trouble, and making her life better rather than worse? Stan is chivalrous; you can see that in the way he talks to Nina and to his wife and to every other female he encounters. But he's also fearful and lonely, so much so that when Emmerich performs Stan when the character is by himself, the character's misery is so naked that it's difficult to look at. When Stan erupts in lethal violence — most notably in a shocking scene late in the first season that turned more than few viewers' sympathies away from him — you understand the roiling emotions that caused the explosion, even though the show hasn't revealed the particulars. It's all because of Emmerich; he makes this complicated, nearly broken man comprehensible and appealing even when he's teetering on the edge of madness.

http://www.vulture.com/2013/06/seitz-noah-emmerich-best-dramatic-performer.html
post #87725 of 93827
TV Notes
On The Air Tonight
SATURDAY Network Primetime/Late Night Options
(All shows are in HD unless noted; start times are ET. Late night shows are preceded by late local news)

ABC:
8PM - Zero Hour (Time Slot Premiere)
9PM - Zero Hour
10PM - Mistresses
(R - Jun. 3)

CBS:
8PM - The Mentalist
(R - Dec. 9)
9PM - Blue Bloods
(R - Nov. 2)
10PM - 48 Hours Mysteries

NBC:
8PM - Chicago Fire
(R - Apr. 3)
9PM - Law & Order: Special Victims Unit
(R - Mar. 20)
10PM - Saturday Night Live (Ben Affleck hosts; Kanye West performs
(R - May 18)
* * * *
11:29PM - Saturday Night Live (Christina Applegate hosts; Passion Pit performs; 93 min.)
(R - Oct. 13)

FOX:
7PM - MLB Baseball: Regional Coverage (LIVE)
* * * *
11PM - Hell's Kitchen
(R - Aug. 13)
Midnight - The Goodwin Games
(R - Jun. 3)

PBS:
(check your local listing for starting time/programming)
8PM - Austin City Limits: Spoon (R - Oct. 9, 2010)

UNIVISION:
8PM - Sábado Gigante (3 hrs.)

TELEMUNDO:
7PM - Movie: Monsters, Inc. (2001)
9PM - La Voz Kids
(R)
post #87726 of 93827
Critic's/Business Notes
Comcast, Tennis Channel Verbiage Volley Proves Leverage Matters
By Brian Lowry, Variety.com - Jan. 14, 2013

As NBC and other networks struggle to find hit comedies, who knew the funniest guy in showbiz was working for Comcast’s PR department?

Asked about the litigation involving the Tennis Channel — which has maintained that Comcast exhibited favoritism toward sports networks it owns, Golf Channel and NBC Sports Network, at Tennis’ expense — the spokesman responded, “Comcast’s decision to carry Tennis Channel was the product of legitimate business considerations, not affiliation.”

See what they did there? Ha ha, ha ha ha.

But wait, it gets better. Comcast has also sought to justify its actions by saying Tennis Channel doesn’t possess the same appeal as the Golf Channel. Since both are relatively narrow sports most desirable in media terms for attracting an upper-income bracket, issuing such a straight-faced assertion requires balls, and not of the golf-sized variety.

Major Hollywood players have always used their clout to gain a competitive advantage, from selling TV shows to booking movies. It’s as much a part of the atmosphere, of the culture, as expensive cars and lying about how much you liked someone’s last project.

Frankly, what’s the point of being a global media conglomerate if you can’t, you know, throw your weight around?

Indeed, in an increasingly uncertain marketplace, one can argue these companies would be remiss if they didn’t explore every reasonable avenue to maximize returns and shareholder value.

While there are rules to curtail these practices, the key word in Comcast’s statement, “legitimate,” is where the trouble always begins — creating gray areas that inevitably lead to friction and amusing press releases.

Because so many decisions are subjective and hardly amount to an exact science, there are various ways to explain choosing one commodity over another, and to debate whether that boils down to good business sense or more nefarious (and usually self-serving) motives.

Even so, the existence of federal guidelines has less prevented companies from exercising their corporate muscle than inspired them to find creative methods and to coin colorful euphemisms to mask (or more charitably, cast the most favorable light on) their underlying objectives, which is to devise the means of making two plus two equal five without merely pressuring their accounting departments to do it. Hence the sudden popularity of terms like “synergy” or “monetize.”

What’s different now is all the arrows are seemingly pointing toward an entertainment business that’s becoming more a la carte and directly transactional — as in, “If you want this particular show or channel, pay for it.”

Technology threatens to break the major players’ chokehold on the process, or at least pry open cracks in their armor. Taken to its extremes, the promise of new devices and means of delivering content can help level the playing field, allowing smaller players to overcome and bypass institutional handicaps by peddling their wares directly to the consumers.

Another recent forecast of a shift in this direction came from media analyst Craig Moffett, who maintains that cord-cutting — the phenomenon of people dumping cable or satellite dishes to access programming more inexpensively online — is real, a potentially chilling prospect for multichannel video programming distributors.

Witness the dispute between Cablevision and Viacom, with the cable owner arguing the studio’s practice of bundling its less-desirable channels with higher-profile ones represented an “all-or-nothing approach” that is “illegal and anti-consumer.” It’s merely the latest in a series of similar conflicts, which — even with all those fraying cords — show little sign of abating.

In theory, it would be wonderful if everyone every TV show, movie or piece of talent could be fairly judged as a free agent, standing alone and evaluated based on individual merit.

That said, those accustomed to a media world built on leverage aren’t going to yield their traditions and perks without a fight. So for now, if you hope to make a bundle, it’s still probably much better to have a bundle.

http://variety.com/2013/tv/news/comcast-tennis-channel-verbiage-volley-proves-leverage-matters-1200496268/
post #87727 of 93827
TV Notes
Frequent Guest contributor Fred Willard is back with a familiar comic spirit in HBO's 'Family Tree'
By Mike Hammer, New York Daily News - Jan. 15, 2013

Fred Willard is a fixture at Christopher Guest’s “Family” functions.

The 79-year-old veteran comic is the designated scene-stealer in every docu-comedy that Guest has helmed since “This Is Spinal Tap” way back in 1984. Guest wasn’t about to forget this ingredient in his formula for success when putting together the HBO series “Family Tree.”

“Let’s just say that when he calls, my only questions are where do I have to go and when do I need to be there,” says the actor, who has appeared in more of Guest’s projects than has the writer/actor/director himself.

Willard joins the cast of Guest’s offbeat cable show, which is about a guy learning about a bizarre family, on Sunday (10:30 p.m.).

For the cast of any Guest flick — and now, TV series — the ability to improvise is essential, and Willard’s got it to the max. He cut his teeth in improv sketch comedy as a Second City vet.

“When Chris told me that he wanted me in ‘Waiting for Guffman’ and there was no script … my first reaction was, ‘Great! No lines to learn!’ ” says Willard. “Then I went into cardiac arrest when I realized I had to be funny without any lines!”

As he tells it, the solution was just to spew. “I threw everything I had out there and Chris used about 75% of it, so I guess I passed the test,” he explains.

“I think that’s why he brings all his regulars back. He knows us so well, it might as well be a family,” says Willard, who has appeared in all five of Guest’s docu-comedy films, from “Best in Show” to “For Your Consideration.”

“He knows what he’s going to get … yet he doesn’t have any idea. He told me he appreciates my input, but doesn’t want to know what I'm going to do. Amazingly, he hasn’t fired me yet.”

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv-movies/fred-willard-climbs-hbo-family-tree-article-1.1373005
post #87728 of 93827
TV Notes
'Zero Hour':It's Not Over Yet
By Anthony Edwards, HuffingtonPost.com - Jan. 14, 2013

Exterior Street, New York City.

A familiar looking guy walking two dogs is stopped.

"Hey Goose, you're back on TV!"
"Anthony, sorry about your new show"
"You were Doctor Green, right?!
I started watching Zero Hour and then I couldn't find it."

I live in New York City and since March I have held variations of the above conversations. As sometimes happens our show was pulled from the schedule after airing three episodes and now I get to tell these folks they can watch the remaining ten episodes of Zero Hour starting Saturday at 8/7 central on ABC.

In Zero Hour I play Hank Galliston a publisher of Modern Skeptic Magazine. Hank's wife is abducted from her antique clock shop and in the quest to save her Hank and his magazine team get pulled into a mystery stretching around the world and back centuries.

It was three months ago when the network decided to pull Zero Hour off the air. I didn't take it personally, I know its business. I was just sad for all the great actors, talented technicians and artists who but their hearts and time into telling this story. We did the work to the best of our abilities. That does not happen on every job. All we set out to do was tell this crazy story and we did it. Everything that ends up on your TV has to be built, found, cast, organized, transported, photographed, recorded, edited and scored. In eight days a big circus moves 40 foot trailers full of lights and equipment, wardrobe, hair and make-up, dressing rooms and creates a base camp many times while prepping for the next episode to start the day after you finish the last. Some days you film four pages of script, others you push for eight.

We started shooting in the heat of August in New York City trying to act cold in fake snow -- to being so cold in December that my co-star Carmen Ejogo and I could barely speak our words. One thing that I do share with the character I play on Zero Hour is that I am not a religious person, but I am not adverse to magic or wishful thinking. The real reason I am happy is that a small miracle has happened and all the great work that my friends did on this show will not be buried. For the next eight Saturdays our little (it's not little) show will get to be seen. What people may not realize is that for all of us who worked on the show we are as eager to see it as anyone. Every scene has an experience both in front of and behind the camera that means something to all of us who made it. I remember it being thrilling to work hard on the big, great sequences that will be spectacular to watch when the special effects are added and the ease of doing simple two-person scenes that make the story sing.

When you are part of the circus, whether you are in the big top or playing a one ring venue in a small town, you just want to show off your act. The business of television may tell us to pack up our tent and move on, but for the next eight weeks we will get to strut and fret our hour upon the stage.

That is all we ever wanted.

Anthony Edwards is an actor.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/anthonyedwards/its-not-over-yet-or-the-l_b_3438369.html?utm_hp_ref=tv
post #87729 of 93827
Obituary/TV Notes
Stephen Colbert's Mother Dies at 92
By Hilary Lewis, The Hollywood Reporter - Jan. 14, 2013

Stephen Colbert's mother died Wednesday at the age of 92.

A special hour-long episode of The Colbert Report aired that night, and a repeat ran on Thursday. Colbert previously suspended his show in February 2012, reportedly due to his mother's ailing health.

When he returned, his only reference to his mother was the following remark: "Evidently, having 11 children makes you tough as nails. Confidential to a lovely lady."

Lorna Elizabeth Tuck Colbert was the mother of 11 children, including the comedian and his sister, former Congressional candidate Elizabeth Colbert Busch.

Lorna Colbert's obituary in Charleston's Post and Courier describes her as "the matriarch of a family of 82" and "an accomplished artist, a church leader, a businesswoman, a supporter of the arts and a woman whose profound faith was apparent in her daily life."

She was born on Nov. 6, 1920, in Larchmont, NY.

The obituary includes a link to sign her guestbook, which had 54 entries as of Friday afternoon.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/stephen-colberts-mother-dies-at-569343
post #87730 of 93827
Critic's Notes
Bianculli's Best Bets
By David Bianculli, TVWorthWatching.com - Jan. 15, 2013

U.S. OPEN GOLF
NBC, 12:00 a.m. ET

Rain has played such havoc with this year’s tournament that as of Saturday morning, no one knows who’s made the cut for weekend play. There’s still too much “Day 2” golf to play before the field can be narrowed, so, once again, play is expected to begin early, just after sunrise, to make up the difference. The cut ought to be known somewhere around noon, which is when NBC is scheduled to begin televising the event anyway.

2013 NHL STANLEY CUP FINALS
NBC Sports Network, 8:00 p.m. ET

Game 1 of this year’s NHL finals, in which the Chicago Blackhawks beat the Boston Bruins, 4-3, in a triple-overtime thriller Wednesday, attracted more TV viewers (more than 6 million) than any opening Stanley Cup final contest since 1997’s Philadelphia-Detroit series. That game provided close to an hour of extra hockey – and tonight, after a few days of well-deserved rest for both teams, comes Game 2.

ZERO HOUR
ABC, 8:00 p.m. ET
SERIES RETURN:
This Anthony Edwards ABC drama series dropped off the map, and the network schedule, almost instantly, leaving its mysteries and puzzles and neo-Nazi conspiracies and kidnappings going unresolved. Well, ABC has decided to burn off the remaining untelevised episodes by showing them in the summer. On Saturday nights, yet. This edition of “Write-Off Theatre” begins tonight with a double feature, picking up with Laila (Jacinda Barrett), the wife of Edwards’ Hank, still held hostage – with Hank negotiating frantically for her release.

THE DARK KNIGHT RISES
HBO, 8:00 p.m. ET

This 2012 Christopher Nolan movie completed his Batman trilogy, starring Christian Bale as the Caped Crusader, and did so with a tale of epic length – but not quite epic in other respects, despite the presence of Anne Hathaway as the latest screen version of Catwoman. Hathaway won an Oscar that year – but not for this. It was for the other movie she made that year, playing Fantine in Les Miserables.

THE AFI LIFE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: A TRIBUTE TO MEL BROOKS
TNT, 9:00 p.m. ET

Mel Brooks has had quite a year, and it’s only June. The month after being saluted with an American Masters biographical tribute, he gets saluted again here, as this year’s recipient of the American Film Institute Life Achievement Award. Congratulations, Mel! Joining him for the festivities are, among others, comic cohorts Carl Reiner and Cloris Leachman, as well as Martin Scorsese, Sarah Silverman, Billy Crystal and more.


http://www.tvworthwatching.com/
post #87731 of 93827
Technology Notes
Americans watched 41 billion online videos in May
By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times' 'Company Town' Blog - Jan. 14, 2013

At a time when television viewing continues to rise in the U.S., people somehow are finding time to watch more Internet videos as well, most likely at the same time.

Some 182 million Americans watched nearly 41 billion online videos in May, up 5% from the previous month, according to newly released data from ComScore Video Metrix.

Google's sites -- primarily YouTube -- ranked as the top online video property in the U.S., with nearly 155 million viewers clicking in. That's more than twice the number of people who watched videos on Facebook (60 million) and nearly triple AOL's video viewers (54 million), according to ComScore.

When it comes sheer numbers of video views, Google dominated there as well. Google and YouTube generated almost 14 billion videos viewed in May, ComScore reported. AOL ranked a distant second with 839 million views followed by Facebook with 727 million.

Among YouTube channels, Vevo continues to cement its reputation as the MTV for the new generation -- with some 50 million viewers watching 561 million music videos in May.

Online networks created by two Los Angeles-based digital media companies, Fullscreen and Maker Studios, brought in 36.5 million views and 32.4 million views, respectively.

Internet videos provide fleeting moments of diversion for a broad swath of the connected population. Almost 85% of the U.S. Internet audience watched online videos in May. The average length of an online video, about 5.6 minutes, may reveal something about the nature of our attention spans.

http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/envelope/cotown/la-et-ct-americans-watched-41-billion-online-videos-in-may-20130614,0,2974727.story
post #87732 of 93827
Critic's/Technology Notes
First impressions: Sizing up PS4, Xbox One controllers
By Brett Molina, USA Today - Jan. 14, 2013

The appearances of the PlayStation 4 and Xbox One at the Electronic Entertainment Expo gave video game players their first taste of how these new devices will look and what experiences they'll offer.

It also gave us the chance to play several games with the new controllers. Let's break them down:

PlayStation 4. For those PlayStation owners that enjoy a lot of first-person shooters, prepare for some adjustments. All functions that would normally map to the L1 and R1 should buttons (aim and shoot), move to L2 and R2, which now feel more like triggers instead of just a really large input.

There were several scenarios where I wanted to tap L1 or R1 instead and got thrown off, but once players get used to it, it feels great.

The controller felt a bit heavier than PS3 models, but not bulky. The thumbsticks are also concave in the middle, which makes handling feel much better. The Start button has been replaced by Options, which essentially does the same things like pausing a game. There's also the Share button, but Sony didn't really show too many features tied to that at the show.

Also intriguing was the Touchpad, which received a lot of use during the demo for Killzone: Shadow Fall. The Touchpad added squad-based controls for a drone players command to hack, attack or defend. Sending orders required quick swipes up, down, left or right on the Touchpad. It feels surprisingly comfortable.

Xbox One. Hang on to those AA batteries. Players will still need them to power the controller. On the bright side, the controller loses the bulky container.

It feels lighter and thinner than the 360 controller overall, yet maintains the same design and feel that players know.

The most interesting element in the Xbox One is the use of rumble. Instead of the entire controller vibrating when certain events happen, players will feel it more in specific parts of the device. In the case of Forza Motorsport 5, when my car would skid to slow down or I needed to pick up speed quickly, the rumble would be felt directly on the right trigger. It's a subtle change, but one that works much more effectively.

Like the PS4, the Xbox One ditches the standard Start and Select options in favor of Menu and View. Although I didn't see these in action, it seems their uses are pretty straightforward.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/gaming/2013/06/14/xbox-one-ps4-controllers/2424527/
post #87733 of 93827
Critic's Notes
First Things First: The Case, Then the Pint
By Mike Hale, The New York Times - Jan. 14, 2013

When Kevin Whately shot his first appearance as Detective Sergeant Robbie Lewis of Oxford, England, neither he nor anyone else knew that one of television’s most enduring characters was being born.

That was more than a quarter-century ago, in the first episode of the much-loved British series “Inspector Morse” (1987-2000), in which Mr. Whately played the working-class foil to the hero, the cultured and egotistical detective inspector played by John Thaw. After 33 feature-length episodes of “Morse,” followed by a five-year break, Mr. Whately and a higher-ranking Lewis returned in “Inspector Lewis,” which has run for 27 episodes across seven seasons. Both ITV network shows are at best cult favorites in the United States, where they have been shown as part of PBS’s “Masterpiece Mystery!,” and most viewers wouldn’t know that the 26-year connection of Lewis and Mr. Whately exceeds anything in American prime time. The closest competition is the voice cast of “The Simpsons,” at 24 years and counting. Among flesh-and-blood characters, Mr. Whately’s Lewis has six years on James Arness’s Marshal Dillon (“Gunsmoke”) and Kelsey Grammer’s Frasier Crane (“Cheers” and “Frasier”), though those were uninterrupted runs.

All good things come to an end, however, even dependable detectives. The current season of “Inspector Lewis,” which begins Sunday, may be the character’s last call, though Mr. Whately has referred to his decision to walk away from the show as a sabbatical and left open the possibility of more episodes.

Character and actor have aged gracefully together, from fresh-faced 35-year-olds to boyish 62-year-olds. During that time Mr. Whately and his writers have managed to let Lewis grow — from the sidekick on “Morse,” whom Mr. Whately has called “a donkey,” to the wise veteran of his own show — while staying remarkably true to the conception of the role. To balance the mercurial and overbearing Morse, Lewis was a plain-spoken Everyman with a sneaky, sardonic wit. He was stubborn but principled and compassionate, arriving at the answers more slowly than Morse but with less collateral damage to the feelings of others.

As a detective inspector — with a high-strung intellectual, Hathaway (Laurence Fox), for a sergeant — Lewis has remained quiet and solid, if a bit cranky, an oasis of calm in a television landscape crowded with obsessive detective-geniuses derived from Sherlock Holmes. He’s a type himself, the born copper whose utter reliability hides his doubts and weaknesses, but he’s unusual for being defined not by his competency or his demons but by his decency. The qualities that Morse mocked (but eventually honored, with his dying words, “Thank Lewis for me”) defined the very different kind of lead character that Lewis would become.

The three episodes of the current season are typical “Inspector Lewis”; the mysteries are convoluted and not so interesting, but the picturesque environs of Oxford and the comfortable byplay among Lewis and Hathaway; their boss, Chief Superintendent Innocent (Rebecca Front); and the winsome pathologist Laura Hobson (Clare Holman) more than compensate. The excruciatingly slow courtship of Lewis and Hobson progresses while cases involving murderous psychics and a dodgy funeral parlor are solved, and the former theology student Hathaway continues to have doubts about his fitness for police work.

Knowing that this might be the last hurrah, the writers and directors have given these episodes a valedictory quality that edges up to but doesn’t cross the line of mawkishness; the final, silent fade-out is both moving and appropriately modest. And Lewis is always Lewis. In the first episode of “Inspector Morse,” he begged off a trip to the pub with his alcoholic boss because it was his night with the kids. As “Inspector Lewis” comes to a close, he’s ready to give up the whole grind to spend more time with them. You never really believe it when American TV cops say that, but after a quarter-century, we can trust Lewis.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/14/arts/television/first-things-first-the-case-then-the-pint.html?ref=television&_r=0
post #87734 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Actually, they would have found out about it only because, today, the same leak that led to the Watergate story would have been a leak via Twitter, a file sharing site or some other social media resource.

The difference is, today, all the work would be done for the journalists. All they would have to do is repeat what the press release says.

...and that's exactly how they do it now.

Today, news is sold by keywords and hash tags. A guy at home in his PJ's can do that.
That's the point. It would have been all over the internet before traditional journalists would have woken up. Traditional journalism is old news, pun intended. The trouble to me is the old checks and double checks are gone. News today gets legs whether the stories are totally true or not.
post #87735 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

My take is Watergate never would have been uncovered by many of today's "journalists", so what good are they? They are no longer society's watchog over government because too many news organizations have become political. Too many have also become talking heads who just yak-yak all day long. Until journalists get back to digging for the truth regardless of ideology, they might as well collect unemployment.
Actually, they would have found out about it only because, today, the same leak that led to the Watergate story would have been a leak via Twitter, a file sharing site or some other social media resource.

The difference is, today, all the work would be done for the journalists. All they would have to do is repeat what the press release says.

...and that's exactly how they do it now.

Today, news is sold by keywords and hash tags. A guy at home in his PJ's can do that.

Er, Watergate wasn't a leak. It came from a police blotter that some of the details didn't add up with and a curious reporter asked questions about. The "leaks" (if you want to call them that, but it was already out in the open by the time Woodward started talking to Deep Throat about it) came later. Pentagon Papers was a leak in the WikiLeaks fashion. Ellsberg, the leaker, when to jail over it too.

The reason the mainstream media was slow to Watergate had more to do with the notion that "The People" trusted the government. Nixon wouldn't bug the Dems. He had the election sowed up. McGovern was self-destructing in front of the American People. It was unthinkable at the time. Good journalism proved them all wrong.

It is BECAUSE of Watergate, the public began the distrust of the government it has."They lied to us once, They will lie to us again." 1972 was truly a "different time" than today. In 1972, it was the "innocence" of the time. Today, it is out-right partisan on the part of the national media. That has been well documented in the last 6 years. That is one of the reasons you are hearing now, all the scandal's of this Administration is "Nixsonian" in nature. It is a breakdown of the "trust" of government. Plan and simple and in this case, the national media has been, either knowingly or not, an accomplice, as it was in 1972 with Watergate. There, unknowingly. This time, IMHO, completely knowingly.
Edited by foxeng - 6/15/13 at 9:00am
post #87736 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

Er, Watergate wasn't a leak. It came from a police blotter that some of the details didn't add up with and a curious reporter asked questions about. The "leaks" (if you want to call them that, but it was already out in the open by the time Woodward started talking to Death Throat about it) came later. Pentagon Papers was a leak in the WikiLeaks fashion. Ellsberg, the leaker, when to jail over it too.

The reason the mainstream media was slow to Watergate had more to do with the notion that "The People" trusted the government. Nixon wouldn't bug the Dems. He had the election sowed up. McGovern was self-destructing in front of the American People. It was unthinkable at the time. Good journalism proved them all wrong.

It is BECAUSE of Watergate, the public began the distrust of the government it has."They lied to us once, They will lie to us again." 1972 was truly a "different time" than today. In 1972, it was the "innocence" of the time. Today, it is out-right partisan on the part of the national media. That has been well documented in the last 6 years. That is one of the reasons you are hearing now, all the scandal's of this Administration is "Nixsonian" in nature. It is a breakdown of the "trust" of government. Plan and simple and in this case, the national media has been, either knowingly or not, an accomplice, as it was in 1972 with Watergate. There, unknowingly. This time, IMHO, completely knowingly.
Uh, that's "Deep" Throat, not "Death" Throat. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Throat_(Watergate)
post #87737 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by BoilerJim View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

Er, Watergate wasn't a leak. It came from a police blotter that some of the details didn't add up with and a curious reporter asked questions about. The "leaks" (if you want to call them that, but it was already out in the open by the time Woodward started talking to Deep Throat about it) came later. Pentagon Papers was a leak in the WikiLeaks fashion. Ellsberg, the leaker, when to jail over it too.

The reason the mainstream media was slow to Watergate had more to do with the notion that "The People" trusted the government. Nixon wouldn't bug the Dems. He had the election sowed up. McGovern was self-destructing in front of the American People. It was unthinkable at the time. Good journalism proved them all wrong.

It is BECAUSE of Watergate, the public began the distrust of the government it has."They lied to us once, They will lie to us again." 1972 was truly a "different time" than today. In 1972, it was the "innocence" of the time. Today, it is out-right partisan on the part of the national media. That has been well documented in the last 6 years. That is one of the reasons you are hearing now, all the scandal's of this Administration is "Nixsonian" in nature. It is a breakdown of the "trust" of government. Plan and simple and in this case, the national media has been, either knowingly or not, an accomplice, as it was in 1972 with Watergate. There, unknowingly. This time, IMHO, completely knowingly.
Uh, that's "Deep" Throat, not "Death" Throat. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_Throat_(Watergate)

Sorry typo. Typing too fast for the brain to keep up. (called old age) I have corrected it. But on the other hand, maybe Death is better!
post #87738 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

Sorry typo. Typing too fast for the brain to keep up. (called old age) I have corrected it. But on the other hand, maybe Death is better!
You were thinking Michael Douglas ...
post #87739 of 93827
FRIDAY's fast affiliate overnight prime-time ratings -and what they mean- have been posted on Analyst Marc Berman's Media Insight's Blog
post #87740 of 93827
I thought Watergate began because Mr. Gump looked out his Hotel Room and thought the building across from had a Power Outage because he saw people searching with a flashlight! biggrin.gif
post #87741 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

Er, Watergate wasn't a leak. It came from a police blotter that some of the details didn't add up with and a curious reporter asked questions about. The "leaks" (if you want to call them that, but it was already out in the open by the time Woodward started talking to Deep Throat about it) came later. Pentagon Papers was a leak in the WikiLeaks fashion. Ellsberg, the leaker, when to jail over it too.

The reason the mainstream media was slow to Watergate had more to do with the notion that "The People" trusted the government. Nixon wouldn't bug the Dems. He had the election sowed up. McGovern was self-destructing in front of the American People. It was unthinkable at the time. Good journalism proved them all wrong.

It is BECAUSE of Watergate, the public began the distrust of the government it has."They lied to us once, They will lie to us again." 1972 was truly a "different time" than today. In 1972, it was the "innocence" of the time. Today, it is out-right partisan on the part of the national media. That has been well documented in the last 6 years. That is one of the reasons you are hearing now, all the scandal's of this Administration is "Nixsonian" in nature. It is a breakdown of the "trust" of government. Plan and simple and in this case, the national media has been, either knowingly or not, an accomplice, as it was in 1972 with Watergate. There, unknowingly. This time, IMHO, completely knowingly.
I agree, but now this discussion will probably get deleted, sigh........
post #87742 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

I agree, but now this discussion will probably get deleted, sigh........
Nah. History stated in a non-partisan fashion. Granted, there was no HDTV at the time, so this is monumentally off-topic.




Kidding.



Margarita one, by the way.
post #87743 of 93827
HBO Hard Knocks 2013 will feature the Bengals who were also on in 2009 & they went on to win their division that year.
post #87744 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by foxeng View Post

Er, Watergate wasn't a leak. It came from a police blotter that some of the details didn't add up with and a curious reporter asked questions about. The "leaks" (if you want to call them that, but it was already out in the open by the time Woodward started talking to Deep Throat about it) came later. Pentagon Papers was a leak in the WikiLeaks fashion. Ellsberg, the leaker, when to jail over it too.

The reason the mainstream media was slow to Watergate had more to do with the notion that "The People" trusted the government. Nixon wouldn't bug the Dems. He had the election sowed up. McGovern was self-destructing in front of the American People. It was unthinkable at the time. Good journalism proved them all wrong.

It is BECAUSE of Watergate, the public began the distrust of the government it has."They lied to us once, They will lie to us again." 1972 was truly a "different time" than today. In 1972, it was the "innocence" of the time. Today, it is out-right partisan on the part of the national media. That has been well documented in the last 6 years. That is one of the reasons you are hearing now, all the scandal's of this Administration is "Nixsonian" in nature. It is a breakdown of the "trust" of government. Plan and simple and in this case, the national media has been, either knowingly or not, an accomplice, as it was in 1972 with Watergate. There, unknowingly. This time, IMHO, completely knowingly.
I agree, but now this discussion will probably get deleted, sigh........

But in rereading it now, I just realized I missed the PERFECT place for a joke. What I should have written was:

Er, Watergate wasn't a leak, even though it was performed by "The Plumbers." Guess that is why I am BEHIND the camera! biggrin.gif
post #87745 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrDon View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

I agree, but now this discussion will probably get deleted, sigh........
Nah. History stated in a non-partisan fashion. Granted, there was no HDTV at the time, so this is monumentally off-topic.

Wellllllll..................... In 1939, what was to become NTSC was called "high definition" over the other formats and resolutions of the time. wink.gif
post #87746 of 93827
Quote:
Originally Posted by DoubleDAZ View Post

I agree, but now this discussion will probably get deleted, sigh........
Only 18 1/2 minutes of it will be erased.
post #87747 of 93827
Rosemary Woods is the moderator of this forum now?
post #87748 of 93827
How quickly they forget: her name was Rose Mary Woods; "Rose" and "Mary" were separate words, like Mary Ann instead of Marianne.

I cringed when, on screen as liberal and pro-Democrat television journalist Murphy Brown, Candice Bergen mispronounced Rosalynn Carter's first name with a short O.  (OK, her first name is Eleanor, but she goes by her middle name, which is Rosalynn with a long O.)  Nobody in the entire Shukovksy-English constellation caught that.
 
Edited by dattier - 6/16/13 at 8:57am
post #87749 of 93827
TV Notes
Venerable Format of ‘NewsHour’ Struggles With New Era of Media
By Elizabeth Jensen, The New York Times - Jan. 14, 2013

For many of its 38 years, the sober studio-interview format of the “PBS NewsHour” has served the program well, drawing viewers and corporate underwriters alike. But with a deep financing crisis forcing layoffs and other cutbacks this week, some public television employees believe that format — and a general unwillingness to embrace the digital realities facing journalism — may be jeopardizing the program’s future.

“NewsHour” came under criticism in a confidential May 2012 report commissioned by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, one of the program’s major supporters in recent years, that concluded bluntly that the program needed to aggressively “modernize news gathering production.”

The report stressed the need for a major reorganization that included developing new digital platforms and clarifying its editorial focus. It also said more “decision-making transparency” was needed from MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, the profit-making company that co-produces the program for PBS. (The company is controlled by Jim Lehrer and Robert MacNeil, its founding anchors. Washington public television station WETA is the other producer.)

The pressures facing “NewsHour” are not unique. “What every traditional media organization is confronted with today is how to change profoundly to reflect the revolution in how people consume media,” said a former CNN bureau chief, Frank Sesno, now director of the School of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University. But many organizations have moved more quickly to adapt, equipping producers with inexpensive video cameras to reduce news gathering costs, and investing in online and mobile platforms.

Mr. Sesno said that he “desperately” wants “NewsHour” to succeed. “They’ve got to figure out how to do the deeper dive and bring people along with them,” he said, by developing more of a conversation with the audience and becoming a “multimedia information experience. You can’t just be a TV show anymore.”

In the year since the Gates Foundation report was delivered, the foundation, whose $3.56 million, three-year grant to “NewsHour” to cover global health expired in December 2011, has yet to return as a supporter. A foundation spokesman, Christopher Williams, said in an e-mail on Wednesday that the consultants’ report “was not conducted as a prerequisite to any further funding.” He added, however, that the foundation does not discuss “what a particular grantee’s prospects for funding might be.”

A “NewsHour” spokeswoman, Anne Bell, said in an e-mail that the study was “helpful,” adding that “many of the recommendations have been acted upon” and that the program had “increased dramatically” its Web and social media initiatives.

With corporate funds running short, however, the program’s financial situation has deteriorated rapidly, leaving the production company to close a gaping hole of about $7 million on a $28 million budget this year, according to public television employees familiar with the numbers.

Corporate underwriting, which has declined elsewhere in public media, has fallen far short of what program officials hoped to raise, partly because the program was asking too much for sponsorships, said two public television employees.

Four times in recent months, MacNeil/Lehrer Productions executives have asked PBS officials for emergency $1 million infusions so they could pay the “NewsHour” bills, the public television employees said, and they received at least $3 million. Ms. Bell said the show would close the fiscal year with a “relatively small operating deficit.”

MacNeil/Lehrer Productions and WETA produce “NewsHour,” which is a nonprofit program, under an annually renewable contract. PBS and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting contribute a portion of the program’s budget — $12.5 million this year — with the rest to be raised from corporations and foundations by the production company.

PBS, in a statement from Beth Hoppe, its head of programming, declined to comment “on financial information regarding specific programs,” but said it was working with “NewsHour” to ensure that the program’s “critical services” continued.

With a new fiscal year starting July 1, the program’s immediate financial squeeze will be eased, said the public television employees. But the end-of-year request for emergency funds requests revealed the intensity of the financial pressures.

Although Mr. Lehrer retired from anchoring in 2011, he remains fully in charge of “NewsHour,” said the public television employees. Mr. Lehrer and Mr. MacNeil each own 16 percent of MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, with the remainder held by the media giant Liberty Media. “NewsHour” did not respond to a request to interview Mr. Lehrer.

This week, “NewsHour” took some steps to bring its expenses more in line with revenue. In an internal memo, Linda Winslow, its executive producer, and Bo Jones, the chief executive of MacNeil/Lehrer Productions, told employees that the program would close its Denver and San Francisco offices, effective July 1. In the program’s first significant layoffs in two decades, about 15 positions are being eliminated.

Terence Smith, the program’s former media reporter, who retired in 2006, said of the moves: “They are now doing the cutbacks that they needed to do four or five years ago, because this deficit is crippling and has been running year after year.”

In the internal memo, Ms. Winslow and Mr. Jones said the program, which is based at WETA, also would further reduce costs through “changes in our technical production processes” to “streamline and digitize operations.”

But the memo added, “Under no circumstances do we intend to abandon the mini-documentary reports that have become so critical to our broadcast.” Indeed, Mr. Lehrer, the public television employees said, has said repeatedly that he saw no need for the program to change what for years had been a successful alternative format.

Outside consultants disagree. A May 2012 confidential study, from consultant Frank N. Magid Associates, concluded that viewers found the program “smarter” than other network news sources, and appreciated its “fairness, depth, original content and overall sense of purpose.”

But they also felt that it “doesn’t excel for having reporters and personalities that viewers enjoy,” finding it “old-fashioned, slow-moving, even boring.”

In response to a Baltimore Sun critique of the program this week, one of its anchors, the senior correspondent Gwen Ifill, defended “NewsHour,” writing, “we still stick by our core mission — to provide news and information for people who choose to know more than what their home browser page can show them.”

PBS, among other changes, wants the program to choose a permanent anchor or two co-anchors, said the public television employees. When Mr. Lehrer left two years ago, he decided not to name a replacement. Instead, a handful of anchors, including Ms. Ifill and Judy Woodruff, share the two host chairs in constant rotation, further muddling the program’s identity, critics said, and adding to costs.

PBS could choose not to renew the program’s contract and find a new producer. For the moment, PBS is instead investing $3 million in a new program, “PBS NewsHour Weekend,” which is expected to start in the fall, anchored by Hari Sreenivasan, a correspondent on the weekday program and its director of digital partnerships.

Two different companies will produce them. The contract for the weekend program went to WNET, in New York. PBS executives have said they hoped the new program would generate new models to produce a news program less expensively, said the public television employees.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/06/14/business/media/venerable-format-of-newshour-struggles-with-new-era-of-media.html?ref=media
post #87750 of 93827
Emmy Notes
‘Ellen,’ ‘Sesame Street,’ CBS & PBS Lead 40th Daytime Creative Arts Emmy Awards
By the Deadline.com Team - Jan. 15, 2013

The Ellen DeGeneres Show and PBS‘s Sesame Street led the 40th Daytime Creative Arts Emmys with six wins apiece at the annual awards presented Friday night by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences and the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. CBS tied PBS as the most-awarded network as honors were doled out in over 55 categories, while Leeza Gibbons won in her first Emmy nomination in 15 years. Embattled Sesame Street fixture Kevin Clash won three Emmys for his work on the children’s show as co-exec producer, performer, and director. Here’s the full list of winners:

OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S ANIMATED PROGRAM
Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness – Nickelodeon

Peter Hastings, Executive Producer
Bret Haaland, Co-Executive Producer, Supervising Producer
Randy Dormans, Gabe Swarr, Supervising Producers
Andrew Huebner, Producer

OUTSTANDING CHILDREN’S SERIES
R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour The Series – HUB Network

Dan Angel, Billy Brown, Harvey Kahn,
Kim Arnott, Executive Producers
Jane Stine, Joan Waricha, Co-Executive Producers
Charles Lyall, Dawn Knight, Supervising Producers

OUTSTANDING PRE-SCHOOL ANIMATED PROGRAM
Bubble Guppies - Nickelodeon

Jonny Belt, Robert Scull, Executive Producers
Ellen Martin, Helen Lebeau, Scott Dyer,
Pam Lehn, Supervising Producers
Allie Strawbridge, Coordinating Producer
Lynne Warner, Producer
Jason Pattan, Line Producer

OUTSTANDING LEGAL/COURTROOM PROGRAM
Judge Judy

Timothy Regler, Randy Douthit, Executive Producers
Victoria Jenest, Supervising Producer
Kirk Leins, Christopher Thomas, Coordinating Producers
Shannon Weber, Cybil Jordan, Senior Producers
Alex Martinez, Matt Pomfret,
Marisa van den Borre, Gina Madrid, Producers
Judge Judy Sheindlin, Host

OUTSTANDING LIFESTYLE PROGRAM
The Martha Stewart Show – Hallmark

Martha Stewart, Michael Morrison, Executive Producers
Lisa Wagner, Christina Deyo, Senior Supervising Producers
Fran Brescia-Coniglio, Maryann Vanderventer, Supervising Producers
Greta Anthony, Lenore Welby, Laurie Hepburn, Senior Producers
Nikki Elkins, Barbara Fight, Stephanie Fitzhugh, Mary Forrest,
Courtney Knapp, Molly McGuiness, Mary Elizabeth, Lawrence,
Nell O’Hara, Ashley Nolan, Producers
Calia Brencsons-Van Dyk, Line Producer

OUTSTANDING NEW APPROACHES – ENHANCEMENT TO A DAYTIME PROGRAM OR SERIES
The Ellen DeGeneres Show

Ellen DeGeneres, Mary Connelly,
Ed Glavin, Andy Lassner, Executive Producers
Kelly Davies, Senior Web Producer
Daniel Leary, Digital Producer

OUTSTANDING NEW APPROACHES – ORIGINAL DAYTIME PROGRAM OR SERIES
The Beauty Inside – YouTube, Facebook

PJ Pereira, Chief Creative Officer
Jeff Ferro, Producer
Elisa Moore, Broadcast Producer
Erin Davis, Senior Interactive Producer
Drake Doremus, Director
Richard Greenberg, Neil Ramanan, Writers
Topher Grace, Matthew Gray Gubler,
Mary Elizabeth Winstead, Performers
Jaime Robinson, Executive Creative Director
Jason Apaliski, Creative Director
Chaz Whitworth, Art Director

OUTSTANDING PRE-SCHOOL CHILDREN’S SERIES
Sesame Street – PBS

Carol Lynn Parente, Executive Producer
Kevin Clash, Co-Executive Producer
Nadine Zylstra, Supervising Producer
Tim Carter, Senior Producer
April Coleman, Coordinating Producer
Benjamin Lehmann, Producer
Stephanie Longardo, Line Producer

OUTSTANDING PROMOTIONAL ANNOUNCEMENT – EPISODIC
Kids’ Choice Awards 2012 Campaign – Nickelodeon

Anthony Gelsomino, Executive Producer
Karen Ammon, Producer
Jay Schmalholz, Creative Director
Peter Siaggas, Director
Erica Ottenberg, Michael
Pecoriello, Writers
Michael Tenney, Production Manager
Matthew Duntemann, SVP Design
Thomas Rizzo, Director of Production
Daniel Dickson, Art Director
Jennifer Bryson, Director of Production

OUTSTANDING PROMOTIONAL ANNOUNCEMENT – INSTITUTIONAL
The Ellen DeGeneres Show – Celebrity

Mary Connelly, Ed Glavin, Andy Lassner, Executive Producers
Zach Lyall, Producer
Kevin A. Leman II, Jared Stone, Creative Directors
Ellen DeGeneres, Jason Gelles, Lauren Pomerantz, Writers
Finian Johnson, Philippe Bergerioux, Editors
Blake Bryant, SVP Marketing, Telepictures
Adrianne Anderson, VP Marketing

OUTSTANDING SPECIAL CLASS SERIES
Made – MTV

Tony DiBari, Dave Sirulnick, Francis Lyons,
Dave Grant, Kate Bernstein, Donna Edge-Rachell,
Bob Kusbit, Executive Producers
Alissa Horowitz, John Crenny,
Garrett Hohendorf, Haewon Yom, Producers
Robert Yacyshyn, Line Producer
Matthew Parillo, VP of Production

OUTSTANDING SPECIAL CLASS SPECIAL
Guy’s Family Reunion – Food Network

Frank Matson, Kat Higgins, Tim McOsker, Guy Fieri , Executive Producers

OUTSTANDING HOST IN A LIFESTYLE/TRAVEL PROGRAM
LEEZA GIBBONS, as Host, My Generation – PBS

OUTSTANDING PERFORMER IN A CHILDREN’S SERIES
KEVIN CLASH, as Elmo, Sesame Street -PBS

OUTSTANDING PERFORMER IN AN ANIMATED PROGRAM
DAVID TENNANT, as Huyang, Star Wars: The Clone Wars – Cartoon Network


OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN ART DIRECTION/
SET DECORATION/SCENIC DESIGN FOR A DRAMA SERIES
The Young and the Restless – CBS

William Hultstrom, Production Designer
David Hoffmann, Art Director
Fred Cooper, Andrea Joel, Joe Bevacqua, Set Decorators

OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
JUDY BLYE WILSON, Casting Director, The Young and the Restless – CBS


OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN COSTUME DESIGN FOR A DRAMA SERIES
The Bold and the Beautiful – CBS

Danielle King, Costume Designer

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN HAIRSTYLING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
The Bold and the Beautiful – CBS

Michele Arvizo, Head Hairstylist
Audrey Soto, Romaine Markus-Myers, Adriana Lucio, Hairstylists

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN LIGHTING DIRECTION FOR A DRAMA SERIES
The Bold and the Beautiful – CBS

Patrick Cunniff, Lighting Designer/Lighting Director
Phil Callan, Lighting Director

and

The Young and the Restless – CBS
Ray Thompson, William Roberts, Lighting Directors

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN LIVE & DIRECT TO TAPE SOUND MIXING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
Days of Our Lives – NBC

Zoli Osaze, Re-Recording Mixer
Roger Cortes, Production Mixer
Jacqueline Frazier, Hector Sarabia,
Harry Young, Boom Operators

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MAKEUP FOR A DRAMA SERIES
The Young and the Restless – CBS

Patti Denney, Head Makeup Artist
Marlene Mason, Ralph Wilcox, Kathy Jones,
Robert Bolger, Laura Schaffer Holmes, Makeup Artists

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MULTIPLE CAMERA EDITING FOR A DRAMA SERIES
General Hospital – ABC

Denise Van Cleave, Penny Pengra, Christine Magarian Ucar,
Peter Fillmore, David Gonzalez, Christine Cooper, Editors

and

One Life To Live – ABC
Tracy Casper Lang, Teresa Cicala, Michael Sweeney,
Barry Gingold, Larry Farina, Stephen Cali, Vince Catania, Editors

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC DIRECTION AND COMPOSITION FOR A DRAMA SERIES
The Bold and the Beautiful – CBS

Bradley Bell, Jack Allocco, David Kurtz, Music Directors, Composers
Lothar Struff, Music Supervisor

OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL SONG FOR A DRAMA SERIES
“ONLY LOVE GOES ON FOREVER” – The Young and the Restless – CBS

Jack Allocco, David Kurtz, Gary Verna, Composers & Lyricists

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT INTECHNICAL DIRECTION/ELECTRONIC CAMERA/VIDEO CONTROL FOR A DRAMA SERIES
The Bold and the Beautiful – CBS

Jim Dray, Technical Director
Gordon Sweeney, Tom Luth, Ted Morales, Camera Operators
Scha Jani, Roberto Bosio, Video Control

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN ART DIRECTION/SET DECORATION/SCENIC DESIGN
The Talk – CBS

Jeff Hall, Production Designer
Matthew Tognacci, Art Director
Kristen O’Malley, Set Decorator

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN COSTUME DESIGN/STYLING
R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour The Series – HUB Network

Farnaz Khaki-Sadigh, Natalie Simon, Costume Designers

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING IN AN ANIMATED PROGRAM
Dan Vs. - HUB Network

Brian Sheesley, Supervising Director
Stephanie Arnett, Ashley Lenz, James Krenzke, Directors
Hyeonsu Park, Supervising Animation Director

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING IN A CHILDREN’S SERIES
Sesame Street – PBS

Ken Diego, Kevin Clash, Joey Mazzarino, Matt Vogel, Directors

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING IN A LIFESTYLE/CULINARY/TRAVEL PROGRAM
Joseph Rosendo’s Travelscope – PBS

Joseph Rosendo, Director

OUTSTANDING DIRECTING IN A TALK SHOW/MORNING PROGRAM
The Ellen DeGeneres Show – SYNDICATED

Liz Patrick, Director
Diana Horn, John Zook, Associate Directors

and

Today Show – NBC
Joe Michaels, Director
Erica Levens, Associate Director

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN HAIRSTYLING
R.L. Stine’s The Haunting Hour The Series – HUB Network

Trudy Parisien, Key Hairstylist
Cara Doell, Hairstylist

and

The Talk – CBS
Soo Jin Yoon, Cheryl Eckert, Vickie Mynes, Michael Ward, Hairstylists

OUTSTANDING INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENT IN ANIMATION

JOEL FAJNOR, Art Director
Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness “Kung Fu Day Care” – Nickelodeon

BILL DELY, Color Designer
Kung Fu Panda: Legends of Awesomeness “Kung Shoes” – Nickelodeon

JASON PARK, Background Designer
Transformers: Prime “Orion Pax – Part 3” – HUB Network

ARATO KATO, Character Animator
Transformers: Prime “Hard Knocks” – HUB Network

KIRK VAN WORMER, Storyboard Artist
Transformers: Prime “Nemesis Prime” – HUB Network

ROBERT KLINE, Storyboard Artist
Disney Minnie’s Bow-Toons “Piano Movers and Shakers” – Disney Channel


OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN LIGHTING DIRECTION
The Ellen DeGeneres Show – SYNDICATED

Marisa Davis, Lighting Director

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN LIVE & DIRECT TO TAPE SOUND MIXING
Disney Parks Christmas Day Parade – ABC

Don Worsham, Pablo Munguia, Production Mixers
Jamie Ledner, Post-Production Mixer
Brian Riordan, Music Mixer

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MAKEUP
The Talk – CBS

Ann-Marie Oliver, Stephanie Cozart Burton,
Dell McDonald, Jude Alcala, Makeup Artists

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MAIN TITLE AND GRAPHIC DESIGN
Sesame Street – PBS

Rickey Boyd, Creative Director – Graphics
Michael Lapinski, Art Director
Rhea Borzak, Compositor
Andrew Atteberry, 3D Animator
Julian Herrera, VFX Supervisor

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MULTIPLE CAMERA EDITING
Sesame Street – PBS

Todd James, Tim Carter, Supervising Editors
Jesse Averna, John Tierney, Editors

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN MUSIC DIRECTION AND COMPOSITION
The Fresh Beat Band – Nickelodeon

Scott Kraft, Nadine van der Velde, Music Directors
Ric Markmann, Dan Pinella, Peter Zizzo, Chris Wagner, Composers

OUTSTANDING ORIGINAL SONG – CHILDREN’S AND ANIMATION
“I LOVE YOU TOO” 3rd & Bird! – Disney Channel

Ziggy Marley, Composer & Lyricist

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SINGLE CAMERA EDITING
Biz Kid$ – PBS

Alex Carrillo, Jim Golingo, Editors

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SINGLE CAMERA PHOTOGRAPHY (FILM OR ELECTRONIC)
Born to Explore with Richard Wiese – SYNDICATED

John Barnhardt, Cinematographer
Greg Harriott, Camera

and

Equitrekking – PBS
Greg Barna, Director of Photography

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND EDITING – LIVE ACTION
Sesame Street – PBS

Chris Prinzivalli, Michael Barrett, Michael Croiter, Supervising Sound Editors
Jorge Muelle, Music Editor
Chris Sassano, Sound Editor
Dick Maitland, Sound Effects Editor

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND MIXING – LIVE ACTION
Joseph Rosendo’s Travelscope – PBS

Jason Grigg, Audio Mixer

OUTSTANDING SPECIAL CLASS DIRECTING
Disney Parks Christmas Day Parade – ABC

Ryan Polito, Director

OUTSTANDING SPECIAL CLASS WRITING
The Ellen DeGeneres Show – SYNDICATED

Kevin A. Leman II, Head Writer
Ellen DeGeneres, Jason Gelles, Paul Horne,
Lauren Pomerantz, Ryan Raddatz, Gil Rief,
Amy Rhodes, Beth Sherman, Adam Yenser, Writers

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN TECHNICAL DIRECTION/ELECTRONIC CAMERA/VIDEO CONTROL
The Ellen DeGeneres Show – SYNDICATED

Michael Williams, Technical Director
David Weeks, Timothy O’Neill, Paul Wileman, Brad Zerbst,
Forrest Fraser, Brian Loewe, Camera Operators
Randolph Johnson, Video Control

OUTSTANDING WRITING IN ANIMATION
WordGirl – PBS

Tom Martin, Eric Shaw, Head Writers
Jack Ferraiolo, Jayne Hamil, Ryan Raddatz, Writers

OUTSTANDING WRITING IN A CHILDREN’S SERIES
Sesame Street – PBS

Joey Mazzarino, Head Writer
Molly Boylan, Annie Evans, Christine Ferraro,
Emily Perl Kingsley, Luis Santeiro, Ed Valentine,
Belinda Ward, John Weidman, Writers

OUTSTANDING STUNT COORDINATION
Days of Our Lives – NBC

Terry James, Stunt Coordinator

OUTSTANDING CASTING FOR AN ANIMATED SERIES OR SPECIAL
The Legend of Korra – Nickelodeon

Shannon Reed, Casting Director
Sarah Noonan, Original Casting by
Gene Vassilaros, Original Casting by

OUTSTANDING SPECIAL CLASS SHORT FORMAT DAYTIME PROGRAM
Make Your Mark: Ben Horowitz, Bullying PSA – Disney Channel

Richard Loomis, SVP/CMO Disney Channels Marketing & Creative
Ron Pomerantz, Vice President Disney Channel Marketing & Creative
Siobhan Murphy, Creative Director Disney Channel Marketing & Creative
F. Michael Blum, Executive Producer/Director
Tracy Pion, Creative Director
Tom Pace, Jen Gruskoff, Writers
Jaycen C. Armstrong, Producer
Amanda Erlanson, Supervising Producer
Rick Milewski, Editor

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND EDITING – ANIMATION
Slugterra – Disney XD

Jonny Ludgate, Supervising Sound Editor
Jeff Davis, Gordon Sproule, Sound Editors

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT IN SOUND MIXING – ANIMATION
Ben10: Omniverse – Cartoon Network

Carlos Sanches, Re-Recording Mixer

OUTSTANDING TRAVEL PROGRAM
Jack Hanna’s Into the Wild – SYNDICATED

Guy Nickerson, Jack Hanna, Executive Producers
Elaine Pugliese, Supervising Producer
Peter Bredemeier, Shelby Redfield, Producers
Cyndie Nickerson, Line Producer

http://www.deadline.com/2013/06/40th-annual-daytime-creative-arts-emmy-awards-2013-winners/
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